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Design Objects
Volume Number:7
Issue Number:1
Column Tag:C Workshop

Related Info: Memory Manager File Manager Event Manager

Designing With Objects

By Wade Maxfield, Dallas, TX

Note: Source code files accompanying article are located on MacTech CD-ROM or source code disks.

How to Design an Object Oriented Program

[Wade Maxfield is a System Analyst Consultant currently working at Mobil Oil company in Dallas, Texas. His interest in computers dates from the late 1960’s, when he wrote his “very first” bubble sort in Fortran for an IBM 1130. His training for the real world comes from the BSEET program at DeVry Institute.]

In a 1960’s era Reader’s Digest “Life in these United States” anecdote, a man told a story about his huge English Sheepdog. One of his neighbors a few blocks down the lane had a Triumph automobile, which was a few inches shorter in height than the dog. As this tiny car would scoot by their house on the way to work, their dog would tear out, barking loudly. This became a ritual, since the neighbor went to work the same time each afternoon.

Finally, the neighbor had enough. In full view of everyone, he skidded to a stop. The dog dug in, missing the car by inches. Sitting on the back of the driver’s seat in the topless car, he turned to the dog and asked, “Now that you have it, what are you going to do with it?”

We are in the same predicament. We have objects. What are we going to do with them? In this article, I will endeavor to show you how to plan, design, and write an object oriented program by example. I have chosen a very simple task-- removing line feeds from a text file. The main thing to learn is that messages are where you start, and objects where you finish. There are several pieces to the design puzzle. Some background is in order. I have listed the key elements by heading.

1. Messages:

Messages are what we describe fully before we write our program. If you program off the cuff, you will find that you will still want to define a message before you write the program, even if it is 30 seconds before.

Conceptually, messages are data. Messages have a transient existence. They are created by the sending object, destroyed by the receiving object. Messages tell the object what to do. A message has a command portion, and a variable data portion.

The command portion in a message always causes some software to be executed but a message has no software in it. In a truly message based system a message can be seen using tools that can examine data lying around inside a program’s environment. In today’s compiled object oriented systems, messages are function calls. The function name is the command portion and the parameters are the variable data portion.

Depending upon the destination and the purpose of a message it might need to be acknowledged. This acknowledgment in a totally message based system is in the form of a message called an ACK(nowledgment). If a message cannot be acted upon, or if the work the object is supposed to do fails, a message is NAK(ed. (not acknowledged)). In a compiled object oriented system, the return value from the function call is the ACK or NAK. An acknowledgment is a conceptual tool. If this tool is exercised properly, it can guarantee system performance. Your objects can always be told whether or not an operation occurred.

2. Objects:

Objects started with SmallTalk in Xerox PARC. Danny Kay and his cohorts came up with SmallTalk during research into where computers should go. Their research spawned the ill-fated Xerox Star, the Apple Lisa, the Macintosh, and now the NeXT. They pioneered the concept of treating software functions as black boxes. You talked to these boxes with messages. These boxes are known as objects.

[an aside:

The object oriented package in the THINK C environment contains very good explanations of objects and messages (methods) from the programming usage viewpoint. Messages as function calls are fully explained. What is not fully explained is how an object works.

An object is defined by declaring a structure with an implicit typedef statement. This creates a structure which is used as a future template for the actual object. The object is declared as a pointer to a structure of type object. Then the new(object) call is made. This function allocates a Macintosh Memory Manager Handle large enough to hold the structure definition, and fills in the new handle with enough address information to derive the addresses of the functions referenced in the structure. From then on, a call through a “message dispatcher” finishes the calling of the routine indicated by the method described in the object or its ancestor. A message call looks like this: object->method(parm1, parm2). ]

3. Data Definitions:

Software engineers at Bell Laboratories pioneered the concept of designing software by describing all of the data you are going to manipulate. You first wrote down all of the variable names, and placed them into a dictionary. In this dictionary, you then described everything you would do to the variables. Once you have rigorously defined everything that can be done to the data, you have described what the software must do to successfully complete its given task.

4. Design Methodology and its Graphics:

Mr. Yourdon, with his cohort Mr. DeMarco, came up with a methodology of analyzing software design. The Yourdon Structured Analysis and Design Methodology is oriented towards real time design, but it works for Macintosh software design. The reason is that all Macintosh programs are near real time programs. All real time software responds to events as they occur. What user will wait minutes for the computer to respond to a mouse click?

The most important (to me) portion of the Yourdon design techniques is the data flow diagrams. These describe where the data goes (but not when). I have modified his diagram concepts, and thrown away a few of his rules. I will lay a few ground rules for drawing these modified diagrams.

First, a circle is an object. An object receives messages from other objects. An objects name is placed in the circle.

Second, messages are drawn as arcs from one object to the next. A directional arrow is placed at the end of the arc and a brief description of the message sent to the object placed near the middle of the arc. This description is usually more of a mnemonic than a true description.

Third, data is indicated by a description sandwiched between two parallel lines (usually horizontal). Variables are data. The data is manipulated by objects (and may be part of the object). An “arrowed” arc is used to show which object manipulated the data, with a description of what happens to the data (read, write, update, Etc.). In object oriented programming, an object should only manipulate its own data. It can be told to manipulate its data with a message, or asked for the current value of the data with a message. Data may also be a disk file, or any other storage location (such as a video screen).

Fourth, a rectangular box is used to indicate an external event which causes some data to flow through the system in the form of messages. This external event may be a mouse click or keyboard entry from the user, a call back routine from a disk write event, or an interrupt from the system time clock. An external event is almost always asynchronous to program execution. The flow of this data is also indicated by labeled arcs.

Diagram 1

Diagram 2

Diagram 3

Diagram 4

Diagram 5

Finally:

So now we have the elements necessary to think of designing for object oriented programming. First we have objects, which accept messages. Second, we have the concept that you describe everything that you must do to the data (ie: describe all of the messages). Third, we have some structured analysis techniques modified from real time design analysis given by Yourdon. Lets do a design.

The Design:

I need to strip line feeds from text files which are sent to me from IBM (yuk!) based systems. I need for this program to 1). display a standard SFGetFile dialog box, 2). open the selected file, 3). display a standard SFPutFile dialog box, 4). create the described file, 5). read in the source data a line at a time until exhausted, and 6). write the same data minus the line feeds to the destination file. I will use THINK C 4.0.

How the messages flow:

(Note, the names are made up as I go along. Any correlation to any code past or present is purely coincidental. Any correlation to objects already known is purposeful.)

I will send a (GetExistingFile) message to myFileManager object to get me the source file the user wants to convert. myFileManager will send a reply message to me telling me one of two things: 1) he has the data for me (ACK), 2) he doesn’t have anything for me (ie: the user canceled, an error occurred), and nothing can be guaranteed about his data (NAK). See diagram 1.

If the message was a success, I will send an (OpenFile) message to myFileManager. He will create a myDataFile object for me that deals with that file, and give that object to me. It will know how to read, write, and close that file. See diagram 3.

Then I will send a (GetNewFile) message to myFileManager object to get me the destination file the user wants as the output. After dealing with the identical return as in the (GetExistingFile) message, I will send an (OpenFile) message to myFileManager, and get the destination myDataFile object. See diagrams 2 and 3. Then I will create my TextFilter object and initialize it.

Now, until the return message from myDataFile input object indicates an error or end of file, I will send (ReadLine) messages to the source file object. I will feed the lines in a (StripLineFeeds) message to the TextFilter object. I can ignore the (ACK) message from this object. Then I will send a (WriteSome) message to the output object. See diagram 4.

At a NAK from the input myDatFile object, I will send a (CloseFile) message to myFileManager object, handing him the input an output objects. That will take care of any clean up for this particular situation. I will also send a (Dispose) message to my TextFilter object. See diagrams 4 and 5.

Normally, an Exit message or a Quit message would be sent, but for this simple situation, the clean up was done in the run method, and no other messages are needed. The program execution falls through to the normal exit code included in the application shell.

Conclusion:

If THINK C 4.0 were truly a message based system, with an interpreter handling the dispatch of messages, and the running of code based on where the message was sent, then you would see very little program logic should you try to examine the “code” without the above narrative. Messages would flow back and forth between objects without apparent rhyme or reason, and you would have a hard time predicting what the system does unless you had the master plan in your hand.

You could design a program that way under THINK C 4.0, or a similar environment. If you did, you would find that under situations where one message triggered a second message which triggered the first message (and so on), the stack would quickly overflow. There would be no returns from the subroutines. The address pushed on the stack for each message call would not be popped. And we know all messages should be popped off! A work around for this would be an assembly language routine which would take the outgoing message as its parameters and do the stack clean up for you. This would be very dangerous for the casual programmer. Any mistake would crash the system.

Another way to handle messages under this type of environment would be to build your own message dispatcher, and tie it into the user defined events in the Macintosh event manager. A message would be posted into the event queue, and the message would be dispatched through the main message processor, Macintosh style.

The messages themselves could be done two ways. You could include every case in the do application event handler. Talk about huge multilevel switch statements! Or, if the message portion of the event was a pointer to the data structure containing the message, and that structure contained the object and the address of its method (the message to be sent), along with some indication of the parameters to be given to the method, a message dispatcher would work. Each object handle would have to be locked down to prevent movement. It would be difficult to send several messages in a row from one object. The design would stay the same, but there could be as much as one method per message sent or received.

For our program, I am going to use the environment handed to me without changes. This solves a problem for me in that I look at the resulting code and it looks like pure C! This makes it easy for me to understand and troubleshoot. However, the advantages of objects do show up. My program reads more like an outline than a typical C program containing a massive amounts of details.

What is not apparent is the design methodology behind the program. The program is easy to modify. It also looks to be simple, and it is. The objects do the hard work, and their code can look very dirty. The benefit is in dealing on a different conceptual plane. Once an object is written, it can be easily reused or stretched.

Once the “system” using objects is designed, the objects themselves don’t have to reside inside the current application. An object can be moved to a different program or computer. As long as the messaging system handles the delivery of messages and their replies, the “system” will always accomplish what it is supposed to. This “lever” [message oriented design] allows multiple processor systems to be built with very little change in design when moving from a single processor system.

The code:

NOTE: For this example, I have taken the standard Starter.c application provided with THINK C 4.0 and modified it for this project. Many of the explanatory notes are the ones given in the THINK C 4.0 source code. For this project, I was able to ignore them!

(This is the root of all object oriented programs for THINK C 4.0. Note that it looks more like an outline than a program.)

/*****
 * RemoveLF.c
 *
 * A starter main file for writing programs with the
 * THINK Class Library
 *****/
#include “CRemoveLFApp.h”
extern  CApplication *gApplication;

void main()
{
 gApplication = new(CRemoveLFApp);
 ((CRemoveLFApp *)gApplication)->IRemoveLFApp();
 gApplication->Run();
 gApplication->Exit();
}

(All of the work in our particular program is done in the Run method.)
/*****
 * CRemoveLFApp.c
 * Application methods for a typical application.
  *****/
#include “oops.h”
#include “messageDefines.h”
#include “CRemoveLFApp.h”
#include “CRemoveLFDoc.h”
#include “CmyFileManager.h”
#include “CmyDataFile.h”
#include “CTextFilter.h”

extern  OSType gSignature;
static char readBuffer[512];
/*..........................................................*/
void CRemoveLFApp::Run(void)
/*
Name: Wade Maxfield
Date: November 25, 1989
Notes:
Run
we need to do our thing here, not the normal built in
code work
Modification History:
*/
{
CmyFileManager *FileManager;
SFReply sourceReply;
SFReply destinationReply;
short returnMessage;
CmyDataFile *sourceDataFile;
CmyDataFile *destinationDataFile;
long bytesRead;
CTextFilter *TextFilter;

 FileManager = new(CmyFileManager);
 FileManager->ImyFileManager();
 
/* ask for the source file */
 returnMessage = FileManager->GetExistingFile(&sourceReply);

 if ( returnMessage == NAK )
    return; /* this application is finished. */
 
/* ask for the destination file. (this creates it also) */
 returnMessage = FileManager->GetNewFile (&destinationReply,’TEXT’);

 if ( returnMessage == NAK )
   return; /* this application is finished. */

 returnMessage = FileManager->OpenFile (&sourceDataFile,&sourceReply);
 
 if ( returnMessage == NAK )
    return;
 
returnMessage = FileManager->OpenFile (&destinationDataFile,&destinationReply);

if ( returnMessage == NAK )
   return;
 
/* we are ready for the new text filter object */
TextFilter = new(CTextFilter);
TextFilter->ITextFilter(); /* initialize it */
 
do {    
   returnMessage = sourceDataFile->ReadLine (readBuffer,512L,&bytesRead);
 
   if ( returnMessage == NAK )
      break;
 
   /* strip the line feeds */
   TextFilter->StripLineFeeds(readBuffer,&bytesRead);
 
   returnMessage = destinationDataFile->WriteSome (readBuffer,bytesRead);
   } while(TRUE);

FileManager->CloseFile(&sourceDataFile);     
FileManager->CloseFile(&destinationDataFile);      
TextFilter->Dispose(); /* get rid of the text filter object */
 }

/***
 * IRemoveLFApp
 *
 * Initialize the application. Your initialization method should 
 at least call the inherited method. If your application class defines 
its own instance variables or global variables, this is a good place 
to initialize them.
 *
 ***/
void CRemoveLFApp::IRemoveLFApp(void)
{
CApplication::IApplication(4, 20480L, 2048L);
}

/***
 * SetUpFileParameters
 *
 * In this routine, you specify the kinds of files your
 * application opens.
 ***/

void CRemoveLFApp::SetUpFileParameters(void)
{
inherited::SetUpFileParameters();  /* Be sure to call the default method 
*/

/**
 **sfNumTypes is the number of file types
 **your application knows about.
 **sfFileTypes[] is an array of file types.
 **You can define up to 4 file types in
 **sfFileTypes[].
 **/
sfNumTypes = 1;
sfFileTypes[0] = ‘TEXT’;

/**
 **Although it’s not an instance variable,
 **this method is a good place to set the
 **gSignature global variable. Set this global
 **to your application’s signature. You’ll use it
 **to create a file (see CFile::CreateNew()).
 **/
gSignature = ‘????’;
}

/***
 * DoCommand
 *
 * Your application will probably handle its own commands.
 * Remember, the command numbers from 1-1023 are reserved.
 * The file Commands.h contains all the reserved commands.
 *
 * Be sure to call the default method, so you can get
 * the default behvior for standard commands.
 ***/
void CRemoveLFApp::DoCommand(long theCommand)
{
switch (theCommand) {
 /* Your commands go here */
 default: inherited::DoCommand(theCommand);
 break;
 }
}

/***
 * Exit
 * Chances are you won’t need this method.
 * This is the last chance your application gets to clean up
 * things like temporary files.
 ***/
void CRemoveLFApp::Exit()
{
/* your exit handler here */
}

/***
 * CreateDocument
 * The user chose New from the File menu.
 * In this method, you need to create a document and send it
 * a NewFile() message.
 ***/
void CRemoveLFApp::CreateDocument()
{
CRemoveLFDoc*theDocument;
 
  theDocument = new(CRemoveLFDoc);
 
/**
 **Send your document an initialization
 **message. The first argument is the
 **supervisor (the application). The second
 **argument is TRUE if the document is printable.
 **/
  theDocument->IRemoveLFDoc(this, TRUE);

/**
 **Send the document a NewFile() message.
 **The document will open a window, and
 **set up the heart of the application.
 **/
 theDocument->NewFile();
}

/***
 * OpenDocument
 *
 * The user chose Open  from the File menu.
 * In this method you need to create a document
 * and send it an OpenFile() message.
 *
 * The macSFReply is a good SFReply record that contains
 * the name and vRefNum of the file the user chose to
 * open.
 ***/
void CRemoveLFApp::OpenDocument(SFReply *macSFReply)
{
CRemoveLFDoc*theDocument;
 
 theDocument = new(CRemoveLFDoc);

/**
 **Send your document an initialization
 **message. The first argument is the
 **supervisor (the application). The second
 **argument is TRUE if the document is printable.
 **/
 theDocument->IRemoveLFDoc(this, TRUE);

/**
 **Send the document an OpenFile() message.
 **The document will open a window, open
** the file specified in the macSFReply record,
** and display it in its window.
**/
 theDocument->OpenFile(macSFReply);
}

 (This object’s file contains the code which describes the myDataFile 
object.  Some of these methods will be useful in future projects.)
/*
*
CmyDataFile.c
 this file adds a method to the standard definition.  It uses some code 
borrowed from another  (non-object oriented) project to do it.
*/

#include “MessageDefines.h”
#include “CmyDataFile.h”

/* needed for code module picked up from another project */
typedef short WORD ;
typedef  char CHAR;

long ReadaLine(WORD refNum,CHAR *tempString,WORD  maxChars) ;
#define NIL 0L
static union {
 HParamBlockRec dfParameterBlock; /* our parameter block for private 
use */
 CInfoPBRec dirPBBlock;
 }p;

/*:........................................................*/
long ReadaLine(WORD refNum,CHAR *tempString,WORD  maxChars) 
/* WORD refNum;  /* Mac file reference number*/
/*CHAR *tempString;/* where to store the data */
/* WORD maxChars;  /* maximum number of characters to read for this line 
*/
/*
Name: Wade Maxfield
Date: Feb 21, 1989
Notes:
Modification History:
11/25/89 -- here we mix objects and standard c code.
*/
{
WORD error;
WORD stringCount;

/*
PBGetFPos (paramBlock: ParmBlkPtr; async: BOOLEAN) : OSErr;

Trap macro  _GetFPos

Parameter block
    -->  12  ioCompletion    pointer
    <--  16  ioResult        word
    -->  24  ioRefNum        word
    <--  36  ioReqCount      long word
    <--  40  ioActCount      long word
    <--  44  ioPosMode       word
    <--  46  ioPosOffset     long word
*/
 p.dfParameterBlock.fileParam.ioCompletion = NIL;
 p.dfParameterBlock.ioParam.ioRefNum = refNum;
 error = PBGetFPos (&p.dfParameterBlock,FALSE ) ;/* false = synchronously 
*/
 if (error != noErr)
 return(error);
 
/*PBRead (paramBlock: ParmBlkPtr; async: BOOLEAN) : OSErr;
   Trap macro  _Read
    Parameter block
        --> 12  ioCompletion    pointer
        <-- 16  ioResult    word
        --> 24  ioRefNum    word
        --> 32  ioBuffer    pointer
        --> 36  ioReqCount  long word
        <-- 40  ioActCount  long word
        --> 44  ioPosMode   word
        <-> 46  ioPosOffset long word
*/
 p.dfParameterBlock.ioParam.ioBuffer = tempString;
 p.dfParameterBlock.ioParam.ioReqCount =maxChars ;
 /* 0d is cr, $80 is newline mode */
 p.dfParameterBlock.ioParam.ioPosMode = fsAtMark+0x0D80;
 /* from present counter */
 
 error = PBRead (&p.dfParameterBlock,FALSE ) ;/* false = synchronously 
*/

 if (p.dfParameterBlock.ioParam.ioActCount)
    stringCount =p.dfParameterBlock.ioParam.ioActCount-1;
 else
    stringCount = 0;
 
 /* all characters exhausted */
 if ( (error == eofErr && stringCount == 0 ) || 
    (error != noErr && error != eofErr) )
    return(error);
 
 if ( tempString[stringCount] == ‘\r’)
    tempString[++stringCount]=0;  /* delimit string */
 else
    tempString[++stringCount] = 0;
 
 return(stringCount);
}

/* now the methods */
/* ............................................*/
void CmyDataFile::ImyDataFile(void)
/*
Name: Wade Maxfield
Date: November 25, 1989
Notes:
initalize this object
Modification History:
*/
{
/* call the superclass function */
CDataFile::IDataFile();
}

/* ..................................................... */
OSErr CmyDataFile::ReadLine(Ptr buffer, long howMuch, long *bytesRead)
/*
Name: Wade Maxfield
Date: November 25, 1989
Notes:
read a line from the file into the buffer, stopping at carriage return
return an ACK or a NAK
Modification History:
*/
{
long returnValue;

returnValue = ReadaLine(refNum,buffer, howMuch);
  
if (returnValue < 0 )
   {
   *bytesRead = 0;
   return(NAK);
   }
else
   {
   *bytesRead = returnValue;
   return(ACK);
   }
}

(Contains the file manager object)
/*
 CmyFileManager.c
 this is the methods file for my file manager object.
*/
#include “oops.h”
#include “MessageDefines.h”
#include “Global.h”
#include “CmyFileManager.h”
#include “CApplication.h”

/**** Global Variables ****/
extern CApplication*gApplication; /* Application object */
extern  OSType gSignature;

/* ............................................... */
void CmyFileManager::ImyFileManager(void)
/*
Name: Wade Maxfield
Date: November 25, 1989
Notes:
initalize this object
Modification History:
*/
{
/* call the superclass function */
CDataFile::IDataFile();
}

/* .................................................. */
short CmyFileManager::GetExistingFile(SFReply *macSFReply)
/*
Name: Wade Maxfield
Date: November 25, 1989
Notes:
put up the SFGetFile dialog box, return result in macSFReply
return a good message(ACK) or a bad message (NAK)
\Modification History:
*/
{
gApplication->ChooseFile(macSFReply);
 
if ( !macSFReply->good )
   return(NAK);
else
   return(ACK);
}
/* .................................................... */
short  CmyFileManager::GetNewFile(SFReply *macSFReply,OSType fType)
/*
Name: Wade Maxfield
Date: November 25, 1989
Notes:
put up the SFPutFile dialog box, return result in macSFReply
create the chosen file, or recreate it.
return a good message(ACK) or a bad message (NAK)
Modification History:
*/
{
Point   corner;  /* Top left corner of dialog box*/
SignedBytesaveHState;
short returnMessage;
 /* Center dialog box on the screen*/
FindDlogPosition(‘DLOG’, gApplication->sfGetDLOGid, &corner);  
saveHState = HGetState(this);
HLock(this);

SFPutFile(corner,”\pSave file as:”,”\p”,NULL,macSFReply);
 
HSetState(this, saveHState);
/* now create the file for a future open. 
  these methods are inherited. */
if ( macSFReply->good)
   {
   SFSpecify(macSFReply);
   returnMessage = CreateNew(gSignature, fType );
 
   /* if is a duplicate, and user said ok to delete old,
   then go ahead and re do it */
   if ( returnMessage == dupFNErr && macSFReply->good)
      {
      ThrowOut(); /* get rid of old file */
      returnMessage = CreateNew(gSignature, fType );
      }
   }

if ( !macSFReply->good || returnMessage < 0)
   return(NAK);
else
   return(ACK);
}
/* ................................................ */
short  CmyFileManager::OpenFile(CmyDataFile **newDataFileObject, SFReply 
*macSFReply)
/*
Name: Wade Maxfield
Date: November 25, 1989
Notes:
Create a myDataFile object, and open the file, hand it back to
the calling method.
return a good message(ACK) or a bad message (NAK)
Modification History:
*/
{
short returnMessage;

/* create the new file object */
*newDataFileObject = NULL; /* to allow test for object create */ 
*newDataFileObject = new(CmyDataFile);
 
if (!(long)(*newDataFileObject)) /* object wasn’t created */
   return(NAK);
 
(*newDataFileObject)->ImyDataFile();
 
/* tell the inherited routine what file we have */
(*newDataFileObject)->SFSpecify(macSFReply); 
 
returnMessage = (*newDataFileObject)->Open(fsRdWrPerm); 
 /* call the inherited open */
 
if ( returnMessage < 0 )
   return(NAK); /* indicate an error (NAK) */
 
return(ACK); /* return a good message */
}

/* ..................................................... */
short  CmyFileManager::CloseFile(CmyDataFile **dataFileObject)
/*
Name: Wade Maxfield
Date: November 25, 1989
Notes:
Close the file and dispose of the data file object.
\return a good message(ACK) 
Modification History:
*/
{
/* first, close the file, then delete the file object */
(*dataFileObject)->Close();
 
(*dataFileObject)->Dispose(); /* close and dispose of the object */
*dataFileObject = NULL; /* indicate is gone */
return(ACK); /* all quiet on western front */
}

/*
CTextFilter.c
 this object has no ancestors
*/
#include “messageDefines.h”
#include “CTextFilter.h”
/* ................................................... */
void CTextFilter::ITextFilter(void)
{
/* we don’t need to do anything right now */
}

/* .................................................... */
short CTextFilter::StripLineFeeds(char *textBuffer, long *bufferSize)
/* remove line feeds within the current text buffer */
{
short index, index2;

for ( index = 0 ; index < *bufferSize; index++ )
   {
   if ( textBuffer[index ] == 0x0a )
      {
       (*bufferSize) --;
       for ( index2 = index; index2 < (*bufferSize)+1; index2++)
           textBuffer[index2] = textBuffer[index2+1];
         }
      }

return(ACK);
}

(Header files)
/*
CmyDataFile.h
this is the definition of my file manager object
*/
#define _H_CmyDataFile  /* Include this file only once */
#include “CDataFile.h”

struct CmyDataFile : CDataFile 
 {
 /* instance variables */
 /* my messages */
 void ImyDataFile(void);
 OSErr ReadLine(Ptr info,long howMuch, long *bytesRead);
 };
/*
CmyFileManager.h
this is the definition of my file manager object
*/
#define _H_CmyFileManager /* Include this file only once */
#include “CDataFile.h”
#include “CmyDataFile.h”
struct CmyFileManager : CDataFile 
 {
 /* instance variables */
 /* my messages */
 void ImyFileManager(void);
 short GetExistingFile(SFReply *macSFReply);
 short GetNewFile(SFReply *macSFReply,OSType fType);
 short OpenFile(CmyDataFile **newDataFileObject,SFReply *macSFReply);
 short CloseFile(CmyDataFile **newDataFileObject);
 };

/*
MessageDefines.h
Generic values need across all messages
*/
#define ACK  1
#define NAK  0

/*
CTextFilter.h
this is the class definition for the text filter .
*/
#define _H_CTextFilter
#include “CObject.h”

struct CTextFilter : CObject
 {
 /* no instance variables */
 /* methods */
 void ITextFilter(void);
 short StripLineFeeds(char *textBuffer, long *bufferSize);
 };

 

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Software Updates via MacUpdate

Apple iTunes 12.2 - Play Apple Music...
Apple iTunes lets you organize and stream Apple Music, download and watch video and listen to Podcasts. It can automatically download new music, app, and book purchases across all your devices and... Read more
Apple Security Update 2015-005 - For OS...
Apple Security Update 2015-005 is recommended for all users and improves the security of OS X. For detailed information about the security content of this update, please visit: http://support.apple.... Read more
Apple HP Printer Drivers 3.1 - For OS X...
Apple HP Printer Drivers includes the latest HP printing and scanning software for OS X Lion or later. For information about supported printer models, see this page. Version 3.1: The latest printing... Read more
Epson Printer Drivers 3.1 - For OS X 10....
Epson Printer Drivers installs the latest software for your EPSON printer or scanner for OS X Yosemite, OS X Mavericks, OS X Mountain Lion, and OS X Lion. For more information about printing and... Read more
Xcode 6.4 - Integrated development envir...
Xcode provides everything developers need to create great applications for Mac, iPhone, and iPad. Xcode brings user interface design, coding, testing, and debugging into a united workflow. The Xcode... Read more
OS X Yosemite 10.10.4 - Apple's lat...
OS X Yosemite is Apple's newest operating system for Mac. An elegant design that feels entirely fresh, yet inherently familiar. The apps you use every day, enhanced with new features. And a... Read more
Dash 3.0.2 - Instant search and offline...
Dash is an API Documentation Browser and Code Snippet Manager. Dash helps you store snippets of code, as well as instantly search and browse documentation for almost any API you might use (for a full... Read more
FontExplorer X Pro 5.0 - Font management...
FontExplorer X Pro is optimized for professional use; it's the solution that gives you the power you need to manage all your fonts. Now you can more easily manage, activate and organize your... Read more
Typinator 6.6 - Speedy and reliable text...
Typinator turbo-charges your typing productivity. Type a little. Typinator does the rest. We've all faced projects that require repetitive typing tasks. With Typinator, you can store commonly used... Read more
Arq 4.12.1 - Online backup to Google Dri...
Arq is super-easy online backup for the Mac. Back up to your own Google Drive storage (15GB free storage), your own Amazon Glacier ($.01/GB per month storage) or S3, or any SFTP server. Arq backs up... Read more

Hands-On With Raceline CC
Set for release soon, Rebellion’s motorbike racing game, Raceline CC certainly looks stylish. But how does it play? I got my hands on a preview build to answer exactly that. | Read more »
Siegefall - Tips, Tricks, and Strategies...
So, you fancy establishing a base and ruling the world again. Siegefall is a convenient place to do that, but how about some great tips and tricks on how best to go about it? Here are a few ideas on how to get ahead as a beginner to this medieval... | Read more »
The WWE Comes to Racing Rivals - Because...
Racing Rivals is a racing game that's all about, well, rivalry. And who knows rivalry better than WWE superstars (shhhh, that was rhetorical)? [Read more] | Read more »
Hey, Who Put Apple Music in My SoundHoun...
One of the App Store's popular music discovery sources - SoundHound - has already been updated to include Apple's own music discovery source - Apple Music. That was fast! [Read more] | Read more »
Arcane Legends has a New Expansion Calle...
Arcane Legends has been going strong since it debuted at the tail end of 2012. So well, in fact, that it's already up to its sixth expansion. [Read more] | Read more »
Vector 2 is Officially a Thing and it...
Vector is a pretty cool parkour-driven runner that's gotten a pretty decent following since it first came out - although personally I think more people could stand to show it some love. Anyway, Nekki has announced that a sequel isofficially on its... | Read more »
Get Ready to Trucksform and Roll Out (an...
It looks like NuOxygen is bringing the truck-transforming racer Trucksform (get it?) to iOS in a couple of weeks. Although really it's more of an auto-driver than a racer. But still, transforming trucks! [Read more] | Read more »
This Week at 148Apps:June 22-26, 2015
June's Summer Journey Continues With 148Apps How do you know what apps are worth your time and money? Just look to the review team at 148Apps. We sort through the chaos and find the apps you're looking for. The ones we love become Editor’s Choice,... | Read more »
LEGO® Minifigures Online (Games)
LEGO® Minifigures Online 1.0.1 Device: iOS iPhone Category: Games Price: $4.99, Version: 1.0.1 (iTunes) Description: | Read more »
World of Tanks Blitz celebrates its firs...
Today marks the first anniversary of the launch of World of Tanks Blitz, the mobile version of the PC tank battler, World of Tanks. World of Tanks Blitz launched on iOS and Android on June 26th last year and to celebrate, Wargaming is giving all... | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

Apple Releases OS X 10.10.4 With WIFi Fix, iO...
On Tuesday, Apple released final versions of OS X 10.10.4 and iOS 8.4, as well as updates for the Safari browser for OS X Yosemite, Mavericks, and Mountain Lion. The OS X 10.10.4 update focuses on... Read more
Dual-Band High-Gain Antennas for Home Wi-Fi N...
Linksys has announced what it claims are the first dual-band, omni-directional high-gain antennas for the consumer market. The new Linksys high-gain antennas available in a 2- and 4-pack (WRT004ANT... Read more
Apple refurbished 2014 15-inch Retina MacBook...
The Apple Store has Apple Certified Refurbished 2014 15″ 2.2GHz Retina MacBook Pros available for $1609, $390 off original MSRP. Apple’s one-year warranty is included, and shipping is free. They have... Read more
Clearance 2014 MacBook Airs available for up...
Adorama has 2014 MacBook Airs on sale for up to $301 off original MSRP including NY + NJ sales tax and free shipping: - 11″ 256GB MacBook Air: $798 $301 off original MSRP - 13″ 128GB MacBook Air: $... Read more
5K iMacs on sale for $100 off MSRP, free ship...
B&H Photo has the new 27″ 3.3GHz 5K iMac on sale for $1899.99 including free shipping plus NY tax only. Their price is $100 off MSRP. They have the 27″ 3.5GHz 5K iMac on sale for $2199, also $100... Read more
27-inch 3.2GHz iMac on sale for $1679, save $...
B&H Photo has the 27″ 3.2GHz iMac on sale for $1679.99 including free shipping plus NY sales tax only. Their price is $120 off MSRP. Read more
12-inch 1.2GHz Gray MacBook on sale for $1487...
Amazon.com has the new 12″ 1.2GHz Gray MacBook in stock and on sale for $1487 including free shipping. Their price is $102 off MSRP, and it’s the lowest price available for this model. We expect... Read more
15-inch 2.2GHz Retina MacBook Pro on sale for...
Amazon.com has the 15″ 2.2GHz Retina MacBook Pro on sale for $1819 including free shipping. Their price is $180 off MSRP, and it’s the lowest price available for this model. Read more
OtterBox Releases New Symmetry Series Metalli...
Otterbox’s new Symmetry Series of smartphone cases flaunts the best of both both street style and street smarts with their new metallic finishes and trusted OtterBox protection for iPhone 6 and... Read more
Eliminate Cable Chaos with New GE Branded Wra...
GE licensee Jasco Products has introduced a new line of GE branded Wrap-n-Charge USB wall chargers with built-in cable management. “We are always working to combine great technology with innovative... Read more

Jobs Board

*Apple* TV Live Streaming Frameworks Test En...
**Job Summary** Work and contribute towards the engineering of Apple 's state-of-the-art products involving video, audio, and graphics in Interactive Media Group (IMG) at Read more
Project Manager, WW *Apple* Fulfillment Ope...
…a senior project manager / business analyst to work within our Worldwide Apple Fulfillment Operations and the Business Process Re-engineering team. This role will work Read more
Senior Data Scientist, *Apple* Retail - Onl...
**Job Summary** Apple Retail - Online sells Apple products to customers around the world. In addition to selling Apple products with unique services such as iPad Read more
*Apple* Music Producer - Apple (United State...
**Job Summary** Apple Music seeks a Producer to help shepherd some of the most important content and editorial initiatives within the music app, with a particular focus Read more
Sr. Technical Services Consultant, *Apple*...
**Job Summary** Apple Professional Services (APS) has an opening for a senior technical position that contributes to Apple 's efforts for strategic and transactional Read more
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