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MACINTOSH C CARBON
MACINTOSH C CARBON: A Hobbyist's Guide To Programming the Macintosh in C
Version 1.0
© 2001 K. J. Bricknell
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CHAPTER 12

DRAWING WITH QUICKDRAW

Introduction

As stated at Chapter 11, QuickDraw is a collection of system software routines that your application uses to perform imaging operations, that is, the construction and display of graphical information for display on output devices such as screens and printers.

The Coordinate Plane, Points, Rectangles, and Regions

QuickDraw defines the following mathematical constructs which are widely used in its functions and data types:

  • The coordinate plane.

  • The point.

  • The rectangle.

  • The region.

The Coordinate Plane

QA Macintosh screen (or screens) represents part of a global coordinate plane bounded by the limits of QuickDraw coordinates (-32768 to 32767). The (0,0) origin point of this global coordinate plane is at the upper-left corner of the main screen. From the upper-left coordinate of the main screen, coordinate values decrease to the left and up and increase to the right and down. Any pixel on the screen can be specified by a vertical coordinate and a horizontal coordinate.

In addition to the global coordinate system, QuickDraw maintains a local coordinate system for every window's graphics port. The relationship between local and global coordinates is shown at Fig 1.

Points

The location on the coordinate plane where imaginary horizontal and vertical grid lines intersect is called a point. Points themselves are dimensionless whereas a pixel is not. As shown at Fig 2, a pixel "hangs" down and to the right of the point by which it is addressed. A pixel thus lies between the infinitely thin lines of the coordinate grid.

The data type for points is Point:

     struct Point
     {
       short v;  // Vertical coordinate.
       short h;  // Horizontal coordinate.
     };
     typedef struct Point Point;
     typedef Point *PointPtr;

Rectangles

A rectangle, whose borders are infinitely thin in the same way that a point is infinitely small, is used to define an area on the screen.

The data type for rectangles is Rect:

     struct Rect 
     {
       short top;
       short left;
       short bottom;
       short right;
     };
     typedef struct Rect Rect;
     typedef Rect *RectPtr;

If the bottom coordinate of a rectangle is equal to or less than the top, or the right coordinate is less than the left, the rectangle is said to be an empty rectangle.

Regions

A region is an arbitrary area, or set of areas, the outline of which is one or more closed loops. A region can be concave or convex, can consist of one connected area or many separate ones, and can even have holes in the middle. In the examples at Fig 3, the region on the left has a hole and the one on the right consists of two unconnected areas.

Region Objects and Accessor Functions

QuickDraw stores information about regions in opaque data structures called region objects. The data type RgnHandle is defined as a reference to a region object:

     typedef struct OpaqueRgnHandle* RgnHandle;

One accessor function is provided to access the information in region objects:

Function

Description

GetRegionBounds

Get the region's bounding rectangle.

For a region which is a rectangle, the rectangle returned by GetRegionBounds defines the entire region. The data for more complex regions is stored in the region object in a proprietary format. The function IsRegionRectangular may be used to determine whether a specific region is rectangular.

The Graphics Pen, Foreground and Background Colours, Pixel Patterns and Bit Patterns, and Transfer Modes

The Graphics Pen

The metaphorical graphics pen used for drawing lines and shapes in a graphics port is rectangular in shape and its size (that is, its height and width) is measured in pixels. Whenever you draw into a graphics port, the characteristics of the graphics pen determine how the drawing looks. Those characteristics are as follows:

  • Pen location, which is specified in local coordinates stored in the graphics port. The functions Move and MoveTo are used to move the pen to a specified location, and the function GetPen gets the pen's current location.

  • Pen size, which is specified by the a width and a height (in pixels) stored in the graphics port. The pen's default size is one-by-one pixel; however, PenSize can be used to change the size and shape up to a 32,767-by-32767 pixel square. Note that, if either the width or height is set to 0, the pen does not draw.

  • Pen colour, that is, the graphics port's foreground colour.

  • Pen pattern, which defines the pattern that the pen draws with.

  • Pen transfer mode, a Boolean or arithmetic operation which determines how QuickDraw transfers the pen pattern to the pixel map during drawing operations.

  • Pen visibility, which is specified by an integer stored in the graphics port, indicating whether drawing operations will actually appear. For example, for 0 or negative values, the pen draws with "invisible ink". The functions ShowPen and HidePen are used to change pen visibility.

Getting and Setting the Pen State

The following functions are used to get and set the current pen state:

Function

Description

GetPenState

Returns, in a PenState structure, the graphics pen's current location, size, transfer mode, and pattern.

SetPenState

Using information supplied by a PenState structure, sets the graphics pen's location, size, transfer mode, and pattern.

PenNormal

Resets the pen size, transfer mode, and pattern to the state initialised when the graphics port was opened.

Foreground and Background Colour

Foreground Colour

The function RGBForecolor is used to set the foreground colour in the graphics port. You may also use the Palette Manager function PmForeColor to set the foreground colour.

The foreground colour is used by the graphics pen for drawing lines, framed shapes, and text. The foreground colour is also used by QuickDraw shape painting functions.

Background Colour

The function RGBBackColor is used to set the background colour in the graphics port. You may also use the Palette Manager function PmBackColor to set the background colour.

The background colour is used by QuickDraw erasing functions, and is also used by the ScrollRect function to replace the scrolled pixels.

Pixel Patterns and Bit Patterns

Pixel Patterns

If you wish to draw or paint with a colour pattern rather than the colour set by RGBForecolor, you can set the pen pixel pattern in the graphics port using SetPortPenPixPat or PenPixPat. (Initially, the pen pixel pattern in the graphics port is all-"black". When you set a non-all-"black" pattern, the pen pattern in the graphics port overrides the foreground colour.)

You define a pixel pattern in a 'ppat' resource. To retrieve the pixel pattern stored in the 'ppat' resource, you use the GetPixPat function. The handle to a pixPat data structure returned by GetPixPat may then be used in a call to SetPortPenPixPat or PenPixPat to set the pixel pattern.

Similarly, if you wish to erase with a pixel pattern rather than the background colour, or replace the pixels scrolled by ScrollRect with a pixel pattern rather than the background colour, you can set the background pixel pattern in the graphics port using SetPortBackPixPat or BackPixPat. (Initially, the background pixel pattern in the graphics port is all-"white". When you assign a non-all-"white" pattern, the background pattern in the graphics port overrides the background colour)

In addition to drawing, painting and erasing functions, QuickDraw includes shape filling functions, which may be used to fill a specified shape using a specified pixel pattern. A handle to a pixPat data structure is passed in the thePPat parameter of these functions.

Bit Patterns

After drawing or painting with a pixel pattern, you can return to drawing or painting with the foreground colour by simply restoring the default all-"black" pattern by calling PenPat and passing in the bit pattern contained in the QuickDraw global variable black as follows:

     Pattern blackPattern;

     PenPat(GetQDGlobalsBlack(&blackPattern));

After erasing with a pixel pattern, you can return to erasing with the background colour by simply restoring the default all-"white" pattern by calling BackPat and passing in the bit pattern contained in the QuickDraw global variable white as follows:

     Pattern whitePattern;

     BackPat(GetQDGlobalsWhite(&whitePattern));

When you use the PenPat and BackPat functions, QuickDraw constructs a pixel pattern equivalent to the bit pattern, The graphics port's current foreground colour is used for the "black" bits in the bit pattern, and the background colour is used for the "white" bits.

The PenPat and BackPat functions may also be used to set other bit patterns in the graphics port.

Transfer Modes

The term transfer mode may be considered as a generic term encompassing three different transfer mode types. Each has to do with the way source pixels interact with destination pixels during drawing, painting, erasing, filling, and copying operations. The three types of transfer mode are as follows:

  • Boolean Pattern Mode. Boolean pattern modes apply to line drawing, framing, painting, erasing, and filling operations.

  • Boolean Source Mode. Boolean source modes apply to text drawing and copying operations.

  • Arithmetic Source Mode. Arithmetic source modes apply to drawing (including text drawing), painting, and copying operations.

Boolean Pattern Modes

Pattern modes may be set as pen transfer modes in the graphics port using the PenMode function. The modes are represented by eight constants, each of which relates to a specific Boolean operation (COPY, OR, XOR, and BIC (for bit clear)) and their inverse variants.

The effects of these modes are best explained assuming a 1-bit (black-and-white) environment in which the foreground colour is black and the background colour is white. The following lists the pattern modes and describes the effect of source pixels on destination pixels in such an environment.

Pattern Mode

Action On Destination Pixel

If source pixel is black

If source pixel is white

patCopy

Apply foreground colour.

Apply background colour.

patOr

Apply foreground colour.

Leave alone.

patXor

Invert.

Leave alone.

patBic

Apply background colour.

Leave alone.

notPatCopy

Apply background colour.

Apply foreground colour.

notPatOr

Leave alone.

Force black.

notPatXor

Leave alone.

Invert.

notPatBic

Leave alone.

Apply background colour.

These effects are illustrated at Fig 4. Note particularly that patCopy causes the destination pixels to be completely over-written. patCopy is the transfer mode initially set in the graphics port.

Boolean Source Modes

Boolean source modes may be set as text in the graphics port using the function TextMode, and may be passed as parameters in QuickDraw functions for copying pixel images. The Boolean source modes are the equivalent in text drawing and copying to the Boolean pattern mode used for non-text drawing, painting, filling, and erasing operations.

The relevant constants are srcCopy, srcOr, srcXor, srcBic, notSrcCopy, notSrcOr, notSrcXor, and notSrcBic. The additional non-standard mode grayishTextOr is useful for drawing text in deactivated or disabled user interface objects. (This mode is considered non-standard because it is not stored in pictures and printing with it is undefined.)

Arithmetic Source Modes

Arithmetic source modes may be set in the graphics port, and may be passed as parameters in QuickDraw functions for copying pixel images.

Arithmetic source modes perform arithmetic operations on the values of the red, green and blue components of the source and destination pixels. Because they work with RGB colours rather than colour table indexes, arithmetic transfer modes produce predictable results on indexed devices. The arithmetic source modes and their effects in a colour environment are as follows:

Constant

Value

Description

blend 32

Destination pixel is replaced with a blend of the source and destination pixel colours. Revert to srcCopy mode if the destination is a bitmap or 1-bit pixel image.

addPin 33

Destination pixel is replaced with the sum of the source and destination pixel colours up to a maximum allowable value. Revert to srcBic mode if the destination is a bitmap or 1-bit pixel image.

addOver 34

Destination pixel is replaced with the sum of the source and destination pixel colours, but if the value of the red, green or blue component exceeds 65,536, then subtract 65,536 from that value. Revert to srcXor mode if the destination is a bitmap or 1-bit pixel image.

subPin 35

Destination pixel is replaced with the difference of the source and destination pixel colours, but not less than a minimum allowable value. Revert to srcOr mode if the destination is a bitmap or 1-bit pixel image.

transparent 36

Source and destination pixel are replaced with the source pixel if the source pixel is not equal to the background colour.

addMax 37

Destination pixel is replaced with the colour containing the greater saturation of each of the RGB components of the source and destination pixels. Revert to srcBic mode if the destination is a bitmap or 1-bit pixel image.

subOver 38

Destination pixel is replaced with the difference of the source and destination pixel colours, but if the value of the red, green or blue is less than 0, add the negative result to 65,536. Revert to srcXor mode if the destination is a bitmap or 1-bit pixel image.

adMin 39

Destination pixel is replaced with the colour containing the lesser saturation of each of the RGB components of the source and destination pixels. Revert to srcOr mode if the destination is a bitmap or 1-bit pixel image.

Drawing Lines and Framed Shapes

Functions for Drawing Lines

You can move the graphics pen to a specified location, and you can draw lines from that location. Lines are drawn using the current graphics pen size, foreground colour or pen pixel/bit pattern, and pen pattern mode.

Functions for moving the graphics pen and drawing lines are as follows:

Function

Description

MoveTo

Moves the graphics pen location to the specified location, in local coordinates.

Move

Moves the graphics pen a specified distance from its current location.

LineTo

Draws a line from the current pen location to the specified location, in local coordinates.

Line

Draws a line a specified distance from the graphics pen's current location.

Fig 5 shows a line drawn with a pen of size 20-by-40 pixels. Note that the pen "hangs" below and to the right of the defining points,

Functions for Drawing Framed Shapes

Framing a shape draws its outline only, using the current pen size, foreground colour or pen pixel/bit pattern, and pen pattern mode. The pixels in the interior of the shape are unaffected. Framed shapes are drawn using the current graphics pen size, foreground colour or pen pixel/bit pattern, and pen pattern mode.

Functions for drawing framed shapes are as follows:

Function

Description

FrameRect

Draws a rectangle, the position and size of which are defined by a Rect structure.

FrameOval

Draws an oval, the position and size of which are determined by a bounding rectangle defined by a Rect structure.

FrameRoundRect

Draws a rounded rectangle, the position and size of which are determined by a bounding rectangle defined by a Rect structure. Curvature of the corners is defined by ovalWidth and ovalHeight parameters.

FrameArc

Draws an arc, the position and size of which are determined by a bounding rectangle defined by a Rect structure. Starting point and arc extent are determined by startAngle and arcAngle parameters.

FramePoly

Draws a polygon by "playing back" all the line drawing calls that define it.

FrameRgn

Draws an outline around a specified region. The line is drawn just inside the region.

Fig 6 shows various framed shapes drawn with various graphics pen sizes and bit patterns. Note that the bounding rectangles completely enclose the shapes they bound, that is, no pixels extend outside the infinitely thin lines of the bounding rectangle. Note also that the arc is a portion of the circumference of an oval bounded by a pair or radii joining at the oval's centre.

Framed Polygons and Regions

Framed polygons and regions require that you call several functions to create and draw them. You begin by calling a function that collects drawing commands into a definition for the object. You then use drawing functions to define the object before calling a function which signals the end of the object definition. Finally, you use a function which draws the newly-defined object.

Framed Polygons

To define a polygon you must first call OpenPoly. You then call LineTo a number of times to create lines from the first vertex to the second, from the second vertex to the third, etc. You then call ClosePoly, which completes the definition process. After defining a polygon in this way, you can draw the polygon, as a framed polygon, using FramePoly.

Note that, in the framed polygon at Fig 5, the final defining line from the last vertex back to the first vertex was not drawn during the definition process. Note also that, as in all line drawing, FramePoly hangs the pen down and to the right of the infinitely thin lines that define the polygon.

Framed Regions

To define a region, you can use any set of lines or shapes, including other regions, so long as the region's outline consists of one or more closed loops. First, however, you must call NewRgn and OpenRgn. You then use line, shape, or region drawing commands to define the region. When you have finished collecting commands to define the outline of the region, you call CloseRgn. You can then draw the framed region using FrameRegion.

Drawing Painted and Filled Shapes

Painting a shape fills both its outline and its interior with the current foreground colour or graphics pen pixel/bit pattern. Filling a shape fills both its outline and its interior with a pixel pattern or bit pattern passed in a parameter of the QuickDraw shape filling functions.

Transfer Mode. Painting operations utilise the current graphics pen pattern mode. In filling operations, the transfer mode is invariably the pattern mode patCopy, meaning that the destination pixels are always completely overwritten.

Functions for Painting and Filling Shapes

The following lists the available functions for painting and filling shapes:

Function

Description

PaintRect

Fills a rectangle with the current foreground colour or graphics pen pixel/ bit pattern.

PaintOval

Fills an oval with the current foreground colour or graphics pen pixel/ bit pattern.

PaintRoundRect

Fills a round rectangle with the current foreground colour or graphics pen pixel/ bit pattern.

PaintArc

Fills a wedge with the current foreground colour or graphics pen pixel/ bit pattern.

PaintPoly

Fills a polygon with the current foreground colour or graphics pen pixel/ bit pattern.

PaintRgn

Fills a region with the current foreground colour or graphics pen pixel/ bit pattern.

FillRect

Fills a rectangle with a specified bit pattern.

FillCRect

Fills a rectangle with a specified pixel pattern.

FillOval

Fills an oval with a specified bit pattern.

FillCOval

Fills an oval with a specified pixel pattern.

FillRoundRect

Fills a round rectangle with a specified bit pattern.

FillCRoundRect

Fills a round rectangle with a specified pixel pattern.

FillArc

Fills a wedge of an oval with a specified bit pattern.

FillCArc

Fills a wedge of an oval with a specified pixel pattern.

FillPoly

Fills a polygon with a specified bit pattern.

FillCPoly

Fills a polygon with a specified pixel pattern.

FillRgn

Fills a region with a specified bit pattern.

FillCRgn

Fills a region with a specified pixel pattern.

Wedges

The wedges drawn by PaintArc, FillArc, and FillCArc are pie-shaped segments of an oval bounded by a pair of radii joining at the oval's centre. A wedge includes part of the oval's interior. Like the framed arc, wedges are defined by the bounding rectangle that encloses the oval, along with a pair of angles marking the positions of the bounding radii. Fig 7 shows a wedge.

Painted and Filled Polygons and Regions

The general procedure for drawing painted and filled polygons and regions is the same as described for their framed counterparts, above.

Fig 7 shows the polygon as defined for the framed polygon at Fig 6, but this time drawn with one of the polygon painting or filling functions. Note that, although the final defining line from the last vertex back to the first vertex was not drawn, the painting and filling functions complete the polygon (whereas FramePoly did not).

Fig 7 also shows a region comprising two rectangles and an overlapping oval, drawn using PaintRgn. Note that, where two regions overlap, the additional area is added to the region and the overlap is removed from the region.

Erasing and Inverting Shapes

Erasing a shape fills both its outline and its interior with the background colour or background pixel/bit pattern. Inverting a shape simply inverts all the pixels in the shape; for example, all black pixels become white, and vice versa.

Transfer Mode. In erasing operations, the transfer mode is invariably the pattern mode patCopy, meaning that the destination pixels are always completely overwritten.

Functions for Erasing and Inverting Shapes

The following list the available functions for painting and filling shapes:

Function

Description

EraseRect

Fills a rectangle with the current background colour or pixel/ bit pattern.

EraseOval

Fills an oval with the current background colour or pixel/ bit pattern.

EraseRoundRect

Fills a round rectangle with the current background colour or pixel/ bit pattern.

EraseArc

Fills a wedge with the current background colour or pixel/ bit pattern.

ErasePoly

Fills a polygon with the current background colour or pixel/ bit pattern.

EraseRgn

Fills a region with the current background colour or pixel/ bit pattern.

InvertRect

Inverts all the pixels in a rectangle.

InvertOval

Inverts all the pixels in an oval.

InvertRoundRect

Inverts all the pixels in a round rectangle.

InvertArc

Inverts all the pixels in a wedge.

InvertPoly

Inverts all the pixels in a polygon.

InvertRgn

Inverts all the pixels in a region.

Drawing Pictures

Your application can record a sequence of QuickDraw drawing operations in a picture and play its image back later. Fig 8 shows an example of a simple picture containing a filled rectangle, a filled oval, and some text.

The subject of pictures is addressed in more detail at Chapter 13.

Drawing Text

Setting the Font

The font used to draw text in a graphics port may be set using the function TextFont. TextFont takes a single parameter, of type SInt16, which may be either a predefined constant or a font family ID number. Although predefined constants remain in the header file Fonts.h, their use is now discouraged by Apple.

You can get the font family ID using GetFNum. For example, the following sets the current font to Palatino:

     short fontNum;

     GetFNum("\pPalatino",&fontNum);
     TextFont(fontNum);

If you know the font family ID, you can get its name by calling the Font Manager's GetFontName function. If you do not know either the font family ID or the font name, you can use the Resource Manager's GetIndResource function followed by the GetResInfo function to determine the names and IDs of all available fonts.

Setting and Modifying the Text Style

You use the function TextFace to change the text style, using any combination of the constants bold, italic, underline, outline, shadow, condense, and extend. Some examples of are as follows:

     TextFace(bold);                              // Set to bold.
     TextFace(bold | italic);                     // Set to bold and italic.)
     TextFace(GetPortTextFace(thePort) | bold);   // Add bold to existing.
     TextFace(GetPortTextFace(thePort) &~ bold);  // Remove bold.
     TextFace(normal);                            // Set to plain.

Setting the Font Size

You use the function TextSize to change the font size in typographical points. A point is approximately 1/72 inch.

Changing the Width of Characters

Widening and narrowing space and non-space characters lets you meet special formatting requirements. You use SpaceExtra to specify the extra pixels to be added to or subtracted from the standard width of the space character. SpaceExtra is ordinarily used in text-justification functions.

Transfer Mode

The transfer mode initially set in the graphics port is the Boolean source mode srcOr. This mode causes the colour of the glyph to be determined by the foreground colour and the drawn glyph to completely overwrite the existing pixels. (In this mode only those bits which make up the actual glyph are drawn.)

A glyph is the visual representation of a character.

You should generally use either srcOr or srcBic when drawing text, because all other transfer modes draw the character's background as well as the glyph itself. This can result in the clipping of characters by adjacent characters.

Copying Pixel Images Between Graphics Ports

QuickDraw provides the following three primary image-processing functions:

  • CopyBits, which copies a pixel image to another graphics port, optionally allowing you to:

    • Resize the image.

    • Modify the image with transfer modes.

    • Clip the image to a region.
  • CopyMask, which copies a pixel image to another graphics port, allowing you to:

    • Resize the image.

    • Modify the image by passing it through a mask.
  • CopyDeepMask, which combines the effects of CopyBits and CopyMask, , optionally allowing you to:

    • Resize the image.

    • Clip the image to a region.

    • Specify a transfer mode.

    • Modify the image by passing it through a mask.

The mask used by CopyMask and CopyDeepMask may be another pixel map whose pixels indicate proportionate weights of the colours for the source and destination pixels.

The CopyBits, CopyMask, and CopyDeepMask functions date from the era of black-and-white Macintoshes, which is why they expect a pointer to a bitmap in their source and destination parameters. Thus, when you are copying pixel maps using these functions, you must cast the address of the handle to the pixel map to a pointer to a bitmap. By looking at certain information in the graphics port object, CopyBits, CopyMask, and CopyDeepMask can establish that you have passed the functions a handle to a pixel map rather than the base address of a bitmap.

Using Masks

With CopyMask and CopyDeepMask, you supply a pixel map to act as the copying mask. The mask's pixels proportionally select between source and destination pixel values.

In the case of masks that are 1 bit deep, black bits in the mask cause the destination pixel to take the colour of the source pixel and white bits cause the destination pixel to retain its current colour. In the case of masks with pixel depths greater than 1, Colour QuickDraw takes a weighted average between source and destination colours. For example, a blue mask (that is, one with high values for the blue components of all pixels) filters out blue values coming from the source.

Transfer Modes

CopyBits and CopyDeepMask both allow you to specify the transfer mode, which can be either a Boolean source mode or an arithmetic source mode.

The Importance of Foreground and Background Colour

Applying a foreground colour other than black or a background colour other than white to the pixel can produce an unexpected result. For consistent results, you should set the foreground colour to black and the background colour to white before using CopyBits, CopyMask, or CopyDeepMask. (That said, setting foreground and background colours to something other than black or white can achieve some interesting colouration effects.)

Dithering

You can use dithering with CopyBits and CopyDeepMask. Dithering is a technique used by these functions to mix existing colours together to create the illusion of a third colour that may be unavailable on an indexed device, and to improve images that you shrink when copying them from a direct device to an indexed device.

You can add dithering to any transfer mode by adding the following constant to the transfer mode:

     ditherCopy = 64  // Add to source mode for dithering.

Copying From Offscreen Graphics Ports

To gracefully display complex images, your application should construct the image in an offscreen graphics world and then use CopyBits to transfer the image to the onscreen graphics port. (Offscreen graphics worlds are addressed at Chapter 13.)

Scrolling Pixels in the Port Rectangle

You can use ScrollRect to scroll the pixels in the port rectangle. ScrollRect takes four parameters: the rectangle to scroll, a horizontal distance to scroll, a vertical distance to scroll, and a region reference. ScrollRect is a special form of CopyBits which copies bits enclosed by a rectangle and stores them within that same rectangle. The vacated area is filled with the current background colour or pixel/bit pattern.

Manipulating Rectangles and Regions

QuickDraw provides many functions for manipulating rectangles and regions. You can use the functions which manipulate rectangles to manipulate any shape based on a rectangle, that is, rounded rectangles, ovals , arcs, and wedges.

For example, you could define a rectangle to bound an oval and then frame the oval. You could then use OffsetRect to move the oval's bounding rectangle downwards. Using the offset bounding rectangle, you could frame a second, connected oval to form a figure eight with the first oval. You could then use that shape to help define a region. You could create a second region, and then use UnionRgn to create a region from the union of the two.

Manipulating Rectangles

The following summarises the functions for manipulating, and performing calculations on, rectangles:

Function

Description

EmptyRect

Determine whether a rectangle is an empty rectangle.

EqualRect

Determine whether two rectangles are equal.

InsetRect

Shrinks or expands a rectangle.

OffsetRect

Moves a rectangle.

PtInRect

Determines whether a pixel is enclosed in a rectangle.

PtToAngle

Calculates the angle from the middle of a rectangle to a point.

Pt2Rect

Determines the smallest rectangle that encloses two points.

SectRect

Determines whether two rectangles intersect.

UnionRect

Calculates the smallest rectangle that encloses two rectangles.

Manipulating Regions

The following summarises the functions for manipulating, and performing calculations on, regions:

Function

Description

CopyRgn

Makes a copy of a region.

DiffRgn

Subtracts one region from another.

EmptyRgn

Determines whether a region is empty.

EqualRgn

Determines whether two regions have identical sizes, shapes, and locations.

InsetRgn

Shrinks or expands a region.

OffsetRgn

Moves a region.

PtInRgn

Determines whether a pixel is within a region.

RectInRgn

Determines whether a rectangle intersects a region.

RectRgn

Changes the structure of an existing region to that of a rectangle (using a Rect).

SectRgn

Calculates the intersection of two regions.

SetEmptyRgn

Sets a region to empty.

SetRectRgn

Changes the structure of an existing region to that of a rectangle (using coordinates).

UnionRgn

Calculates the union of two regions.

XorRgn

Calculates the difference between the union and the intersection of two regions.

Manipulating Polygons

You can use OffSetPoly to move a polygon; however, QuickDraw provides no other functions for manipulating polygons.

Scaling Shapes and Regions Within the Same Graphics Port

To scale shapes and regions within the same graphics port, you can use the functions ScalePt, MapPt, MapRect, MapRgn, and MapPoly.

Highlighting

Highlighting is used when selecting and deselecting objects such as text or graphics. TextEdit, for example, uses highlighting to indicate selected text. If the current highlight colour is, for example, blue, TextEdit draws the selected text, then uses InvertRgn to produce a blue background for the text.

The system highlight colour, which can be changed by the user at the Highlight Color item in the Appearance pane of the Appearance control panel, is stored in a low memory global represented by the symbolic name HiliteRGB. It can be retrieved using LMGetHiliteRGB. You can override the default colour using the function HiliteColor. The current colour is copied the graphics port object, and may be retrieved from there using the function GetPortHiliteColor.

Color QuickDraw implements highlighting by replacing the background colour with the highlight colour. Another low memory global, represented by the symbolic name HiliteMode, contains a byte which represents the current highlight mode. One bit in that byte, represented by the constant pHiliteBit, is used to toggle the background and highlight colours.

Because Color QuickDraw resets the highlight bit after performing each drawing operation, your application must always clear the highlight bit immediately before calling InvertRgn (or, indeed, any of the other drawing or image-copying function that uses the patXor or srcXor transfer modes.)

The highlight mode can be retrieved and set using LMGetHiliteMode and LMSetHiliteMode, and BitClr may be used to clear the highlight bit:

     UInt8  hiliteMode;
     ...
     hiliteMode = LMGetHiliteMode();
     BitClr(&hiliteMode,pHiliteBit);
     LMSetHiliteMode(hiliteMode);

Another way to use highlighting is to add this constant to the transfer mode you pass in calls to the functions PenMode, CopyBits, CopyDeepMask and TextMode:

     hilite = 50  // Add to source or pattern mode for highlighting.

Drawing Other Graphics Entities

In addition to drawing lines, rectangles, rounded rectangles, ovals, arcs, wedges, polygons and regions, and text, you can also use QuickDraw to draw the following:

  • Cursors.

  • Icons.

Cursors and Icons are addressed at Chapter 13.

Saving and Restoring the Graphics Port Drawing State

As stated above, the functions GetPenState and SetPenState are used to save and restore the graphics pen's location, size, transfer mode, and pattern, and PenNormal is used to initialise the pen's size, transfer mode, and pattern.

Typically, an application calls GetPenState at the beginning of a function that changes the pen's location, size, transfer mode, and/or pattern and restores the saved state to the pen on exit from that function. Depending on its requirements, an application might also save and restore the graphics port's foreground and background colours, and the text transfer mode, in the same way.

Since the introduction of the Appearance Manager, it has also become necessary to save and restore the pen pixel/bit pattern and background pixel/bit pattern in functions that call the Appearance Manager functions SetThemeBackground, SetThemePen, and/or SetThemeWindowBackground. Recall from Chapter 6 that constants of type ThemeBrush are passed in the inBrush parameter of these Appearance Manager functions and that the value in the inBrush parameter can represent either a colour or a pattern depending on the current appearance.

Accordingly, in the era of the Appearance Manager, applications which call SetThemeBackground and/or SetThemePen will need to take measures to save and restore the complete graphics port drawing state and, if required, normalise that state.

The following functions are used for saving, restoring, and normalising the graphics port drawing state:

Function

Description

GetThemeDrawingState

Obtains the drawing state of the current graphics port.

SetThemeDrawingState

Sets the drawing state of the current graphics port.

NormalizeThemeDrawingState

Sets the current graphics port to the default drawing state.

DisposeThemeDrawingState

Releases the memory associated with a reference to a graphics port's drawing state. (Note that this memory may also be released by passing true in the inDisposeNow parameter of SetThemeDrawingState.)

Information about the current state of the graphics port is stored in a structure of type ThemeDrawingState. This is a private data structure.

Main QuickDraw Constants, Data Types and Functions

Constants

Boolean Pattern Modes

patCopy      = 8
patOr        = 9
patXor       = 10
patBic       = 11
notPatCopy   = 12
notPatOr     = 13
notPatXor    = 14
notPatBic    = 15

Boolean Source Modes

srcCopy      = 0
srcOr        = 1
srcXor       = 2
srcBic       = 3
notSrcCopy   = 4
notSrcOr     = 5
notSrcXor    = 6
notSrcBic    = 7
ditherCopy   = 64

Arithmetic Transfer Modes

blend        = 32
addPin       = 33
addOver      = 34
subPin       = 35
transparent  = 36
addMax       = 37
subOver      = 38
adMin        = 39

Add Dithering to Transfer Modes

ditherCopy   = 64

Highlighting

hilite       = 50
hiliteBit    = 7
pHiliteBit   = 0

Pattern List Resource ID for Pattern Resources in the System File

sysPatListID  = 0

Data Types

Point

struct Point
{
  short  v;
  short  h;
};

typedef struct Point Point;
typedef Point *PointPtr;

Rect

struct Rect 
{
  short  top;
  short  left;
  short  bottom;
  short  right;
};

typedef struct Rect Rect;
typedef Rect *RectPtr;

Region

typedef struct OpaqueRgnHandle *RgnHandle;

Polygon

struct Polygon
{
  short  polySize;
  Rect   polyBBox;
  Point  polyPoints[1];
};

typedef struct Polygon Polygon;
typedef Polygon *PolyPtr, **PolyHandle;

PenState

struct PenState
{
  Point    pnLoc;
  Point    pnSize;
  short    pnMode;
  Pattern  pnPat;
};

typedef struct PenState PenState;

Functions

Managing the Graphics Pen

void  HidePen(void);
void  ShowPen(void);
void  GetPen(Point *pt);
void  GetPenState(PenState *pnState);
void  SetPenState(const PenState *pnState);
void  PenSize(short width,short height);
void  PenMode(short mode);
void  PenNormal(void);

Getting and Setting Foreground, Background , and Pixel Colour

void  RGBForeColor(const RGBColor *color);
void  RGBBackColor(const RGBColor *color);
void  GetForeColor(RGBColor *color);
void  GetBackColor(RGBColor *color);
void  GetCPixel(short h,short v,RGBColor *cPix);
void  SetCPixel(short h,short v,const RGBColor *cPix);

Creating and Disposing of Pixel Patterns

PixPatHandle  GetPixPat(short patID);
PixPatHandle  NewPixPat(void);
void          CopyPixPat(PixPatHandle srcPP,PixPatHandle dstPP);
void          MakeRGBPat(PixPatHandle pp,const RGBColor *myColor);
void          DisposePixPat(PixPatHandle pp);

Getting Pattern Resources

PatHandle  GetPattern(short patternID);
void       GetIndPattern(Pattern *thePat,short patternListID,short index);

Changing the Pen and BackGround Pixel Pattern and Bit Pattern

void  BackPixPat(PixPatHandle pp);
void  PenPixPat(PixPatHandle pp);
void  BackPat(const Pattern *pat);
void  PenPat(const Pattern *pat);

Drawing Lines

void  MoveTo(short h,short v);
void  Move(short dh,short dv);
void  LineTo(short h,short v);
void  Line(short dh,short dv);

Drawing Rectangles

void  FrameRect(const Rect *r);
void  PaintRect(const Rect *r);
void  FillRect(const Rect *r,ConstPatternParam pat);
void  FillCRect(const Rect *r,PixPatHandle pp);
void  InvertRect(const Rect *r);
void  EraseRect(const Rect *r);

Drawing Rounded Rectangles

void  FrameRoundRect(const Rect *r,short ovalWidth,short ovalHeight);
void  PaintRoundRect(const Rect *r,short ovalWidth,short ovalHeight);
void  FillRoundRect(const Rect *r,short ovalWidth,short ovalHeight,const Pattern *pat);
void  FillCRoundRect(const Rect *r,short ovalWidth,short ovalHeight,PixPatHandle pp);
void  InvertRoundRect(const Rect *r,short ovalWidth,short ovalHeight);
void  EraseRoundRect(const Rect *r,short ovalWidth,short ovalHeight);

Drawing Ovals

void  FrameOval(const Rect *r);
void  PaintOval(const Rect *r);
void  FillOval(const Rect *r,const Pattern *pat);
void  FillCOval(const Rect *r,PixPatHandle pp);
void  InvertOval(const Rect *r);
void  EraseOval(const Rect *r);

Drawing Arcs and Wedges

void  FrameArc(const Rect *r,short startAngle,short arcAngle);
void  PaintArc(const Rect *r,short startAngle,short arcAngle);
void  FillArc(const Rect *r,short startAngle,short arcAngle,const Pattern *pat);
void  FillCArc(const Rect *r,short startAngle,short arcAngle,PixPatHandle pp);
void  InvertArc(const Rect *r,short startAngle,short arcAngle);
void  EraseArc(const Rect *r,short startAngle,short arcAngle);

Drawing and Painting Polygons

void  FramePoly(PolyHandle poly);
void  PaintPoly(PolyHandle poly);
void  FillPoly(PolyHandle poly,const Pattern *pat);
void  FillCPoly(PolyHandle poly,PixPatHandle pp);
void  InvertPoly(PolyHandle poly);
void  ErasePoly(PolyHandle poly);

Drawing Regions

void  FrameRgn(RgnHandle rgn);
void  PaintRgn(RgnHandle rgn);
void  FillCRgn(RgnHandle rgn,PixPatHandle pp);
void  EraseRgn(RgnHandle rgn);
void  InvertRgn(RgnHandle rgn);
void  FillRgn(RgnHandle rgn, const Pattern *pat);

Setting Text Characteristics

void  TextFont(short font);
void  TextFace(short face);
void  TextMode(short mode);
void  TextSize(short size);
void  SpaceExtra(Fixed extra);
void  GetFontInfo(FontInfo *info);

Drawing and Measuring Text

void   DrawChar(short ch);
void   DrawString(ConstStr255Param s);
void   DrawText(const void *textBuf,short firstByte,short byteCount);
short  CharWidth(short ch);
short  StringWidth(ConstStr255Param s);

Copying Images

void  CopyBits(const BitMap *srcBits,const BitMap *dstBits,const Rect *srcRect,
      const Rect *dstRect,short mode,RgnHandle maskRgn);
void  CopyMask(const BitMap *srcBits,const BitMap *maskBits,const BitMap *dstBits,
      const Rect *srcRect,const Rect *maskRect,const Rect *dstRect);
void  CopyDeepMask(const BitMap *srcBits,const BitMap *maskBits,const BitMap *dstBits,
      const Rect *srcRect,const Rect *maskRect,const Rect *dstRect,short mode, 
      RgnHandle maskRgn);

Getting and Setting the Highlight Colour and HighLight Mode

void   HiliteColor(const RGBColor *color);
void   LMGetHiliteRGB(RGBColor *hiliteRGBValue);
void   LMSetHiliteRGB(const RGBColor *hiliteRGBValue);
UInt8  LMGetHiliteMode(void);
void   LMSetHiliteMode(UInt8 value);

Creating and Disposing of Colour Tables

CTabHandle  GetCTable(short ctID);
void        DisposeCTable(CTabHandle cTable);

Creating and Managing Polygons

PolyHandle  OpenPoly(void);
void        ClosePoly(void);
void        KillPoly(PolyHandle poly);
void        OffsetPoly(PolyHandle poly,short dh,short dv);

Creating and Managing Rectangles

void     SetRect(Rect *r,short left,short top,short right,short bottom);
void     OffsetRect(Rect *r,short dh,short dv);
void     InsetRect(Rect *r,short dh,short dv);
Boolean  SectRect(const Rect *src1,const Rect *src2,Rect *dstRect);
void     UnionRect(const Rect *src1,const Rect *src2,Rect *dstRect);
Boolean  PtInRect(Point pt,const Rect *r);
void     Pt2Rect(Point pt1,Point pt2,Rect *dstRect);
void     PtToAngle(const Rect *r,Point pt,short *angle);
Boolean  EqualRect(const Rect *rect1,const Rect *rect2);
Boolean  EmptyRect(const Rect *r);

Creating and Managing Regions

RgnHandle  NewRgn(void);
void       OpenRgn(void);
void       CloseRgn(RgnHandle dstRgn);
void       DisposeRgn(RgnHandle rgn);
void       CopyRgn(RgnHandle srcRgn,RgnHandle dstRgn);
void       SetEmptyRgn(RgnHandle rgn);
void       SetRectRgn(RgnHandle rgn,short left,short top,short right,short bottom);
void       RectRgn(RgnHandle rgn,const Rect *r);
void       OffsetRgn(RgnHandle rgn,short dh,short dv);
void       InsetRgn(RgnHandle rgn,short dh,short dv);
void       SectRgn(RgnHandle srcRgnA,RgnHandle srcRgnB,RgnHandle dstRgn);
void       UnionRgn(RgnHandle srcRgnA,RgnHandle srcRgnB,RgnHandle dstRgn);
void       DiffRgn(RgnHandle srcRgnA,RgnHandle srcRgnB,RgnHandle dstRgn);
void       XorRgn(RgnHandle srcRgnA,RgnHandle srcRgnB,RgnHandle dstRgn);
Boolean    PtInRgn(Point pt,RgnHandle rgn);
Boolean    RectInRgn(const Rect *r,RgnHandle rgn);
Boolean    EqualRgn(RgnHandle rgnA,RgnHandle rgnB);
Boolean    EmptyRgn(RgnHandle rgn);
OSErr      BitMapToRegion(RgnHandle region,const BitMap *bMap);

Scaling and Mapping Points, Rectangles, Polygons, and Regions

void  ScalePt(Point *pt,const Rect *srcRect,const Rect *dstRect);
void  MapPt(Point *pt,const Rect *srcRect,const Rect *dstRect);
void  MapRect(Rect *r,const Rect *srcRect,const Rect *dstRect);
void  MapRgn(RgnHandle rgn,const Rect *srcRect,const Rect *dstRect);
void  MapPoly(PolyHandle poly,const Rect *srcRect,const Rect *dstRect);

Determining Whether QuickDraw has Finished Drawing

Boolean  QDDone(GrafPtr port);

Retrieving Color QuickDraw Result Codes

short  QDError(void);

Managing Port Rectangles and Clipping Regions

void  ScrollRect(const Rect *r,short dh,short dv,RgnHandle updateRgn);
void  SetOrigin(short h,short v);
void  PortSize(short width,short height);
void  MovePortTo(short leftGlobal,short topGlobal);
void  GetClip(RgnHandle rgn);
void  SetClip(RgnHandle rgn);
void  ClipRect(const Rect *r);

Manipulating Points in Graphics Ports

void     GlobalToLocal(Point *pt);
void     LocalToGlobal(Point *pt);
void     AddPt(Point src,Point *dst);
void     SubPt(Point *src,Point *dst);
void     SetPt(Point *pt,short h,short v);
Boolean  EqualPt(Point pt1,Point pt2);
Boolean  GetPixel(short h,short v);

Relevant Appearance Manager Data Types and Functions

Data Types

typedef struct OpaqueThemeDrawingState *ThemeDrawingState;

Functions

OSStatus  NormalizeThemeDrawingState(void);
OSStatus  GetThemeDrawingState(ThemeDrawingState *outState);
OSStatus  SetThemeDrawingState(ThemeDrawingState inState,Boolean inDisposeNow);
OSStatus  DisposeThemeDrawingState(ThemeDrawingState inState);

 
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