TweetFollow Us on Twitter

Scrolling Windows PP
Volume Number:11
Issue Number:12
Column Tag:Getting Started

PowerPlant and Scrolling Windows

By Dave Mark, MacTech Magazine Regular Contributing Author

Note: Source code files accompanying article are located on MacTech CD-ROM or source code disks.

Due to popular demand, this month’s column returns to the land of CodeWarrior and PowerPlant. Assuming it’s okay with all of you, I’d like to spend the next few months really getting to know PowerPlant, instead of hopping back and forth between PowerPlant, TCL, and Sprocket. Any dissenting opinions? Let me know! As always, look on page 2 of the magazine to find out how to get in touch with us.

I want to take a moment and thank Greg Dow, the creator of PowerPlant, for all his help. Greg has never been too busy to answer my questions, and spent a lot of time making sure I got it right. If you see Greg at MacWorld or at WWDC, thank him and buy him an Espresso!

Create the PictScroller Project

This month’s program will create windows that look like the one shown in Figure 1. Notice that the window is divided into two areas. The top area contains two buttons. The left button beeps when you click on it. The right button is disabled (we’ll change that in next month’s column). The lower portion of the window contains a PICT, and the scroll bars allow you to scroll the PICT up and down, left and right. The close box, zoom box, and size box each work as expected. The PICT is not scaled, and “sticks” to the upper left corner of the scrolling region. Perhaps the coolest thing about this program is that dragging the thumb forces the window to update dynamically. In other words, the window is constantly redrawn as you drag the thumb, unlike a normal Macintosh window which updates only after the scrollbar’s thumb is released.

Figure 1: A PictScroller window

Let’s get to work.

• Create a folder named PictScroller ƒ on your hard drive, anywhere outside of the CW7 folder.

• Lauch CodeWarrior IDE 1.3. You’ll find it inside the CodeWarrior 7 folder, inside the Metrowerks CodeWarrior subfolder.

• Create a new project file named PictScroller.µ - be sure you use one of the two PowerPlant stationery files when you create the project. Select either PowerPlant 68K.µ or PowerPlant PPC.µ from the Project Stationery popup menu.

• In the project window that appears, double-click on the file name <PP Starter Source>.cp.

This file is located in the stationery folder. Since we’ll eventually modify this file and we don’t want our changes reflected in the project stationery, we’ll save a copy of this file in our working folder.

• Select Save As... from the File menu and save the file as PictScroller.cp in your PictScroller ƒ folder.

Notice that the file name actually changed in the project window, showing that your copy of the file has replaced the stationery file in the project. Our next step is to change the name of the include file associated with this .cp file.

• Towards the top of the file PictScroller.cp, you’ll find an include file named <PP Starter Header>.h. Open this file by selecting the file name and typing AppleD.

• Once the file <PP Starter Header>.h opens, select Save As... from the File menu and save it in your PictScroller ƒ folder under the name PictScroller.h.

• Close the file PictScroller.h.

• Back in PictScroller.cp, change the reference <PP Starter Header>.h in the #include to say PictScroller.h instead.

At this point, all of our source code is disconnected from the stationery files. There is one more stationery dependency left, however, and that is the file <PP Starter Resource>, the default constructor file.

• Back in the project window, double-click on the file named <PP Starter Resource>.rsrc. Though the file contains regular old resources, its creator is MWC2, the creator type associated with Constructor 2.0.

• In Constructor, select Save As... from the File menu, navigate back over to your PictScroller ƒ folder and save the file as PictScroller.rsrc.

• Go back to CodeWarrior and select the file <PP Starter Resource>.rsrc in the project window.

• Select Add Files... from the Project menu and add the file PictScroller.rsrc to the project.

• Once again, select <PP Starter Resource>.rsrc in the project window. This time, select Remove Files from the Project menu to remove the last stationery file from the project.

We have now made our own copy of the three files we’ll be modifying: PictScroller.rsrc, PictScroller.cp, and PictScroller.h. Before we make our changes, let’s take the default project for a spin.

• Select Run from the Project menu.

PowerPlant will now compile all of the source code files (the entire PowerPlant framework) in your project. This took about one minute and 15 seconds on a PowerMac 8100/100. Your mileage may vary.

It is interesting to note that the completely compiled project file takes up about 1.1 meg of hard drive space, as compared with the more than 10 meg consumed by last month’s TCL project. Obviously, Symantec stores a lot more project information than CodeWarrior. Still, a size factor of 10 to 1 is pretty significant. Hey, Rich Parker, do you know why this is?

• Once the project compiles and runs, select Quit from the File menu.

We are now ready to use Constructor to design our custom two-button scrolling window.

• Go back to Constructor. The file PictScroller.rsrc should still be open.

Figure 2 shows the PictScroller.rsrc Constructor window before we start messing with it. Constructor handles three different resource types. Views, by far the most popular type, are what we’ll be working with. Views are Constructor interface elements designed to act as containers for other Constructor elements. You’ll frequently encounter the terms view and pane. All visual Constructor elements are panes. Views are panes that can contain other panes. Don’t get too hung up on the terminology. It really isn’t important.

Figure 2: The PictScroller.rsrc window, before we make our changes

Text traits allow you to embed TextEdit style information inside a resource, rather than specifying it programmatically using QuickDraw calls. Think of text traits as a poor person’s style sheet.

Custom types allow you to create your own custom views, as opposed to the views that are built into Constructor.

The project stationery came with a single view, an LWindow with a resource ID of 1 and a name of <replace me>. This View resource will act as the template for our two-button scrolling window. Let’s start changing it.

• Make sure the LWindow view is selected, then select Resource Info from the Edit menu.

A resource info window will appear (Figure 3). We’ll change the resource name to something a little more meaningful.

Figure 3: The resource info window for the LWindow view

• Change the Resource Name: to PictScroller.

• Close the resource info window.

• Now double-click on the LWindow view. A view editing window will appear (Figure 4).

You should recognize this as the window that appeared when you ran your program before. Notice that this view consists of 2 panes, one representing the window and one representing a static text string that appears in the window.

Figure 4: The “before” picture of our LWindow view

• Click on the static text string and press the Delete key to delete the static text pane from the LWindow view.

• Double-click on the window pane (the one with the number 1 in the upper right corner). A pane info window will appear (Figure 5).

• Click on the Size Box, Resizable, and Zoom Box checkboxes (so all five checkboxes in that area are checked).

• Select Stagger on Main Screen from the Auto Position: popup menu.

• Change the Window Title: to PictScroller.

• Close the info window.

Figure 5: The pane info window for the PictScroller window,
after all the changes were made

• Click on the Tools palette window and drag an LStdButton from the palette into the PictScroller view.

• Double-click on the button that appears. A pane info window for the button will appear (Figure 6).

Figure 6: The pane info for the Beep button,
after all the changes were made

The Binding to Superview: checkboxes let you specify how this pane binds to its enclosure. For example, if we check the Top checkbox, the button will stick to the top of the enclosing view. If the enclosing view is resized, the button won’t move. If the Bottom checkbox were checked instead, the button would move when the enclosing view is resized, sticking a fixed number of pixels from the bottom. Note that if the Top and Bottom checkboxes were both checked, if the enclosing view was resized, the button would scale!

Since the top of our enclosing pane won’t scroll, not checking any of the checkboxes is equivalent to checking both Top and Left.

• Change the Pane ID: to 1000. We can use this ID to retireve a pointer to the button object. We’ll do this in the code later on.

• Change the Button Title: to Beep.

• Change the Value Message: to 1000. As pointed out in the last PowerPlant column, the Text Message check box lets you use 4-letter codes (like 'beep') instead of integers (like 1000).

• Change the Location: fields as follows. Left = 20, Top = 8, Width = 80, and Height = 20.

• Close the button’s info window.

Now let’s do the second button.

• Drag out a second LStdButton from the Tools palette.

• Double-click on the button. The button’s info window will appear.

• In the Binding to Superview: window, click on the Right checkbox. This makes the button stick to the right side of the window when the window is resized.

• Change the Location: fields as follows. Left = 200, Top = 8, Width = 80, and Height = 20.

• Change the Button Title: to Dialog.

• Uncheck the Enabled check box (so the button is dimmed). Note that there is a bug in Constructor: disabled buttons appear with no title text. No big deal. The title appears in grey when you run the program.

• Change the Pane ID to 1001.

• Change the Value Message to 1001. We won’t be tying any code to this button till next month.

• Close the button’s info window.

Now let’s create the scrolling pane that will contain the PICT.

• Drag an LActiveScroller from the palette to the LWindow view window. An LActiveScroller updates dynamically in response to thumb drags. An LScroller updates once the thumb is released.

• Double-click on the LActiveScroller. The LActiveScroller’s info window will appear.

• Change the Location: fields as follows. Left = -1, Top = 36, Width = 302, and Height = 165. Try some different values and you’ll see why I chose these.

• Check all four of the Binding to Superview: checkboxes. We do this so that the pane will stay the same size as the window, even when it resizes. Note that this will not affect the PICT resource that we embed in this view. In other words, just because this view scales doesn’t mean that embedded panes scale.

• Set the Pane ID: to 1002.

• Set the Scrolling View ID: to 1003. Note that this is the ID of the view we want scrolled inside this view. We’ll create view 1003 next.

• Close the LActiveScroller’s info window.

Now we’ll create the pane that will hold the PICT resource.

• Drag an LPicture from the palette inside the LActiveScroller.

Due to a bug in Constructor, you won’t be able to drag the LPicture so it is embedded inside the LActiveScroller. Luckily, there is a different way to make this happen.

• Select Show Hierarchy from the Display menu. The hierarchy window will appear, listing all the views inside the LWindow view.

• In the hierarchy window, click on the LPicture icon and drag it to the right and slightly up. The little black triangle that appears as you drag should point to the lower right corner of the LActiveScroller icon and the line that appears should be below LActiveScroller. Figure 7 shows a before and after picture of the hierarchy change.

Figure 7: The first picture is before
and the second picture is after the hierarchy change,
moving the LPicture within the LActiveScroller

• Close the hierarchy window.

Now we’ll set the LPicture info.

• Double-click on the LPicture. The LPicture’s info window will appear.

• Change the Location: fields as follows. Left = 1, Top = 1, Width = 285, and Height = 148.

• Set the Pane ID: to 1003.

• Set the PICT Resource ID: to 128.

• Check all four of the Binding to Superview: checkboxes. Once you get your program working, try unchecking a few of these to see what happens.

• Check the Reconcile Overhang checkbox. This keeps white space from appearing when you grow the window down. It is usually checked for PICTs, unchecked for text.

• Set the Scroll Unit: values to 1 and 1. This specifies the scrolling resolution.

• Leave the Image Size: values at 0 and 0. This tells Constructor to use the FrameRect of the PICT as the bounding rectangle. Try setting these values as the width and height used in the Location: fields. Combine this with your Binding to Superview experimentation for maximal effect.

• Leave the Scroll Position: values at 0 and 0. These are the initial values of the scroll bars. 0 and 0 will start the PICT off unscrolled.

• Close the LPicture info window.

At this point, the LPicture will be grey. That’s because we haven’t created a PICT resource with an ID of 128. We’ll do that next.

• Quit Constructor, saving your changes when prompted to.

• Go into Resorcerer or ResEdit and open the file PictScroller.rsrc.

• Open up your Scrapbook and copy a picture into the clipboard.

• Back in Resorcerer/ResEdit, paste the picture, creating a new PICT resource.

• Change the PICT resource ID to 128.

• Quit Resorcerer/ResEdit, saving your changes.

• Go back into Constructor, open PictScroller.rsrc and verify that your picture made it into the LPicture (Figure 8).

• Quit Constructor.

Figure 8: The final version of the PictScroller view in Constructor

Modifying the Source Code

Now that we have our Constructor view completely defined, we’ll make a few small code changes to bring it to life. Since our stationery-based program already has the ability to generate a new window tied to the LWindow view with a resource ID of 1, all we have to do is register the LActiveScroller class (you’ll see why in a minute), turn the CPPStarterApp class into an LListener, then add a function that listens for the message generated by the Beep button (and beep when we get that message).

• Back in CodeWarrior, open the file PictScroller.h.

• Change the declaration of the CPPStarterApp class so it is derived from both the LApplication and LListener class. Take a look at the new listing of PictScroller.h that follows the next few commands.

• Add the #include of the file LListener.h.

• Finally, add a new, public member function named ListenToMessage() to the class declaration.

• Close PictScroller.h.

Here’s the new version of PictScroller.h:

// ====================
// <PP Starter Header>.h         ©1994-1995 Metrowerks Inc.
// All rights reserved.
// ====================

#pragma once

#include <LApplication.h>
#include <LListener.h>

class CPPStarterApp : 
 public LApplication, public LListener {

public:

    // constructor registers all PPobs
 CPPStarterApp();
    // stub destructor
 virtual ~CPPStarterApp();
 
    // this overriding function performs application functions
 virtual Boolean ObeyCommand
 (CommandT inCommand, void* ioParam);
 
    // this overriding function returns the status of menu items
 virtual void FindCommandStatus
 (CommandT inCommand,
 Boolean &outEnabled, Boolean &outUsesMark,
 Char16 &outMark, Str255 outName);
 
 virtual void ListenToMessage
 (MessageT inMessage,
 void *ioParam);

protected:

    // overriding startup functions
 virtual voidStartUp();
};

We covered the LListener class 3 columns ago, in our first PowerPlant program. As a reminder, a class that is derived from LListener can receive messages sent to it by other classes. In this case, we’re going to tie a CPPStarterApp object to the Beep button by passing a CPPStarterApp pointer to the Beep button object’s AddListener() member function. Check back to the previous PowerPlant column for more detail. And if you still don’t get it, don’t worry. We’ll do more message listening in future PowerPlant columns.

Our next step is to make changes to the file PictScroller.cp.

• Open the file PictScroller.cp.

• Add this line below the #include of LEditField.h:

 
#include <LActiveScroller.h>

• Scroll down to the constructor CPPStarterApp::CPPStarterApp(), and add this line at the end of the function:

 URegistrar::RegisterClass
 (LActiveScroller::class_ID,
 LActiveScroller::CreateActiveScrollerStream);

As we discussed in the previous PowerPlant column, we need to register all the PowerPlant classes we’ll be using. Before we added this line, the only thing the constructor did was call RegisterAllPPClasses(), which registers a bunch of classes. Unfortunately, this does not include the LActiveScroller class. No big deal. We just registered it ourselves.

To see which classes are registered automatically, open the file PPobClasses.cp and check out the function RegisterAllPPClasses() (at the very bottom of the file). To get there quickly, once you’ve compiled your source, option-double-click on the constructor call RegisterAllPPClasses().

I copied the RegisterClass() call above directly from the bottom of PPobClasses.cp. Note that we could have avoided this step if we had used an LScroller instead of an LActiveScroller. LScrollers are part of the mainstream. LActiveScrollers are part of the iconoclastic fringe, the bad seeds, the outcasts...

OK, OK, back to the code. Our next step is to add a listener function that beeps when it gets the right message.

• Add this function to the bottom of PictScroller.cp:

// ---------
// • ListenToMessage
// ---------
// Constructor

void CPPStarterApp::ListenToMessage
 (MessageT inMessage, void *ioParam )
{
 if ( inMessage == 1000 )
 SysBeep( 20 );
}

Our final step: add the listener to the Beep button.

• Find the function CPPStarterApp::ObeyCommand(). It is about 3/4 of the way through the file.

• In the switch statement, find the case for cmd_New.

• Insert these lines after the call to CreateWindow() and before the call theWindow->Show():

 LStandardButton *theButton =
 (LStandardButton *)theWindow->FindPaneByID( 1000 );
 theButton->AddListener( this );

Here’s what the entire case looks like:

 case cmd_New:
    // EXAMPLE, create a new window
 LWindow*theWindow;
 theWindow = LWindow::CreateWindow
 (window_Sample, this);
 LStdButton *theButton =
 (LStdButton *)theWindow->FindPaneByID( 1000 );
 theButton->AddListener( this );
 theWindow->Show();
 break;

Run the Sucker

That’s it. Now go take this puppy for a ride. When it runs, a window like the one shown in Figure 1 will appear by default. Look through the code and see if you can figure out why. Select New from the File menu and more windows will appear. If your PICT was large enough, you’ll be able to scroll it. Try dragging a scrollbar’s thumb. Is that cool or what? The window updates automatically, as you move the thumb. Interestingly, the CodeWarrior source code windows do the same thing. Gee, do you think the CodeWarrior editor was written in PowerPlant? Very cool.

When you resize the window, notice that the right, disabled button sticks to the right side of the window. If you make the window small enough, the buttons will run into each other. Go back into Constructor and figure out how to set the minimum height and width for the window. Here’s a clue: To get at the LWindow info window, open the LWindow view, then double-click on the title bar of the window shown in the overview window (the window shown in Figure 8).

Finally, notice that the Beep button beeps and that the Dialog button is disabled and that its title was drawn in grey.

Till Next Month...

Next month, we’ll add another view to our program. Right now, I’m thinking about a modeless dialog, but who knows? See you then...

 

Community Search:
MacTech Search:

Software Updates via MacUpdate

MTR 5.0.0.1 - The Mac's oldest and...
MTR (was MacTheRipper)--the Mac's oldest and smartest DVD-backup app--is now updated to version 5.001 MTR -- the complete toolbox, not a one-trick, point-and-click extractor. MTR is intended for... Read more
LibreOffice 4.4.5.2 - Free, open-source...
LibreOffice is an office suite (word processor, spreadsheet, presentations, drawing tool) compatible with other major office suites. The Document Foundation is coordinating development and... Read more
Adobe Lightroom 6.1.1 - Import, develop,...
Adobe Lightroom is available as part of Adobe Creative Cloud for as little as $9.99/month bundled with Photoshop CC as part of the photography package. Lightroom 6 is also available for purchase as a... Read more
File Juicer 4.41 - Extract images, video...
File Juicer is a drag-and-drop can opener and data archaeologist. Its specialty is to find and extract images, video, audio, or text from files which are hard to open in other ways. It finds and... Read more
A Better Finder Rename 9.52 - File, phot...
A Better Finder Rename is the most complete renaming solution available on the market today. That's why, since 1996, tens of thousands of hobbyists, professionals and businesses depend on A Better... Read more
OmniFocus 2.2.3 - GTD task manager with...
OmniFocus helps you manage your tasks the way that you want, freeing you to focus your attention on the things that matter to you most. Capturing tasks and ideas is always a keyboard shortcut away in... Read more
TinkerTool 5.4 - Expanded preference set...
TinkerTool is an application that gives you access to additional preference settings Apple has built into Mac OS X. This allows to activate hidden features in the operating system and in some of the... Read more
Tinderbox 6.3.1 - Store and organize you...
Tinderbox is a personal content management assistant. It stores your notes, ideas, and plans. It can help you organize and understand them. And Tinderbox helps you share ideas through Web journals... Read more
Parallels Desktop 10.2.2 - Run Windows a...
Parallels Desktop is simply the world's bestselling, top-rated, and most trusted solution for running Windows applications on your Mac. With Parallels Desktop for Mac, you can seamlessly run both... Read more
Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2015 9.0.1 - Digit...
Premiere Pro CC 2015 is available as part of Adobe Creative Cloud for as little as $19.99/month (or $9.99/month if you're a previous Premiere Pro customer). Premiere Pro CS6 is still available for... Read more

You Against Me (Games)
You Against Me 1.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: A simple game… You. Me. Claim, steal, lock, score, win! | Read more »
Yep, it's True - Angry Birds 2 is O...
The not exactly rumors were true and the birds are back. Angry Birds 2 has come to the App Store and the world will... well I suppose it'll still be the same, but now we have more bird-flinging options! [Read more] | Read more »
You Could Design Your Own Card for Chain...
If you've ever wanted to create your own item, weapon, trap, or even monster for Chainsaw Warrior: Lords of the Night, this is your chance. Auroch Digital is currently holding a contest so that fans can fight to the death (not really) to see which... | Read more »
Bitcoin Billionaire is Going Back in Tim...
If you thought you managed to buy everything there is to buy in Bitcoin Billionaire and make all the money, well you though wrong. Those of you who made it far enough might remember investing in time travel - and it looks like that investment is... | Read more »
Domino Drop (Games)
Domino Drop 1.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $1.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: Domino Drop is a delightful new puzzle game with dominos and gravity!Learn how to play it in a minute, master it day by day.Your... | Read more »
OPERATION DRACULA (Games)
OPERATION DRACULA 1.0.1 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $5.99, Version: 1.0.1 (iTunes) Description: 25% off launch sale!!! 'Could prove to be one of the most accurate representations of the Japanese bullet hell shmup... | Read more »
Race The Sun (Games)
Race The Sun 1.01 Device: iOS iPhone Category: Games Price: $4.99, Version: 1.01 (iTunes) Description: You are a solar craft. The sun is your death timer. Hurtle towards the sunset at breakneck speed in a futile race against time.... | Read more »
Tap Delay (Music)
Tap Delay 1.0.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Music Price: $4.99, Version: 1.0.0 (iTunes) Description: Back in the “old days”, producers and engineers created delay and echo effects using tape machines. Tap Delay combines the warm... | Read more »
This Week at 148Apps: July 20-24, 2015
July is Heating Up With 148Apps How do you know what apps are worth your time and money? Just look to the review team at 148Apps. We sort through the chaos and find the apps you're looking for. The ones we love become Editor’s Choice, standing out... | Read more »
Red Game Without A Great Name (Games)
Red Game Without A Great Name 1.0.3 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $2.99, Version: 1.0.3 (iTunes) Description: The mechanical bird is flying through an unfriendly, Steampunk world. Help it avoid obstacles and deadly... | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

Apple’s Education discount saves up to $300 o...
Purchase a new Mac or iPad at The Apple Store for Education and take up to $300 off MSRP. All teachers, students, and staff of any educational institution qualify for the discount. Shipping is free,... Read more
12-inch MacBooks in stock for $20 off, save o...
Adorama has 12″ Retina MacBooks in stock for $20 off MSRP including free shipping plus NY & NJ sales tax only. For a limited time, Adorama will include a free Apple USB-C to USB Adapter, free 4-... Read more
College Student Deals: Additional $100 off Ma...
Take an additional $100 off all MacBooks and iMacs at Best Buy Online with their College Students Deals Savings, valid through August 8, 2015. Anyone with a valid .EDU email address can take... Read more
2015 13-inch 2.7GHz Retina MacBook Pro on sal...
B&H Photo has the new 2015 13″ 2.7GHz/128GB Retina MacBook Pro on sale today for $1199 including free shipping plus NY sales tax only. Their price is $100 off MSRP. Read more
2.8GHz Mac mini available for $988, includes...
Adorama has the 2.8GHz Mac mini available for $988, $11 off MSRP, including a free copy of Apple’s 3-Year AppleCare Protection Plan. Shipping is free, and Adorama charges sales tax in NY & NJ... Read more
Updated Mac Price Trackers
We’ve updated our Mac Price Trackers with the latest information on prices, bundles, and availability on systems from Apple’s authorized internet/catalog resellers: - 15″ MacBook Pros - 13″ MacBook... Read more
High-Precision Battery Fuel Gauge IC Extends...
Renesas Electronics Corporation has announced its new lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery fuel gauge IC, the RAJ240500, designed to extend battery life for connected mobile devices such as tablets, notebook... Read more
27-inch 3.3GHz 5K iMac on sale for $1799, $20...
B&H Photo has the 27″ 3.3GHz 5K iMac on sale for $1799 including free shipping plus NY tax only. Their price is $200 off MSRP, and it’s the lowest price available for this model from any Apple... Read more
Twelve South Free Dual Screen Backgrounds Co...
Twelve South has posted a second collection of travel Desktop photos, noting: For the Twelve South team, a vacation is never just a vacation. It’s a time to try out new prototypes on the road, visit... Read more
Apple Refurbished iMacs available for up to $...
The Apple Store has Apple Certified Refurbished iMacs available for up to $380 off the cost of new models. Apple’s one-year warranty is standard, and shipping is free: - 27″ 3.5GHz 5K iMac – $1949 $... Read more

Jobs Board

Engineering Manager, Search Relevance, *Appl...
**Job Summary** Apple 's new Spotlight Suggestions service provides fast, relevant search results from the Inte et in Spotlight and Safari on iOS and OS X. We are looking Read more
Lead Infrastructure Engineer - *Apple* /Mac P...
…of a team * Requires proven problem solving skills Preferred Additional: * Apple Certified System Administrator (ACSA) * Apple Certified Technical Coordinator (ACTC) Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions (US) - A...
Job Description: Sales. Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales. Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions (US) - A...
Job Description: Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions (US) - A...
Job Description: Sales. Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales. Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, Read more
All contents are Copyright 1984-2011 by Xplain Corporation. All rights reserved. Theme designed by Icreon.