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Feb 96 Challenge
Volume Number:12
Issue Number:2
Column Tag:Programmer’s Challenge

Programmer’s Challenge

By Bob Boonstra, Westford, Massachusetts

Note: Source code files accompanying article are located on MacTech CD-ROM or source code disks.

Intersecting Rectangles

The Challenge this month is to write a routine that will accept a list of rectangles and calculate a result based on the intersections of those rectangles. Specifically, your code will return a list of non-overlapping rectangles that contain all points enclosed by an odd (or even) number of the input rectangles. The prototype for the code you should write is:

void RectangleIntersections(
 const Rect inputRects[], /* list if input rectangles */
 const long numRectsIn,   /* number of inputRects */
 Rect outputRects[], /* preallocated storage for output */
 long *numRectsOut,/* number of outputRects returned */
 const Boolean oddParity  /* see text for explanation */
);

The parameter oddParity indicates whether you are to return rectangles containing points enclosed by an odd number of the numRectsIn inputRects rectangles (oddParity==true) or by an even (nonzero) number of rectangles (oddParity==false). Sufficient storage for the output will be preallocated for you and pointed to by outputRects.

As an example, if you were given these inputRects:

 {0,10,20,30}, {5,15,20,30}

and oddParity were true, you might return the following list of outputRects:

 {0,10,5,15}, {0,15,5,30}, {5,10,15,20}

It would also be correct to return a result that combined the first of these rectangles with either of the other two. If oddParity were false, you would return the following list for the example input:

 {5,15,20,30}

The outputRects must be non-empty and non-overlapping. In the example, it would be incorrect to return the following for the odd parity case:

 {0,10,5,30} {0,10,20,15}

The outputRects you generate must also be maximal, in the sense that each edge of each of the outputRects should pass through a vertex of one of the inputRects. That is, for example, I don’t want you to return a 1¥1 rectangle representing each point enclosed in the desired number of inputRects. Before returning, set *numRectsOut to indicate the number of outputRects you generated.

If you need auxiliary storage, you may allocate any reasonable amount within your code using toolbox routines or malloc, but you must deallocate that storage before returning. (No memory leaks! - I’ll be calling your code many times.)

This native PowerPC Challenge will be scored using the latest Metrowerks compiler, with the winner determined by execution time. If you have any questions, or would like some test data for your code, please send me e-mail at one of the Programmer’s Challenge addresses, or directly to bob_boonstra@mactech.com. Test data will also be sent to the Programmer’s Challenge mailing list, which you can join by sending a message to autoshare@mactech.com with the SUBJECT line “sub challenge YourName”, substituting your real name for YourName.

Two Months Ago Winner

Eight of the 13 solutions submitted for the Find Again And Again Challenge worked correctly. Congratulations to Gustav Larsson (Mountain View, CA) for submitting an entry that was significantly faster than the others. The problem was to write a text search engine optimized to operate repeatedly on the same block of text. A variety of optimization techniques were represented in the solutions, a couple of which are highlighted in the table of results below. Several people optimized for the case where the same word was repeatedly searched for. Some of my tests included this case, and those results are in the columns headed “repeat.” The “random” columns shows results for tests that searched for random occurrences of random words. Each of the tests were run under conditions where only 64KB of auxiliary storage was available, and where much more memory was available. These conditions were weighted 20% and 80% respectively in calculating the total time, since the problem statement promised that ample memory would usually be provided. You can see that Gustav’s solution performed reasonably well when memory was scarce, and very well when memory was plentiful.

Gustav’s solution hashes as many words of the input text as possible in the initialization routine. He uses the Boyer-Moore-Horspool algorithm to find words in any text that was not parsed during initialization. Other features of the approach are described in the well-commented code.

Here are the times and code sizes for entries that passed by tests. Numbers in parentheses after a person’s name indicate that person’s cumulative point total for all previous Challenges, not including this one.

64K Memory >>64K Memory code

Name repeat random repeat random time size

Gustav Larsson (67) 1814 3773 62 111 1255 3584

Tom Saxton 46 16400 197 459 3814 2000

Xan Gregg (81) 27 2907 1316 2835 3907 1664

Kevin Cutts (46) 1760 3234 1760 2809 4654 1600

Joseph Ku 8856 14570 121 509 5189 1584

David Cary 60 22665 499 1000 5745 2124

Eric Lengyel (40) 34 10221 29 4697 5831 1188

Ernst Munter (110) 2036 2053 2287 4603 6330 2976

Top Contestants of All time

Here are the Top Contestants for the Programmer’s Challenges to date, including everyone who has accumulated more than 20 points. The numbers below include points awarded for this month’s entrants.

Rank Name Points Rank Name Points

1. [Name deleted] 176 11. Mallett, Jeff 44

2. Munter, Ernst 110 12. Kasparian, Raffi 42

3. Gregg, Xan 88 13. Vineyard, Jeremy 42

4. Larsson, Gustav 87 14. Lengyel, Eric 40

5. Karsh, Bill 80 15. Darrah, Dave 31

6. Stenger, Allen 65 16. Landry, Larry 29

7. Riha, Stepan 51 17. Elwertowski, Tom 24

8. Cutts, Kevin 50 18. Lee, Johnny 22

9. Goebel, James 49 19. Noll, Robert 22

10. Nepsund, Ronald 47

There are three ways to earn points: (1) scoring in the top 5 of any Challenge, (2) being the first person to find a bug in a published winning solution or, (3) being the first person to suggest a Challenge that I use. The points you can win are:

1st place 20 points 5th place 2 points

2nd place 10 points finding bug 2 points

3rd place 7 points suggesting Challenge 2 points

4th place 4 points

Here is Gustav’s winning solution:

Find Again and Again

Copyright © 1995 Gustav Larsson

Constants & Types
#define ALPHABET_SIZE 256
#define ALLOC_SIZE(n) ((n+3) & -4L) /* next multiple of 4 */
#define HASH_BUCKETS 1024           /* must be power of 2 */
#define HASH_MASK (HASH_BUCKETS - 1)
#define NO_NULL_CHAR 'A'
#define NULL 0

typedef unsigned char  uchar;
typedef unsigned short ushort;
typedef unsigned long  ulong;

typedef struct Word Word;
typedef struct Occurrence Occurrence;
typedef struct Private Private;

/* 
  A block of occurrence positions.  We pack in as many occurrences as possible into 
  a single block, from 3 to 6 depending on textLength.

  The first entry in the block is always used.  The remaining entries are in use if they 
  are not zero.  These facts are used several places to simplify the code.
*/
struct Occurrence {
  Occurrence *next;
  union {
    ushort pos2[6];   /* 2 bytes/occurrence */
    struct {
      ushort lo[4];
      uchar  hi[4];
    } pos3;           /* 3 bytes/occurrence */
    long pos4[3];     /* 4 bytes/occurrence */
  } p;
};

/*
  There is one Word struct for each distinct word.  The word’s length is stored in the 
  top eight bits of the hash value.  There’s no need to store the characters in the word 
  since we can just look at the first occurrence (first entry in Word.first).
*/
struct Word {
  Word        *next;
  ulong       hash;
  Occurrence  *last;
  Occurrence  first;
};

/*
  The structure of our private storage.  The hashCodes[] array serves two purposes: it 
  distinguishes alphanumeric from non-alphanumeric characters, and it provides a 
  non-zero hash code for each alphanumeric character.  The endParsedText field will 
  be -1 if there was enough private memory to parse all the text.  Otherwise, it points to 
  the start of the unparsed text.  nullChar is used by the BMH_Search() function when 
  we must search unparsed text for an occurrence.
*/
struct Private {
  ulong hashCodes [ ALPHABET_SIZE ];
  Word  *hashTable [ HASH_BUCKETS ];
  long  endParsedText;  /* start of parsed text */
  long  posBytes;       /* POS_x_BYTES, below */
  char  nullChar;       /* char not appearing in the text */
  long  heap;           /* start of private heap  */
};

Macros
/*
  These macros simplify access to the occurrence positions stored in an Occurrence 
  struct.  Posbytes is a macro argument that is usually set to private->posBytes.  
  However, you can also use a constant for posbytes, which lets the compiler choose 
  the right case at compile time, producing smaller and faster code.
*/
#define POS_2_BYTES 1   /* word position fits in 2 bytes */
#define POS_3_BYTES 0   /* fits in 3 bytes; usual case */
#define POS_4_BYTES 2   /* fits in 4 bytes */

#define GET_POS(pos,occur,index,posbytes)           \
  {                                                 \
    if ( (posbytes) == POS_3_BYTES )                \
      pos = ((long)(occur)->p.pos3.hi[index] << 16) \
          + (occur)->p.pos3.lo[index];              \
    else if ( (posbytes) == POS_2_BYTES )           \
      pos = (occur)->p.pos2[index];                 \
    else                                            \
      pos = (occur)->p.pos4[index];                 \
  }

#define SET_POS(pos,occur,index,posbytes)       \
  {                                             \
    if ( (posbytes) == POS_3_BYTES )            \
    {                                           \
      (occur)->p.pos3.hi[index] = (pos) >> 16;  \
      (occur)->p.pos3.lo[index] = (pos);        \
    }                                           \
    else if ( (posbytes) == POS_2_BYTES )       \
      (occur)->p.pos2[index] = pos;             \
    else                                        \
      (occur)->p.pos4[index] = pos;             \
  }

InitFind
void InitFind (
  char *textToSearch,
  long textLength,
  void *privateStorage,
  long storageSize
)
{
  Private *private = privateStorage;

  private->endParsedText =
    InitFindBody(
        (uchar *)textToSearch,
        textLength,
        privateStorage,
        (uchar *)privateStorage + storageSize
    );

  if ( private->endParsedText != -1 )
    private->nullChar =
      PickNullChar(
            private,
            (uchar *)textToSearch + private->endParsedText,
            (uchar *)textToSearch + textLength );
  else
    private->nullChar = NO_NULL_CHAR;
}

InitFindBody
/*
  This function does most of the work for InitFind().  The arguments have been recast 
  into a more useful form; uchar and ulong are used a lot so that we don’t have to 
  worry about the sign, especially when indexing private->hashCodes[].

  The return value is the character position when the unparsed text begins (if we run 
  out of private storage), or -1 if all the text was parsed.
*/
static long InitFindBody (
  uchar   *textToSearch,
  long    textLength,
  Private *private,
  uchar   *endPrivateStorage
)
{
  uchar       *alloc, *textPos, *textEnd, *wordStart;
  long        wordLength;
  ulong       hash, code;
  Word        *word;
  Occurrence  *occur;

/*
  Init table of hash codes.  The remaining entries are guaranteed to be initialized to 
  zero.  The hash codes were chosen so that any two codes differ by at least five bits.
  */
  {
    ulong *table = private->hashCodes;  /* reduces typing */

    table['0'] = 0xFFC0;  table['5'] = 0xF492;
    table['1'] = 0xFE07;  table['6'] = 0xF31E;
    table['2'] = 0xF98B;  table['7'] = 0xF2D9;
    table['3'] = 0xF84C;  table['8'] = 0xCF96;
    table['4'] = 0xF555;  table['9'] = 0xCE51;

    table['A'] = 0xC9DD;  table['N'] = 0xA245;
    table['B'] = 0xC81A;  table['O'] = 0x9F0A;
    table['C'] = 0xC503;  table['P'] = 0x9ECD;
    table['D'] = 0xC4C4;  table['Q'] = 0x9941;
    table['E'] = 0xC348;  table['R'] = 0x9886;
    table['F'] = 0xC28F;  table['S'] = 0x959F;
    table['G'] = 0xAF5C;  table['T'] = 0x9458;
    table['H'] = 0xAE9B;  table['U'] = 0x93D4;
    table['I'] = 0xA917;  table['V'] = 0x9213;
    table['J'] = 0xA8D0;  table['W'] = 0x6DD3;
    table['K'] = 0xA5C9;  table['X'] = 0x6C14;
    table['L'] = 0xA40E;  table['Y'] = 0x6B98;
    table['M'] = 0xA382;  table['Z'] = 0x6A5F;

    table['a'] = 0x6746;  table['n'] = 0x3C88;
    table['b'] = 0x6681;  table['o'] = 0x3B04;
    table['c'] = 0x610D;  table['p'] = 0x3AC3;
    table['d'] = 0x60CA;  table['q'] = 0x37DA;
    table['e'] = 0x5D85;  table['r'] = 0x361D;
    table['f'] = 0x5C42;  table['s'] = 0x3191;
    table['g'] = 0x5BCE;  table['t'] = 0x3056;
    table['h'] = 0x5A09;  table['u'] = 0x0D19;
    table['i'] = 0x5710;  table['v'] = 0x0CDE;
    table['j'] = 0x56D7;  table['w'] = 0x0B52;
    table['k'] = 0x515B;  table['x'] = 0x0A95;
    table['l'] = 0x509C;  table['y'] = 0x078C;
    table['m'] = 0x3D4F;  table['z'] = 0x064B;
  }

  /*  Determine the number of bytes needed to store each occurrence position. */
  if ( textLength <= 0x10000L )
    private->posBytes = POS_2_BYTES;
  else if ( textLength <= 0x1000000L )
    private->posBytes = POS_3_BYTES;
  else
    private->posBytes = POS_4_BYTES;

  /* Set up variables to handle allocation of private storage. */
  alloc = (uchar *)&private->heap;

  /* Parse the text */
  textPos = textToSearch;
  textEnd = textPos + textLength;

  while ( textPos != textEnd )
  {
    /* Search for start of word */
    while ( private->hashCodes[*textPos] == 0 )
    {
      textPos++;
      if ( textPos == textEnd )
        return -1;  /* parse all text */
    }
    wordStart = textPos;

    /* Search for end of word; generate hash value too */
    hash = 0;
    while ( textPos != textEnd &&
            (code = private->hashCodes[ *textPos ]) != 0 )
    {
      hash = (hash << 1) ^ code;
      textPos++;
    }
    wordLength = textPos - wordStart;
    hash = (hash & 0xFFFFFF) | (wordLength << 24);

    /*
      Record the occurrence.  First we see if a Word struct exists for this word and 
      whether we need to allocate a new Occurrence struct.
    */
    word = LookupWord(
                private,
                (char *)textToSearch,
                (char *)wordStart,
                wordLength,
                hash );
    if ( word )
    {
      long allocateNewBlock, blockSize, i, pos;

      /*
        This word has occurred before, so it already has a Word struct.  See if there’s 
        room in the last Occurrence block for another entry.  Remember that entry #0 in 
        the Occurrence block is always in use, so we can start checking at entry #1 for a 
        non-zero entry.
      */
      occur = word->last;
      allocateNewBlock = TRUE;
      switch ( private->posBytes )
      {
        case POS_2_BYTES:  blockSize = 6; break;
        case POS_3_BYTES:  blockSize = 4; break;
        case POS_4_BYTES:  blockSize = 3; break;
      }

      for ( i = 1; i < blockSize; i++ )
      {
        GET_POS( pos, occur, i, private->posBytes )
        if ( pos == 0 )
        {
          SET_POS( wordStart - textToSearch, occur, i,
                   private->posBytes )
          allocateNewBlock = FALSE;
          break;
        }
      }

      if ( allocateNewBlock )
      {
        /* Block is full.  Allocate new Occurrence block */
        occur = (Occurrence *) alloc;
        alloc += ALLOC_SIZE( sizeof(Occurrence) );
        if ( alloc >= endPrivateStorage )
          return wordStart-textToSearch; /* out of memory */

        /* Init the new struct and link it to the end of the occurence list. */
        SET_POS( wordStart - textToSearch, occur, 0,
                 private->posBytes )
        word->last->next = occur;
        word->last = occur;
      }
    }
    else
    {
      long i;

/* This is a new word.  Allocate a new Word struct, which contains an Occurrence 
    struct too.  */
      word = (Word *) alloc;
      alloc += ALLOC_SIZE( sizeof(Word) );
      if ( alloc >= endPrivateStorage )
        return wordStart-textToSearch ;  /* out of memory */

      /*  Link it to the start of the Word list, coming off the hash table. */
      word->next = private->hashTable[ hash & HASH_MASK ];
      private->hashTable[ hash & HASH_MASK ] = word;

      /* Init the Word struct */
      word->hash = hash;
      word->last = &word->first;

      /* Init the Occurrence struct */
      SET_POS( wordStart - textToSearch, &word->first, 0,
               private->posBytes )
    }
  }

  /* Finished parsing text */
  return -1;
}

FindWordOccurrence
long FindWordOccurrence (
  char *wordToFind,
  long wordLength,
  long occurrenceToFind,
  char *textToSearch,
  long textLength,
  void *privateStorage,
  long storageSize
)
{
  Private *private = privateStorage;
  Word  *word;
  ulong hash;

  /* Make occurenceToFind zero-based */
  occurrenceToFind--;

  /* Generate hash value for word to find */
  hash = 0;
  {
    long remain = wordLength;
    uchar *p = (uchar *) wordToFind;
    while ( remain > 0 )
    {
      hash = (hash << 1) ^ private->hashCodes[*p++];
      remain--;
    }
    hash = (hash & 0xFFFFFF) | (wordLength << 24);
  }

  /* Look for word/occurrence in hash table */
  word = LookupWord( private, textToSearch, wordToFind,
                     wordLength, hash );
  if ( word )
  {
    Occurrence *occur = &word->first;
    long blockSize, pos, i;

    /* Word exists in hash table, so go down the occurrence list.  */
    switch ( private->posBytes )
    {
      case POS_2_BYTES: blockSize = 6;  break;
      case POS_3_BYTES: blockSize = 4;  break;
      case POS_4_BYTES: blockSize = 3;  break;
    }

    while ( occur && occurrenceToFind >= blockSize )
    {
      occurrenceToFind -= blockSize;
      occur = occur->next;
    }

    if ( occur )
    {
      GET_POS( pos, occur, occurrenceToFind,
               private->posBytes )
      if ( occurrenceToFind == 0 || pos != 0 )
        return pos;
      occurrenceToFind -= blockSize;
    }

    occur = word->last;
    for ( i = 0; i < blockSize; i++ )
    {
      GET_POS( pos, occur, i, private->posBytes )
      if ( pos == 0 )
        occurrenceToFind++;
    }
  }

  /* Not in parsed text, so check the unparsed text */
  if ( private->endParsedText != -1 )
  {
    char *p;
    if ( wordLength > 3 )
      p = BMH_Search(
              private->hashCodes,
              wordToFind,
              wordLength,
              occurrenceToFind,
              textToSearch + private->endParsedText,
              textToSearch + textLength,
              private->nullChar );
    else
      p = SimpleSearch(
              private->hashCodes,
              wordToFind,
              wordLength,
              occurrenceToFind,
              textToSearch + private->endParsedText,
              textToSearch + textLength );
    if (p)
      return (p - textToSearch);
  }

  /* Not found */
  return -1;
}

LookupWord 
/* Look up a word in the hash table */
static Word *LookupWord (
  Private *private,
  char    *textToSearch,
  char    *wordText,
  long    wordLength,
  ulong   hash
)
{
  Word *word = private->hashTable[ hash & HASH_MASK ];
  while ( word )
  {
    if ( word->hash == hash )
    {
      char *w1, *w2;
      long pos, remain = wordLength;

      /*
        The hash values match, so compare characters to make sure it’s the right word.  
        We already know the word length is correct since the length is contained
        in the upper eight bits of the hash value.
      */
      GET_POS( pos, &word->first, 0, private->posBytes )
      w1 = textToSearch + pos;
      w2 = wordText;
      while ( remain-- > 0 && *w1++ == *w2++ )
        ;
      if ( remain == -1 )
        return word;
    }
    word = word->next;
  }
  return NULL;
}

PickNullChar 
/*
  Find a character that doesn’t appear anywhere in the unparsed text.  BMH_Search() is 
  faster if such a character can be found.
*/
static char PickNullChar (
  Private *private,
  uchar   *textStart,
  uchar   *textEnd
)
{
  long i;
  uchar *p, occurs[ ALPHABET_SIZE ];

  for ( i = 0; i < ALPHABET_SIZE; i++ )
    occurs[i] = FALSE;

  for ( p = textStart; p < textEnd; p++ )
    occurs[*p] = TRUE;

  for ( i = 0; i < ALPHABET_SIZE; i++ )
    if ( occurs[i] == FALSE && private->hashCodes[i] == 0 )
      return i;

  return NO_NULL_CHAR;
}

BMH_Search
/*
  Search the unparsed text using the Boyer-Moore-Horspool algorithm.  Ideally a null 
  character is supplied (one that appears in neither the search string nor the text being 
  searched).  This allows the inner loop to be faster.
*/
static char *BMH_Search (
  ulong *hashCodes,       /* private->hashCodes     */
  char  *wordToFind,
  long  wordLength,
  long  occurrenceToFind, /* 0 is first occurrence  */
  char  *textStart,       /* start of unparsed text */
  char  *textEnd,         /* end of unparsed text   */
  char  nullChar          /* private->nullChar      */
)
{
  long  i;
  char  *text, *wordEnd;
  char  word[256];
  long  offset[ ALPHABET_SIZE ];

  /*
    Copy the search string to a private buffer, where
    the first character is the null character.
  */
  word[0] = nullChar;
  for ( i = 0; i < wordLength; i++ )
    word[i+1] = wordToFind[i];

  /* Set up the offset[] lookup table */
  for ( i = 0; i < ALPHABET_SIZE; i++ )
    offset[i] = wordLength;

  for ( i = 1; i < wordLength; i++ )
    offset[ word[i] ] = wordLength - i;

  /* Let the search begin... */
  wordEnd = word + wordLength;
  text = textStart + wordLength - 1;

  if ( nullChar == NO_NULL_CHAR )
  {
    /* No null character, so use a slower inner loop */
    while ( text < textEnd )
    {
      long i;
      char *p, *q;
      for ( i = wordLength, p = wordEnd, q = text;
            i > 0 && *p == *q;
            i--, p--, q-- )
        ;
/*If i == 0, we have found the search string.  Now we make sure that it is delimited.*/
      if ( i == 0 && hashCodes[*q] == 0 &&
           (text+1 == textEnd || hashCodes[text[1]] == 0) )
      {
        if ( occurrenceToFind == 0 )
          return q+1;
        occurrenceToFind--;
      }

      text += offset[*text];
    }
  }
  else
  {
    /* There is a null character (usual case), 
        so we can use a faster and simpler inner loop. */
    while ( text < textEnd )
    {
      char *p, *q;
      for ( p = wordEnd, q = text; *p == *q; p--, q-- )
        ;
      if ( p == word && hashCodes[*q] == 0 &&
           (text+1 == textEnd || hashCodes[text[1]] == 0) )
      {
        if ( occurrenceToFind == 0 )
          return q+1;
        occurrenceToFind--;
      }
      text += offset[*text];
    }
  }
  return NULL;
}

SimpleSearch
/*
  Search the unparsed text using a simple search algorithm.  Note that wordLength 
  must be 1, 2, or 3.  This algorithm runs faster than BMH_Search() for small search 
  strings.
*/
static char *SimpleSearch(
  ulong *hashCodes,       /* private->hashCodes      */
  char  *wordToFind,
  long  wordLength,       /* 1..3                    */
  long  occurrenceToFind, /* 0 is 1st occurrence     */
  char  *textStart,       /* start of unparsed text  */
  char  *textEnd          /* end of all text         */
)
{
  char *text, first;

  first = wordToFind[0];
  text = textStart;

  if ( wordLength == 1 )
  {
    while ( text < textEnd )
    {
      while ( text < textEnd && *text != first )
        text++;
      if ( hashCodes[*(text-1)] == 0 &&
           hashCodes[text[wordLength]] == 0 )
      {
        if ( occurrenceToFind == 0 )
          return text;
        occurrenceToFind--;
      }
    text++;
    }
  }
  else if ( wordLength == 2 )
  {
    while ( text < textEnd )
    {
      while ( text < textEnd && *text != first )
        text++;
      if ( text[1] == wordToFind[1] &&
           hashCodes[*(text-1)] == 0 &&
           hashCodes[text[wordLength]] == 0 )
      {
        if ( occurrenceToFind == 0 )
          return text;
        occurrenceToFind--;
      }
    text++;
    }
  }
  else /* wordLength == 3 */
  {
    while ( text < textEnd )
    {
      while ( text < textEnd && *text != first )
        text++;
      if ( text[1] == wordToFind[1] &&
           text[2] == wordToFind[2] &&
           hashCodes[*(text-1)] == 0 &&
           hashCodes[text[wordLength]] == 0 )
      {
        if ( occurrenceToFind == 0 )
          return text;
        occurrenceToFind--;
      }
    text++;
    }
  }
  return NULL;
}

 
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VueScan 9.4.41 - Scanner software with a...
VueScan is a scanning program that works with most high-quality flatbed and film scanners to produce scans that have excellent color fidelity and color balance. VueScan is easy to use, and has... Read more
Cloud 3.0.0 - File sharing from your men...
Cloud is simple file sharing for the Mac. Drag a file from your Mac to the CloudApp icon in the menubar and we take care of the rest. A link to the file will automatically be copied to your clipboard... Read more
LibreOffice 4.3.1.2 - Free Open Source o...
LibreOffice is an office suite (word processor, spreadsheet, presentations, drawing tool) compatible with other major office suites. The Document Foundation is coordinating development and... Read more
SlingPlayer Plugin 3.3.20.505 - Browser...
SlingPlayer is the screen interface software that works hand-in-hand with the hardware inside the Slingbox to make your TV viewing experience just like that at home. It features an array of... Read more
Get Lyrical 3.8 - Auto-magically adds ly...
Get Lyrical auto-magically add lyrics to songs in iTunes. You can choose either a selection of tracks, or the current track. Or turn on "Active Tagging" to get lyrics for songs as you play them.... Read more
Viber 4.2.2 - Send messages and make cal...
Viber lets you send free messages and make free calls to other Viber users, on any device and network, in any country! Viber syncs your contacts, messages and call history with your mobile device,... Read more
Cocktail 7.6 - General maintenance and o...
Cocktail is a general purpose utility for OS X that lets you clean, repair and optimize your Mac. It is a powerful digital toolset that helps hundreds of thousands of Mac users around the world get... Read more
LaunchBar 6.1 - Powerful file/URL/email...
LaunchBar is an award-winning productivity utility that offers an amazingly intuitive and efficient way to search and access any kind of information stored on your computer or on the Web. It provides... Read more
Maya 2015 - Professional 3D modeling and...
Maya is an award-winning software and powerful, integrated 3D modeling, animation, visual effects, and rendering solution. Because Maya is based on an open architecture, all your work can be scripted... Read more
BBEdit 10.5.12 - Powerful text and HTML...
BBEdit is the leading professional HTML and text editor for the Mac. Specifically crafted in response to the needs of Web authors and software developers, this award-winning product provides a... Read more

Latest Forum Discussions

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Fire in the Hole Review
Fire in the Hole Review By Rob Thomas on August 29th, 2014 Our Rating: :: WALK THE PLANKUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad Seafoam’s Fire in the Hole looks like a bright, 8-bit throwback, but there’s not enough booty to... | Read more »
Dodo Master Review
Dodo Master Review By Jordan Minor on August 29th, 2014 Our Rating: :: NEST EGGiPad Only App - Designed for the iPad Dodo Master is tough but fair, and that’s what makes it a joy to play.   | Read more »
Motorsport Manager Review
Motorsport Manager Review By Lee Hamlet on August 29th, 2014 Our Rating: :: MARVELOUS MANAGEMENTUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad Despite its depth and sense of tactical freedom, Motorsport Manager is one of the most... | Read more »
Motorsport Manager – Beginner Tips, Tric...
The world of Motorsport management can be an unforgiving and merciless one, so to help with some of the stress that comes with running a successful race team, here are a few hints and tips to leave your opponents in the dust. | Read more »
Baseball Battle Review
Baseball Battle Review By Jennifer Allen on August 29th, 2014 Our Rating: :: SIMPLE HITTINGUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad Simple and cute, Baseball Battle is a fairly fun baseball game for those looking for something... | Read more »
Checkmark 2.1 Update Released, and it’s...
Checkmark 2.1 Update Released, and it’s on Sale for a Limited Time Posted by Jessica Fisher on August 29th, 2014 [ permalink ] | Read more »
The Walking Dead Pinball Review
The Walking Dead Pinball Review By Blake Grundman on August 29th, 2014 Our Rating: :: DECISIONS, DECISIONS...Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad Zen Studios is at it again, taking a property that would never seem to work... | Read more »
Stupeflix Has Released a Major Update fo...
Stupeflix Has Released a Major Update for Replay Posted by Jessica Fisher on August 29th, 2014 [ permalink ] iPhone App - Designed for the iPhone, compatible with the iPad | Read more »
ALONE… Review
ALONE… Review By Jennifer Allen on August 29th, 2014 Our Rating: :: MINIMALISTIC AND TOUGHUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad Tough yet satisfying, ALONE… is a challenging endless flyer with some suitably sensitive... | Read more »
Hyperlapse Review
Hyperlapse Review By Jennifer Allen on August 28th, 2014 Our Rating: :: SPEEDY VIDEO SNAPSUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad Want to make a great time-lapse video quickly? Hyperlapse is perfect for that.   | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

13-inch 1.4GHz MacBook Air on sale for $899,...
Adorama has the new 2014 13″ 1.4GHz/128GB MacBook Air on sale for $899.99 including free shipping plus NY & NJ tax only. Their price is $100 off MSRP. Read more
It’s Official: Apple Issues Invitations To Se...
Apple has issued one of its characteristically cryptic press invitations for a special event to be held at the Flint Center for the Performing Arts in hometown Cupertino on Sept. 9, 2014 at 10:00 am... Read more
Tablet Shipments To See First On-year Decline...
TrendForce analyst Caroline Chen notes that when the iPad launched in 2010, it was an instant hit and spurred a tablet PC revolution, with tablets so popular that that notebook PC sales stagnated and... Read more
SOBERLINK Releases Apple iOS Compatible Handh...
Cypress, California based SOBERLINK, Inc., creator of the first handheld Breathalyzer designed to improve recovery outcomes, continues to show prominence in the mobile alcohol monitoring space with... Read more
New 21″ 1.4GHz iMac on sale again for $999, s...
Best Buy has the new 21″ 1.4GHz iMac on sale for $999.99 on their online store. Their price is $100 off MSRP. Choose free shipping or free local store pick up. Price is for online orders only, in-... Read more
Smartphone Outlook Remains Strong for 2014, U...
According to a new mobile phone forecast from the International Data Corporation (IDC) Worldwide Quarterly Mobile Phone Tracker, more than 1.25 billion smartphones will be shipped worldwide in 2014,... Read more
Save up to $60 with Apple refurbished iPod to...
The Apple Store has Apple Certified Refurbished 5th generation iPod touches available starting at $149. Apple’s one-year warranty is included with each model, and shipping is free. Many, but not all... Read more
12-Inch MacBook Air Coming in 4Q14 or 2015 –...
Digitimes’ Aaron Lee and Joseph Tsai report that according to Taiwan-based upstream supply chain insiders, Apple plans to launch a thinner MacBook model either at year end 2014 or in 2015, and that... Read more
Sapphire Screen “Most Wanted” iPhone 6 New Fe...
According to the ‘uSell.com iPhone Most Wanted Survey’ — a representative survey of 1,000 U.S. smartphone users conducted by used iPhone marketplace uSell.com — close to half of all smartphone users... Read more
The iPad’s Real Competitive Challenger (Not S...
It’s been my contention for some time that the iPad is suffering from something of an identity crisis, and I suspect that may be a factor in slackening sales this year. Apple can’t seem to decide... Read more

Jobs Board

*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions (US) - A...
Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, you're also the Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions (US) - A...
Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, you're also the Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions (US) - A...
Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, you're also the Read more
Senior Event Manager, *Apple* Retail Market...
…This senior level position is responsible for leading and imagining the Apple Retail Team's global event strategy. Delivering an overarching brand story; in-store, Read more
*Apple* Solutions Consultant (ASC) - Apple (...
**Job Summary** The ASC is an Apple employee who serves as an Apple brand ambassador and influencer in a Reseller's store. The ASC's role is to grow Apple Read more
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