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Feb 96 Challenge
Volume Number:12
Issue Number:2
Column Tag:Programmer’s Challenge

Programmer’s Challenge

By Bob Boonstra, Westford, Massachusetts

Note: Source code files accompanying article are located on MacTech CD-ROM or source code disks.

Intersecting Rectangles

The Challenge this month is to write a routine that will accept a list of rectangles and calculate a result based on the intersections of those rectangles. Specifically, your code will return a list of non-overlapping rectangles that contain all points enclosed by an odd (or even) number of the input rectangles. The prototype for the code you should write is:

void RectangleIntersections(
 const Rect inputRects[], /* list if input rectangles */
 const long numRectsIn,   /* number of inputRects */
 Rect outputRects[], /* preallocated storage for output */
 long *numRectsOut,/* number of outputRects returned */
 const Boolean oddParity  /* see text for explanation */
);

The parameter oddParity indicates whether you are to return rectangles containing points enclosed by an odd number of the numRectsIn inputRects rectangles (oddParity==true) or by an even (nonzero) number of rectangles (oddParity==false). Sufficient storage for the output will be preallocated for you and pointed to by outputRects.

As an example, if you were given these inputRects:

 {0,10,20,30}, {5,15,20,30}

and oddParity were true, you might return the following list of outputRects:

 {0,10,5,15}, {0,15,5,30}, {5,10,15,20}

It would also be correct to return a result that combined the first of these rectangles with either of the other two. If oddParity were false, you would return the following list for the example input:

 {5,15,20,30}

The outputRects must be non-empty and non-overlapping. In the example, it would be incorrect to return the following for the odd parity case:

 {0,10,5,30} {0,10,20,15}

The outputRects you generate must also be maximal, in the sense that each edge of each of the outputRects should pass through a vertex of one of the inputRects. That is, for example, I don’t want you to return a 1¥1 rectangle representing each point enclosed in the desired number of inputRects. Before returning, set *numRectsOut to indicate the number of outputRects you generated.

If you need auxiliary storage, you may allocate any reasonable amount within your code using toolbox routines or malloc, but you must deallocate that storage before returning. (No memory leaks! - I’ll be calling your code many times.)

This native PowerPC Challenge will be scored using the latest Metrowerks compiler, with the winner determined by execution time. If you have any questions, or would like some test data for your code, please send me e-mail at one of the Programmer’s Challenge addresses, or directly to bob_boonstra@mactech.com. Test data will also be sent to the Programmer’s Challenge mailing list, which you can join by sending a message to autoshare@mactech.com with the SUBJECT line “sub challenge YourName”, substituting your real name for YourName.

Two Months Ago Winner

Eight of the 13 solutions submitted for the Find Again And Again Challenge worked correctly. Congratulations to Gustav Larsson (Mountain View, CA) for submitting an entry that was significantly faster than the others. The problem was to write a text search engine optimized to operate repeatedly on the same block of text. A variety of optimization techniques were represented in the solutions, a couple of which are highlighted in the table of results below. Several people optimized for the case where the same word was repeatedly searched for. Some of my tests included this case, and those results are in the columns headed “repeat.” The “random” columns shows results for tests that searched for random occurrences of random words. Each of the tests were run under conditions where only 64KB of auxiliary storage was available, and where much more memory was available. These conditions were weighted 20% and 80% respectively in calculating the total time, since the problem statement promised that ample memory would usually be provided. You can see that Gustav’s solution performed reasonably well when memory was scarce, and very well when memory was plentiful.

Gustav’s solution hashes as many words of the input text as possible in the initialization routine. He uses the Boyer-Moore-Horspool algorithm to find words in any text that was not parsed during initialization. Other features of the approach are described in the well-commented code.

Here are the times and code sizes for entries that passed by tests. Numbers in parentheses after a person’s name indicate that person’s cumulative point total for all previous Challenges, not including this one.

64K Memory >>64K Memory code

Name repeat random repeat random time size

Gustav Larsson (67) 1814 3773 62 111 1255 3584

Tom Saxton 46 16400 197 459 3814 2000

Xan Gregg (81) 27 2907 1316 2835 3907 1664

Kevin Cutts (46) 1760 3234 1760 2809 4654 1600

Joseph Ku 8856 14570 121 509 5189 1584

David Cary 60 22665 499 1000 5745 2124

Eric Lengyel (40) 34 10221 29 4697 5831 1188

Ernst Munter (110) 2036 2053 2287 4603 6330 2976

Top Contestants of All time

Here are the Top Contestants for the Programmer’s Challenges to date, including everyone who has accumulated more than 20 points. The numbers below include points awarded for this month’s entrants.

Rank Name Points Rank Name Points

1. [Name deleted] 176 11. Mallett, Jeff 44

2. Munter, Ernst 110 12. Kasparian, Raffi 42

3. Gregg, Xan 88 13. Vineyard, Jeremy 42

4. Larsson, Gustav 87 14. Lengyel, Eric 40

5. Karsh, Bill 80 15. Darrah, Dave 31

6. Stenger, Allen 65 16. Landry, Larry 29

7. Riha, Stepan 51 17. Elwertowski, Tom 24

8. Cutts, Kevin 50 18. Lee, Johnny 22

9. Goebel, James 49 19. Noll, Robert 22

10. Nepsund, Ronald 47

There are three ways to earn points: (1) scoring in the top 5 of any Challenge, (2) being the first person to find a bug in a published winning solution or, (3) being the first person to suggest a Challenge that I use. The points you can win are:

1st place 20 points 5th place 2 points

2nd place 10 points finding bug 2 points

3rd place 7 points suggesting Challenge 2 points

4th place 4 points

Here is Gustav’s winning solution:

Find Again and Again

Copyright © 1995 Gustav Larsson

Constants & Types
#define ALPHABET_SIZE 256
#define ALLOC_SIZE(n) ((n+3) & -4L) /* next multiple of 4 */
#define HASH_BUCKETS 1024           /* must be power of 2 */
#define HASH_MASK (HASH_BUCKETS - 1)
#define NO_NULL_CHAR 'A'
#define NULL 0

typedef unsigned char  uchar;
typedef unsigned short ushort;
typedef unsigned long  ulong;

typedef struct Word Word;
typedef struct Occurrence Occurrence;
typedef struct Private Private;

/* 
  A block of occurrence positions.  We pack in as many occurrences as possible into 
  a single block, from 3 to 6 depending on textLength.

  The first entry in the block is always used.  The remaining entries are in use if they 
  are not zero.  These facts are used several places to simplify the code.
*/
struct Occurrence {
  Occurrence *next;
  union {
    ushort pos2[6];   /* 2 bytes/occurrence */
    struct {
      ushort lo[4];
      uchar  hi[4];
    } pos3;           /* 3 bytes/occurrence */
    long pos4[3];     /* 4 bytes/occurrence */
  } p;
};

/*
  There is one Word struct for each distinct word.  The word’s length is stored in the 
  top eight bits of the hash value.  There’s no need to store the characters in the word 
  since we can just look at the first occurrence (first entry in Word.first).
*/
struct Word {
  Word        *next;
  ulong       hash;
  Occurrence  *last;
  Occurrence  first;
};

/*
  The structure of our private storage.  The hashCodes[] array serves two purposes: it 
  distinguishes alphanumeric from non-alphanumeric characters, and it provides a 
  non-zero hash code for each alphanumeric character.  The endParsedText field will 
  be -1 if there was enough private memory to parse all the text.  Otherwise, it points to 
  the start of the unparsed text.  nullChar is used by the BMH_Search() function when 
  we must search unparsed text for an occurrence.
*/
struct Private {
  ulong hashCodes [ ALPHABET_SIZE ];
  Word  *hashTable [ HASH_BUCKETS ];
  long  endParsedText;  /* start of parsed text */
  long  posBytes;       /* POS_x_BYTES, below */
  char  nullChar;       /* char not appearing in the text */
  long  heap;           /* start of private heap  */
};

Macros
/*
  These macros simplify access to the occurrence positions stored in an Occurrence 
  struct.  Posbytes is a macro argument that is usually set to private->posBytes.  
  However, you can also use a constant for posbytes, which lets the compiler choose 
  the right case at compile time, producing smaller and faster code.
*/
#define POS_2_BYTES 1   /* word position fits in 2 bytes */
#define POS_3_BYTES 0   /* fits in 3 bytes; usual case */
#define POS_4_BYTES 2   /* fits in 4 bytes */

#define GET_POS(pos,occur,index,posbytes)           \
  {                                                 \
    if ( (posbytes) == POS_3_BYTES )                \
      pos = ((long)(occur)->p.pos3.hi[index] << 16) \
          + (occur)->p.pos3.lo[index];              \
    else if ( (posbytes) == POS_2_BYTES )           \
      pos = (occur)->p.pos2[index];                 \
    else                                            \
      pos = (occur)->p.pos4[index];                 \
  }

#define SET_POS(pos,occur,index,posbytes)       \
  {                                             \
    if ( (posbytes) == POS_3_BYTES )            \
    {                                           \
      (occur)->p.pos3.hi[index] = (pos) >> 16;  \
      (occur)->p.pos3.lo[index] = (pos);        \
    }                                           \
    else if ( (posbytes) == POS_2_BYTES )       \
      (occur)->p.pos2[index] = pos;             \
    else                                        \
      (occur)->p.pos4[index] = pos;             \
  }

InitFind
void InitFind (
  char *textToSearch,
  long textLength,
  void *privateStorage,
  long storageSize
)
{
  Private *private = privateStorage;

  private->endParsedText =
    InitFindBody(
        (uchar *)textToSearch,
        textLength,
        privateStorage,
        (uchar *)privateStorage + storageSize
    );

  if ( private->endParsedText != -1 )
    private->nullChar =
      PickNullChar(
            private,
            (uchar *)textToSearch + private->endParsedText,
            (uchar *)textToSearch + textLength );
  else
    private->nullChar = NO_NULL_CHAR;
}

InitFindBody
/*
  This function does most of the work for InitFind().  The arguments have been recast 
  into a more useful form; uchar and ulong are used a lot so that we don’t have to 
  worry about the sign, especially when indexing private->hashCodes[].

  The return value is the character position when the unparsed text begins (if we run 
  out of private storage), or -1 if all the text was parsed.
*/
static long InitFindBody (
  uchar   *textToSearch,
  long    textLength,
  Private *private,
  uchar   *endPrivateStorage
)
{
  uchar       *alloc, *textPos, *textEnd, *wordStart;
  long        wordLength;
  ulong       hash, code;
  Word        *word;
  Occurrence  *occur;

/*
  Init table of hash codes.  The remaining entries are guaranteed to be initialized to 
  zero.  The hash codes were chosen so that any two codes differ by at least five bits.
  */
  {
    ulong *table = private->hashCodes;  /* reduces typing */

    table['0'] = 0xFFC0;  table['5'] = 0xF492;
    table['1'] = 0xFE07;  table['6'] = 0xF31E;
    table['2'] = 0xF98B;  table['7'] = 0xF2D9;
    table['3'] = 0xF84C;  table['8'] = 0xCF96;
    table['4'] = 0xF555;  table['9'] = 0xCE51;

    table['A'] = 0xC9DD;  table['N'] = 0xA245;
    table['B'] = 0xC81A;  table['O'] = 0x9F0A;
    table['C'] = 0xC503;  table['P'] = 0x9ECD;
    table['D'] = 0xC4C4;  table['Q'] = 0x9941;
    table['E'] = 0xC348;  table['R'] = 0x9886;
    table['F'] = 0xC28F;  table['S'] = 0x959F;
    table['G'] = 0xAF5C;  table['T'] = 0x9458;
    table['H'] = 0xAE9B;  table['U'] = 0x93D4;
    table['I'] = 0xA917;  table['V'] = 0x9213;
    table['J'] = 0xA8D0;  table['W'] = 0x6DD3;
    table['K'] = 0xA5C9;  table['X'] = 0x6C14;
    table['L'] = 0xA40E;  table['Y'] = 0x6B98;
    table['M'] = 0xA382;  table['Z'] = 0x6A5F;

    table['a'] = 0x6746;  table['n'] = 0x3C88;
    table['b'] = 0x6681;  table['o'] = 0x3B04;
    table['c'] = 0x610D;  table['p'] = 0x3AC3;
    table['d'] = 0x60CA;  table['q'] = 0x37DA;
    table['e'] = 0x5D85;  table['r'] = 0x361D;
    table['f'] = 0x5C42;  table['s'] = 0x3191;
    table['g'] = 0x5BCE;  table['t'] = 0x3056;
    table['h'] = 0x5A09;  table['u'] = 0x0D19;
    table['i'] = 0x5710;  table['v'] = 0x0CDE;
    table['j'] = 0x56D7;  table['w'] = 0x0B52;
    table['k'] = 0x515B;  table['x'] = 0x0A95;
    table['l'] = 0x509C;  table['y'] = 0x078C;
    table['m'] = 0x3D4F;  table['z'] = 0x064B;
  }

  /*  Determine the number of bytes needed to store each occurrence position. */
  if ( textLength <= 0x10000L )
    private->posBytes = POS_2_BYTES;
  else if ( textLength <= 0x1000000L )
    private->posBytes = POS_3_BYTES;
  else
    private->posBytes = POS_4_BYTES;

  /* Set up variables to handle allocation of private storage. */
  alloc = (uchar *)&private->heap;

  /* Parse the text */
  textPos = textToSearch;
  textEnd = textPos + textLength;

  while ( textPos != textEnd )
  {
    /* Search for start of word */
    while ( private->hashCodes[*textPos] == 0 )
    {
      textPos++;
      if ( textPos == textEnd )
        return -1;  /* parse all text */
    }
    wordStart = textPos;

    /* Search for end of word; generate hash value too */
    hash = 0;
    while ( textPos != textEnd &&
            (code = private->hashCodes[ *textPos ]) != 0 )
    {
      hash = (hash << 1) ^ code;
      textPos++;
    }
    wordLength = textPos - wordStart;
    hash = (hash & 0xFFFFFF) | (wordLength << 24);

    /*
      Record the occurrence.  First we see if a Word struct exists for this word and 
      whether we need to allocate a new Occurrence struct.
    */
    word = LookupWord(
                private,
                (char *)textToSearch,
                (char *)wordStart,
                wordLength,
                hash );
    if ( word )
    {
      long allocateNewBlock, blockSize, i, pos;

      /*
        This word has occurred before, so it already has a Word struct.  See if there’s 
        room in the last Occurrence block for another entry.  Remember that entry #0 in 
        the Occurrence block is always in use, so we can start checking at entry #1 for a 
        non-zero entry.
      */
      occur = word->last;
      allocateNewBlock = TRUE;
      switch ( private->posBytes )
      {
        case POS_2_BYTES:  blockSize = 6; break;
        case POS_3_BYTES:  blockSize = 4; break;
        case POS_4_BYTES:  blockSize = 3; break;
      }

      for ( i = 1; i < blockSize; i++ )
      {
        GET_POS( pos, occur, i, private->posBytes )
        if ( pos == 0 )
        {
          SET_POS( wordStart - textToSearch, occur, i,
                   private->posBytes )
          allocateNewBlock = FALSE;
          break;
        }
      }

      if ( allocateNewBlock )
      {
        /* Block is full.  Allocate new Occurrence block */
        occur = (Occurrence *) alloc;
        alloc += ALLOC_SIZE( sizeof(Occurrence) );
        if ( alloc >= endPrivateStorage )
          return wordStart-textToSearch; /* out of memory */

        /* Init the new struct and link it to the end of the occurence list. */
        SET_POS( wordStart - textToSearch, occur, 0,
                 private->posBytes )
        word->last->next = occur;
        word->last = occur;
      }
    }
    else
    {
      long i;

/* This is a new word.  Allocate a new Word struct, which contains an Occurrence 
    struct too.  */
      word = (Word *) alloc;
      alloc += ALLOC_SIZE( sizeof(Word) );
      if ( alloc >= endPrivateStorage )
        return wordStart-textToSearch ;  /* out of memory */

      /*  Link it to the start of the Word list, coming off the hash table. */
      word->next = private->hashTable[ hash & HASH_MASK ];
      private->hashTable[ hash & HASH_MASK ] = word;

      /* Init the Word struct */
      word->hash = hash;
      word->last = &word->first;

      /* Init the Occurrence struct */
      SET_POS( wordStart - textToSearch, &word->first, 0,
               private->posBytes )
    }
  }

  /* Finished parsing text */
  return -1;
}

FindWordOccurrence
long FindWordOccurrence (
  char *wordToFind,
  long wordLength,
  long occurrenceToFind,
  char *textToSearch,
  long textLength,
  void *privateStorage,
  long storageSize
)
{
  Private *private = privateStorage;
  Word  *word;
  ulong hash;

  /* Make occurenceToFind zero-based */
  occurrenceToFind--;

  /* Generate hash value for word to find */
  hash = 0;
  {
    long remain = wordLength;
    uchar *p = (uchar *) wordToFind;
    while ( remain > 0 )
    {
      hash = (hash << 1) ^ private->hashCodes[*p++];
      remain--;
    }
    hash = (hash & 0xFFFFFF) | (wordLength << 24);
  }

  /* Look for word/occurrence in hash table */
  word = LookupWord( private, textToSearch, wordToFind,
                     wordLength, hash );
  if ( word )
  {
    Occurrence *occur = &word->first;
    long blockSize, pos, i;

    /* Word exists in hash table, so go down the occurrence list.  */
    switch ( private->posBytes )
    {
      case POS_2_BYTES: blockSize = 6;  break;
      case POS_3_BYTES: blockSize = 4;  break;
      case POS_4_BYTES: blockSize = 3;  break;
    }

    while ( occur && occurrenceToFind >= blockSize )
    {
      occurrenceToFind -= blockSize;
      occur = occur->next;
    }

    if ( occur )
    {
      GET_POS( pos, occur, occurrenceToFind,
               private->posBytes )
      if ( occurrenceToFind == 0 || pos != 0 )
        return pos;
      occurrenceToFind -= blockSize;
    }

    occur = word->last;
    for ( i = 0; i < blockSize; i++ )
    {
      GET_POS( pos, occur, i, private->posBytes )
      if ( pos == 0 )
        occurrenceToFind++;
    }
  }

  /* Not in parsed text, so check the unparsed text */
  if ( private->endParsedText != -1 )
  {
    char *p;
    if ( wordLength > 3 )
      p = BMH_Search(
              private->hashCodes,
              wordToFind,
              wordLength,
              occurrenceToFind,
              textToSearch + private->endParsedText,
              textToSearch + textLength,
              private->nullChar );
    else
      p = SimpleSearch(
              private->hashCodes,
              wordToFind,
              wordLength,
              occurrenceToFind,
              textToSearch + private->endParsedText,
              textToSearch + textLength );
    if (p)
      return (p - textToSearch);
  }

  /* Not found */
  return -1;
}

LookupWord 
/* Look up a word in the hash table */
static Word *LookupWord (
  Private *private,
  char    *textToSearch,
  char    *wordText,
  long    wordLength,
  ulong   hash
)
{
  Word *word = private->hashTable[ hash & HASH_MASK ];
  while ( word )
  {
    if ( word->hash == hash )
    {
      char *w1, *w2;
      long pos, remain = wordLength;

      /*
        The hash values match, so compare characters to make sure it’s the right word.  
        We already know the word length is correct since the length is contained
        in the upper eight bits of the hash value.
      */
      GET_POS( pos, &word->first, 0, private->posBytes )
      w1 = textToSearch + pos;
      w2 = wordText;
      while ( remain-- > 0 && *w1++ == *w2++ )
        ;
      if ( remain == -1 )
        return word;
    }
    word = word->next;
  }
  return NULL;
}

PickNullChar 
/*
  Find a character that doesn’t appear anywhere in the unparsed text.  BMH_Search() is 
  faster if such a character can be found.
*/
static char PickNullChar (
  Private *private,
  uchar   *textStart,
  uchar   *textEnd
)
{
  long i;
  uchar *p, occurs[ ALPHABET_SIZE ];

  for ( i = 0; i < ALPHABET_SIZE; i++ )
    occurs[i] = FALSE;

  for ( p = textStart; p < textEnd; p++ )
    occurs[*p] = TRUE;

  for ( i = 0; i < ALPHABET_SIZE; i++ )
    if ( occurs[i] == FALSE && private->hashCodes[i] == 0 )
      return i;

  return NO_NULL_CHAR;
}

BMH_Search
/*
  Search the unparsed text using the Boyer-Moore-Horspool algorithm.  Ideally a null 
  character is supplied (one that appears in neither the search string nor the text being 
  searched).  This allows the inner loop to be faster.
*/
static char *BMH_Search (
  ulong *hashCodes,       /* private->hashCodes     */
  char  *wordToFind,
  long  wordLength,
  long  occurrenceToFind, /* 0 is first occurrence  */
  char  *textStart,       /* start of unparsed text */
  char  *textEnd,         /* end of unparsed text   */
  char  nullChar          /* private->nullChar      */
)
{
  long  i;
  char  *text, *wordEnd;
  char  word[256];
  long  offset[ ALPHABET_SIZE ];

  /*
    Copy the search string to a private buffer, where
    the first character is the null character.
  */
  word[0] = nullChar;
  for ( i = 0; i < wordLength; i++ )
    word[i+1] = wordToFind[i];

  /* Set up the offset[] lookup table */
  for ( i = 0; i < ALPHABET_SIZE; i++ )
    offset[i] = wordLength;

  for ( i = 1; i < wordLength; i++ )
    offset[ word[i] ] = wordLength - i;

  /* Let the search begin... */
  wordEnd = word + wordLength;
  text = textStart + wordLength - 1;

  if ( nullChar == NO_NULL_CHAR )
  {
    /* No null character, so use a slower inner loop */
    while ( text < textEnd )
    {
      long i;
      char *p, *q;
      for ( i = wordLength, p = wordEnd, q = text;
            i > 0 && *p == *q;
            i--, p--, q-- )
        ;
/*If i == 0, we have found the search string.  Now we make sure that it is delimited.*/
      if ( i == 0 && hashCodes[*q] == 0 &&
           (text+1 == textEnd || hashCodes[text[1]] == 0) )
      {
        if ( occurrenceToFind == 0 )
          return q+1;
        occurrenceToFind--;
      }

      text += offset[*text];
    }
  }
  else
  {
    /* There is a null character (usual case), 
        so we can use a faster and simpler inner loop. */
    while ( text < textEnd )
    {
      char *p, *q;
      for ( p = wordEnd, q = text; *p == *q; p--, q-- )
        ;
      if ( p == word && hashCodes[*q] == 0 &&
           (text+1 == textEnd || hashCodes[text[1]] == 0) )
      {
        if ( occurrenceToFind == 0 )
          return q+1;
        occurrenceToFind--;
      }
      text += offset[*text];
    }
  }
  return NULL;
}

SimpleSearch
/*
  Search the unparsed text using a simple search algorithm.  Note that wordLength 
  must be 1, 2, or 3.  This algorithm runs faster than BMH_Search() for small search 
  strings.
*/
static char *SimpleSearch(
  ulong *hashCodes,       /* private->hashCodes      */
  char  *wordToFind,
  long  wordLength,       /* 1..3                    */
  long  occurrenceToFind, /* 0 is 1st occurrence     */
  char  *textStart,       /* start of unparsed text  */
  char  *textEnd          /* end of all text         */
)
{
  char *text, first;

  first = wordToFind[0];
  text = textStart;

  if ( wordLength == 1 )
  {
    while ( text < textEnd )
    {
      while ( text < textEnd && *text != first )
        text++;
      if ( hashCodes[*(text-1)] == 0 &&
           hashCodes[text[wordLength]] == 0 )
      {
        if ( occurrenceToFind == 0 )
          return text;
        occurrenceToFind--;
      }
    text++;
    }
  }
  else if ( wordLength == 2 )
  {
    while ( text < textEnd )
    {
      while ( text < textEnd && *text != first )
        text++;
      if ( text[1] == wordToFind[1] &&
           hashCodes[*(text-1)] == 0 &&
           hashCodes[text[wordLength]] == 0 )
      {
        if ( occurrenceToFind == 0 )
          return text;
        occurrenceToFind--;
      }
    text++;
    }
  }
  else /* wordLength == 3 */
  {
    while ( text < textEnd )
    {
      while ( text < textEnd && *text != first )
        text++;
      if ( text[1] == wordToFind[1] &&
           text[2] == wordToFind[2] &&
           hashCodes[*(text-1)] == 0 &&
           hashCodes[text[wordLength]] == 0 )
      {
        if ( occurrenceToFind == 0 )
          return text;
        occurrenceToFind--;
      }
    text++;
    }
  }
  return NULL;
}

 

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VOX just sounds better! The beauty is in its simplicity, yet behind the minimal exterior lies a powerful music player with a ton of features and support for all audio formats you should ever need.... Read more
Paparazzi! 1.0b2 - Make user-defined siz...
Paparazzi! is a small utility for OS X that makes screenshots of webpages. This very simple tool takes screenshots of websites which do not fit on one screen. You specify the desired width, minimal... Read more
Carbon Copy Cloner 4.1.13 - Easy-to-use...
Carbon Copy Cloner backups are better than ordinary backups. Suppose the unthinkable happens while you're under deadline to finish a project: your Mac is unresponsive and all you hear is an ominous,... Read more
TrailRunner 3.8.832 - Route planning for...
TrailRunner is the perfect companion for runners, bikers, hikers, and all people wandering under the sky. Plan routes on a geographical map. Import GPS or workout recordings and journalize your... Read more
VueScan 9.5.65 - Scanner software with a...
VueScan is a scanning program that works with most high-quality flatbed and film scanners to produce scans that have excellent color fidelity and color balance. VueScan is easy to use, and has... Read more
Adobe Illustrator CC 2017 21.0.2 - Profe...
Illustrator CC 2017 is available as part of Adobe Creative Cloud for as little as $19.99/month (or $9.99/month if you're a previous Illustrator customer). Adobe Illustrator CC 2017 is the industry... Read more
iDefrag 5.1.7 - Disk defragmentation and...
iDefrag helps defragment and optimize your disk for improved performance. Features include: Supports HFS and HFS+ (Mac OS Extended). Supports case sensitive and journaled filesystems. Supports... Read more
Quicken 4.4.2 - Complete personal financ...
Quicken makes managing your money easier than ever. Whether paying bills, upgrading from Windows, enjoying more reliable downloads, or getting expert product help, Quicken's new and improved features... Read more
iDefrag 5.1.7 - Disk defragmentation and...
iDefrag helps defragment and optimize your disk for improved performance. Features include: Supports HFS and HFS+ (Mac OS Extended). Supports case sensitive and journaled filesystems. Supports... Read more

5 dastardly difficult roguelikes like th...
Edmund McMillen's popular roguelike creation The Binding of Isaac: Rebirth has finally crawled onto mobile devices. It's a grotesque dual-stick shooter that tosses you into an endless, procedurally generated basement as you, the pitiable Isaac,... | Read more »
Last week on PocketGamer
Welcome to a weekly feature looking back on the past seven days of coverage on our sister website, PocketGamer. It’s taken a while for 2017 to really get going, at least when it comes to the world of portable gaming. Thank goodness, then, for... | Read more »
ROME: Total War - Barbarian Invasion set...
To the delight of mobile strategy fans, Feral Interactive released ROME: Total War just a few months ago. Now the game's expansion, Barbarian Invasion is marching onto iPads as a standalone release. [Read more] | Read more »
Yuri (Games)
Yuri 1.0 Device: iOS iPhone Category: Games Price: $3.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: It's night. Yuri opens his eyes. He wakes up in a strange forest.The small, courageous explorer rides on his bed on casters in this... | Read more »
Space schmup Xenoraid launches on the Ap...
10Tons Xenoraid is out today on the App Store, bringing some high-speed space action to your mobile gadgets just in time for the weekend. The company's last premium title, another sci-fi game titled Neon Chrome, did quite well for itself, so... | Read more »
Star Wars: Force Arena Beginner's G...
Star Wars: Force Arena joined the populous ranks of Star Wars games on mobile today. It's a two-lane MOBA starring many familiar faces from George Lucas's famed sci-fi franchise. As with most games of this nature, Force Arena can be a little obtuse... | Read more »
Mysterium: The Board Game (Games)
Mysterium: The Board Game 1.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $6.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: The official adaptation of the famous board game Mysterium! | Read more »
Sonny (Games)
Sonny 1.0.4 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $2.99, Version: 1.0.4 (iTunes) Description: Reimagined for iOS, cult-hit RPG Sonny brings challenging turn-based combat that requires strategy and mastery of each new skill to... | Read more »
Towaga (Games)
Towaga 1.0 Device: iOS iPhone Category: Games Price: $2.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: "It has been foretold that a masked being would stand atop the legendary Towaga Temple, dwelling among shadows to fulfil The Black Moon... | Read more »
Bubble Witch 3 Saga Guide: How to get th...
King's bringing its fairytale bubble-popping puzzler back for its 3rd outing in Bubble Witch 3 Saga. If you're familiar with the series, not much has changed here on the surface level, though you'll likely be pleased with the improvements. If you'... | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

Opera Announces Neon Concept Browser For Mac
Opera is inviting users to get a glimpse of what Opera for computers could become with its Opera Neon browser concept. Each Opera Neon feature is described as “an alternate reality” for the Opera... Read more
Tellini Releases TabView 3.0 Missing Tool fo...
Tellini has announced the release of TabView 3.0. TabView has been the first macOS viewer for PowerTab tablatures. PowerTab is a well-known and widely adopted tablature editor for Windows systems and... Read more
13-inch 1.6GHz/128GB MacBook Air on sale for...
Overstock.com has the 1.6GHz/128GB 13″ MacBook Air on sale for $130 off MSRP including free shipping: - 13″ 1.6GHz/128GB MacBook Air (MMGF2LL/A): $869.99 $130 off MSRP Their price is the lowest... Read more
12-inch 32GB Space Gray iPad Pro on sale for...
B&H Photo has 12″ Space Gray 32GB WiFi Apple iPad Pros on sale for $55 off MSRP including free shipping. B&H charges sales tax in NY only: - 12″ Space Gray 32GB WiFi iPad Pro: $744.44 $55 off... Read more
9-inch 32GB Space Gray iPad Pro on sale for $...
B&H Photo has the 9.7″ 32GB Space Gray Apple iPad Pro on sale for $549 for a limited time. Shipping is free, and B&H charges NY sales tax only. Read more
Apple iMacs on sale for up to $120 off MSRP,...
B&H Photo has 21″ and 27″ Apple iMacs on sale for up to $120 off MSRP, each including free shipping plus NY sales tax only: - 27″ 3.3GHz iMac 5K: $2199 $100 off MSRP - 27″ 3.2GHz/1TB Fusion iMac... Read more
Apple refurbished Apple TVs available for up...
Apple has Certified Refurbished 32GB and 64GB Apple TVs available for up to $30 off the cost of new models. Apple’s standard one-year warranty is included with each model, and shipping is free: -... Read more
1.4GHz Mac mini, refurbished, available for $...
The Apple Store has Apple Certified Refurbished 1.4GHz Mac minis available for $419. Apple’s one-year warranty is included, and shipping is free. Their price is $80 off MSRP, and it’s the lowest... Read more
16GB iPad Air 2, Apple refurbished, available...
Apple has Certified Refurbished 16GB iPad Air 2s available for $319 including free shipping. A standard Apple one-year is included. Their price is $60 off original MSRP for this model. Read more
Mac Pros on sale for $200 off MSRP, refurbish...
B&H Photo has Mac Pros on sale for $200 off MSRP. Shipping is free, and B&H charges sales tax in NY only: - 3.7GHz 4-core Mac Pro: $2799, $200 off MSRP - 3.5GHz 6-core Mac Pro: $3799, $200... Read more

Jobs Board

*Apple* Premier Retailer - Service Technicia...
DescriptionSimply Mac is the largest premier retailer for Apple products and solutions. At Simply Mac we are all Apple , all the time. Same products. Same prices. Read more
*Apple* Premier Retailer - Service Technicia...
DescriptionSimply Mac is the largest premier retailer for Apple products and solutions. At Simply Mac we are all Apple , all the time. Same products. Same prices. Read more
*Apple* Premier Retailer - Service Manager -...
DescriptionSimply Mac is the largest premier retailer for Apple products and solutions. At Simply Mac we are all Apple , all the time. Same products. Same prices. Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions- Crows N...
Job Description: Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, Read more
*Apple* & PC Desktop Support Technician...
Apple & PC Desktop Support Technician job in Los Angeles, CA Introduction: We have immediate job openings for several Desktop Support Technicians with one of our Read more
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