TweetFollow Us on Twitter

Sep 01 Programming

Volume Number: 17 (2001)
Issue Number: 09
Column Tag: Programming Techniques

The Under-used UserPane

by Spec Bowers

Presenting a Whole Slew of Nifty Controls

Introduction

Could you use a QuickTime control, an MLTE control, an HTML Renderer control, a StoneTable control, a WASTE control, a Color Picker control? They're all here - made out of a UserPane.

Of all the controls Apple has created in recent years, the most flexible is the UserPane. It is also the hardest to use. Most of us probably just write special–purpose code in our update handlers or mouse–down handlers rather than bother with the intricacies of a UserPane.

With a simple wrapper class, the UserPane is very easy to use - and it makes other packages easier to use. We have made UserPane controls for QuickTime, MLTE, HTML Rendering, the Color Picker, the StoneTable list manager replacement, and the WASTE text engine. These packages are easier to use thanks to the UserPane.


Figure 1. Four kinds of UserPane

Wrapping a UserPane control around QuickTime, MLTE, or other packages makes the code easy to reuse and greatly simplifies your event handling code. The QuickTime control is almost as simple as a standard pushbutton; the MLTE control is easier than TextEdit.

Your event loop already has code for HandleControlClick, HandleControlKey, SetKeyboardFocus, Activate/DeactivateControl, Hide/ShowControl, and IdleControls. When you wrap a UserPane control around a package like QuickTime, it automatically responds to your existing control handling code. You can put controls for QuickTime, MLTE, HTML Rendering, etc. in a window, a dialog, inside a tab panel - anywhere you put a standard control - and it just works.

This article:

  • describes the functions of a UserPane;
  • presents a C++ wrapper class that makes it easy to use a UserPane;
  • presents several examples of UserPanes;
  • shows how to handle a UserPane in a window or dialog

UserPane Functions

Apple defines several callback functions for a UserPane control:

  • A DrawProc draws the content of your control. It might be called to draw a part of the control but usually draws the entire control.
  • A HitTestProc returns the part code of the control where the mouse–down occurred. We usually just detect a mouse–down anywhere in the control and return a partcode which represents the entire control.
  • A TrackingProc tracks a control while the user holds down the mouse button.
  • An IdleProc performs idle processing.
  • A KeyDownProc handles keyboard events.
  • An ActivateProc handles activate and deactivate events.
  • A FocusProc handles keyboard focus - e.g. for Set/AdvanceKeyboardFocus.
  • A BackgroundProc sets the background color or pattern for embedded controls.

To install a callback you first create a UPP, then pass it to the control via SetControlData. Later, to prevent a memory leak, you should dispose the UPP. Alternatively, you can adopt a "create once and reuse" protocol. Whatever way you do it, installing a callback is a nuisance. The AMUserPane makes it very simple to install a callback.

The AMUserPane Class

The AMUserPane class provides functions for easily installing callbacks and for disposing of UPPs when the control is discarded, provides some standard callback functions, and provides some utility functions to simplify using a UserPane.

To install a DrawProc, just call "SetDrawProc ()":

//—————
void   AMUserPane::SetDrawProc ()
{
   mDrawUPP = NewControlUserPaneDrawUPP (StaticDrawProc);
   ::SetControlData (mControl,
                kControlNoPart,
                kControlUserPaneDrawProcTag,
                sizeof (mDrawUPP),
                (Ptr)&mDrawUPP);
}
There are similar functions for installing a TrackingProc, KeyDownProc, ActivateProc, etc.
AMUserPane declares data members for each callback function:
   ControlUserPaneDrawUPP            mDrawUPP;
   ControlUserPaneHitTestUPP         mHitTestUPP;
   ControlUserPaneTrackingUPP      mTrackingUPP;
   ControlUserPaneIdleUPP            mIdleUPP;
   ControlUserPaneKeyDownUPP         mKeyDownUPP;
   ControlUserPaneActivateUPP      mActivateUPP;
   ControlUserPaneFocusUPP            mFocusUPP;
   ControlUserPaneBackgroundUPP      mBackgroundUPP;
Its constructor initializes each UPP to nil, and its destructor disposes each (non–nil) UPP:
//—————
AMUserPane::AMUserPane ()
{
   mDrawUPP = nil;
   mHitTestUPP = nil;
   mTrackingUPP = nil;
   mIdleUPP = nil;
   mKeyDownUPP = nil;
   mActivateUPP = nil;
   mFocusUPP = nil;
   mBackgroundUPP = nil;
}

//—————
AMUserPane::~AMUserPane ()
{
   if (mDrawUPP != nil) {
      DisposeControlUserPaneDrawUPP (mDrawUPP);
   }
   if (mHitTestUPP != nil) {
      DisposeControlUserPaneHitTestUPP (mHitTestUPP);
   }
   if (mTrackingUPP != nil) {
      DisposeControlUserPaneTrackingUPP (mTrackingUPP);
   }
   if (mIdleUPP != nil) {
      DisposeControlUserPaneIdleUPP (mIdleUPP);
   }
   if (mKeyDownUPP != nil) {
      DisposeControlUserPaneKeyDownUPP (mKeyDownUPP);
   }
   if (mActivateUPP != nil) {
      DisposeControlUserPaneActivateUPP (mActivateUPP);
   }
   if (mFocusUPP != nil) {
      DisposeControlUserPaneFocusUPP (mFocusUPP);
   }
   if (mBackgroundUPP != nil) {
      DisposeControlUserPaneBackgroundUPP (mBackgroundUPP);
   }
}

Look back at SetDrawProc and you'll see that it installs a callback to a function named "StaticDrawProc". AMUserPane provides a member function, DoDraw, which is overridden in each subclass. The StaticDrawProc is a glue function which dispatches to the particular DoDraw of the subclass - the QuickTime DoDraw, or the MLTE DoDraw, for example. During initialization we store a pointer to a specific instance of AMUserPane in the control's RefCon. In each callback we retrieve the control's RefCon, cast it to an AMUserPane pointer, then call the member function.

//—————
void   AMUserPane::Initialize (
   ControlHandle      inControl)
{
   mControl = inControl;
   ::SetControlReference (mControl, (SInt32)this);
}

//—————
pascal void      AMUserPane::StaticDrawProc (
   ControlHandle   control,
   SInt16               part)
{
   AMUserPane*      pane = (AMUserPane*)::GetControlReference (control);

   pane->DoDraw (part);
}

//—————
void   AMUserPane::DoDraw (
   SInt16      part)
{
   // override in each subclass
}

AMUserPane is a base class; it provides common code for a wide variety of UserPane controls. We have made half a dozen subclasses. Let's take a look at some of them.

A ColorSwatch UserPane

Our simplest UserPane is a wrapper around the Color Picker. It paints the control's rectangle with a color. If the user clicks the UserPane, it invokes the Color Picker, then redraws the rectangle with the selected color. We overrode DoDraw and DoTracking. The Initialize function calls SetDrawProc and SetTrackingProc to install callbacks.

//—————
void   AMColorSwatch::DoDraw (
   SInt16         /* part */ )
{
   RGBColor      saveColor;
   Rect            rect;

   ::GetForeColor (&saveColor);
   ::RGBForeColor (&mSwatchColor);
   GetControlRect (&rect);
   ::PaintRect (&rect);
   ::RGBForeColor (&saveColor);
}

//—————
ControlPartCode      AMColorSwatch::DoTracking (
   Point            startPt,
   ControlActionUPP   actionProc)
{
   ControlPartCode      result = 0;
   Point            dialogPos = {0, 0};
   Str255            prompt = "\p";
   RGBColor         outColor;

   if (::GetColor (dialogPos, prompt, &mSwatchColor, &outColor)) {
      mSwatchColor = outColor;
      DoDraw (0);
      result = 99;   // any non-zero code
   }

   return result;
}

//—————
void   AMColorSwatch::Initialize (
   ControlHandle      inControl)
{
   AMUserPane::Initialize (inControl);

   SetDrawProc ();
   SetTrackingProc ();
}

An HTML Pane - Glitches and Solutions

The HTML pane is only slightly more complex but illustrates two glitches. The first time we put it inside a Tab control it worked pretty well. Clicking a tab results in HideControl/ShowControl of the panels. Each panel is a simple UserPane with embedded controls. When we hide or show a panel, the Control Manager hides or shows any embedded controls, including our custom UserPane controls. (This by the way is one of the advantages of turning QuickTime, MLTE, etc. into UserPane controls - HideControl, ShowControl and other Control Manager functions work the same as with standard controls.)

There was a glitch, though. When we deactivated the window, suddenly one of our hidden UserPane controls drew something. The Control Manager doesn't call the DrawProc of a hidden control but it may call the ActivateProc. We added a simple "IsVisible" call to test for visibility inside any of our callback functions that might draw anything.

//—————
void   AMHTMLPane::DoActivate (
   Boolean      activating)
{
   Rect         cntlRect;

   if (IsVisible ()) {
      if (activating) {
         HRActivate (mHTMLRec);
      } else {
         HRDeactivate (mHTMLRec);
      }
   }
}

This didn't completely solve the problem, however. We saw the HTMLPane's scrollbars even when the pane was hidden. This was because the scrollbars were not properly embedded within the HTML UserPane. The HTML Rendering Lib creates scrollbars on the fly as needed. Those scrollbars end up embedded in the root control. Because they are not embedded in the HTML UserPane they are not hidden/shown along with the pane. Our solution is to look for newly created controls in the root control and embed them in our UserPane control.

Before we call any function that might create other controls we call CountRootControls. Afterwards, we call EmbedNewControls. If there are more controls afterwards than before, those new controls should be embedded in our UserPane, not in the root control.

//—————
UInt16      AMUserPane::CountRootControls ()
{
   UInt16            numControls = 0;
   WindowRef      theWindow;
   ControlRef      root;

   theWindow = GetOwnerWindow ();
   ::GetRootControl (theWindow, &root);
   ::CountSubControls (root, &numControls);

   return numControls;
}

//—————
void   AMUserPane::EmbedNewControls (
   UInt16         inBeforeNum)
{
   WindowRef      theWindow;
   ControlRef      root;
   UInt16            afterNum;
   UInt16            i;
   ControlRef      child;

   theWindow = GetOwnerWindow ();
   ::GetRootControl (theWindow, &root);
   ::CountSubControls (root, &afterNum);
   for (i = afterNum; i > inBeforeNum; i—) {
      ::GetIndexedSubControl (root, i, &child);
      ::EmbedControl (child, mControl);
   }
}

In most of our UserPanes' Initialize functions we call CountNewControls and EmbedNewControls just in case subcontrols are created. The HTMLPane's Initialize is typical. We get a "before" count of root controls, create a new HRReference, then set its bounds to the UserPane control's bounds. We install a DrawProc, TrackingProc, and ActivateProc. Finally, we embed the newly created controls (scrollbars) in the UserPane.

//—————
void   AMHTMLPane::Initialize (
   ControlHandle      inControl)
{
   AMUserPane::Initialize (inControl);

   OSErr         err = noErr;
   UInt16         beforeNum;
   Rect            cntlRect;
   GrafPtr      ownerPort;

   beforeNum = CountRootControls ();

   GetControlRect (&cntlRect);

   ownerPort = (GrafPtr) GetWindowPort (GetOwnerWindow ());
   err = HRNewReference (&mHTMLRec, kHRRendererHTML32Type, ownerPort);

   if (err == noErr) {
      HRSetRenderingRect (mHTMLRec, &cntlRect);
      HRSetDrawBorder (mHTMLRec, true);

      SetDrawProc ();
      SetTrackingProc ();
      SetActivateProc ();
   }

   EmbedNewControls (beforeNum);
}

The HTMLPane was now working well - until we viewed an HTML file that had a frameset. Suddenly, there were two new scrollbars and they were not embedded properly. So we added CountRootControls and EmbedNewControls to the DoDraw function. Other than that, the DoDraw is very simple.

//—————
void   AMHTMLPane::DoDraw (
   SInt16         part)
{
   UInt16         beforeNum;
   Rect            cntlRect;

   beforeNum = CountRootControls ();

   GetControlRect (&cntlRect);
   HRSetRenderingRect (mHTMLRec, &cntlRect);

   RectRgn (mHTMLRgn, &cntlRect),
   HRDraw (mHTMLRec, mHTMLRgn);

   EmbedNewControls (beforeNum);
      // in case last click created new scroll bars
}

The DoTracking function is very simple. About all it does is ask the HTML Rendering library to handle the event. We could have synthesized a mouse–down event from the Start Point but instead we call an external function to get the current event record from our main event–handling code.

//—————
ControlPartCode      AMHTMLPane::DoTracking (
   Point            startPt,
   ControlActionUPP   actionProc)
{
   WindowRef      owner = GetOwnerWindow ();

   ::SetPortWindowPort (owner);
   ::HRIsHREvent (GetCurrentEventRecord ());

   return 99;   // any non-zero code
}

Using a UserPane

Okay, so we have written a UserPane class. How do we use it? That's the easy part. First, create a UserPane control resource. For a window or a dialog, create a CNTL with procID 256 and initial value 318. This value turns on feature bits for SupportsEmbedding, SupportsFocus, WantsIdle, WantsActivate, HandlesTracking, and GetsFocusOnClick. For a dialog, in its DITL resource create an item of type Control and set its ID to the resource ID of the CNTL resource.

Wherever you declare the variables (data members) for your window or dialog, declare an instance of the UserPane class. We find it convenient also to declare a ControlHandle. You'll also have to #include the UserPane class's header.

#include "AMColorSwatch.h"
   ControlHandle   mSwatchHandle;
   AMColorSwatch   mSwatchPane;

When you create a window, get a ControlHandle to the UserPane control, then initialize the instance of the UserPane class.

   mSwatchHandle = ::GetNewControl (CNTL_Swatch, window);
   mSwatchPane.Initialize (mSwatchHandle);

In your window's event handling code for a mouse–down, call the usual FindControl. If the click is in the UserPane control, call the usual TrackControl or HandleControlClick.

   if (whichControl == mSwatchHandle) {
      if (HandleControlClick (mSwatchHandle, where, curEvent.modifiers, nil) != 0) {
      }
   } else if (mSwatchPane.ClickSubControl (whichControl, where)) {
      // ClickedSwatch ();
   }

What is "ClickSubControl"? If the UserPane has any subcontrols, e.g. scrollbars, then FindControl may find that the click was in the scrollbar. ClickSubControl checks to see if the click was in one of the UserPane's subcontrols. If it was, then ClickSubControl passes the click along to the UserPane class's DoTracking method and returns true. If the click was not in a subcontrol, then ClickSubControl returns false.

//—————
Boolean      AMUserPane::ClickSubControl (
   ControlRef      inControl,
   Point            inWhere)
{
   UInt16            numSubs;
   UInt16            i;
   ControlRef      sub;

   ::CountSubControls (mControl, &numSubs);
   for (i = 1; i <= numSubs; i++) {
      ::GetIndexedSubControl (mControl, i, &sub);
      if (inControl == sub) {
         DoTracking (inWhere, nil);
            // treat it as a click in the userPane
         return true;
      }
   }
   return false;
}

The example application doesn't have any UserPanes in a dialog but it's easy to do. After creating the dialog, call GetDialogItemAsControl to get a ControlHandle to the UserPane. Then Initialize the UserPane instance with the control handle. The Control Manager and Dialog Manager will take care of almost everything. You just add a case to your dialog's switch statement.

There is one other piece of code you will have to add if your UserPane has subcontrols. You'll have to add a Filter function because the Dialog Manager doesn't know anything about the subcontrols. The Filter function will have code like this:

      if (mQuickTimePane.FilterSubControls (ioEvent)) {
         *outItemHit = kQuickTimePane;
         return true;
      }

FilterSubControls checks to see if the event is a mouse–down. If it is, then FilterSubControls calls FindWindow and FindControl, then calls ClickSubControl, which we saw earlier.

//—————
// if the event is for one of our subcontrols
// then process it as if it were for us;
// pass back true to tell Dialog Manager
// that event has been processed
//
Boolean      AMUserPane::FilterSubControls (
   EventRecord      *ioEvent)
{
   Boolean         filtered = false;
   UInt16         numControls = 0;
   WindowPtr      whichWindow;
   ControlHandle   whichControl;
   Point         localWhere;
   short         partCode;
   UInt16         i;
   ControlRef      sub;

   ::CountSubControls (mControl, &numControls);
   if (numControls > 0) {
      if ((ioEvent->what == mouseDown)
      && (FindWindow (ioEvent->where, &whichWindow) == inContent)) {
         SetPortWindowPort (whichWindow);
         localWhere = ioEvent->where;
         GlobalToLocal (&localWhere);
         FindControl (localWhere, whichWindow, &whichControl);
         if (ClickSubControl (whichControl, localWhere)) {
            return true;
               // => click was for this userPane
         }
      }
   }
   return filtered;
}

Summary

We've described two of our UserPanes - the Color Picker and the HTML Renderer. The other four UserPanes - for QuickTime, MLTE, StoneTable, and WASTE - are similar. The AMUserPane class, all six UserPane classes, and the example application are available as source code. The controls are useful and easy to use. If you use any of them we would be interested in hearing from you.

A Plug

These UserPane classes are part of the AppMaker library. The example was created using AppMaker, which generated both the resources and the source code. Whether you use AppMaker or you do it by hand, I think you will find that these UserPanes are very useful widgets to have in your toolbox.


Spec Bowers is the founder, cook, and chief bottle washer at Bowers Development. He has been developing programming tools for most of his career. You can contact him at bowersdev@aol.com or see the web page at http://members.aol.com/bowersdev.

 

Community Search:
MacTech Search:

Software Updates via MacUpdate

NetShade 6.3.1 - Browse privately using...
NetShade is an anonymous proxy and VPN app+service for Mac. Unblock your Internet through NetShade's high-speed proxy and VPN servers spanning seven countries. NetShade masks your IP address as you... Read more
Dragon Dictate 4.0.7 - Premium voice-rec...
With Dragon Dictate speech recognition software, you can use your voice to create and edit text or interact with your favorite Mac applications. Far more than just speech-to-text, Dragon Dictate lets... Read more
Persecond 1.0.2 - Timelapse video made e...
Persecond is the easy, fun way to create a beautiful timelapse video. Import an image sequence from any camera, trim the length of your video, adjust the speed and playback direction, and you’re done... Read more
GIMP 2.8.14p2 - Powerful, free image edi...
GIMP is a multi-platform photo manipulation tool. GIMP is an acronym for GNU Image Manipulation Program. The GIMP is suitable for a variety of image manipulation tasks, including photo retouching,... Read more
Sandvox 2.10.2 - Easily build eye-catchi...
Sandvox is for Mac users who want to create a professional looking website quickly and easily. With Sandvox, you don't need to be a Web genius to build a stylish, feature-rich, standards-compliant... Read more
LibreOffice 5.0.1.2 - Free, open-source...
LibreOffice is an office suite (word processor, spreadsheet, presentations, drawing tool) compatible with other major office suites. The Document Foundation is coordinating development and... Read more
f.lux 36.1 - Adjusts the color of your d...
f.lux makes the color of your computer's display adapt to the time of day, warm at night and like sunlight during the day. Ever notice how people texting at night have that eerie blue glow? Or wake... Read more
VirtualBox 5.0.2 - x86 virtualization so...
VirtualBox is a family of powerful x86 virtualization products for enterprise as well as home use. Not only is VirtualBox an extremely feature rich, high performance product for enterprise customers... Read more
File Juicer 4.43 - Extract images, video...
File Juicer is a drag-and-drop can opener and data archaeologist. Its specialty is to find and extract images, video, audio, or text from files which are hard to open in other ways. In computer... Read more
Apple MainStage 3.2 - Live performance t...
MainStage 3 makes it easy to bring to the stage all the same instruments and effects that you love in your recording. Everything from the Sound Library and Smart Controls you're familiar with from... Read more

ReBoard: Revolutionary Keyboard (Utilit...
ReBoard: Revolutionary Keyboard 1.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Utilities Price: $1.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: Do everything within the keyboard without switching apps! If you are in WhatsApp, how do you schedule a... | Read more »
Tiny Empire (Games)
Tiny Empire 1.1.3 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $2.99, Version: 1.1.3 (iTunes) Description: Launch cannonballs and blow tiny orcs into thousands of pieces in this intuitive fantasy-themed puzzle shooter! Embark on an... | Read more »
Astropad Mini (Productivity)
Astropad Mini 1.0 Device: iOS iPhone Category: Productivity Price: $4.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: *** 50% off introductory price! ​*** Get the high-end experience of a Wacom tablet at a fraction of the price with Astropad... | Read more »
Emo Chorus (Music)
Emo Chorus 1.0.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Music Price: $1.99, Version: 1.0.0 (iTunes) Description: Realistic Choir simulator ranging from simple Chorus emulation to full ensemble Choir with 128 members. ### introductory offer... | Read more »
Forest Spirit (Games)
Forest Spirit 1.0.5 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $2.99, Version: 1.0.5 (iTunes) Description: | Read more »
Ski Safari 2 (Games)
Ski Safari 2 1.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $1.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: The world's most fantastical, fun, family-friendly skiing game is back and better than ever! Play as Sven's sister Evana, share... | Read more »
Lara Croft GO (Games)
Lara Croft GO 1.0.47768 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $4.99, Version: 1.0.47768 (iTunes) Description: Lara Croft GO is a turn based puzzle-adventure set in a long-forgotten world. Explore the ruins of an ancient... | Read more »
Whispering Willows (Games)
Whispering Willows 1.23 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $4.99, Version: 1.23 (iTunes) Description: **LAUNCH SALE 50% OFF** - Whispering Willows is on sale for 50% off ($4.99) until September 9th. | Read more »
Calvino Noir (Games)
Calvino Noir 1.1 Device: iOS iPhone Category: Games Price: $3.99, Version: 1.1 (iTunes) Description: The film noir stealth game. Calvino Noir is the exploratory, sneaking adventure through the 1930s European criminal underworld.... | Read more »
Angel Sword (Games)
Angel Sword 1.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $6.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: Prepare to adventure in the most epic full scale multiplayer 3D RPG for mobile! Experience amazing detailed graphics in full HD.... | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

Big Grips Lift Handle For iPad Air and iPad A...
KEM Ventures, Inc. which pioneered the extra-large, super-protective iPad case market with the introduction of Big Grips Frame and Stand in 2011, is launching Big Grips Lift featuring a new super-... Read more
Samsung Launches Galaxy Tab S2, Its Most Powe...
Samsung Electronics America, Inc. has announced the U.S. release of the Galaxy Tab S2, its thinnest, lightest, ultra-fast tablet. Blending form and function, elegant design and multitasking power,... Read more
Tablet Screen Sizes Expanding as iPad Pro App...
Larger screen sizes are gaining favor as the tablet transforms into a productivity device, with shipments growing 185 percent year-over-year in 2015. According to a new Strategy Analytics’ Tablet... Read more
Today Only: Save US$50 on Adobe Elements 13;...
Keep the memories. lose the distractions. Summer’s winding down and it’s time to turn almost perfect shots into picture perfect memories with Elements 13. And get the power to edit both photos and... Read more
1.4GHz Mac mini on sale for $449, save $50
Best Buy has the 1.4GHz Mac mini on sale for $50 off MSRP on their online store. Choose free shipping or free local store pickup (if available). Price for online orders only, in-store price may vary... Read more
12-inch 1.1GHz Gold MacBook on sale for $1149...
B&H Photo has the 12″ 1.1GHz Gold Retina MacBook on sale for $1149.99 including free shipping plus NY sales tax only. Their price is $150 off MSRP, and it’s the lowest price available for this... Read more
27-inch 3.3GHz 5K iMac on sale for $1849, sav...
Best Buy has the 27″ 3.3GHz 5K iMac on sale for $1849.99. Their price is $150 off MSRP, and it’s the lowest price available for this model. Choose free shipping or free local store pickup (if... Read more
Worldwide Tablet Shipments Expected to Declin...
Does Apple badly need a touchscreen convertible/hybrid laptop MacBook? Yes, judging from a new market forecast from the International Data Corporation (IDC) Worldwide Quarterly Tablet Tracker, which... Read more
Continued PC Shipment Shrinkage Expected Thro...
Worldwide PC shipments are expected to fall by -8.7 percent in 2015 and not stabilize until 2017, according to the latest International Data Corporation (IDC) Worldwide Quarterly PC Tracker data. The... Read more
Imminent iPhone 6s Announcement Leads To 103%...
NextWorth Solutions, with its online and in-store electronics trade-in programs including http://NextWorth.com, reports that it has experienced a 103 percent surge in quoted trade-in values over the... Read more

Jobs Board

*Apple* Retail Online Store: Customer Insigh...
**Job Summary** Apple Retail (Online Store) is seeking an experienced e-commerce analytics professional to join the Customer Insights Team. The Web e-Commerce Analyst Read more
*Apple* Music, Business Operations - Apple I...
Changing the world is all in a day039s work at Apple . If you love innovation, here039s your chance to make a career of it. You039ll work hard. But the job comes with Read more
WW *Apple* Retail Online Store: Customer In...
**Job Summary** The Apple Retail - Online Store is seeking an experienced web merchandising analytics professional to join the Customer Insights Team. The Web Read more
Senior Payments Security Manager - *Apple*...
**Job Summary** Apple , Inc. is looking for a highly motivated, innovative and hands-on senior payments security manager to join the Apple Pay security team. You will Read more
Software QA Engineer, *Apple* Pay Security...
**Job Summary** Imagine what you could do here. At Apple , great ideas have a way of becoming great products, services, and customer experiences very quickly. Bring Read more
All contents are Copyright 1984-2011 by Xplain Corporation. All rights reserved. Theme designed by Icreon.