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AppleScript and BBEdit

Volume Number: 24 (2008)
Issue Number: 08
Column Tag: AppleScript

AppleScript and BBEdit

Extend and enhance your BBEdit experience with AppleScript

by José R.C. Cruz

Introduction

The BBEdit text editor is the flagship product of Bare Bones Software. It came onto the scene in 1992 as a better alternative over the anemic TeachText. Now, it's a popular editor for writing source code, HTML and XML files, and even regular text files. Its feature set includes support for more than 32K of text, regex search and replace, syntax coloring, and tag palettes. Its Mac OS X version can also supports both AppleScript and shell scripts.

This article shows how you can use AppleScript to enhance your BBEdit setup. First, it provides a peek into BBEdit's scripting dictionary. Next, it introduces the BBEdit Script menu. Then it shows how to attach a script to any of BBEdit's menu items. The article also comes with examples of useful scripts.

The article assumes that you are familiar with the AppleScript language and the Script Editor. Also, its example scripts are all available from the MacTech site at the following URL: ftp.mactech.com/src/mactech/volume24_2008/24.08.sit

The BBEdit Dictionary

The BBEdit scripting dictionary (Figure 1) consists of eight AppleScript suites. The first three suites, (grey) define the methods and properties that most scriptable applications share. The Required suite defines those that all application must have. The Standard suite defines those that are common to most applications. And the Miscellaneous suite defines are those that an application may have.


Figure 1. The BBEdit Scripting Dictionary

The remaining four suites (colored) are unique to BBEdit. Each suite defines the methods and properties needed for a specific task. To use any of these methods or properties, make sure to call them within a tell...end tell block, as follows.

   tell application "BBEdit"
      — 

— call the BBEdit methods and properties here

      —
   end tell — application "BBEdit"

Covering all the methods and properties in detail is beyond this article's scope. Instead, this article will focus only on methods and properties used by its script examples.

The BBEdit suite

The BBEdit suite (orange) defines the methods and properties common to all tasks. Some will start and control a specific BBEdit feature. Others will access a specific BBEdit object.

For example, BBEdit 8.x displays its text files in two places: in a window or in a drawer (Figure 2). To access the front window, use the text window property.

   tell application "BBEdit"
      get text window 1
   end tell — application "BBEdit"

To access the second document in the drawer, e.g. fubar.txt, use the text document property.

   tell application "BBEdit"
      get text document "fubar.txt"
   end tell — application "BBEdit"

Next, you can read the text data in one of two ways. To retrieve the entire text, use the contents property.

   tell application "BBEdit"
      get contents of text window 1
   end tell — application "BBEdit"

To retrieve only the selected text, use the selection property.

   tell application "BBEdit"
      get selection of text window 1 as text
   end tell — application "BBEdit"


Figure 2. The BBEdit display views

Notice that the above example forces the selection property to return its results as text. But if you remove the as text option, the property returns its results as a range of characters.

You can also use the same two properties to replace the data. For example, to replace the entire text to "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet", use the contents property as follows.

   tell application "BBEdit"
      set the contents of text window 1 ¬
         to "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet"
   end tell — application "BBEdit"

To replace only the selected text, use the selection property as follows.

   tell application "BBEdit"
      set the selection of text window 1 ¬
         to "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet"
   end tell — application "BBEdit"

Finally, you can display other text data in a separate window. To do so, first use the make method to create a new text window. Then display the text "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet" as follows.

   tell application "BBEdit"
      make new text window ¬
         with properties {contents:"Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet"}
   end tell — application "BBEdit"

The Text suite

The Text Suite (green) defines the properties that refer to specific text elements. Use them to read or change parts of the text data.

For example, to retrieve the third word on the front text window, use the word property.

   tell application "BBEdit"
      get word 3 of text window 1
   end tell — application "BBEdit"

To read the fifth word of the sixth line on that same window, include a line property.

   tell application "BBEdit"
      get word 5 of line 6 of text window 1
   end tell — application "BBEdit"

To read 10 words, starting at the fifth word, from the document foobar.htm, use the word property with a thru keyword.

   tell application "BBEdit"
      get word 5 thru 15 of text document "foobar.htm"
   end tell — application "BBEdit"

To change the fifth line of the front text window to "Lorem ipsum dolor", use the line property as follows.

   tell application "BBEdit"
      set line 5 of text window 1 to "Lorem ipsum dolor"
   end tell — application "BBEdit"

BBEdit defines words as those text elements that have only letters, numbers, or both. It treats spaces, punctuations, and other characters as delimiters. Consider the following line of sample text.

   — 123 BBEdit property_1 ???

BBEdit sees only four words in the above line: 123, BBEdit, property, and 1. It sees the remaining elements as text delimiters.

The HTML suite

The HTML suite (red) defines the methods and properties used for web–related tasks. Some work on the HTML data displayed by the front text window. Others work on data stored on a file.

For example, to check the HTML data on the front window, use the balance tags method.

   tell application "BBEdit"
      balance tags of text window 1
   end tell — application "BBEdit"

BBEdit returns a TRUE if the HTML data is well formed; otherwise, it returns a FALSE. To check the data on the file foobar.htm, use the check syntax method.

   set tPth to path to sites folder from user domain as string
   set tPth to tPth & "foobar.htm"
   tell application "BBEdit"
      check syntax of alias tPth show results true
   end tell — application "BBEdit"

The above script assumes that the file is in the Sites subdirectory of the home directory. Also, BBEdit displays any errors it finds in a separate window.

The Unix suite

The Unix suite (blue) defines two methods for running a shell script from BBEdit. Make sure that the script starts with a valid #! header. Otherwise, it will either fail to run or terminate with an error.

Suppose you have the shell script foo.sh displayed on a BBEdit text window. To run the script, use to run unix script method.

tell application "BBEdit" run unix script end tell — application "BBEdit"

To run only the selected portion of that script, set the selection only option to TRUE.

   tell application "BBEdit"
      run unix script selection only true
   end tell — application "BBEdit"

To display the results of the script in a separate window, add an output to option as follows.

   tell application "BBEdit"
      run unix script output to new untitled window
   end tell — application "BBEdit"

To pass values to the script, first prepare the values as a list. Then pass the list to the script as follows.

   set tArg to {"foobar", 24}   
   tell application "BBEdit"
      run unix script output to new untitled window
   end tell — application "BBEdit"

The script reads the above values as positional parameters.

Now, suppose you have the script foobar.sh stored in your Documents directory. To run that script on the text in the front window, use the run unix filter method.

   set tPth to path to documents folder from user domain as string
   set tPth to tPth & "foobar.sh"
   tell application "BBEdit"
      run unix filter alias tPth
   end tell — application "BBEdit"

In the above example, BBEdit replaces the text with the output of the script. To save the script output in a separate file, set the replacing selection option to FALSE.

   set tPth to path to documents folder from user domain as string
   set tPth to tPth & "foobar.sh"
   tell application "BBEdit"
      run unix filter alias tPth replacing selection false
   end tell — application "BBEdit"

Here, BBEdit saves the output in the file Unix Script Output. It also stores this file in the path ~/Application Support/BBEdit/Unix Support/.

Running Scripts From BBEdit

You can run your AppleScript scripts from BBEdit's Script menu (Figure 3). For your scripts to appear in this menu, make sure to store them in the directory path ~/Application Support/BBEdit/Scripts.


Figure 3. The BBEdit Script menu

You can also remove the Script menu if you have no need for it. To do so, first choose Preferences from the BBEdit menu. Click on the Menus entry to display its preferences panel. Then click on the checkbox Scripts to clear it (Figure 4). You should see the Script menu disappear from the menu bar.


Figure 4. Disabling the Script menu

To restore the Script menu, follow the same steps to display the Menus preferences panel. Then click on the checkbox Scripts to set the option.

Using the menu

The Script menu gives you easy access to various scripting resources. For example, to launch the Apple Script Editor, choose the menu item Open Script Editor from the menu. To view BBEdit's scripting dictionary, choose the menu item Open Scripting Dictionary. To view the contents of the Scripts directory from the Finder, choose Open Scripts Folder.

The Script menu also lets you record your actions without leaving BBEdit. To begin the process, choose the menu item Start Recording. BBEdit will record your actions within and perhaps without.

To end the process, choose the menu item Stop Recording. BBEdit then prompts you for a filename for the script. Also, BBEdit saves the script in its Script directory by default. You can then use the Script Editor to open the script and make any changes you see fit.

Currently, BBEdit does not let you to choose a different script editor such as Script Debugger. This limitation may change in future versions of BBEdit. You can also override the Open Script Editor menu item using a menu action script.

Order of display

The Script menu lists the contents of its directory in alphanumeric order. If its directory has other subdirectories, the menu lists them in the same order as well.

You can, however, change the order in which each script or directory appears on the menu. All you have to do is to add a numeric prefix to their names. Assume, for example, you have the following items in Figure 5. The Script menu displays these items as shown in Figure 6.


Figure 5. Contents of the Script directory


Figure 6. The Script menu before reordering

Now change the name of script foobar to 02)foobar. Also, change the name of subdirectory foobie to 01)foobie. The Script menu will now reorder these items as shown in Figure 7. Notice that the menu excludes the number prefix added to the two names.


Figure 7. The Script menu after reordering

Example menu scripts

The following are three examples of scripts for the BBEdit Script menu. They operate on any text selected on the front text window. For reasons of length, some examples show only the main parts of the script. You can always download the examples from the MacTech website if you want to see the entire scripts.

Feel free to modify these scripts to suit your needs.

The script in Listing 1 is a very simple one. This script encodes the selected text using a ROT–13 algorithm. It then displays the encoded result in a separate window. It also sets the title of the output window to that of the source window plus a .rot13 suffix.

Listing 1. The menu script Encode in ROT–13

on run
   local tTxt, tDoc
   
   tell application "BBEdit"
      — retrieve the selected text
      set tTxt to the selection of text window 1
      set tTxt to tTxt as text
      
      — retrieve the document title
      set tDoc to name of text window 1
   end tell — application "BBEdit"
   
   — validate the selection
   if (length of tTxt is 0) then
      display alert ¬
         "Script Error" message ¬
         "You have not selected a text to be encoded" as informational
   else
      — rotate the selection
      set tTxt to rotate given target:tTxt
      
      — modify the file name
      set tDoc to appendRot13 for tDoc
      
      tell application "BBEdit"
         — create a new text window
         make new text window
         set name of text window 1 to tDoc
         
         — display the rotated text
         set the text of text window 1 to tTxt
         activate
      end tell — application "BBEdit"
   end if
end run
property kABC : "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz"
property kNOP : "nopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklm"
— Attach the ROT–13 suffix
to appendRot13 for aNom
   local tOld, tMod, tSuf
   
   — set the text item delimiters
   set tOld to text item delimiters of AppleScript
   set text item delimiters of AppleScript to "."
   
   — dissect the filename
   set tMod to text item 1 of aNom
   set tSuf to text item 2 of aNom
   
   — modify the filename
   set tMod to tMod & "–rot13."
   set tMod to tMod & tSuf
   
   — restore the text item delimiters
   set text item delimiters of AppleScript to tOld
   
   — return the modified name
   return (tMod)
end appendRot13 — for aNom
— Subject the text to a ROT–13 algorithm
to rotate given target:aTxt
   local tPos, tChr, tLst
   local tRot
   
   — disassemble the target text into its characters
   set tRot to ""
   set tLst to characters of aTxt
   
   repeat with tChr in tLst
      — check against the stream of lower–case characters
      set tPos to offset of tChr in kABC
      if (tPos > 0) then
         set tRot to tRot & (character tPos of kNOP)
      else
         set tRot to tRot & tChr
      end if — (tPos > 0)
   end repeat — with tChr in tLst
   
   — return the rotated text
   return (tRot)
end rotate — given target:aTxt

The script in Listing 2 is a bit more complex. First, it reads the selected text from the front text window. It then prompts the user for the recipient's e–mail address and for a message title. Next, the script asks the user to choose which e–mail account to use. Then it uses Apple Mail to prepare a draft email message containing the selected text.

Listing 2. The menu script E–Mail Selection

on run
   local tTxt, tRcv, tSnd
   
   — retrieve the selected text
   tell application "BBEdit"
      set tTxt to the selection of text window 1
      set tTxt to tTxt as text
   end tell — application "BBEdit"
   
   — validate the selection
   if (length of tTxt is 0) then
      display alert ¬
         "Script Error" message ¬
         "You have not selected a text to be mailed" as informational
   else
      — get the recipient details
      set tRcv to askForReceiver()
      
      — get the account details
      set tSnd to askForAccount()
      
      — send the selection
      if (tSnd is false) then
         — DO NOTHING HERE
         beep
      else
         sendMail for tTxt from tSnd to tRcv
      end if
   end if
end run
— Send the text
— NOTE:
— The following script is a modified version of Apple's sample script
to sendMail for aTxt from aSnd to aRcx
   local tMsg, tSub, tRcx
   
   — retrieve the following recipient data
   set tSub to subject of aRcx
   set tRcx to recipient of aRcx
   
   — activate Apple Mail
   tell application "Mail"
      activate
      
      — create a new outgoing message
      set tMsg to make new outgoing message
      set content of tMsg to aTxt & return & return
      set subject of tMsg to tSub
      set sender of tMsg to item 1 of aSnd
      
      tell tMsg
         set visible to true
         make new to recipient at end of to recipients ¬
            with properties {address:tRcx}
         
      end tell — tMsg
   end tell — application "Mail"
end sendMail — for aTxt from aSnd to aRcx
   .
   .
   .

The script in Listing 3 is much more interesting. First, the script counts the number of words and lines in the selected text. Then it counts the number of syllables in each word. Next, it calculates the text's readability index and grade using the Flesch–Kincaid formula. It then displays the results in a dialog window.

To keep things simple, this script approximates the syllable count as the number of vowels in each word.

Listing 3. The menu script Flesch–Kincaid Index

on run
   local tStat, tTxt, tWrd
   
   — retrieve the selected text
   tell application "BBEdit"
      set tTxt to the selection of text window 1
      set tTxt to tTxt as text
   end tell — application "BBEdit"
   
   — validate the selection
   if (length of tTxt is 0) then
      display alert ¬
         "Script Error" message ¬
         "You have not selected a text for analysis" as informational
   else
      — count the number of words in the target text
      set tStat to readabilityStats from tTxt
      
      — display the results
      set tTxt to "Ease Index: "
      set tTxt to tTxt & (index of tStat as string)
      set tTxt to tTxt & (ASCII character (13))
      set tTxt to tTxt & "Grade Level: "
      set tTxt to tTxt & (grade of tStat as string)
      
      display dialog tTxt buttons {"OK"} ¬
         with title ¬
         "Flesch–Kincaid Readability" default button 1 ¬
         giving up after 10
   end if
end run
— Determine the readability statistics of the target text
on readabilityStats from aTxt
   local tStat, tWrds, tFKI, tFKG
   local tAWL, tASW
   
   — initialize the statistics results
   set tStat to {sentences:0, wordCount:0, syllables:0, index:0, grade:0}
   
   — calculate the following
   — readability:count:sentences
   set sentences of tStat to numberOfLines from aTxt
   
   — readability:count:words
   set tWrds to numberOfWords from aTxt
   set wordCount of tStat to wordCount of tWrds
   
   — readability:count syllables
   set tWrds to wordList of tWrds
   set syllables of tStat to numberOfSyllables from tWrds
   
   try
      — calculate the following averages
      set tAWL to ((wordCount of tStat) / (sentences of tStat))
      set tASW to ((syllables of tStat) / (wordCount of tStat))
      
      — calculate the Fleisch–Kincaid ease index
      set tFKI to 206.835 – 1.015 * tAWL – 84.6 * tASW
      set index of tStat to tFKI
      
      — calculate the Fleisch–Kincaid grade level
      set tFKG to 0.39 * tAWL + 11.8 * tASW – 15.59
      set grade of tStat to round (tFKG)
   on error
      set index of tStat to 0
      set grade of tStat to 0
   end try
   
   — return the statistics results
   return (tStat)
end readabilityStats — from aTxt
   .
   .
   .

Attaching Scripts To BBEdit

Another way to run scripts on BBEdit is to attach them to a menu item. Known as menu action scripts, they can run before or after the selected menu action. They can enhance the original action or replace it entirely. Menu action scripts are stored in the following directory.

~/Library/Application Support/BBEdit/Menu Scripts.

Also, only version 6.0, or newer, of the BBEdit application supports this type of scripts.

Anatomy of the script

Menu action scripts come in three forms. The first form (Figure 8) has a standard on run handler. When a user selects a menu item, the script runs the handler right after the selection. It then prevents the original menu action from running.


Figure 8. Overriding a menu item action

The second form (Figure 9) has an on menuselect handler. When a user selects a menu item, the script runs the handler before the original action. The handler then returns a Boolean value, which tells the script what to do next. If the handler returns a FALSE, the script allows the original menu action to run. If it returns a TRUE, the script comes to an end.


Figure 9. Preceding a menu item action

The third form (Figure 10) has two handlers: an on menuselect and an on postmenuselect. When a user selects a menu item, the script first runs the on menuselect handler. If this handler returns a TRUE, the script stops, preventing the original menu action to run. But if the handler returns a FALSE, the script lets the original action to run. Then it runs the on postmenuselect handler.


Figure 10. Enclosing a menu item action

To attach a menu action script to a menu item, you need to name the script in a certain way. The following is the syntax you should use for the script's name.

menu•menu_item

The menu string is the name of the menu on the menubar. It can also be the name of the hierarchical menu as well. The menu_item string is the name of menu item itself. For example, to attach a script to the menu item About BBEdit, use the following name for the script.

BBEdit•About BBEdit

To attach a script to the menu item Save As..., use the following name.

File•Save As...

Make sure to separate the two strings with a '•' character. If the menu item contains an ellipsis, make sure to include that as well. Otherwise, BBEdit will not recognize the script.

Example menu action scripts

The following are three examples of menu action scripts for BBEdit. These examples require version 8.x or newer of BBEdit. Feel free to modify these scripts to suit your needs.

Again, for reasons of length, some examples show only the main parts of the script. To see the scripts in their entirety, download the examples from the MacTech website.

The script in Listing 4 overrides the Make Backup Now... menu item in the File menu. First, this script gets the file name and path of the displayed text document. It then prepares the name of the backup tarball using the file's name. Next, it sets the backup path to the directory ~/Documents/Backup. Then it creates the backup tarball in that directory.

Listing 4. The menu action script File•Make Backup Now...

on menuselect(aMenu, anItem)
   local tDoc, tBck
   
   — retrieve the document information
   set tDoc to pathOfDocument()
   set tBck to backupName for (dnom of tDoc)
   set tDoc to (dpth of tDoc)
   
   — backup the document
   tell me to storeBackup for tDoc at tBck
end menuselect
— Create the tarball backup
on storeBackup for aDoc at aTar
   local tNew, tCmd, tBck
   
   — prepare the tarball backup
   set tBck to pathToBackup()
   set tBck to tBck & aTar
   
   — does the tarball already exists?
   set tNew to pathExists for tBck
   
   — prepare the tar command
   set tCmd to "tar —file=" & (POSIX path of tBck)
   set tCmd to tCmd & " —label=bbedit_backup"
   
   if (tNew) then
      — backup:file:create
      set tCmd to tCmd & " —create "
   else
      — backup:file:update
      set tCmd to tCmd & " —update "
   end if — (tNew)
   
   set tCmd to tCmd & (POSIX path of aDoc)
   
   try
      — execute the backup command
      do shell script tCmd
      
      — inform the user
      if (tNew) then
         set tBck to "Created the tarball backup at:" & return ¬
            & return & tBck
      else
         set tBck to "Updated the tarball backup at:" & return ¬
            & return & tBck
      end if — (tNew)
      
      display dialog tBck with title ¬
         "Successful Backup" giving up after 5 ¬
         buttons {"OK"} default button 1
   on error tErr
      display alert ¬
         "Backup Error" message ¬
         (tErr as string) as critical
   end try
end storeBackup — for aDoc at aTar
   .
   .
   .

The script in Listing 5 overrides the Find Differences... menu item, which is under the Search menu. This script first gets the file path to the displayed text document. It then asks the user to choose a second file to compare against. Next, the script compares the two files using the command–line tool diff. Then it displays the results on a separate text window.

Listing 5. The menu action script Search•Find Differences...

on run
   local tDoc, tRef, tDiff
   
   — get the frontmost document
   set tDoc to frontDocument()
   
   — get the document directory
   set tDoc to docInfo for tDoc
   if (tDoc is not false) then
      set tRef to selectTarget for tDoc
      set tDiff to getDifferences for tRef against (dpth of tDoc)
      
      — display the differences
      tell application "BBEdit"
         — create a new text window
         make new text window
         set name of text window 1 to "Diff results"
         
         — display the results
         set the text of text window 1 to tDiff
         activate
      end tell — application "BBEdit"
   end if — (tDoc is not false)
end run
— Get the frontmost document
on frontDocument()
   local tDoc, tPth
   
   tell application "BBEdit"
      set tDoc to text window 1
      set tPth to the file of tDoc
   end tell — application "BBEdit"
   
   — return the retrieval results
   return (tPth)
end frontDocument
— Display the differences between the two files
on getDifferences for aDoc against aRef
   local tCmd, tDiff
   
   — prepare the diff command
   set tCmd to "diff —ignore–all–space"
   set tCmd to tCmd & " —text"
   set tCmd to tCmd & " —suppress–common–lines"
   set tCmd to tCmd & " " & (POSIX path of aRef)
   set tCmd to tCmd & " " & (POSIX path of aDoc)
   
   — execute the command
   try
      do shell script tCmd
      set tDiff to result
   on error tErr
      set tDiff to tErr as string
   end try
   
   — return the comparison results
   return (tDiff)
end getDifferences — for aDoc against aRef
   .
   .
   .

The script in Listing 6 overrides the Folder Listing... menu item. This menu item is in the hierarchical menu Insert, which is under the Edit menu. First, the script asks the user to choose a directory. It lists the contents of that directory using the ls command–line tool. Then it displays the results on the front text window.

Listing 6. The menu action script Insert•Folder Listing...

on run
   local tDir, tLst
   
   — ask for the target directory
   set tDir to askForTarget()
   
   — get a list of contents from that directory
   set tLst to listContents from tDir
   
   — display the results
   set tDir to "Contents of the directory:" & return & tab ¬
         & (POSIX path of tDir)
   set tLst to tDir & return & tLst
   tell application "BBEdit"
      set selection of text window 1 to tLst
   end tell — application "BBEdit"
end run
— Display the contents of the target directory
on listContents from aTgt
   local tLst, tCmd
   
   — set the shell command
   set tCmd to "ls –ASl " & (POSIX path of aTgt)
   
   — execute the command
   try
      do shell script tCmd
      set tLst to result
   on error
      set tLst to "Unable to list the contents of the target:" & return
      set tLst to tLst & (aTgt as string)
   end try
   
   — return the retrieval results
   return (tLst)
end listContents — from aTgt
— Ask the user for a target directory
on askForTarget()
   local tPth
   
   — set the default directory
   set tPth to path to documents folder from user domain
   
   — prompt the user for a target directory
   choose folder ¬
      "Select which directory to peruse" default location tPth
   set tPth to result
   
   — return the selection
   return (tPth)
end askForTarget

Final Remarks

BBEdit has a strong and impressive support for AppleScript. It gives you a scripting dictionary with an extensive set of properties and methods. It allows you easy access to various scripts and script resources. It lets you record your actions on demand and save the results to a file. It even lets you attach scripts to specific menu events.

Because of its level of support, BBEdit continues to stand out against other text editors. It is also a prime example of what a scriptable application should be.

Bibliography and References

Borenstein, Philip, Stephen Chernicoff, et al. "Using AppleScripts in BBEdit". BBEdit 8.5 User Manual, pp. 277281. Copyright 1992–2006. Bare Bones Software Inc.

Apple. AppleScript Language Guide. Copyright 1999. Apple, Inc.


JC is a freelance engineering writer who lives happily in North Vancouver, British Columbia. He writes frequently for MacTech and REALbasic Developer. He also spends quality time with his nephew. He can be reached at anarakisware@gmail.com.

 
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Bartender 1.2.20 - Organize your menu ba...
Bartender lets you organize your menu bar apps. Features: Lets you tidy your menu bar apps how you want. See your menu bar apps when you want. Hide the apps you need to run, but do not need to... Read more
TotalFinder 1.6.2 - Adds tabs, hotkeys,...
TotalFinder is a universally acclaimed navigational companion for your Mac. Enhance your Mac's Finder with features so smart and convenient, you won't believe you ever lived without them. Tab-based... Read more
Vienna 3.0.0 RC 2 :be5265e: - RSS and At...
Vienna is a freeware and Open-Source RSS/Atom newsreader with article storage and management via a SQLite database, written in Objective-C and Cocoa, for the OS X operating system. It provides... Read more
VLC Media Player 2.1.5 - Popular multime...
VLC Media Player is a highly portable multimedia player for various audio and video formats (MPEG-1, MPEG-2, MPEG-4, DivX, MP3, OGG, ...) as well as DVDs, VCDs, and various streaming protocols. It... Read more
Default Folder X 4.6.7 - Enhances Open a...
Default Folder X attaches a toolbar to the right side of the Open and Save dialogs in any OS X-native application. The toolbar gives you fast access to various folders and commands. You just click... Read more
TinkerTool 5.3 - Expanded preference set...
TinkerTool is an application that gives you access to additional preference settings Apple has built into Mac OS X. This allows to activate hidden features in the operating system and in some of the... Read more
Audio Hijack Pro 2.11.0 - Record and enh...
Audio Hijack Pro drastically changes the way you use audio on your computer, giving you the freedom to listen to audio when you want and how you want. Record and enhance any audio with Audio Hijack... Read more
Intermission 1.1.1 - Pause and rewind li...
Intermission allows you to pause and rewind live audio from any application on your Mac. Intermission will buffer up to 3 hours of audio, allowing users to skip through any assortment of audio... Read more

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Note Review
Note Review By Jennifer Allen on July 29th, 2014 Our Rating: :: TOO SIMPLEiPhone App - Designed for the iPhone, compatible with the iPad Note is a note taking app that’s a little too short on features to be worth its asking price... | Read more »
Chainsaw Warrior Goes on Sale & Ther...
Chainsaw Warrior Goes on Sale & There’s a Chance to Win a Copy of the Original Board Game Posted by Jennifer Allen on July 29th, 2014 [ permalink | Read more »
It Came From Canada: Tiny Tower Vegas
If you go to a casino, you might make a lot of money. If you run a casino, you’re guaranteed to make a lot of money. The choice seems pretty obvious. So while waiting for your shady real estate deals to move forward, get prepared with Tiny Tower... | Read more »
Z Hunter Review
Z Hunter Review By Lee Hamlet on July 29th, 2014 Our Rating: :: RIGHT ON TARGETUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad While it might not necessarily break new ground, Z Hunter has enough tricks up its sleeve to ensure that... | Read more »
Huge Update Comes To Duet, Adding 48 New...
Huge Update Comes To Duet, Adding 48 New Stages Posted by Jennifer Allen on July 29th, 2014 [ permalink ] Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad | Read more »
Sharknado: The Video Game Available Now....
Sharknado: The Video Game Available Now. Seriously. Posted by Rob Rich on July 29th, 2014 [ permalink ] Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad | Read more »
Frog Orbs 2 Review
Frog Orbs 2 Review By Nadia Oxford on July 29th, 2014 Our Rating: :: THIS MAGIC IS A TAD MONOTONOUS Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad Frog Orbs 2 is repetitive, but younger players should enjoy it nonetheless.   | Read more »
Puzzix Review
Puzzix Review By Jennifer Allen on July 29th, 2014 Our Rating: :: NICE IDEAUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad A little like Tetris, Puzzix is all about piecing together blocks and watching them vanish. It could do with... | Read more »
Cannonball eMail is Now Live – Works Wit...
Cannonball eMail is Now Live – Works With Gmail, Yahoo, Outlook, Hotmail, and AOL Posted by Jessica Fisher on July 29th, 2014 [ permalink ] | Read more »
To The End Review
To The End Review By Lee Hamlet on July 29th, 2014 Our Rating: :: A VICIOUS CYCLEUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad To The End will test players’ patience, timing, and dedication as they try to navigate all 13 levels in... | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

Updated MacBook Pro Price Trackers
We’ve updated our MacBook Pro Price Trackers with the latest information on prices, bundles, and availability on the new 2014 models from Apple’s authorized internet/catalog resellers as well as... Read more
Apple updates MacBook Pros with slightly fast...
Apple updated 13″ and 15″ Retina MacBook Pros today with slightly faster Haswell processors. 13″ models now ship with 8GB of RAM standard, while 15″ MacBook Pros ship with 16GB across the board. Most... Read more
Apple drops price on 13″ 2.5GHz MacBook Pro b...
The Apple Store has dropped their price for the 13″ 2.5GHz MacBook Pro by $100 to $1099 including free shipping. Read more
Apple drops prices on refurbished 2013 MacBoo...
The Apple Store has dropped prices on Apple Certified Refurbished 13″ and 15″ 2013 MacBook Pros, with model now available starting at $929. Apple’s one-year warranty is standard, and shipping is free... Read more
iOS 8 and OS X 10.10 To Support DuckDuckGo As...
Writing for Quartz, Dan Frommer reports that Apple’s forthcoming iOS 8 and OS X 10.10 operating systems version updates will allow users to select DuckDuckGo as their default search engine. He notes... Read more
U.K. Hospital Using iPods and iPads To Record...
British news journal GazetteLive’s. Ian McNeal notes that the old “an apple a day keeps the doctor away” proverb is being turned on its head at http://southtees.nhs.uk/hospitals/james-cook/ James... Read more
13-inch 2.5GHz MacBook Pro on sale for $1099,...
Best Buy has the 13″ 2.5GHz MacBook Pro available for $1099.99 on their online store. Choose free shipping or free instant local store pickup (if available). Their price is $100 off MSRP. Price is... Read more
Roundup of Apple refurbished MacBook Pros, th...
The Apple Store has Apple Certified Refurbished 13″ and 15″ MacBook Pros available for up to $400 off the cost of new models. Apple’s one-year warranty is standard, and shipping is free. Their prices... Read more
Record Mac Shipments In Q2/14 Confound Analys...
A Seeking Alpha Trefis commentary notes that Apple’s fiscal Q3 2014 results released July 22, beat market predictions on earnings, although revenues were slightly lower than anticipated. Apple’s Mac’... Read more
Intel To Launch Core M Silicon For Use In Not...
Digitimes’ Monica Chen and Joseph Tsai, report that Intel will launch 14nm-based Core M series processors specifically for use in fanless notebook/tablet 2-in-1 models in Q4 2014, with many models to... Read more

Jobs Board

Sr Software Lead Engineer, *Apple* Online S...
Sr Software Lead Engineer, Apple Online Store Publishing Systems Keywords: Company: Apple Job Code: E3PCAK8MgYYkw Location (City or ZIP): Santa Clara Status: Full Read more
*Apple* Solutions Consultant (ASC) - Apple (...
**Job Summary** The ASC is an Apple employee who serves as an Apple brand ambassador and influencer in a Reseller's store. The ASC's role is to grow Apple Read more
Sr. Product Leader, *Apple* Store Apps - Ap...
**Job Summary** Imagine what you could do here. At Apple , great ideas have a way of becoming great products, services, and customer experiences very quickly. Bring Read more
*Apple* Solutions Consultant (ASC) - Apple (...
**Job Summary** The ASC is an Apple employee who serves as an Apple brand ambassador and influencer in a Reseller's store. The ASC's role is to grow Apple Read more
*Apple* Solutions Consultant (ASC) - Apple (...
**Job Summary** The ASC is an Apple employee who serves as an Apple brand ambassador and influencer in a Reseller's store. The ASC's role is to grow Apple Read more
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