TweetFollow Us on Twitter

What's New In REALbasic 2005?

Volume Number: 21 (2005)
Issue Number: 7
Column Tag: Programming

What's New In REALbasic 2005?

A look at what's new in REAL Software's recently released update to REALbasic.

by Will Leshner

REALbasic 2005 Is Out

REAL Software recently released an all new version of REALbasic called REALbasic 2005, and you might be wondering what all the fuss is about. REALbasic 2005 was first announced at REAL World (REAL Software's annual REALbasic developers conference) in 2004, and it was finally released in June of this year. It sports an entirely redesigned user interface, new controls, additions to the REALbasic language itself, and a new "Rapid Release" shipping schedule that promises a new version of REALbasic every 90 days.

To really appreciate some of the things I'll be talking about, you'll want to run REALbasic for yourself. If you don't have a license, you can download the REALbasic demo from the REAL Software website.

New IDE

Made With REALbasic

With the release of REALbasic 2005, REAL Software hasn't just redesigned the REALbasic IDE, they have also rewritten it in REALbasic. The IDE itself is now the best example of a made with REALbasic application. This alone is a great step forward for REALbasic, because it means that the REAL Software engineers are now fulltime REALbasic developer, and they will now benefit from the improved efficiency that working in REALbasic provides. That means features should be quicker to implement and should appear in releases more quickly. It also means that the REAL Software engineers will experience the same bugs and design flaws in REALbasic as their customers, making it much more likely that fixes will appear sooner, rather than later.

All-In-One Window


Figure 1. All-in-one project window.

The most obvious change to the REALbasic IDE is the all-in-one project window (as shown in Figure 1). This change may take some getting used to, but it has several advantages over the old multi-window approach. First, the new IDE is a joy to use on Windows. If you haven't had a chance to use older versions of REALbasic on Windows, you may not be aware of some of the problems, but there were several and they affected productivity substantially. One problem with the old IDE was that it used floating windows for both the controls palette and the properties editor. While a floating window approach worked well on the Mac, it didn't work well on Windows, where the floating windows would fight with the main IDE window for the focus. The main window itself was also a problem on Windows. It was an MDI-style window that severely limited a developer's ability to switch from one code or layout window to another.

Another feature of the new IDE's one-window approach is that it simplifies having more than one project open at the same time. A serious limitation with the old IDE was its inability to open more than one project at a time. Developers managed to work around that limitation through tricks, such as having more than one copy of the REALbasic application running at the same time. With REALbasic 2005, such tricks become unnecessary, because opening multiple projects is fully supported by the IDE. Furthermore, having multiple projects open at the same time is easy to manage for developers because each project is fully contained within its own window.

IDE As Web Browser

The REALbasic 2005 IDE models itself on a tabbed web browser. In a web browser, you visit web pages. In the REALbasic 2005 IDE, you visit editors. Each editor you visit in a project can be thought of as a location, just as the different web pages you visit in a web browser can be thought of as locations.. In the REALbasic 2005 IDE, you can jump directly to a location using the Location field at the top of every project window. For example, if you wanted to jump directly to the Open event of the App object, you would type App.Open in the Location field and hit return to have the IDE take you directly to the code editor for that event. Also like a web browser, as you visit code editor locations, the IDE will remember where you've been. You can move back and forward through the locations you have visited by clicking the backward and forward buttons in the IDE's main toolbar (see Figure 2).


Figure 2. Browser-like project navigation controls.

If you find that there is a particular location you visit a lot, you can set a bookmark to that location. Choosing a bookmark from the Bookmarks menu opens the location for that bookmark. Bookmarks are global across all projects, which means that you can select a bookmark for a location in a project that isn't open, and the IDE will automatically open the project and take you directly to the location in that project. There is also a favorites bar, located below the main toolbar, into which you can place bookmarks that you use a lot. The bookmarks in the bookmarks bar are local to a project and will not show up in other projects.

Tabbed Editors

Most of your time using the REALbasic IDE will likely be spent in the main content area, located below the main toolbar and the favorites bar. The main content area is tabbed, with each location you visit contained within its own tab (see Figure 3). One of the advantages to the new tabbed interface is the ability to quickly switch from one location in a project to another simply by clicking tabs. If you need to see two locations at the same time, it is possible to open another project window for the current project by choosing New Window from the File menu.


Figure 3. Project tabs.

Most tab locations have the same basic structure. At the top is a bar of buttons for common actions specific to that particular location. The Project tab, for example, has buttons for adding classes, modules, and menu bars, to a project. A code editor tab has buttons for adding methods, properties, events, and other code elements (Figure 4 shows the menu editor toolbar). Below the command bar is the main content area for the tab. The look of the main content area will depend on the type of tab. The Project tab contains a list of all the classes, windows, modules, and other elements contained within that project. A code editor tab contains a list of all of the methods, properties, events, and other code elements for the item being edited, together with a code editor pane for editing those items. A window layout tab contains a pasteboard for editing a window, a list of controls to add to the window, and a properties editor for editing the properties of the window or the items contained on that window.


Figure 4. Menu editor command bar.

Redesigned Editors

Most of the editors in REALbasic 2005 have been redesigned, and perhaps the biggest change is the way the new window editor works. The old IDE's window editor looked, and in many ways acted, like a real window. There were, however, several problems with editing a window that itself acted like a real window. First, every class instantiated directly on the window had to be contained within the window itself. Some classes, like Timers and TCPSockets, are not really controls and do not appear in the UI of the running application. The presence of these non-controls during the design phase tended to clutter the window, and generally got in the way when trying to position and style those elements that really were controls. Another problem with the old window editor was that you could never design a window that was larger than your monitor. If you had a small monitor and a large window, you were forced to play games with the position of the window in order to design it. Lastly, there was a problem with the old window editor on Windows that had to do with maximizing all the windows in the project. Because a window editor was just another window as far as Windows is concerned, it would get maximized along with all the other windows, which was clearly not the desired behavior.

The new window editor in REALbasic 2005 fixes many of the problems of the old window editor. The window being edited is now contained within a pasteboard, and you can drop objects anywhere on the pasteboard, not just on the window. So, for example, if a window is to have a Timer on it, the Timer can be placed on the pasteboard, next to the window, keeping it outside the confines of the window itself. Also, the pasteboard has scrollbars, which means that you can edit a window of any size, regardless of the size of your monitor. Finally, the new window editor solves the problem on Windows where the window being edited is treated like a real window. The window is actually just a picture in the IDE, so Windows won't maximize it in unfortunate ways.

In addition to the window editor, the code editor has also gotten a face lift in the new IDE. The most obvious change is the addition of guidelines to show you which code blocks belong together. The guidelines are especially useful when the code in a method has several nested blocks and the code itself is a bit too long to all fit on one screen. The lines make it immediately obvious which End If goes with which If. The lines also server a functional purpose. Clicking a line selects all the text in that block.

Most Improved: Searching

Perhaps one of the best features of the new REALbasic IDE is its vastly improved searching options. There is still a traditional find dialog, from which you can find and replace text throughout a project. New, in the REALbasic 2005 IDE, however, is the ability to perform regular expression and whole word searches. Search really shines, however, when you do a Find All. All found items are displayed in a separate search tab. Double-clicking an item in a search tab brings you directly to the location for that item. But you don't have to leave the search tab in order to replace some or all of the found items with new text. At the bottom of each search tab is a field into which you can type replacement text. To perform a replace, all you have to do is type replacement text, select the items in the list of found items you want to replace, and click the Replace button.

You do not need to visit the Find dialog in order to search for items in a project. There is a search field in the main toolbar of the project window into which you can type text to do an instant search. A popup in the search field lets you set the scope of the search to the entire project, the current item, or the current method. If you are running Mac OS X Tiger, then you get one more option that is really cool: computer. A computer search uses Apple's new Spotlight technology to search all the REALbasic projects on your computer for a given search term. In order to use this option, you will need to download and install REAL Software's Spotlight plugin for REALbasic. Once you do, you will be able to perform lightning-fast searches of all of the projects on your Mac. As with any search, the results will appear in their own search tab. Double-clicking one will automatically open the project for that item, if the project is not currently open.

Customizable IDE


Figure 5. A customize dialog.

The new REALbasic IDE is much more customizable that the previous versions. For example, every toolbar you see can be customized. If you don't like a particular command button, you can remove it. If you don't like the order of the buttons, you can rearrange them. Some command buttons aren't even visible by default. Add Binding and List Bindings, for example, are two commands you might like to have easy access to that also happen to have buttons associated with them. By default, window editor toolbars don't include those to buttons. To add them, just bring up the customize dialog for the window editor toolbar (shown in Figure 5) and add either or both of them.

The only downside to REALbasic 2005's toolbar customization process is that you need to be looking at a toolbar in order to edit it. It may not occur to you that some toolbars can be edited. The debugger toolbar, for example, lacks a Run button, but you can add a Run button using the debugger's toolbar editor. You must be running in the debugger in order to access that editor, however.

Much More

I've only scratched the surface of all of the new features to be found in the REALbasic 2005 IDE. In addition to those things I've already talked about, there is also a totally new Language Reference, a new debugger, file type sets, and code refactoring tools. I'll leave these new features for you to discover on your own.

New Language Additions

The IDE isn't the only thing to get new additions in REALbasic. The REALbasic language has had a few additions to it as well, and all of them are welcome. Here are a few of the more exciting additions.

Declaring Variables

It was once the case that REALbasic required all variable declarations to appear at the top of a method, before any other code. That restriction was relaxed in REALbasic 5 so that a Dim statement could appear anywhere at the top level of a method. Now, in REALbasic 2005, variables can be declared inside blocks as well. And, as you would expect, the scope of such a variable is the block itself. Which means that the following silly code, while illegal in REALbasic 5, is perfectly legal in REALbasic 2005:

dim x as Integer = 2
   if x = 3 then
      dim y as Integer = 4
   x = y
end if

Another addition to the REALbasic language having to do with declaring variables is the ability to declare the loop variable of a for statement directly in the statement itself, as this code demonstrates:

for i as Integer = 0 to 10
   j = j + i
next

New Static Keyword

One thing sorely lacking in REALbasic is class properties and class methods. As in C++, static properties and methods would be shared by all the instances of a class. They enable class instances to coordinate their behavior, and they also make the Singleton design pattern a possibility (you can fake singletons now in REALbasic, but you can't get the compiler to enforce them for you). REALbasic 2005 doesn't introduce static property and class methods, but it does introduce Static as a keyword of the language and that gets us half way to static properties and methods.

Static is used like Dim to declare variables in a method. The difference is that variables declared Static persist across calls of the method, and their value is shared by all callers of that method (in other words, Static works in REALbasic the way it works in C). Static variables can be declared in module method or class method. Static variables in class method are static to the method and not to any particular instance of that method. Which means that every instance of the method sees the same static variable.

Static variables declared in methods of a class can be used by instances of that class to communicate with each other. One common example is keeping running total of all of the instances of a class that are currently in existence. Things are a little tricky because the static variable is private to the method in which it is declared, so we can't really define a cluster of support methods around one static variable. Instead, what we can do is create one method to which we pass commands for acting on the static variable. In the case of an instance count, we would need commands for incrementing the count, decrementing the count, and returning the count. Our final method might look something like the following:

private function InstanceCount(aCmd as String) as Integer
   static  count as Integer
   dim result as Integer

   select case aCmd
   case "INCREMENT"
      count = count + 1
   case "DECREMENT"
      count = count - 1
   case "GET"
      result = count
   end select

   return result
end function

To use InstanceCount, we would simply need to call InstanceCount("INCREMEMNT") in the constructor for our class, and InstanceCount("DECREMENT") in its destructor. We could also provide a public method for getting the instance count that would just return InstanceCount("GET").

Soft Declares

Another very useful new feature in REALbasic is the ability to create soft declares. Declares are a way to call a functions in shared libraries. They are commonly used to get at platform-specific functions of the operating system that are otherwise unavailable to pure REALbasic code.

Up until REALbasic 2005, a function specified in a declare was hard-coded in the executable and resolved when the application launched. If the OS couldn't figure out what shared library and function a particular declare referred to, then the application would fail to launch. In REALbasic 2005, it is now possible to make a declare "soft", which means that the declared function is not resolved until runtime. A new IsFunctionAvailable method has also been added to the System object. IsFunctionAvailable makes it possible to determine, at runtime, whether a function specified in a declare is or is not available, and take action accordingly.

An example may help to clarify the issue. I'll use a silly declare to make the point, but I hope you can see how the idea can be extended to other, more interesting declares. Imagine we are writing a custom control and we need to know the system's double-click time in order to handle double-clicks properly. There is a Carbon function called GetDblTime that will return that number, so we dutifully construct the following declare:

Declare Function GetDblTime Lib "Carbon" () as Integer

At which point we decide to test things out, so we run the project. There are two possible outcomes, depending on whether we are building a Mach-O application or a PEF application. If we are building a Mach-O application, our application will launch and the above declare will perform correctly. If, however, we are building a PEF application, we will get an error dialog at application launch telling us that the Carbon shared library could not be found. That is because the PEF loader doesn't know about a shared library called "Carbon", as we have identified it in the declare above. The PEF loader does know about a shared library called "CarbonLib", and if we had constructed the above declare using "CarbonLib" instead of "Carbon", then our PEF application would launch correctly.

A soft declare solves this problem. It defers the resolution of the "Carbon" shared library to runtime, instead of load time. Furthermore, it is the REALbasic framework that does the resolving and not the PEF loader, so it can be a bit smarter about handling a declare to "Carbon" in a PEF application. Turning the above declare into a soft declare is as easy as adding the Soft keyword to the front:

Soft Declare Function GetDblTime Lib "Carbon" () as Integer

Amazing as it may seem, simply adding the Soft keyword resolves the entire PEF versus Mach-O problem. The declare will now function correctly in both kinds of applications.

Soft declares solve a whole host of problems. On Linux, for example, there is a particularly nasty problem having to do with declaring to functions in LibC. On many distributions of Linux, LibC is really just a linker script for gcc that tracks down the real LibC shared library. Before REALbasic 2005, it was necessary to construct declares using a path to LibC itself, which resulted in code that was decidedly non-portable. Furthermore, you'd have to know where LibC lived on the particular distribution of Linux on which you were planning to run your application. Soft declares solves this problem as well. In REALbasic 2005 all you have to do is create a soft declare to "LibC" and then REALbasic resolves the real location for you at runtime.

New Controls And Classes

In addition to a brand new IDE and additions the REALbasic language, REALbasic 2005 also comes with several new classes and controls that developers can add to their bag of tricks. I'll cover a couple of them here.

HTMLViewer


Figure 6. HTMLViewer on Mac OS.


Figure 7. HTMLViewer on Windows.

REALbasic developers have long wished for a built-in HTML control and in REALbasic 2005 that wish has been granted. The HTMLViewer uses the default HTML rendering technology on each platform. On Mac OS, that technology is WebKit, on Windows it is Internet Explorer, and on Linux it is Mozilla.

I was lucky enough to be attending WWDC when Apple first announced WebKit. I really enjoyed the web-browser-in-three-steps demonstration that the Apple engineers performed during several of the sessions I attended. Now, that same demonstration is possible with REALbasic, and the result is a web browser that runs on Mac OS, Windows, and Linux. It doesn't take much to whip up a web browser in REALbasic 2005. In fact, it only takes one line of code. To begin, start with a blank desktop project. Drop an HTMLViewer control, an EditField, and a PushButton onto Window1. Then, in the Action event for PushButton1, add this code:

HTMLViewer1.LoadURL EditField1.Text

That's all there is to it. Run the project, enter a URL into the edit field, push the button, and start browsing. Figures 6 and 7 show the resulting web browser running on both Mac OS and Windows.

ContainerControl

Before REALbasic 2005, if you had a set of controls that worked together as a group, and you wanted that same set of controls to appear either in different places on the same window, or in different windows, then you had no choice but to recreate the exact same set of controls in each place that you needed them to appear. That problem is solved in REALbasic 2005 with the introduction of the ContainerControl. A ContainerControl acts a little bit like a window in that you design one in a window editor. But instead of appearing as a separate window, a ContainerControl is attached to another window, either at design time, or in code at runtime. One ContainerControl can be attached to any number of windows. In fact, you can even embed one ContainerControl inside another ContainerControl. Furthermore, ContainerControls are first-class citizens in REALbasic. You can attach properties, events, and methods to them in order to encapsulate their behavior in the ContainerControl itself.

There are a number of ways that ContainerControls can be used to simplify the creation of a complex user interface. For example, creating resizable panes becomes almost trivial with ContainerControls. By locking the bounds of each control contained within the ContainerControl appropriately, it is a simple matter of resizing the ContainerControl itself to get the effect of a resizable pane.


Figure 8. ContainerControl with two buttons.

Let's work through an example to see how ContainerControls can be used to easily solve a tricky problem. Anybody who has had to create cross-platform dialogs is well aware that the order of the OK and Cancel buttons as they appear in a dialog is different on Windows and the Mac. In order to have the buttons appear in the right order on each platform, it is usually necessary to write custom code in each dialog's Open event to take care of switching the buttons to the right order, depending on the platform. With ContainerControls, however, this becomes a simple task that can be solved once and forgotten. Start by creating a new ContainerControl in an empty project. Onto the ContainerControl drop two PushButtons, changing the Caption property of one PushButton to OK, and the other to Cancel. It is necessary to arrange the buttons in the proper order for one of the platforms on which the application will run. In Figure 8 I have arranged the butons in Mac OS order. The next step is to place code in the ContainerControl's Open event to switch the button order when the application is running on Windows (the buttons are already in the right order for the Mac). This requires a #if conditional compilation directive, as follows:

#if TargetWin32
   dim bp as Integer
   bp = CancelButton.Left
   CancelButton.Left = OkButton.Left
   OkButton.Left = bp
#endif

The final step is to place the ContainerControl inside of another window, where it can be instantiated when the window is created. Figure 9 shows what this might look like. If you now create Windows and Mac OS versions of the app and run them on their respective platforms, you should see the OK and Cancel buttons appear in their correct positions for each platform. Furthermore, the ContainerControl we created to solve this problem is reusable. We can drag it to any window or dialog box to get the exact same effect.


Figure 9. ContainerControl on a window.

BinaryStream

In addition to new controls, REALbasic 2005 comes with several new classes, as well as additions to existing classes. One addition that is particularly welcome are extensions to the BinaryStream. BinaryStreams are used to read and write binary data in a file. That hasn't changed in REALbasic 2005. What has changed is that BinaryStreams can now be used with MemoryBlocks and Strings as well. The trick to getting a BinaryStream to use a MemoryBlock or a String is to pass a an existing String or MemoryBlock to a BinaryStream when constructing one. For example, here is how you would create a BinaryStream that operated on a MemoryBlock, instead of a file:

dim mb as MemoryBlock
dim bs as BinaryStream
mb = new MemoryBlock(0)
bs = new BinaryStream(mb)

A BinaryStream that has been created with a MemoryBlock can be used just like any other BinaryStream. The difference is that instead of reading and writing data from a file, the BinaryStream will read and write data from a MemoryBlock instead. In the past, when I needed a memory-based stream class, I wrote it myself. But the new REALbasic implementation is much better than my home-grown one. Because BinaryStream is the stream class in all cases (MemoryBlock, String, or file), code can be written that reads and writes BinaryStreams that never has to know that the underlying data lives in a MemoryBlock instead of a file. That means more general code that can be reused in interesting ways.

REAL SQL Database

One new feature in REALbasic 2005 that is of particular interest to me is the addition of a new single-user database engine based on SQLite. In case you haven't heard of it, SQLite is a powerful and speedy SQL database engine with a growing user base. In fact, Apple has included SQLite in Mac OS 10.4 and provided access to it through its new CoreData technology. By choosing SQLite, REAL Software has guaranteed that REALbasic developers will have access to a state-of-the-art, high-performance database engine.

Access to the SQLite database engine is through the REALSQLDatabase class. The REALDatabase class still exists for backward compatibility, but it has been deprecated, and REAL Software suggests we move to the new database engine as soon as possible. The API for the new REALSQLDatabase class is exactly the same as that of the REALDatabase, so moving code over to the new database should be as easy as finding every occurrence of REALDatabase and replacing it with REALSQLDatabase. It will be necessary to convert any existing databases, however. The REAL SQL Database only understands SQLite databases (and only SQLite 3 databases, if that means anything to you). REAL Software provides a conversion utility on their website to convert databases made with the REAL Database into REAL SQL Databases.

The strength of SQLite is its speed, robustness, and ability to handle a wide range of SQL syntax. If you are looking for a way to have both a local single-user database and a remote multi-user database in the same application, then the REAL SQL Database is definitely worth a look. By taking advantage of REALbasic's Database classes and the database engines that support them, it is possible to talk to several different databases at once in the same application. For example, you could create an application that talked to a MySQL database if it is available, but fell back to a local REAL SQL Database when access to the MySQL database isn't available. For the most part, you could even feed exactly the same SQL to both database engines, making the transition between the two seamless.

New Platform

Before REALbasic 2005 was released, it was possible to run the REALbasic IDE on three platforms: Mac OS Classic, Mac OS X, and Windows. REALbasic 2005 loses one platform, but gains another. The lost platform is Mac OS Classic. While it is still possible to build Classic applications, the REALbasic IDE itself is not supported on that platform. In exchange for Classic, we get Linux. Although it has yet to go final, REAL Software is currently conducting on open beta of the Linux IDE. REAL Software has also announced that the Standard version of the Linux IDE will be free. I have to admit that I'm not as familiar with Linux development as I am with Mac and Windows development, but now that there will be a development IDE that I am already familiar with on Linux, I'm looking forward to adding Linux to the platforms I can support with my software products.

New Release Schedule

As if REALbasic 2005 and all of its exciting new features aren't enough, REAL Software has also announced a new release schedule to go along with it. In the past, new major versions of REALbasic arrived anywhere from six to eighteen months apart from each other. This created a problem for both REAL Software and REALbasic developers. For REAL Software, the problem was that while their engineers were furiously coding the next major release, they were also maintaining the current release. As with all software, REAL Software periodically released maintenance releases of REALbasic in order to provide bug fixes to developers waiting for those fixes. Maintenance releases would contain bug fixes, and occasionally minor features, but never the big new features that were being prepared for the major release. Sometimes a particular bug fix was too risky to ship in a maintenance release, so it, and the developers waiting for it, had to wait for the major release.

REAL Software's new release schedule is based on a rapid release model in which a new version of REALbasic will ship at least every 90 days. New releases will included both bug fixes and new features. With this new rapid release model, there will no longer be a need to maintain one release of REALbasic while working on the next release. Upcoming releases are always both the maintenance release for the current version, as well as the next major release with new features.

With the new rapid release model comes a new way to buy REALbasic. Instead of paying to upgrade REALbasic at every major release, developers will pay once for all the updates in a given period of time. New licenses include six months of updates. Upgraded and renewed licenses include twelve months of updates.

Conclusion

As you can see, there is plenty that is new in REALbasic 2005. The big change, of course, is the new REALbasic IDE, but almost every aspect of REALbasic has something new to explore. If you haven't yet given REALbasic a try, you should. REALbasic has always been a good tool for developers to have in their toolbox. With REALbasic 2005, that tool got even better.


Will Leshner is a full-time software engineer who has also been developing software with REALbasic for over five years. He writes the From Scratch column in REALbasic Developer, and he also has a weblog devoted to REALbasic, which can be found at http://rbgazette.com.

 
AAPL
$109.41
Apple Inc.
+2.67
MSFT
$45.74
Microsoft Corpora
+0.58
GOOG
$504.89
Google Inc.
+9.50

MacTech Search:
Community Search:

Software Updates via MacUpdate

Command-C 1.1.7 - Clipboard sharing tool...
Command-C is a revolutionary app which makes easy to share your clipboard between iOS and OS X using your local WiFi network, even if the app is not currently opened. Copy anything (text, pictures,... Read more
Tidy Up 4.0.2 - Find duplicate files and...
Tidy Up is a complete duplicate finder and disk-tidiness utility. With Tidy Up you can search for duplicate files and packages by the owner application, content, type, creator, extension, time... Read more
Typinator 6.3 - Speedy and reliable text...
Typinator turbo-charges your typing productivity. Type a little. Typinator does the rest. We've all faced projects that require repetitive typing tasks. With Typinator, you can store commonly used... Read more
GraphicConverter 9.5 - Graphics editor w...
GraphicConverter is an all-purpose image-editing program that can import 200 different graphic-based formats, edit the image, and export it to any of 80 available file formats. The high-end editing... Read more
Toast Titanium 12.0.1 - The ultimate med...
Toast Titanium goes way beyond the very basic burning in the Mac OS and iLife software, and sets the standard for burning CDs, DVDs, and now Blu-ray discs on the Mac. Create superior sounding audio... Read more
QuickBooks 2015 16.0.2.1422 R3 - Financi...
Save 20% on QuickBooks Pro for Mac today through this special discount link QuickBooks Pro 2013 helps you manage your business easily and efficiently. Organize your finances all in one place, track... Read more
Remotix 3.0.6 - Access all your computer...
Remotix is a fast and powerful application to easily access multiple Macs (and PCs) from your own Mac. Features: Complete Apple Screen Sharing support - including Mac OS X login, clipboard... Read more
BetterZip Quick Look Generator 1.5 - Let...
BetterZip Quick Look Generator lets you view the contents of compressed archives through OS X's Quick Look functions. Simply select an archive in the Finder, in Mail, or Spotlight and press the... Read more
Sandvox 2.9.3 - Easily build eye-catchin...
Sandvox is for Mac users who want to create a professional looking website quickly and easily. With Sandvox, you don't need to be a Web genius to build a stylish, feature-rich, standards-compliant... Read more
Pixelmator 3.3.1 - Powerful layer-based...
Pixelmator is a beautifully designed, easy-to-use, fast, and powerful image editor for OS X. It has everything you need to create, edit, and enhance your images. Pixelmator is a layer-based image... Read more

Latest Forum Discussions

See All

Pentaction: Medieval (Games)
Pentaction: Medieval 1.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $1.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: Pentaction: Medieval is a turn-based strategy board-game about chance and skill on the battlefield. Take control of your... | Read more »
Hipstify Review
Hipstify Review By Jennifer Allen on December 17th, 2014 Our Rating: :: COOL FILTERSUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad Add filters, quotes, and fancy frames to your images, thanks to Hipstify.   | Read more »
Mighty Smighties Gets Evolve Cards and N...
Mighty Smighties Gets Evolve Cards and New Worlds Posted by Jessica Fisher on December 17th, 2014 [ permalink ] Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad | Read more »
Duckie Deck Card Wars Review
Duckie Deck Card Wars Review By Amy Solomon on December 17th, 2014 Our Rating: :: STYLISH GAME OF CARDSUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad Duckie Deck Card Wars adapts the classic card game War for use on devices, complete... | Read more »
PDF Office Review
PDF Office Review By Jennifer Allen on December 17th, 2014 Our Rating: :: CONVENIENT PDF EDITINGiPad Only App - Designed for the iPad Want to create your own PDF files? Import them from elsewhere? Adapt a web page into a PDF? PDF... | Read more »
The Out There: Ω Edition Update will be...
The Out There: Ω Edition Update will be Releasing in 2015, Bringing Better Graphics and Additional Content Posted by Jessica Fisher on December 17th, 2014 [ permalink ] | Read more »
Pinball Planet Pro (Games)
Pinball Planet Pro 1.02 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $2.99, Version: 1.02 (iTunes) Description: - Our missionWe've always loved to play pinball games but we noticed most modern pinball games are simulators for the... | Read more »
Ultrakam 4k. The Professional Camera App...
Ultrakam 4k. The Professional Camera App. 3.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Photography Price: $9.99, Version: 3.0 (iTunes) Description: In March 2014, Ultrakam brought Film Resolution for iPhone for the first time ever and now is... | Read more »
Email+ (Business)
Email+ 1.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Business Price: $2.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: Send email, fast! | Read more »
Mayor it up in SimCity BuildIt, Out Now
Mayor it up in SimCity BuildIt, Out Now Posted by Jessica Fisher on December 16th, 2014 [ permalink ] Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

Holiday sales continue: MacBook Pros for up t...
 B&H Photo has new MacBook Pros on sale for up to $300 off MSRP as part of their Holiday pricing. Shipping is free, and B&H charges NY sales tax only: - 15″ 2.2GHz Retina MacBook Pro: $1699... Read more
Google Search App For iOS Gets A Major Makeov...
Google has given iOS users an early Christmas present with a substantial update of it’s not-very-often-upgraded Google Search app. Google Search has been my go-to tool for Web searches since it was... Read more
ShopKeep Apple Pay And Chip Card Reader Avail...
ShopKeep, a cloud-based technology provider to more than 10,000 small business owners to manage retail shops and restaurants with iPads, has released its new Apple Pay and chip card reader. This... Read more
Holiday sale! 27-inch 5K iMac for $2299, save...
 B&H Photo has the 27″ 3.5GHz 5K iMac in stock today and on sale for $2299 including free shipping plus NY sales tax only. Their price is $200 off MSRP, and it’s the lowest price available for... Read more
Holiday Sale! 3.7GHz Quad Core Mac Pro availa...
 B&H Photo has the 3.7GHz Quad Core Mac Pro on sale for $2599 including free shipping plus NY sales tax only. Their price is $400 off MSRP, and it’s the lowest price for this model from any... Read more
iPhone 6 Number 3 Canadian Google Search Of 2...
CTVNews.ca reports that Apple’s iPhone 6 was the third highest-trending Google Canada search topic of 2014, exceeded only by Robin Williams largely after his death by suicide in August, and the FIFA... Read more
New iPad mini 3 Counter-Top & Wall Mount...
newMacgadgets has announced new secure all-acrylic displays for the iPad mini 3 (also works fine with the mini 2, last year’s iPad mini With Retina Display, and the original iPad mini). The new iPad... Read more
Holiday sales continue, MacBook Airs for up t...
B&H Photo has 2014 MacBook Airs on sale for up to $120 off MSRP, for a limited time, for the Thanksgiving/Christmas Holiday shopping season. Shipping is free, and B&H charges NY sales tax... Read more
B&H lowers price on 27-inch 3.2GHz iMac t...
B&H Photo has lowered their price on the 27″ 3.2GHz iMac, now on sale for $1629 including free shipping plus NY sales tax only. Their price is $170 off MSRP, and it’s the lowest price for this... Read more
15-inch 2.0GHz Retina MacBook Pro available f...
B&H Photo has lowered their price on leftover 2013 15″ 2.0GHz Retina MacBook Pros to $1499 including free shipping plus NY sales tax only. Their price is $500 off original MSRP. Read more

Jobs Board

*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions (US) - A...
Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, you're also the Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions (US) - A...
Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, you're also the Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions (US) - A...
Job Description: Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions (US) - A...
Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, you're also the Read more
Project Manager / Business Analyst, WW *Appl...
…a senior project manager / business analyst to work within our Worldwide Apple Fulfillment Operations and the Business Process Re-engineering team. This role will work Read more
All contents are Copyright 1984-2011 by Xplain Corporation. All rights reserved. Theme designed by Icreon.