TweetFollow Us on Twitter

MACINTOSH C CARBON

Demonstration Program SysMemRes

Goto Contents

// *******************************************************************************************
// SysMemRes.c
// *******************************************************************************************
//
// This program:
//
// o  Loads a window template ('WIND') resource and creates a window.
//
// o  Allocates a relocatable block in the application's heap, gets its size in bytes, draws
//    the size in the window, and then disposes of the block.
//    
// o  Loads a purgeable 'PICT' resource and a non-purgeable 'STR ' resource and draws them in
//    the window.
//
// o  Checks if any error codes were generated as a result of calls to Memory Manager and
//    Resource Manager functions.
//
// o  Terminates when the mouse button is clicked.
//
// The program utilises the following resources:
//
// o  A 'plst' resource.
//
// o  A 'WIND' resource (purgeable).
//
// o  A 'PICT' resource (purgeable).
//
// o  A 'STR ' resource (non-purgeable).
//
// *******************************************************************************************

// .................................................................................. includes

#include <Carbon.h>

// ................................................................................... defines

#define rWindowResourceID  128
#define rStringResourceID  128
#define rPictureResourceID 128

// ....................................................................... function prototypes

void  main            (void);
void  doPreliminaries (void);
void  doNewWindow     (void);
void  doMemory        (void);
void  doResources     (void);

// ************************************************************************************** main

void  main(void)
{  
  doPreliminaries();
  doNewWindow();
  doMemory();
  doResources();

  QDFlushPortBuffer(GetWindowPort(FrontWindow()),NULL);

  while(!Button())
   ;
}

// *************************************************************************** doPreliminaries

void  doPreliminaries(void)
{
  MoreMasterPointers(32);
  InitCursor();
}

// ******************************************************************************* doNewWindow

void  doNewWindow(void)
{
  WindowRef windowRef;

  windowRef = GetNewCWindow(rWindowResourceID,NULL,(WindowRef) -1);
  if(windowRef == NULL)
  {
    SysBeep(10);
    ExitToShell();
  }

  SetPortWindowPort(windowRef);
  UseThemeFont(kThemeSystemFont,smSystemScript);
}

// ********************************************************************************** doMemory

void  doMemory(void)
{
  Handle theHdl;
  Size   blockSize;
  OSErr  memoryError;
  Str255 theString;
  
  theHdl = NewHandle(1024);
  if(theHdl != NULL)
    blockSize = GetHandleSize(theHdl);

  memoryError = MemError();
  if(memoryError == noErr)
  {
    MoveTo(170,35);
    DrawString("\pBlock Size (Bytes) = ");
    NumToString(blockSize,theString);
    DrawString(theString);

    MoveTo(165,55);
    DrawString("\pNo Memory Manager errors");
    
    DisposeHandle(theHdl);
  }
}

// ******************************************************************************* doResources

void  doResources(void)
{
  PicHandle    pictureHdl;
  StringHandle stringHdl;
  Rect         pictureRect;
  OSErr        resourceError;

  pictureHdl = GetPicture(rPictureResourceID);
  if(pictureHdl == NULL)
  {
    SysBeep(10);
    ExitToShell();
  }

  SetRect(&pictureRect,148,75,348,219);

  HNoPurge((Handle) pictureHdl);
  DrawPicture(pictureHdl,&pictureRect);
  HPurge((Handle) pictureHdl);

  stringHdl = GetString(rStringResourceID);
  if(stringHdl == NULL)
  {
    SysBeep(10);
    ExitToShell();
  }

  MoveTo(103,250);
  DrawString(*stringHdl);

  ReleaseResource((Handle) pictureHdl);
  ReleaseResource((Handle) stringHdl);

  resourceError = ResError();
  if(resourceError == noErr)
  {
    MoveTo(160,270);
    DrawString("\pNo Resource Manager errors");
  }  
}

// *******************************************************************************************

Demonstration Program SysMemRes Comments

The 'plst' (Property List) Resource

As stated in the listing, one of the resources utilised by the program is a 'plst' 
(property list) resource.  Carbon applications must contain a 'plst' resource 
with ID 0 in order for the Mac OS X Launch Services Manager to recognize them as Carbon 
applications.  If the 'plst' resource is not provided, the application will be launched as a 
Classic application.

The 'plst' resource used is actually an empty 'plst' resource.  As will be seen at Chapter 9,
 however, this resource, apart from causing Mac OS X to recognise applications as Carbon 
applications, also allows applications to provide information about themselves to the Mac 
OS X Finder.

includes

Carbon greatly simplifies the matter of determining which Universal Headers files need to 
be included in this section.  All that is required is to include the header file Carbon.h, 
which itself causes a great many header files to be included.  If Carbon.h is not specified, 
the following header files would need to be included, and for the reasons indicated:

Appearance.h  Constant:  kThemeSystemFont

              Appearance.h itself includes MacTypes.h, which contains:

              Data Types:  SInt16  Str255  Size  OSErr  Handle  Rect  StringHandle
              Constants:   noErr  NULL

              Appearance.h also includes MacWindows.h, which contains:

              Prototypes:  GetNewCWindow  GetWindowPort

              MacWindows.h itself includes Events.h, which contains:

              Prototype:  Button

              MacWindows.h also includes Menus.h, which itself includes Processes.h, which
              contains:

              Prototype:  ExitToShell

              Appearance.h also includes QuickDraw.h, which contains:

              Prototypes:  InitCursor  SetPortWindowPort  SetRect  DrawPicture  MoveTo
                           GetPicture
              Data Types:  WindowRef  PicHandle

              QuickDraw.h itself includes QuickDrawText.h, which contains:

              Prototypes:  TextFont  DrawString

MacMemory.h   Prototypes:  NewHandle  DisposeHandle  GetHandleSize  HNoPurge  HPurge  
                           MemError  MoreMasterPointers

Resources.h   Prototypes:  ReleaseResource  ResError

Sound.h       Prototype:  SysBeep

TextUtils.h   Prototype:  GetString

              TextUtils.h itself includes NumberFormatting.h, which contains:

              Prototypes:  NumToString

It would be a good idea to peruse the header files MacMemory.h and Resources.h at this stage. 
Another header file which should be perused early in the piece is MacTypes.h.

defines

Constants are established for the resource IDs of the 'WIND', 'PICT' and 'STR ' resources.

main

The main function calls the functions that perform certain preliminaries common to most
applications, create a window, allocate and dispose of a relocatable memory block, and draw a
picture and text in the window.  It then waits for a button click before terminating the
program

The call to the QuickDraw function QDFlushPortBuffer is ignored when the program is run on Mac
OS 8/9.  It is required on Mac OS X because Mac OS X windows are double-buffered.  (The picture
and text are drawn in a buffer and, in this program, the buffer has to be flushed to the screen
by calling QDFlushPortBuffer.)  This is explained in more detail at Chapter 4.

doPreliminaries

The call to MoreMasterPointers is ignored when the program is run on Mac OS X.  (Master
pointers do not need to be pre-allocated, or their number optimised, in the Mac OS X memory
model.)  

On Mac OS 8/9, the call to MoreMasterPointers to allocate additional master pointers is really
not required in this simple program because the system automatically allocates one block of
master pointers at application launch.  However, in larger applications where more than 64
master pointers are required, the call to MoreMasterPointers should be made here so that all
master pointer (nonrelocatable) blocks are located at the bottom of the heap.  This will assist
in preventing heap fragmentation.  Note that specifying a number less than 32 in the inCount
parameter will result in 32 master pointers in the allocated block.

The call to InitCursor sets the cursor shape to the standard arrow cursor and sets the cursor
level to 0, making it visible.

doNewWindow

doNewWindow creates a window.

The call to GetNewCWindow creates a window using the 'WIND' template resource specified in the
first parameter.  The type, size, location, title, and visibility of the window are all
established by the 'WIND' resource.  The third parameter tells the Window Manager to open the
window in front of all other windows.  

Recall that, as soon as the data from the 'WIND' template resource is copied to the opaque data
structure known as a window object during the creation of the window, the relocatable block
occupied by the template will automatically be marked as purgeable.

The call to SetPortWindowPort makes the new window's graphics port the current port for drawing
operations.  The call to the Appearance Manager function UseThemeFont sets the font for that
port to the system font.

doMemory

doMemory allocates a relocatable block of memory, gets the size of that block and draws it
in the window (or, more accurately, in the window's graphics port), and checks for memory
errors.

The call to NewHandle allocates a relocatable block of 1024 bytes.  The call to GetHandleSize
returns the size of the allocated area available for data storage (1024 bytes).  (The actual
memory used by a relocatable block includes a block header and up to 12 bytes of filler.)

The call to MemError returns the error code of the most recent call to the Memory Manager.  If
no error occurred, the size returned by GetHandleSize is drawn in the window, together with a
message to the effect that MemError returned no error.  DisposeHandle is then called to free up
the memory occupied by the relocatable block.

MoveTo moves a "graphics pen" to the specified horizontal and vertical coordinates.  DrawString
draws the specified string at that location.  NumToString creates a string of decimal digits
representing the value of a 32-bit signed integer.  These calls are incidental to the
demonstration.

doResources

doResources draws a picture and some text strings in the window.

GetPicture reads in the 'PICT' resource corresponding to the ID specified in the GetPicture
call.  If the call is not successful, the system alert sound is played and the program
terminates.

The SetRect call assigns values to the left, top, right and bottom fields of a Rect variable. 
This Rect is required for a later call to DrawPicture.

The basic rules applying to the use of purgeable resources are to load it, immediately make it
unpurgeable, use it immediately, and immediately make it purgeable.  Accordingly, the HNoPurge
call makes the relocatable block occupied by the resource unpurgeable, the DrawPicture call
draws the picture in the window's graphics port, and the HPurge call makes the relocatable
block purgeable again.  Note that, because HNoPurge and HPurge expect a parameter of type
Handle, pictureHdl (a variable of type PicHandle) must be cast to a variable of type Handle.

GetString then reads in the specified 'STR ' resource.  Once again, if the call is not
successful, the system alert sound is played and the program terminates.  MoveTo moves the
graphics "pen" to an appropriate position before DrawString draws the string in the window's
graphics port.  (Since the 'STR ' resource, unlike the 'PICT' resource, does not have the
purgeable bit set, there is no requirement to take the precaution of a call to HNoPurge in this
case.)

Note the parameter in the call to DrawString.  stringHdl, like any handle, is a pointer to a
pointer.  It contains the address of a master pointer which, in turn, contains the address of
the data.  Dereferencing the handle once, therefore, get the required parameter for DrawString,
which is a pointer to a string.

The calls to ReleaseResource release the 'PICT' and 'STR ' resources.  These calls release the
memory occupied by the resources and set the associated handles in the resource map in memory
to NULL.

The ResError call returns the error code of the most recent resource-related operation.  If the
call returns noErr (indicating that no error occurred as a result of the most recent call by a
Resource Manager function), some advisory text is drawn in the window.

The next six lines examine the result of the most recent call to a memory manager function and
draw some advisory text if no error occurred as a result of that call.

Note that the last two calls to DrawString utilise "hard-coded" strings.  This sort of thing is
discouraged in the Macintosh programming environment.  Such strings should ordinarily be stored
in a 'STR#' (string list) resource rather than hard-coded into the source code.  The \p token
causes the compiler to compile these strings as Pascal strings.

PASCAL STRINGS

As stated in the Preface, when it comes to the system software, the ghost of
the Pascal language forever haunts the C programmer.  For example, a great many system 
software functions take Pascal strings as a required parameter, and some functions 
return Pascal strings.

Pascal and C strings differ in their formats.  A C string comprises the characters 
followed by a terminating 0 (or NULL byte):

+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
| M | Y |   | S | T | R | I | N | G | 0 |
+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+

A C string is thus said to be "null-terminated".

In a Pascal string, the first byte contains the length of the string, and the 
characters follow that byte:

+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
| 9 | M | Y |   | S | T | R | I | N | G |
+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+

Not surprisingly, then, Pascal strings are often referred to as "length-prefixed" 
strings.

In Chapter 3, you will encounter the data type Str255.  Str255 is the C name for a 
Pascal-style string capable of holding up to 255 characters.  As you would expect, 
the first byte of a Str255 holds the length of the string and the following bytes hold 
the characters of the string.

Utilizing 256 bytes for a string will simply waste memory in many cases.  Accordingly, 
the header file Types.h defines the additional types Str63, Str32, Str31, Str27, 
and Str15, as well as the Str255 type:-

    typedef unsigned char Str255[256];
    typedef unsigned char Str63[64];
    typedef unsigned char Str32[33];
    typedef unsigned char Str31[32];
    typedef unsigned char Str27[28];
    typedef unsigned char Str15[16];
    
Note, then, that a variable of type Str255 holds the address of an array of 256 elements,
each element being one byte long.

As an aside, in some cases you may want to use C strings, and use standard C library 
functions such as strlen, strcpy, etc., to manipulate them.  Accordingly, be aware that 
functions exist (C2PStr, P2CStr) to convert a string from one format to the other.

You may wish to make a "working" copy of the SysMemRes demonstration program file 
package and, using the working copy of the source code file SysMemRes.c, replace the
function doResources with the following, compile-link-run, and note the way the
second and third strings appear in the window.

    void  doResources(void)
    {
      Str255  string1 = "\pIs this a Pascal string I see before me?";
      Str255  string2 = "Is this a Pascal string I see before me?";
      Str255  string3 = "%s this a Pascal string I see before me?";
      Str255  string4;
      SInt16  a;

      // Draw string1    

      MoveTo(30,100);
      DrawString(string1);

      // Change the length byte of string1 and redraw

      string1[0] = (char) 23;
      MoveTo(30,120);
      DrawString(string1);

      // Leave the \p token out at your peril
      // I (ASCII code 73) is now interpreted as the length byte

      MoveTo(30,140);
      DrawString(string2);

      // More peril:-  % (ASCII code 37) is now the length byte

      MoveTo(30,160);
      DrawString(string3);

      // A hand-built Pascal string

      for(a=1;a<27;a++)
        string4[a] = (char) a + 64;

      string4[0] = (char) 26;

      MoveTo(30,180);
      DrawString(string4);

      // But is there a Mac OS function to draw the C strings correctly?

      MoveTo(30,200);
      DrawText(string2,0,40);  // Look it up in your on-line reference
    }
    

MORE ON STRINGS - UNICODE AND CFString OBJECTS

In the Carbon era, no discussion of strings would be complete without reference to
Unicode and CFString objects.

Preamble - Writing Systems, Character Sets, and Character Encoding A writing system (eg., Roman, Hebrew, Arabic) comprises a set of characters and the basic rules for using those characters in creating a visual depiction of a language. An individual character is a symbolic representation of an element of a writing system. In memory, an individual character is stored as a character code, a numeric value that defines that particular character. One byte is commonly used to store a single character code, which allows for a character set of 256 characters maximum. A total of 256 numeric values is, of course, quite inadequate to provide for all the characters in all the world's writing systems, meaning that different character sets must be used for different writing systems. In one-byte encoding systems, therefore, these different character sets are said to "overlap". As an aside, the Apple Standard Roman character set (an extended version of the 128-character ASCII character set) is the fundamental character set for the Macintosh computer. To view the printable characters in this set, replace the main function in the SysMemRes demonstration program with the following: void main(void) { WindowRef windowRef; SInt16 fontNum, a,b; UInt8 characterCode = 0; doPreliminaries(); windowRef = GetNewCWindow(rWindowResourceID,NULL,(WindowPtr) -1); SetPortWindowPort(windowRef); GetFNum("\pGeneva",&fontNum); TextFont(fontNum); for(a = 0;a < 256;a += 16) { for(b=0;b<16;b++) { MoveTo((a * 1.5) + 60,(b * 15) + 40); DrawText((Ptr) &characterCode,0,1); characterCode++; } } while(!Button()) ; } In addition to the overlapping of character sets between writing systems, a further problem is conflicting character encodings within a single writing system. For an example of this in the Roman writing system, change "\pGeneva" to "\pSymbol" in the above substitute main function.

Unicode Unicode is an international standard that combines all the characters for all commonly used writing systems into a single character set. It uses 16 bits per character, allowing for a character set of up to 65,535 characters. With Unicode, therefore, the character sets of separate writing systems do not overlap. In addition, Unicode eliminates the problem of conflicting character encodings within a single writing system, such as that between the Roman character codes and the codes of the symbols in the Symbol font (see above). Unicode makes it possible to develop and localize a single version of an application for users who speak most of the world's written languages, including Cyrillic, Arabic, Chinese, and Japanese.

Core Foundation's String Services Core Foundation is a component of the system software. Through its String Services, Core Foundation facilitates easy and consistent internationalization of applications. The essential part of this support is an opaque data type (CFString). A CFString "object" represents a string as an array of 16Ðbit Unicode characters. Several Control Manager, Dialog Manager, Window Manager, Menu Manager, and Carbon Printing Manager functions utilize CFStrings. CFString objects come in immutable and mutable variants. Mutable strings may be manipulated by appending string data to them, inserting and deleting characters, and padding and trimming characters. CFStrings have many associated functions that do expected things with strings such as comparing, inserting, and appending. Functions are also available to convert Unicode strings (that is, CFStrings) to and from other encodings, particularly 8Ðbit encodings (such as the Apple Standard Roman character encoding) stored as Pascal and C strings.

Example For a basic example of the use of CFStrings, remove the calls to doMemory and doResources, and the functions themselves, from the main function in the original version of the demonstration program SysMemRes and replace the function doNewWindow with the following: void doNewWindow(void) { WindowRef windowRef; Str255 pascalString = "\pThis window title was set using a CFString object"; CFStringRef titleStringRef; CFStringRef textStringRef = CFSTR("A CFString object converted to a Str255"); Boolean result; Str255 textString; windowRef = GetNewCWindow(rWindowResourceID,NULL,(WindowPtr) -1); SetPortWindowPort(windowRef); UseThemeFont(kThemeSystemFont,smSystemScript); titleStringRef = CFStringCreateWithPascalString(NULL,pascalString, CFStringGetSystemEncoding()); SetWindowTitleWithCFString(windowRef,titleStringRef); result = CFStringGetPascalString(textStringRef,textString,256, CFStringGetSystemEncoding()); if(result) { MoveTo(135,130); DrawString(textString); } if(titleStringRef != NULL) CFRelease(titleStringRef); } At the sixth line, an immutable CFString object is created. The easiest way to do this is to use the CFSTR macro. The argument of the macro must be a constant compile-time string (that is, text enclosed in quotation marks) that contains only ASCII characters. CFSTR returns a reference (textStringRef) to a CFString object. This will be used later. The call to the String Services function CFStringCreateWithPascalString converts a Pascal string (pascalString, of type Str255) to a CFString object. The reference to the CFString object is then passed in a call to the Window Manager function SetWindowTitleWithCFString to set the window's title. The call to the String Services function CFStringGetPascalString converts the CFString object (textStringRef) previously created by the CFSTR macro to a Pascal string (textString, of type Str255). 256, rather than 255, is passed in the bufferSize parameter to accommodate the length byte. textString is then passed in a call to the QuickDraw function DrawString, which draws the string in the window. The golden rules for releasing CFString objects are: if a "Create" or "Copy" function is used, CFString should be called to release the string when no longer required; if a "Get" function is used, CFString should not be called. Accordingly, CFRelease is called only in the case of titleStringRef. Note that CFRelease is not NULL-safe, so you must check for a non-NULL value before passing something to CFRelease.

 

Community Search:
MacTech Search:

Software Updates via MacUpdate

Vienna 3.0.6 :5eaf312: - RSS and Atom ne...
Vienna is a freeware and Open-Source RSS/Atom newsreader with article storage and management via a SQLite database, written in Objective-C and Cocoa, for the OS X operating system. It provides... Read more
Kodi 15.1.rc1 - Powerful media center to...
Kodi (was XBMC) is an award-winning free and open-source (GPL) software media player and entertainment hub that can be installed on Linux, OS X, Windows, iOS, and Android, featuring a 10-foot user... Read more
Bookends 12.5.8 - Reference management a...
Bookends is a full-featured bibliography/reference and information-management system for students and professionals. Access the power of Bookends directly from Mellel, Nisus Writer Pro, or MS Word (... Read more
Chromium 44.0.2403.125 - Fast and stable...
Chromium is an open-source browser project that aims to build a safer, faster, and more stable way for all Internet users to experience the web. Version 44.0.2403.125: This release contains a number... Read more
iMazing 1.2.2 - Complete iOS device mana...
iMazing (was DiskAid) is the ultimate iOS device manager with capabilities far beyond what iTunes offers. With iMazing and your iOS device (iPhone, iPad, or iPod), you can: Copy music to and from... Read more
Audio Hijack 3.2.0 - Record and enhance...
Audio Hijack (was Audio Hijack Pro) drastically changes the way you use audio on your computer, giving you the freedom to listen to audio when you want and how you want. Record and enhance any audio... Read more
FontExplorer X Pro 5.0.1 - Font manageme...
FontExplorer X Pro is optimized for professional use; it's the solution that gives you the power you need to manage all your fonts. Now you can more easily manage, activate and organize your... Read more
Calcbot 1.0.2 - Intelligent calculator a...
Calcbot is an intelligent calculator and unit converter for the rest of us. Featuring an easy-to-read history tape, expression view, intuitive conversion, and much more! Features History Tape -... Read more
MTR 5.0.0.1 - The Mac's oldest and...
MTR (was MacTheRipper)--the Mac's oldest and smartest DVD-backup app--is now updated to version 5.001 MTR -- the complete toolbox, not a one-trick, point-and-click extractor. MTR is intended for... Read more
LibreOffice 4.4.5.2 - Free, open-source...
LibreOffice is an office suite (word processor, spreadsheet, presentations, drawing tool) compatible with other major office suites. The Document Foundation is coordinating development and... Read more

Card King: Dragon Wars - Tips, Tricks an...
[Read more] | Read more »
Pac-Man Championship Edition DX has brou...
Bandai Namco has released Pac-Man Championship Edition DX on iOS and Android, which features the classic arcade gameplay that we've all grown to love. Pac-Man Championship Edition DX can be enjoyed in much shorter bursts than the arcade versions... | Read more »
Cosmonautica (Games)
Cosmonautica 1.1 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $6.99, Version: 1.1 (iTunes) Description: Cast off! Are you ready for some hilarious adventures in outer space? | Read more »
Rescue humanity from a Demon horde in An...
Angel Stone is Fincon's follow up to the massively successful Hello Hero and is out now on iOS and Android. You play as a member of The Resistance, a group of mighty human warriors who have risen up in defiance of the Demon horde threatening to... | Read more »
Gallery Doctor (Photography)
Gallery Doctor 1.0 Device: iOS iPhone Category: Photography Price: $2.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: Free up valuable iCloud and iPhone storage with Gallery Doctor, the only iPhone cleaner that automatically identifies the... | Read more »
You Against Me (Games)
You Against Me 1.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: A simple game… You. Me. Claim, steal, lock, score, win! | Read more »
Yep, it's True - Angry Birds 2 is O...
The not exactly rumors were true and the birds are back. Angry Birds 2 has come to the App Store and the world will... well I suppose it'll still be the same, but now we have more bird-flinging options! [Read more] | Read more »
You Could Design Your Own Card for Chain...
If you've ever wanted to create your own item, weapon, trap, or even monster for Chainsaw Warrior: Lords of the Night, this is your chance. Auroch Digital is currently holding a contest so that fans can fight to the death (not really) to see which... | Read more »
Bitcoin Billionaire is Going Back in Tim...
If you thought you managed to buy everything there is to buy in Bitcoin Billionaire and make all the money, well you though wrong. Those of you who made it far enough might remember investing in time travel - and it looks like that investment is... | Read more »
Domino Drop (Games)
Domino Drop 1.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $1.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: Domino Drop is a delightful new puzzle game with dominos and gravity!Learn how to play it in a minute, master it day by day.Your... | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

27-inch 3.5GHz 5K iMac on sale for $81 off MS...
Adorama has the 27″ 3.5GHz 5K iMac on sale for $2218, $81 off MSRP, including a free copy of Apple’s 3-Year AppleCare Protection Plan. Shipping is free, and Adorama charges sales tax in NY & NJ... Read more
Back-to-School with Tablet and Smartphone Acc...
Belkin helps you prepare for the coming school year with a wide variety of the latest mobile and tablet accessories to outfit both grade school and college students. The line-up includes charging... Read more
11-inch MacBook Airs on sale for $100 off MSR...
Best Buy has 11-inch MacBook Airs on sale for $100 off MSRP. Choose free shipping or free local store pickup (if available). Sale prices for online orders only, in-store prices may vary: - 11″ 1.6GHz... Read more
iPad Air 2 on sale for up to $100 off MSRP
Best Buy has iPad Air 2s on sale for up to $100 off MSRP on their online store for a limited time. Choose free shipping or free local store pickup (if available). Sale prices available for online... Read more
Sale! 13-inch MacBook Pros on sale for $100 o...
B&H Photo has 13″ MacBook Pros on sale for $100 off MSRP. Shipping is free, and B&H charges NY sales tax only: - 13″ 2.5GHz/500GB MacBook Pro: $999.99 save $100 - 13″ 2.7GHz/128GB Retina... Read more
Sale! Save $100 on 13-inch MacBook Airs this...
B&H Photo has the 13″ 1.6GHz/128GB MacBook Air on sale for $899.99 including free shipping plus NY tax only. Their price is $100 off MSRP, and it’s the lowest price available for this model.... Read more
Worldwide Tablet Market Decline Continues, Ap...
The worldwide tablet market declined -7.0% year-over-year in the second quarter of 2015 (2Q15) with shipments totaling 44.7 million units according to preliminary data from the International Data... Read more
TP-LINK TL-PA8030P KIT Powerline Featuring Ho...
Consumer and business networking products provider TP-LINK is now shipping its TL-PA8030P KIT AV1200 3-Port Gigabit Passthrough Powerline Starter Kit that expands your home’s network over its... Read more
Apple refurbished iPad Air 2s available for u...
The Apple Store has Apple Certified Refurbished iPad Air 2s available for up to $140 off the price of new models. Apple’s one-year warranty is included with each model, and shipping is free: - 128GB... Read more
Updated Apple iPad Price Trackers
We’ve updated our iPad Air Price Tracker and our iPad mini Price Tracker with the latest information on prices and availability from Apple and other resellers. Read more

Jobs Board

*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions (US) - A...
Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, you're also the Read more
Infrastructure Engineer - *Apple* /Mac - Hil...
Infrastructure Engineer - Apple /Mac Job Code: 1608 # of openings: 1 Description Our fortune 500 client is looking to hire an experienced Infrastructure Engineer to join Read more
Executive Administrative Assistant, *Apple*...
…supporting presentation development for senior leadership. * User experience with Apple hardware and software is preferred. Additional Requirements The following list Read more
*Apple* Bus Company is now hirin - Apple Bus...
Apple Bus Company is now hiring school bus drivers in the Pettis County area. Class B CDL preferred. Free training provided. No nights or weekends required. Flexible Read more
*Apple* Certified Mac Technician - Updated 6...
…and friendly, hands-on technical support to customers troubleshooting and repairing Apple /Mac products with courtesy, speed and skill. Use your problem-solving skills Read more
All contents are Copyright 1984-2011 by Xplain Corporation. All rights reserved. Theme designed by Icreon.