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Children of the Revolution

Volume Number: 19 (2003)
Issue Number: 10
Column Tag: Programming

QuickTime Toolkit

Children of the Revolution

by Tim Monroe

Editing QuickTime Movies with Revolution

Introduction

In the previous QuickTime Toolkit article ("Revolution" in MacTech, September 2003), we took a first look at Revolution, a rapid application development tool published by Runtime Revolution Ltd. We saw how to create a new application -- which we called RunRevVeez -- that can open and display QuickTime movies. We saw how to set things up so that the user can have several movies open at once, and we saw how to use a few of the built-in Revolution commands to modify the appearance of a movie player object at runtime. In terms of movie playback, RunRevVeez is just about complete.

The situation with movie editing is somewhat different, however. As I mentioned last time, Revolution has no built-in support for editing QuickTime movies. In addition (as far as I can tell), it provides no support for tracking changes to a window or document, and it provides no way to save an edited movie. We'd certainly like our application to be able to handle these tasks, so we'll have to go beyond the built-in capabilities of Revolution. We need to write a Revolution plug-in.

Happily, Runtime Revolution provides a software development kit (SDK) for writing Revolution plug-ins, and this makes writing our plug-in a snap. With just a few dozen lines of new C code and a handful of routines borrowed from our existing C-based sample application QTShell, we'll be able to handle all the basic editing operations, keep track of the modification state of a movie window, and save edited movies into new files.

Unhappily, even with this plug-in, there are a few things we won't be able to accomplish with Revolution. The Revolution runtime engine opens QuickTime movie files with read-only permission, which effectively prevents us from saving any changes to a movie into the file we opened the movie from. We will be able to write an edited movie into a new file. (In a nutshell, we'll be able to implement the "Save As" menu item but not the Save menu item.) Also, the Revolution runtime engine installs a movie controller action filter procedure, which effectively prevents us from installing our own procedure. This restricts our ability to access many important QuickTime capabilities. (You may recall that REALbasic currently has this same limitation; see "Basic Instinct" in MacTech, February, 2003.)

In this article, we'll continue our development of RunRevVeez. We'll implement the editing operations on a movie, which requires us to develop a plug-in and then to call the plug-in from within our scripts. We'll look at the file-handling operations (principally, "Save As" and Close) in the next article.

One final note before we begin: Runtime Revolution has recently released Revolution version 2.1. In these articles, I've used version 2.0.2. I would assume that the plug-in and Revolution project will work unchanged under 2.1, but I have not actually verified that.

Revolution Plug-Ins

The Revolution runtime engine is based largely on an existing product called MetaCard, which was introduced in 1990 as a competitor to Apple's HyperCard. Not surprisingly, the plug-in architecture used by MetaCard, and hence Revolution, is identical to that introduced by HyperCard. HyperCard can be extended by adding modules of commands and functions called externals. A set of external commands is called an XCMD and a set of external functions is called an XFCN.

Originally, XCMDs and XFCNs were packaged as executable code resources that were added to the resource fork of the application or to the resource fork of a stack. MetaCard and Revolution followed this example through Revolution version 1.1.1. In version 2.0 and later, the packaging of externals was changed; in current versions, externals on Mac OS X are packaged as bundles, which can be copied into the application bundle.

The packaging actually doesn't really matter all that much, since it will be taken care of by the project files provided with the plug-in SDK. The current SDK provides project files for both CodeWarrior and Project Builder. In this article, we'll work with the Project Builder version, whose project window is shown in Figure 1. (Notice that I've renamed the project as "QTExternal".) We'll need to modify only one file here, external.c. The file XCmdGlue.c contains a number of support routines for the external; we won't need to call any of those routines.


Figure 1: The Project Builder project

Connecting to the Runtime Engine

Our Revolution external will define a number of procedures and functions that can be called by RunRevVeez scripts. To expose those routines to the runtime engine, we need to declare two global variables, Xname and Xtable. The Xname variable specifies the name of the external:

char   Xname[] = "QuickTime Revolution External";

The Xtable variable contains an array of procedure specifiers. Each entry in the array specifies information about a single external function or command. Here's our array:

Xternal Xtable[] = {
   {"mcInitialize", XCOMMAND, 0, XCMD_MCInitialize, 
                                                            XCMD_Abort},
   {"mcUndo", XFUNCTION, 0, XCMD_MCUndo, XCMD_Abort},
   {"mcCut", XFUNCTION, 0, XCMD_MCCut, XCMD_Abort},
   {"mcCopy", XCOMMAND, 0, XCMD_MCCopy, XCMD_Abort},
   {"mcPaste", XFUNCTION, 0, XCMD_MCPaste, XCMD_Abort},
   {"mcClear", XFUNCTION, 0, XCMD_MCClear, XCMD_Abort},
   {"selectAll", XCOMMAND, 0, XCMD_SelectAll, XCMD_Abort},
   {"selectNone", XCOMMAND, 0, XCMD_SelectNone, 
                                                            XCMD_Abort},
   
   {"mcEnableEditMenuItem", XFUNCTION, 0, 
                           XCMD_MCEnableEditMenuItem, XCMD_Abort},
   
   {"windowSetModified", XFUNCTION, 0, 
                        XCMD_SetWindowModified, XCMD_Abort},
   {"saveAs", XFUNCTION, 0, XCMD_SaveAs, XCMD_Abort},
   {"", XNONE, 0, NULL, NULL}
};

The first item in a procedure specifier is the name of the routine that we'll use in our scripts. The second item indicates the type of routine; it's XCOMMAND for commands (which do not return a value to the caller) and XFUNCTION for functions (which do return a value to the caller). The third entry is used by the runtime engine and should be set to 0 by our external. The fourth entry is the name of the corresponding C language routine in the external. (In other words, it's the routine that is called when our script executes the first item.) Finally, the fifth item is the name of an abort routine, which is called when the user cancels the execution of an external routine. All our external routines will use the same abort routine, shown in Listing 1.

Listing 1: Handling user cancellations

XCMD_Abort
void XCMD_Abort()
{
   DebugStr("\pQuickTime Revolution External abort");
}

Our abort routine just prints a diagnostic message on the standard error output.

Handling Commands

When a script calls the mcInitialize command (for instance), the external function XCMD_MCInitialize is executed; XCMD_MCInitialize has this declaration:

void XCMD_MCInitialize (char *args[], int nargs, 
            char **retstring, Bool *pass, Bool *error);

The first parameter passed to XCMD_MCInitialize is an array of C strings that specifies the parameters that were passed to the mcInitialize command. The second parameter specifies the number of items in that array. We'll call mcInitialize with only one parameter, like this:

put the movieControllerID of player "MoviePlayer" \ 
               of stack newStackName into mc
mcInitialize(mc)

The third parameter, retstring, is a pointer to a C string that contains the results of the external routine. For procedures, this is ignored by the runtime engine; for functions, this string is returned to the script as the command result. The buffer for this string must be allocated by the external and is disposed of by the runtime engine.

The fourth and fifth parameters are used to pass other information back to the runtime engine. The pass parameter indicates whether we want the command (in this case, mcInitialize) to be passed up the message hierarchy after it is executed. In general, we shall return false in this parameter. The error parameter indicates the success or failure of the external routine. Once again, we'll always pass back false, to indicate that no error occurred. (Errors may indeed occur within our external routines, but RunRevVeez will have no capability to work around errors; so there's little point in letting it know that something went wrong.)

Configuring the Movie Controller

So let's see how we can implement the handler for the mcInitialize command. As we've seen, the args parameter will contain a single C string, which is the movie controller identifier encoded as a string. To get a value of type MovieController, we need to convert the string to a long.

mc = (MovieController)atol(args[0]);

Once we've got the movie controller identifier, we can call any QuickTime APIs that operate on a movie controller. In RunRevVeez, we need to enable editing (by calling MCEnableEditing) and enable keyboard event handling (by calling MCDoAction with the mcActionSetKeysEnabled selector). Listing 2 shows our complete handler for the mcInitialize command.

Listing 2: Initializing the movie controller

XCMD_MCInitialize
void XCMD_MCInitialize (char *args[], int nargs, 
            char **retstring, Bool *pass, Bool *error)
{
   MovieController mc = NULL;
   ComponentResult result = noErr;
   char *retstr = NULL;
   
   // initialize the movie controller as desired
   *pass = false;
   *error = false;
   if (nargs == 1) {
      mc = (MovieController)atol(args[0]);
      
      if (mc != NULL) {
         // enable editing
         result = MCEnableEditing(mc, true);
         
         // enable keyboard event handling
         MCDoAction(mc, mcActionSetKeysEnabled, (void *)true);
         
         // disable drag support
         MCDoAction(mc, mcActionSetDragEnabled, 
                                                            (void *)false);
      }
   }
   
   retstr = calloc(1, 2);
   if (retstr != NULL)
      retstr[0] = (result == noErr) ? '0': '1';
    
   *retstring = retstr;
}

As indicated just above, we set both pass and error to false. And we pass back, via retstring, a C string of length 1 that contains either "0" or "1". RunRevVeez ignores that value.

Once we've successfully called mcInitialize, the thumb in the controller bar will change to reflect that editing is enabled (as seen in Figure 2).


Figure 2: A movie window with editing enabled

Handling Edit Operations

So, we've enabled movie controller editing. Now we need to handle the various editing operations. In these cases, we need to pass a value back to the caller, indicating whether the operation completed successfully. That's so RunRevVeez can know to set the movie window as modified and that the movie has changed since last opened or saved. We'll return the string "1" if the edit operation fails and "0" if it succeeds. Listing 3 shows how we'll handle the mcUndo command.

Listing 3: Undoing a movie edit

XCMD_MCUndo
void XCMD_MCUndo (char *args[], int nargs, 
            char **retstring, Bool *pass, Bool *error)
{
   MovieController mc = NULL;
   ComponentResult result = noErr;
   char *retstr = NULL;
   
   *pass = false;
   *error = false;
   if (nargs == 1) {
      mc = (MovieController)atol(args[0]);
      if (mc != NULL)
         result = MCUndo(mc);
   }
   
   retstr = calloc(1, 2);
   if (retstr != NULL)
      retstr[0] = (result == noErr) ? '0': '1';
    
   *retstring = retstr;
}

We simply retrieve the movie controller identifier and call MCUndo. Then we call calloc to allocate a 2-byte buffer, to hold the returned character and the null terminating byte.

The other editing operations are quite similar. Listing 4 shows how we handle the mcCut command, and Listing 5 shows how we handle the mcCopy command. Notice in both cases that we call PutMovieOnScrap to place the cut or copied movie segment onto the scrap.

Listing 4: Cutting a movie selection

XCMD_MCCut
void XCMD_MCCut (char *args[], int nargs, 
            char **retstring, Bool *pass, Bool *error)
{
   MovieController mc = NULL;
   ComponentResult result = noErr;
   Movie editmovie = NULL;
   char *retstr = NULL;
   
   *pass = false;
   *error = false;
   if (nargs == 1) {
      mc = (MovieController)atol(args[0]);
      if (mc != NULL) {
         editmovie = MCCut(mc);
         result = (editmovie != NULL) ? result: invalidMovie;
      }
   }
   
   // place the cut movie segment onto the scrap
   if (editmovie != NULL) {
      PutMovieOnScrap(editmovie, 0L);
      DisposeMovie(editmovie);
   }
   retstr = calloc(1, 2);
   if (retstr != NULL)
      retstr[0] = (result == noErr) ? '0': '1';
      
   *retstring = retstr;
}

Listing 5: Copying a movie selection

XCMD_MCCopy
void XCMD_MCCopy (char *args[], int nargs, 
            char **retstring, Bool *pass, Bool *error)
{
   MovieController mc = NULL;
   ComponentResult result = noErr;
   Movie editmovie = NULL;
   char *retstr = NULL;
   
   *pass = false;
   *error = false;
   if (nargs == 1) {
      mc = (MovieController)atol(args[0]);
   
      if (mc != NULL) {
         editmovie = MCCopy(mc);
         result = (editmovie != NULL) ? result: invalidMovie;
      }
   }
   
   // place the copied movie segment onto the scrap
   if (editmovie != NULL) {
      PutMovieOnScrap(editmovie, 0L);
      DisposeMovie(editmovie);
   }
   retstr = calloc(1, 2);
   if (retstr != NULL)
      retstr[0] = (result == noErr) ? '0': '1';
      
   *retstring = retstr;
}

Implementation of XCMD_MCPaste and XCMD_MCClear is left as an easy exercise for the reader. (The complete code for the QuickTime external is of course contained in the source code accompanying this article.)

Selecting All or None of a Movie

Our Edit menu contains two further items, "Select All" and "Select None", which are once again easy to implement. In earlier articles, we've seen how to handle these items by calling MCDoAction with the mcActionSetSelectionDuration selector. Listing 6 shows how our Revolution external handles the selectAll command, and Listing 7 shows how our Revolution external handles the selectNone command.

Listing 6: Selecting all of a movie

XCMD_SelectAll
void XCMD_SelectAll (char *args[], int nargs, 
            char **retstring, Bool *pass, Bool *error)
{
   MovieController mc = NULL;
   Movie mv = NULL;
   ComponentResult result = noErr;
   TimeRecord tr;
   char *retstr = NULL;
   
   *pass = false;
   *error = false;
   if (nargs == 1) {
      mc = (MovieController)atol(args[0]);
   
      if (mc != NULL) {
         mv = MCGetMovie(mc);
         if (mv) {
            tr.value.hi = 0;
            tr.value.lo = 0;
            tr.base = 0;
            tr.scale = GetMovieTimeScale(mv);   
            result = MCDoAction(mc, 
                              mcActionSetSelectionBegin, &tr);
            
            tr.value.hi = 0;
            tr.value.lo = GetMovieDuration(mv);   
            tr.base = 0;
            tr.scale = GetMovieTimeScale(mv);   
            result = MCDoAction(mc, 
                              mcActionSetSelectionDuration, &tr);
         }
      }
   }
   
   retstr = calloc(1, 2);
   if (retstr != NULL)
      retstr[0] = (result == noErr) ? '0': '1';
      
   *retstring = retstr;
}

Listing 7: Selecting none of a movie

XCMD_SelectNone
void XCMD_SelectNone (char *args[], int nargs, 
            char **retstring, Bool *pass, Bool *error)
{
   MovieController mc = NULL;
   Movie mv = NULL;
   ComponentResult result = noErr;
   TimeRecord tr;
   char *retstr = NULL;
   
   *pass = false;
   *error = false;
   if (nargs == 1) {
      mc = (MovieController)atol(args[0]);
   
      if (mc != NULL) {
         mv = MCGetMovie(mc);
         if (mv) {
            tr.value.hi = 0;
            tr.value.lo = 0;   
            tr.base = 0;
            tr.scale = GetMovieTimeScale(mv);   
            result = MCDoAction(mc, 
                              mcActionSetSelectionDuration, &tr);
         }
      }
   }
   
   retstr = calloc(1, 2);
   if (retstr != NULL)
      retstr[0] = (result == noErr) ? '0': '1';
      
   *retstring = retstr;
}

Enabling and Disabling Edit Menu Items

RunRevVeez needs to enable and disable the Edit menu items according to the edit state of the movie in a movie window. For instance, when a movie is first opened and no edit operations have yet occurred, the Undo item should be disabled. QuickTime provides the MCGetControllerInfo function, which we've used in the past to adjust the states of our edit menu items. We'll use it again here, as shown in Listing 8.

Listing 8: Adjusting the Edit menu

XCMD_MCEnableEditMenuItem
void XCMD_MCEnableEditMenuItem (char *args[], int nargs, 
            char **retstring, Bool *pass, Bool *error)
{
   MovieController mc = NULL;
   ComponentResult result = noErr;
   long mcInfo = 0L;
   short index = 0;
   char *retstr = NULL;
   
   *pass = false;
   *error = false;
   retstr = malloc(2);      // either "0" or "1", plus the terminating null byte
   if (nargs == 2) {
      mc = (MovieController)atol(args[0]);
      index = (short)atoi(args[1]);
      
      if (mc != NULL)
         result = MCGetControllerInfo(mc, &mcInfo);
   }
   
   switch (index) {
      case kUndoItemIndex:
         retstr[0] = mcInfo & mcInfoUndoAvailable ? '1': '0';
         break;
   
      case kCutItemIndex:
         retstr[0] = mcInfo & mcInfoCutAvailable ? '1': '0';
         break;
   
      case kCopyItemIndex:
         retstr[0] = mcInfo & mcInfoCopyAvailable ? '1': '0';
         break;
   
      case kPasteItemIndex:
         retstr[0] = mcInfo & mcInfoPasteAvailable ? '1': '0';
         break;
   
      case kClearItemIndex:
         retstr[0] = mcInfo & mcInfoClearAvailable ? '1': '0';
         break;
   
      case kSelectAllItemIndex:
      case kSelectNoneItemIndex:
         retstr[0] = mcInfo & mcInfoEditingEnabled ? '1': '0';
         break;
         
      default:
         DebugStr("\pGOT AN INDEX WE DIDN'T EXPECT!");
         break;
   }   
   
   // tack on the terminating null byte
   retstr[1] = 0;
    
   *retstring = retstr;
}

Notice that our code here looks for two parameters, which are the movie controller identifier and the index of the menu item we want information about. If, according to MCGetControllerInfo, the menu item with that index should be enabled, XCMD_MCEnableEditMenuItem passes back the string "1"; otherwise it passes back the string "0".

In RunRevVeez, the code that enables or disables the menu items is contained in the script attached to the menu item group (and not to any particular menu or item). That's because, when the user clicks on the menu bar, a mouseDown message is sent to the menu item group. We want to call mcEnableEditMenuItem for each menu item index and adjust the menu item according to the value returned by it.

Listing 9: Adjusting the Edit menu

mouseDown
on mouseDown
   put first line of the openStacks into theTopStack
   put exists(player "MoviePlayer" of stack theTopStack) \
                  into gotPlayer
  
   repeat for each item itemIndex in "1,3,4,5,6,8,9"
      if gotPlayer then
         if mcEnableEditMenuItem(the movieControllerID of \
                  player "MoviePlayer" of stack theTopStack, \
                     itemIndex) is "1" then
            enable menuItem itemIndex of menu "Edit"
         else
            disable menuItem itemIndex of menu "Edit"
         end if
      else
         disable menuItem itemIndex of menu "Edit"
      end if
   end repeat
  
end mouseDown

We also need to adjust the states of the items in the File menu and the Movie menu. We'll postpone our consideration of the File menu to the next article. We can handle the Movie menu as shown in Listing 10.

Listing 10: Adjusting the Movie menu

mouseDown
if gotPlayer then
   enable menuItem kShowBarItemIndex of menu "Movie"
   enable menuItem kHideSpeakerItemIndex of menu "Movie"
else
   disable menuItem kShowBarItemIndex of menu "Movie"
   disable menuItem kHideSpeakerItemIndex of menu "Movie"
end if

Here we use a few constants that we've defined in our message handler:

constant kShowBarItemIndex = 1
constant kHideSpeakerItemIndex = 2
Setting the Window Status

In the Aqua interface, a window's close button contains a dot if the movie in the window has been modified since opened or last saved (compare Figure 3 with Figure 2).


Figure 3: A modified movie window

In earlier QuickTime Toolkit articles, we've seen that we can set the window modification state by calling SetWindowModified. With Revolution, we need to call into our external to do this. Listing 11 shows our definition of the XCMD_SetWindowModified function.

Listing 11: Setting the window modification state

XCMD_SetWindowModified
void XCMD_SetWindowModified (char *args[], int nargs, 
            char **retstring, Bool *pass, Bool *error)
{
   WindowPtr wID = NULL;
   Boolean state;
   OSErr result = noErr;
   char *retstr = NULL;
   *pass = false;
   *error = false;
   if (nargs == 2) {
      wID = (WindowPtr)atol(args[0]);
      state = (Boolean)atoi(args[1]);
      if (wID != NULL)
         result = SetWindowModified(wID, state);
   }
      
   retstr = calloc(1, 2);
   if (retstr != NULL)
      retstr[0] = (result == noErr) ? '0': '1';
      
   *retstring = retstr;
}

This is pretty much like all the external procedures we've seen so far, except that the first parameter here is of type WindowPtr. Our call to windowSetModified looks like this:

get windowSetModified(windowID of stack theTopStack, 1)

A stack's windowID property contains the operating system ID of the window containing the stack; on Mac OS, this ID is a window pointer. (By the way, notice that we invoke the windowSetModified command by passing it as an expression to the get command. The "get expr" command is a shortcut for the expression:

put expr into it

We need to treat windowSetModified as a function, since that's how we declared it. If we had declared it as a command, we would omit the get.)

We also need to keep track of a window's modification state within our scripts in RunRevVeez (so, for instance, we know whether to enable or disable some of the items in the File menu). We could implement yet another function in our external that calls IsWindowModified. Or we can define a custom property associated with the movie window stack that keeps track of this modification state. Let's use a custom property. Open the movie window's property inspector palette and select the "Custom Properties" panel in the pop-up menu. The original panel looks like Figure 4.


Figure 4: The movie window's custom properties (original)

Click the "+" icon to add a new property. Let's call the new property movieChanged. When a movie window is first opened, this property should be set to 0, so set the property contents accordingly. The property inspector palette now looks like Figure 5.


Figure 5: The movie window's custom properties (final)

Once we've done this, we can access the movieChanged property just like we access any of the built-in properties, for example like this:

set the movieChanged of stack theTopStack to true

We'll see some examples of this in the next section.

Movie Editing

We're now finished constructing the movie editing portions of our Revolution plug-in module. It's very easy to put them to work. When the user selects an item in the Edit menu, the menuPick message handler of the Edit menu is called. Listing 12 shows our complete menuPick handler. Notice that we check to make sure that the value returned by the editing operations (for example, mcCut) is the string "0", which indicates that the operation completed successfully.

Listing 12: Handling the Edit menu items

menuPick
on menuPick pWhich
  
   put first line of the openStacks into theTopStack
   if exists(player "MoviePlayer" of stack theTopStack) then
      put the movieControllerID of player "MoviePlayer" of \
                                 stack theTopStack into mc
      put false into changed
    
      switch pWhich
      case "Undo"
         if mcUndo(mc) = "0" then put true into changed
         break
      case "Cut"
         if mcCut(mc) = "0" then put true into changed
         break
      case "Copy"
         mcCopy(mc)
         break
      case "Paste"
         if mcPaste(mc) = "0" then put true into changed
         break
      case "Clear"
         if mcClear(mc) = "0" then put true into changed
         break
      case "Select All"
          selectAll(mc)
         break
      case "Select None"
         selectNone(mc)
         break
      end switch
     
      if changed then
         set the movieChanged of stack theTopStack to true
         get windowSetModified \
                                    (windowID of stack theTopStack, 1)
         sizeStackToMovie the short name of stack theTopStack
      end if
    
  end if
end menuPick

We also call the sizeStackToMovie method if the movie has been edited, since the size of the movie may have changed.

Conclusion

In this article, we've focused mainly on adding the ability to edit movies to our application RunRevVeez. We've seen how to construct a plug-in that allows our Revolution scripts to invoke external code modules. This is the primary avenue by which we can enhance the built-in behaviors and capabilities of Revolution.

We've got a little bit more work to do to get RunRevVeez to operate precisely as desired. We still need to handle the "Save As" and Close menu items in the File menu, and we need to tie up a few remaining loose ends. We'll tackle all that in the next article.

Credits

Thanks are due once again to Kevin Miller and Tuviah Snyder at Runtime Revolution Ltd. Tuviah was especially helpful with the plug-in. And a special thanks is again due to Geoff Canyon of Inspired Logic, LLC.


Tim Monroe is a member of the QuickTime engineering team at Apple. You can contact him at monroe@mactech.com. The views expressed here are not necessarily shared by his employer.

 

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Robot Circus launched Ticket to Earth as part of the App Store's indie games event last week. If you're not quite digging the space operatics Mass Effect: Andromeda is serving up, you'll be pleased to know that there's a surprising alternative on... | Read more »
Leap to victory in Nexx Studios new plat...
You’re always a hop, skip, and a jump away from a fiery death in Temple Jump, a new platformer-cum-endless runner from Nexx Studio. It’s out now on both iOS and Android if you’re an adventurer seeking treasure in a crumbling, pixel-laden temple. | Read more »
Failbetter Games details changes coming...
Sunless Sea, Failbetter Games' dark and gloomy sea explorer, sets sail for the iPad tomorrow. Ahead of the game's launch, Failbetter took to Twitter to discuss what will be different in the mobile version of the game. Many of the changes make... | Read more »
Splish, splash! The Pokémon GO Water Fes...
Niantic is back with a new festival for dedicated Pokémon GO collectors. The Water Festival officially kicks off today at 1 P.M. PDT and runs through March 29. Magikarp, Squirtle, Totodile, and their assorted evolved forms will be appearing at... | Read more »
Death Road to Canada (Games)
Death Road to Canada 1.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $7.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: Get it now at the low launch price! Price will go up a dollar every major update. Update news at the bottom of this... | Read more »
Bean's Quest Beginner's Guide:...
Bean's Quest is a new take on both the classic platformer and the endless runner, and it's free on the App Store for the time being. Instead of running constantly, you can't stop jumping. That adds a surprising new level of challenge to the game... | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

Updated iPad Price Trackers
Scan our Apple iPad (and iPod touch) Price Trackers for the latest information on sales, bundles, and availability on systems from Apple’s authorized internet/catalog resellers. We update the... Read more
12-inch 32GB Space Gray iPad Pro on sale for...
B&H Photo has 12″ Space Gray 32GB WiFi Apple iPad Pros on sale for $50 off MSRP including free shipping. B&H charges sales tax in NY only: - 12″ Space Gray 32GB WiFi iPad Pro: $749 $50 off... Read more
2.6GHz Mac mini on sale for $559, $140 off MS...
Guitar Center has the 2.6GHz Mac mini (MGEN2LL/A) on sale for $559 including free shipping. Their price is $140 off MSRP, and it’s the lowest price available for this model. Read more
SSD Speeder RAM Disk SSD Life Extender App Fo...
Fehraltorf, Switzerland based B-Eng has announced they are making their SSD Speeder app for macOS publicly available for purchase on their website. SSD Speeder is a RAM disk utility that prevents... Read more
iPhone Scores Highest Overall in Smartphone D...
Customer satisfaction is much higher among smartphone owners who use their device to operate other connected home services such as smart thermostats and smart appliances, according to the J.D. Power... Read more
Swipe CRM Free Photo-Centric CRM Sales DEal C...
Swipe CRM LLC has introduced Swipe CRM: Visual Sales 1.0 for iPad, an app for creating, managing, and sharing visually stunning sales deals. Swipe CRM is targeted to small-and-medium creative... Read more
13-inch 2.0GHz Apple MacBook Pros on sale for...
B&H has the non-Touch Bar 13″ 2.0GHz MacBook Pros in stock today and on sale for $150 off MSRP. Shipping is free, and B&H charges NY sales tax only: - 13″ 2.0GHz MacBook Pro Space Gray (... Read more
15-inch Touch Bar MacBook Pros on sale for up...
B&H Photo has the new 2016 15″ Apple Touch Bar MacBook Pros in stock today and on sale for up to $150 off MSRP. Shipping is free, and B&H charges NY sales tax only: - 15″ 2.7GHz Touch Bar... Read more
Apple’s iPhone 6s Tops Best-Selling Smartphon...
In terms of shipments, the iPhone 6s from Apple bested all competitors for sales in 2016, according to new analysis from IHS Markit, a world leader in critical information, analytics and solutions.... Read more
Logitech Rugged Combo Protective iPad Case an...
Logitech has announced its Logitech Rugged Combo, Logitech Rugged Case, and Logitech Add-on Keyboard for Rugged Case for Apple’s new, more affordable $329 9.7-inch iPad, a complete solution designed... Read more

Jobs Board

*Apple* Mobile Master - Best Buy (United Sta...
**492562BR** **Job Title:** Apple Mobile Master **Location Number:** 000853-Jackson-Store **Job Description:** **What does a Best Buy Apple Mobile Master do?** Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions - Apple,...
Job Description: Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, Read more
Fulltime aan de slag als shopmanager in een h...
Ben jij helemaal gek van Apple -producten en vind je het helemaal super om fulltime shopmanager te zijn in een jonge en hippe elektronicazaak? Wil jij werken in Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions - Apple,...
Job Description: Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, Read more
Fulltime aan de slag als shopmanager in een h...
Ben jij helemaal gek van Apple -producten en vind je het helemaal super om fulltime shopmanager te zijn in een jonge en hippe elektronicazaak? Wil jij werken in Read more
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