TweetFollow Us on Twitter

The Road to Code: The Courage to Start

Volume Number: 23 (2007)
Issue Number: 07
Column Tag: The Road to Code

The Road to Code: The Courage to Start

Take the first step towards programming for Mac OS X

by Dave Dribin

Welcome

Welcome to The Road to Code, a new column about programming on OS X for the non-programmer. My name is Dave Dribin, and I'll be your guide in the issues to come. Unlike a rollercoaster, playing around can't hurt you. In fact, the best way to learn programming is to actually do it. So please, keep your hands and fingers on the keyboard at all times.

Why Program

Before I go into the details of programming, you might be wondering why you would want to program a computer. As a computer user, you no doubt know that the computer is our personal assistant. It helps us stay organized, eases communication with others, and entertains us. Unfortunately, you might also agree that a computer doesn't always work the way we expect. Sometimes a piece of software allows you to do everything except that one thing you need it to do. Other times, software just doesn't exist for the task you are trying to accomplish. The key to harnessing the full power of your personal assistant is to speak to it directly by writing your own programs.

I began programming a long time ago on an operating system far, far away. Apple's DOS 3.3, to be exact, running on an Apple ][+. Once I started programming, I was hooked. The fact that I could tell the computer what to do and it would listen was fantastic. My first programs were very simple, but over the next few years, the programs I wrote increased in complexity.

A year ago, I was going through some of my old 5.25" floppy disks. I came across a number of programs I wrote in Applesoft BASIC: a program to keep track of my (measly) bank account, a blackjack game, and even a program to keep track of my bowling scores. While the finance software and blackjack are not groundbreaking ideas, the bowling program was fairly unique. At the end of our bowling league season, we would get a printout with all of our scores for the entire year, along with a ton of statistics. I was a bowling geek and loved these stats, but I didn't want to wait until the end of the year to see them. So, I wrote a program that would allow me to enter my scores and provide the same statistics without the wait.


Figure 1: My Apple II bowling program

There are a couple of lessons to take away from this. First, start small. I didn't dive right into writing my bowling program. I also found plenty of half-finished work and small, experimental programs on my old disks. Second, practice, practice, practice. The more I programmed, the better I got. Even the little programs that don't do much add to your experience, and that counts for something.

A lot has changed since the days of the Apple ][, with its 1 megahertz processor, 64 kilobytes of memory, and 140 kilobyte floppy disks, but the reasons to start programming have not. Maybe you want to write a program that actually works the way you do, maybe you want to write the next blockbuster game, or maybe you just think it's fun. These are the reasons why I began programming and why I still program today. Whatever your reasons, you should start, too.

What Is Software

Software, also known as a program, is what controls a computer. A computer's sole purpose is to respond to instructions from a program. By writing programs for the computer, you can take full control of your personal assistant. Think of a program as a series of instructions, like a recipe, that the computer follows, step by step. But sometimes even a programmer has trouble communicating with the computer. It is very literal in its interpretation of these instructions. If you don't give them properly, the computer may go off and do something unexpected.

The language used to write programs is called, brace yourself for this, a programming language. Actually, computers are multilingual. Some of the programming languages available on Mac OS X 10.4 are C, C++, Ruby, Python, and Perl. Each language has its own pros and cons. However, the language Apple recommends for writing new OS X software is called Objective-C. Since in this case it's wise to follow the mothership, Objective-C will be the main focus of this column. Objective-C is an extension to C with support for object-oriented programming. You'll get to learn about Objective-C and fancy phrases like "object-oriented programming" in due time, but first we need to build a strong foundation. Since Objective-C is built upon C, I'll cover the basics of C before moving on to Objective-C. As the old saying goes, you've got to learn to walk before you can run.

Time to Code

Before starting to write our first program and in order to follow along, you will need to install Xcode, Apple's free development environment. As of this writing, the current version of Xcode is 2.4.1. It requires Mac OS X 10.4, and is available from Apple's developer website:

http://developer.apple.com/tools/xcode/

You will need to become an Apple Developer Connection (ADC) member, but it does not cost anything to register. Xcode includes all the tools to write Objective-C, including a text editor and a compiler. Even though Objective-C is the language we will be communicating to the computer with, the computer's processor does not understand this language directly. A compiler is needed to translate Objective-C into assembly code, which is the true native tongue of the processor.

With Xcode installed, we can finally start getting our hands dirty and begin coding. We're going to start with what's called a "Hello World" program. This "Hello World" program will print a nice greeting to the user when run, and is often used to introduce programmers to a new language. A word of warning: "Hello World" isn't sexy. In fact, it doesn't even use windows or the mouse. We're going to crawl back into the dark ages for a bit, and we'll be creating console applications, not applications with a graphical user interface (GUI), until we get through the basics. While console applications will run directly in Xcode, they can also be run from the command line using Terminal. But don't get discouraged. We will get to GUI applications soon enough.

Creating Hello World

To create our first program, startup Xcode and select New Project… from the File menu. Xcode provides starting point templates for many kinds of projects. The one we are looking for is Standard Tool under Command Line Utility. For a project name, choose hello_world and choose a suitable directory, such as ~/work/hello_word. After clicking Finish, Xcode will create the project, along with some basic files. Use Figure 2 and Figure 3 as examples.


Figure 2: Creating a new Standard Tool project


Figure 3: Setting the project name and directory

C programs are made up of one or more text files with the ".c" extension called source files. A source file contains the actual programming instructions called source code, often just shortened to source or code depending on the context. This is also why programming is sometimes referred to as coding [Editor's note: if they can be called programmers or coders, could they also be referred to as sorcerers? - jr]. As part of the New Project template, Xcode created a single source file named main.c. To view this file, expand the Source item in the left pane, and select the main.c item. Next, click on the Editor toolbar icon. Your window should look similar to Figure 4.


Figure 4: main.c source file in Xcode

You will notice that this file is not empty. As it turns out, Xcode creates a ready-to-run "Hello World" every time we create a new project. This is handy for us because it means we don't even need to type anything to get started. Click on the Build and Go toolbar icon to compile and run the program. If all goes well, you should get a Run Log window with the Hello, World! message on line 2 similar to Figure 5.


Figure 5: Hello World Run Log

Let's start picking this program apart line by line. The programming instructions are listed in the order you want them to execute. You can think of these instructions, called statements, as sentences, except instead of using a period to mark the end of a sentence, C uses a semicolon to mark the end of a statement. Not every line contains executable statements, though. Sometimes, the code contains extra information about the program for the compiler, and other times it contains extra information for the programmer. For example, Line 4 starts with two slashes, and is what is called a comment. The compiler ignores the two slashes and any text after them. You can put whatever you want in comments, but they should be used to make the program more understandable for someone reading the program.

On line 5, you have a statement that looks like:

   printf("Hello, World!\n");

This is what is known as a function call. A function in C is a set of statements that can be reused over and over again. A function call executes the function's statements. When the function finishes, the program picks up where it left off before the function call.

In this function call, printf is the name of the function to execute, and the text between the parentheses is the function's arguments. Arguments are used as inputs to the function allowing you to customize how it behaves. The text between the double quotes is called a string. The printf function is part of the Standard C library, and displays a message to the console. It expects a string argument and uses that string as its message.

First Steps

To get a better understanding, let's modify this program a bit. Change this line of code to:

   printf("My favorite number is %d\n", 7);

Now build and run the program, and the output in the Run Log should show:

My favorite number is 7

Now it's getting interesting. This time we passed two arguments to printf, the first a string, and the second a number. You'll notice that instead of printing %d, it replaced that with 7. This is where the "f" part of printf name comes from: formatted printing. The string passed to printf is called a format string, and is used like a template to format the final message. In the example above, %d is a placeholder for an integer number. An integer is a number without decimal points. Format strings could be a topic in itself, but here is another example showing how to use strings and floating point numbers (numbers with a decimal point):

   printf("Hello %s.\nMy lunch cost $%.2f.\n", "Dave", 7.5);

The output of this is:

Hello Dave.
My lunch cost $7.50.

You can see the %s is replaced with the string Dave and the %.2f is replaced with 7.50. This also shows how you can customize the formatted output. The .2 tells printf to always use 2 places after the decimal point. The final piece of magic going on is the string \n. printf replaces this string with a newline, which is why our output shows up on two lines. You almost always want one of these at the end of your format string, but I wanted to show explicitly what \n does and that you can put them anywhere in your string.

Congratulations! You're now programming! Try replacing the string "Dave" with your own name, and try printing out other numbers. Remember, it helps to experiment.

Variables

Variables are the next key concept to understand. Think of variables as containers that hold stuff, like storage boxes that you may have around the house. These boxes can hold different items, such as books and clothes. In order to keep things organized, your boxes may also have labels, like "Science Fiction", so you know what it contains. Similarly, variables can hold different values, such as numbers and strings and they also have labels to help keep things organized. Let's replace the entire main.c of our earlier program with Listing 1.

Listing 1: main.c demonstrating variables

#include <stdio.h>
int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
   int myVariable;
   myVariable = 5;
   printf("The number is %d\n", myVariable);
   myVariable = myVariable*2;
   printf("The number is now %d\n", myVariable);
   
   return 0;
}

In C, every variable must be declared before it's used, so the compiler is aware of it. The statement on line 3 is called a variable declaration, and it tells the compiler the variable's label, called a name, and type. This variable is named myVariable and its type is int, for an integer. Why do we need the type? Back to the box analogy, variables in C are like boxes with strict rules. Boxes that are designed to hold books cannot hold clothes, and boxes designed to hold clothes cannot hold books. Thus, an integer variable can hold any integer, but not any other type, such as floating point numbers or strings. This may seem silly, but one benefit to including the type with every variable is it allows the compiler to tell you when you've made a mistake. Just as your parents will tell you if you are putting your books in your clothes box and make you fix it, the compiler will not let you put a string in an integer variable.

You can change the contents of a variable with an assignment statement using an equal sign. The first assignment statement sets the contents of the variable, myVariable, to five. The second assignment statement shows that you can use a mathematical expression on the right hand side of the equal sign. In this case the asterisk (also called a star) means we are multiplying the original number in myVariable, five, by two. The resulting output of this program is:

The number is 5
The number is now 10

A Brief Interlude on Expressions

You can use any of the common arithmetic operations summarized in Table 1 as part of a mathematical expression, and you can use parenthesis to prioritize multiple operations. Take this expression, as an example:

   myVariable = (myVariable+1)*2;

First, one is added to myVariable and then the result is multiplied it by two. If myVariable starts off as five, it will be set to twelve by this statement. Without parenthesis, the standard operator priority is observed. In this case, one is multiplied by two first, and then the result is added to myVariable resulting in myVariable being set to seven. It's usually a good idea to add parentheses to any complex expression to avoid confusion.

Table 1: Arithmetic Operations By Priority

Operation   C Syntax   
              Multiply      *   
              Divide        /   
              Add           +   
              Subtract      -   

Variety is the Spice of Life

Variables are an extremely important part of not only C programming, but also any programming language. Now that you know the basics of variables, try changing the name of myVariable to something else or adding new variables. Also, try out different mathematical expressions. Keep in mind that variable names have certain restrictions. You may only use letters, numbers or the underscore character ("_"), and they must not begin with a number.

Your Own Functions

The Standard C library contains other functions besides printf, but as your program starts getting larger, you will want to write your own custom functions. Usually this is because you want to use the same code without duplicating it, but sometimes you will use functions to make your programs easier to understand. Let's say that we will be printing our Hello, World! message multiple times. We can put this code in our own function, and then call it multiple times. Modify main.c to match Listing 3.

Listing 3: main.c demonstrating custom functions

#include <stdio.h>
void printMessage(void)
{
   printf("Hello, World!\n");
   return;
}
int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
   printMessage();
   printMessage();
   return 0;
}

If you build and run this program, you should see our message printed twice:

Hello, World!
Hello, World!

Notice that we typed our function before using it — it precedes its use in the program. This is called defining a function. Like variables, you must always tell the compiler about the function ahead of time. The very first line of a function is called a function signature. The function signature specifies the name of the function, the name and type of each argument, and the type of the return value. Let's look at our function signature:

void printMessage(void)

Our function name is printMessage. It doesn't take any arguments, so we use (void) to specify this. The first void before the function name means our function does not have a return value. We will get more into arguments and return values in a bit.

After the function signature comes the function body. The function body always begins and ends with curly braces, { and }. Inside the braces are the function's statements. The body of the printMessage function contains two statements. The first calls another function, printf. And the second is a return statement. A return statement marks the end of a function, and causes the program to return to the place where the function was called. While you may include statements after the return statement, they won't get executed. The return statement is optional for functions without a return value, so we could have written this function with one statement as:

void printMessage(void)
{
   printf("Hello, World!\n");
}

Arguments and Return Values

As I mentioned earlier, functions may have arguments and return values to customize their behavior, similar to a mathematical function. Modify main.c to match Listing 5.

Listing 5: main.c demonstrating function arguments and return values

#include <stdio.h>
int squareNumber(int number)
{
   int square;
   square = number*number;
   return square;
}
int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
   int number;
   number = 5;
   printf("The number is %d\n", number);
   number = squareNumber(number);
   printf("The number is now %d\n", number);
   
   return 0;
}

If you build and run this program, you should get the output:

The number is 5
The number is now 25

The function signature of the squareNumber function is different from the printMessage function in that the return type has changed from void to int, and the arguments have changed from (void) to (int number). This states that our function expects to take one integer argument and return an integer value. Inside the body of our function, we multiply the number by itself and store this result in a new integer variable called square. This time, the return statement itself takes an argument, which is used as the return value.

Local Scope of Function Variables

Function arguments themselves are variables. Thus, instead of creating a new variable, we could have shortened our function to:

int squareNumber(int number)
{
   number = number*number;
   return number;
}

Notice that even though we are changing the number variable in the squareNumber function, we still have to set the number variable in the main function. This is because each function has it's own set of variables that are independent from other functions. Variables defined in a function are called local variables. Local variables are only available for use inside the function they are declared in and do not conflict with variables defined in another function. They are essentially different boxes that just happen to have the same label. The concept of which variables are available is called variable scoping. We will cover more about variable scoping over time.

As it turns out, we don't even have to bother using the number argument as a variable. We can just do the multiplication directly in the return statement:

int squareNumber(int number)
{
   return number*number;
}

Multiple Arguments

Functions may take more than one argument by separating each one with a comma:

int multiplyNumbers(int number1, int number2)
{
   return number1*number2;
}

This states that you must pass two arguments when calling multiplyNumbers, for example:

   number = multiplyNumbers(number, 3);

Now that you know how to define your own functions, it's time again to experiment. If you are writing your own functions, keep in mind that the same restrictions described above for variable names also apply to function names. Try creating a function that takes three floating-point number arguments and returns the average of them. I'll give you a hint, especially since I haven't mentioned how to specify floating point number variables and return values, yet. Here's a function signature:

float threeNumberAverage(float number1, float number2, float number3)

Notice that I used float as type for the arguments and return value. Try and fill in the function body yourself.

Tying Up Loose Ends

Before wrapping up, I want to cover a couple points I've been skirting around. Now that you know how to define functions, you'll notice that we've actually been defining two functions in the last few examples. The second function is named main, and main is a special function. The operating system always calls main when a C program starts executing, and is called the entry point of your program. You'll notice that the signature for main has two arguments and a return value. The arguments use somewhat advanced types like an array of strings, which you can ignore for now. The integer return value is sent to the operating system when your program exits. The operating system then sends this value to the program that started your program. For example, if you change the return value to something other than zero, you will see this reflected in the Xcode Run Log window as the status. Be careful, though. Returning a number other than zero from main is typically used to indicate that something in your program went wrong. I suggest always returning zero, for now.

The second point I've skirted around is the very first line of every example:

#include <stdio.h>

Remember how I said that all functions must be defined before use? Well you may be wondering why we can call printf without a definition. This first line tells the compiler to include another source file named stdio.h. This source file, which is short for "standard input and output", contains the definitions for all of the Standard C library functions that pertain to input and output. Notice that this source file has a ".h" extension instead of ".c". This is a special source file called a header file. We will be learning more about header files, but for now, you need to remember to have this line in your source files, if you plan to use printf.

Conclusion

Phew! You made it through this first article, and you've already learned a lot about C programming. I'll reiterate what I said about practice. Take what you've learned about functions and variables and see what you can do. It doesn't hurt to experiment. You'll probably run into problems, but that's all part of the learning process.

Learning something new can be overwhelming. I started running a couple years ago, after being mainly inactive my entire adult life. When I was getting started, I read an inspirational book called The Courage To Start, by John "The Penguin" Bingham (Bingham 1999). A key point John makes is that the hardest part about starting to run at the age of forty-three is taking the first step. This advice holds true to learning anything new, no matter what your age is, though. Don't let that first step scare you. The next time you are cursing at your computer for not being a good personal assistant, take a moment and think. You could wait for an existing piece of software to be enhanced or a new piece of software to emerge, which is what most people do. But if you know how to program, you could write it yourself. Embrace that first step, and I'll see you next month.

Bibliography

Bingham, John. The Courage to Start: A Guide to Running for Your Life. 1999.


Dave Dribin has been writing professional software for over eleven years. After five years programming embedded C in the telecom industry and a brief stint riding the Internet bubble, he decided to venture out on his own. Since 2001, he has been providing independent consulting services, and in 2006, he founded Bit Maki, Inc. Find out more at http://www.bitmaki.com/ and http://www.dribin.org/dave/>.

 

Community Search:
MacTech Search:

Software Updates via MacUpdate

Audio Hijack 3.2.0 - Record and enhance...
Audio Hijack (was Audio Hijack Pro) drastically changes the way you use audio on your computer, giving you the freedom to listen to audio when you want and how you want. Record and enhance any audio... Read more
FontExplorer X Pro 5.0.1 - Font manageme...
FontExplorer X Pro is optimized for professional use; it's the solution that gives you the power you need to manage all your fonts. Now you can more easily manage, activate and organize your... Read more
Calcbot 1.0.2 - Intelligent calculator a...
Calcbot is an intelligent calculator and unit converter for the rest of us. Featuring an easy-to-read history tape, expression view, intuitive conversion, and much more! Features History Tape -... Read more
MTR 5.0.0.1 - The Mac's oldest and...
MTR (was MacTheRipper)--the Mac's oldest and smartest DVD-backup app--is now updated to version 5.001 MTR -- the complete toolbox, not a one-trick, point-and-click extractor. MTR is intended for... Read more
LibreOffice 4.4.5.2 - Free, open-source...
LibreOffice is an office suite (word processor, spreadsheet, presentations, drawing tool) compatible with other major office suites. The Document Foundation is coordinating development and... Read more
Adobe Lightroom 6.1.1 - Import, develop,...
Adobe Lightroom is available as part of Adobe Creative Cloud for as little as $9.99/month bundled with Photoshop CC as part of the photography package. Lightroom 6 is also available for purchase as a... Read more
File Juicer 4.41 - Extract images, video...
File Juicer is a drag-and-drop can opener and data archaeologist. Its specialty is to find and extract images, video, audio, or text from files which are hard to open in other ways. It finds and... Read more
A Better Finder Rename 9.52 - File, phot...
A Better Finder Rename is the most complete renaming solution available on the market today. That's why, since 1996, tens of thousands of hobbyists, professionals and businesses depend on A Better... Read more
OmniFocus 2.2.3 - GTD task manager with...
OmniFocus helps you manage your tasks the way that you want, freeing you to focus your attention on the things that matter to you most. Capturing tasks and ideas is always a keyboard shortcut away in... Read more
TinkerTool 5.4 - Expanded preference set...
TinkerTool is an application that gives you access to additional preference settings Apple has built into Mac OS X. This allows to activate hidden features in the operating system and in some of the... Read more

Rescue humanity from a Demon horde in An...
Angel Stone is Fincon's follow up to the massively successful Hello Hero and is out now on iOS and Android. You play as a member of The Resistance, a group of mighty human warriors who have risen up in defiance of the Demon horde threatening to... | Read more »
Gallery Doctor (Photography)
Gallery Doctor 1.0 Device: iOS iPhone Category: Photography Price: $2.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: Free up valuable iCloud and iPhone storage with Gallery Doctor, the only iPhone cleaner that automatically identifies the... | Read more »
You Against Me (Games)
You Against Me 1.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: A simple game… You. Me. Claim, steal, lock, score, win! | Read more »
Yep, it's True - Angry Birds 2 is O...
The not exactly rumors were true and the birds are back. Angry Birds 2 has come to the App Store and the world will... well I suppose it'll still be the same, but now we have more bird-flinging options! [Read more] | Read more »
You Could Design Your Own Card for Chain...
If you've ever wanted to create your own item, weapon, trap, or even monster for Chainsaw Warrior: Lords of the Night, this is your chance. Auroch Digital is currently holding a contest so that fans can fight to the death (not really) to see which... | Read more »
Bitcoin Billionaire is Going Back in Tim...
If you thought you managed to buy everything there is to buy in Bitcoin Billionaire and make all the money, well you though wrong. Those of you who made it far enough might remember investing in time travel - and it looks like that investment is... | Read more »
Domino Drop (Games)
Domino Drop 1.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $1.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: Domino Drop is a delightful new puzzle game with dominos and gravity!Learn how to play it in a minute, master it day by day.Your... | Read more »
OPERATION DRACULA (Games)
OPERATION DRACULA 1.0.1 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $5.99, Version: 1.0.1 (iTunes) Description: 25% off launch sale!!! 'Could prove to be one of the most accurate representations of the Japanese bullet hell shmup... | Read more »
Race The Sun (Games)
Race The Sun 1.01 Device: iOS iPhone Category: Games Price: $4.99, Version: 1.01 (iTunes) Description: You are a solar craft. The sun is your death timer. Hurtle towards the sunset at breakneck speed in a futile race against time.... | Read more »
Tap Delay (Music)
Tap Delay 1.0.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Music Price: $4.99, Version: 1.0.0 (iTunes) Description: Back in the “old days”, producers and engineers created delay and echo effects using tape machines. Tap Delay combines the warm... | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

Worldwide Tablet Market Decline Continues, Ap...
The worldwide tablet market declined -7.0% year-over-year in the second quarter of 2015 (2Q15) with shipments totaling 44.7 million units according to preliminary data from the International Data... Read more
TP-LINK TL-PA8030P KIT Powerline Featuring Ho...
Consumer and business networking products provider TP-LINK is now shipping its TL-PA8030P KIT AV1200 3-Port Gigabit Passthrough Powerline Starter Kit that expands your home’s network over its... Read more
Apple refurbished iPad Air 2s available for u...
The Apple Store has Apple Certified Refurbished iPad Air 2s available for up to $140 off the price of new models. Apple’s one-year warranty is included with each model, and shipping is free: - 128GB... Read more
Updated Apple iPad Price Trackers
We’ve updated our iPad Air Price Tracker and our iPad mini Price Tracker with the latest information on prices and availability from Apple and other resellers. Read more
Apple refurbished 2014 13-inch 128GB MacBook...
The Apple Store has Apple Certified Refurbished 2014 13″ MacBook Airs available starting at $759. An Apple one-year warranty is included with each MacBook, and shipping is free: - 13″ 1.4GHz/128GB... Read more
Apple’s Education discount saves up to $300 o...
Purchase a new Mac or iPad at The Apple Store for Education and take up to $300 off MSRP. All teachers, students, and staff of any educational institution qualify for the discount. Shipping is free,... Read more
Save up to $600 with Apple refurbished Mac Pr...
The Apple Store has Apple Certified Refurbished Mac Pros available for up to $600 off the cost of new models. An Apple one-year warranty is included with each Mac Pro, and shipping is free. The... Read more
12-inch MacBooks in stock for $20 off, save o...
Adorama has 12″ Retina MacBooks in stock for $20 off MSRP including free shipping plus NY & NJ sales tax only. For a limited time, Adorama will include a free Apple USB-C to USB Adapter, free 4-... Read more
College Student Deals: Additional $100 off Ma...
Take an additional $100 off all MacBooks and iMacs at Best Buy Online with their College Students Deals Savings, valid through August 8, 2015. Anyone with a valid .EDU email address can take... Read more
2015 13-inch 2.7GHz Retina MacBook Pro on sal...
B&H Photo has the new 2015 13″ 2.7GHz/128GB Retina MacBook Pro on sale today for $1199 including free shipping plus NY sales tax only. Their price is $100 off MSRP. Read more

Jobs Board

*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions (US) - A...
Job Description: Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions (US) - A...
Job Description: Sales. Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales. Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, Read more
Engineering Manager, Search Relevance, *Appl...
**Job Summary** Apple 's new Spotlight Suggestions service provides fast, relevant search results from the Inte et in Spotlight and Safari on iOS and OS X. We are looking Read more
Lead Infrastructure Engineer - *Apple* /Mac P...
…of a team * Requires proven problem solving skills Preferred Additional: * Apple Certified System Administrator (ACSA) * Apple Certified Technical Coordinator (ACTC) Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions (US) - A...
Job Description: Sales. Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales. Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, Read more
All contents are Copyright 1984-2011 by Xplain Corporation. All rights reserved. Theme designed by Icreon.