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OS X Investigation and Troubleshooting - Part 3

Volume Number: 22 (2006)
Issue Number: 7
Column Tag: Mac In The Shell

OS X Investigation and Troubleshooting - Part 3

The secrets to OS X success

by Edward Marczak

Introduction

Shovels, spades, backhoes, and even your hands: ways to dig. Just like our analog world, OS X provides us many tools with which to dig in. The first two parts of this series introduced several utilities, like tripwire, find and lsbom to check and monitor changes on a file system. We also looked at programs that monitor processes such as top and Spin Control. This month, we'll look at ways to check out specific binaries - particularly ones that are poorly documented. This will take a combination of looking at their images on the file system, and looking at their processes while it's running.

Slinging the Strings

Almost all programs have some static text stored as strings. Fact of the matter is, though, that C, C++, compiled AppleScript, and (especially) Objective C have a massive amount of descriptive text ripe for the plucking. What more aptly-named utility to use than strings.

strings looks for ASCII data in its input, and will output, by default, any ASCII strings that are at least 4 characters. This takes very little explanation once you see it in action. Recently, I had to troubleshoot OS X Server's PasswordService. While there is a man page, it doesn't quite tell you everything. To the shell I go! Running strings on PasswordService certainly yielded a bit of info:

strings /usr/sbin/PasswordService | less
__dyld_mod_term_funcs
__dyld_make_delayed_module_initializer_calls
__dyld_image_count
__dyld_get_image_name
__dyld_get_image_header
__dyld_NSLookupSymbolInImage
__dyld_NSAddressOfSymbol
libobjc
__objcInit
The kernel support for the dynamic linker is not present to run this program.
RunAppThread Created
RunAppThread Deleted
RunAppThread Started
...

(665 lines snipped for brevity)

Paging through the output yielded a few golden nuggets, including this line:

/Library/Preferences/com.apple.passwordserver.plist

Hey! There's no mention of a plist in the man page! Another interesting line jumped out:

External password command rejected because it must be in /usr/sbin/authserver/tools

Looking in /usr/sbin/authserver/tools reveals one program: weakpass. No man page, no real help, just a brief usage statement. I ran it and got this:

./weakpass marczak admin
approved

A quick search lead me to weakpass_edit which does have a man page, and explains what the program does a bit better. Useful for future reference.

Running strings on this one binary yielded a good bit of info. However, be aware that you're not looking at the actual source of a program, so, some of your detective work is simply inference. You may be looking at strings from a section of code that isn't really implemented yet. Frankly, you don't always know for sure precisely what you're looking at.

Sometimes you find funny comments (I'll leave you to look at strings /usr/sbin/AppleFileServer yourself), and sometimes a developer reveals much more than they had hoped. I once was able to map out an entire website and dig into parts of it that the webmaster didn't know he was sharing - all thanks to info derived from running strings on a binary. More importantly, I find strings useful for finding anything hardcoded - you'll find this a surprising amount, instead of an app reading from a preference file. Or, you'll find the hardcoded debug flags that it may be looking for. Back to OS X Server for one more example.

One day, while doing a little battle with OS X Directory Services, I remembered that there is a way to throw DirectoryService into debug mode. While the kill -USR1 trick is documented, that only debugs after one has logged in. Unfortunately, plenty happens while the machine is booting, before logging in is possible. I knew I once heard of a way to get DirectoryService to debug everything...strings to the rescue. A simple:

strings /usr/sbin/DirectoryService

yielded this deep into the output:

/Library/Preferences/DirectoryService/.DSLogDebugAtStart
...
/Library/Preferences/DirectoryService/.DSLogAPIAtStart

Enough to jog my memory! A simple 'touch /Library/Preferences/DirectoryService/.DSLogDebugAtStart' starts filling /Library/Logs/DirectoryService /DirectoryService.debug.log - right from the word go! Very handy.

So, I wouldn't give up strings too easily. But when using it, you have to remember to put the output into some sort of context, and certainly don't use the output to justify anything you can't prove empirically by running the program you're inspecting.

Watching While Running

Often, you'll find yourself wondering, "just what is that app doing right now?" Up until now, this series hasn't really focused on watching code run, outside of watching the resources it's taking. Sometimes, though, the only way to really troubleshoot an app is to watch it self-destruct. Of course, there are utilities that aid in doing just that.

Like top for running processes, sc_usage shows system calls and page statistics as a program makes calls and pages in and out in a top-like style. You must be root to run sc_usage, which takes a pid, process name, or name of an app to execute by using the -E switch. I prefer to use a process id as it's a little more specific. Let's take a look at Apache running locally on my machine as it serves a web page:

# sc_usage 134
httpd         0 preemptions   0 context switches   1 thread   07:11:38
              0 faults        0 system calls                   0:01:11

TYPE                            NUMBER        CPU_TIME   WAIT_TIME
-- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
System        Idle                                        0:21.670( 0:00.683)
System        Busy                                        0:14.614( 0:00.326)
httpd         Usermode                        0:00.179

zero_fill                         1215        0:00.024    0:00.001
pagein                             143        0:00.018    0:01.046
copy_on_write                      137        0:00.007    0:00.059
cache_hit                          314        0:00.003    0:00.000

read                               278        0:00.019    0:19.523
accept                               1        0:00.000    0:13.716( 0:01.010) W
stat                               286        0:00.038    0:00.494
open                               197        0:00.012    0:00.491
close                              195        0:00.020    0:00.176
mach_msg_trap                      411        0:00.003    0:00.164
access                              26        0:00.010    0:00.115
statfs                              11        0:00.009    0:00.083
poll                                 2        0:00.000    0:00.075
getdirentries                      141        0:00.130    0:00.063
chdir                                2        0:00.000    0:00.004
getattrlist                        261        0:00.012    0:00.001
lstat                              189        0:00.009    0:00.000
vm_allocate                        215        0:00.003    0:00.000

CURRENT_TYPE              LAST_PATHNAME_WAITED_FOR     CUR_WAIT_TIME THRD# PRI
-- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
accept                    //%239/%239105369/footer.tpl.php  4:50.062   0  31  

The first block of information shows the process name and some basic statistics, counting from the time you started sc_usage. In the next block, there are rows segregated by type, with the following headings:

    Type - The type of system call or, in the last group, the actual call used.

    Number - The number of times this call has been made. A number is parenthesis represents the delta between samples.

    CPU_Time - The amount of CPU time this process has used.

    Wait_time - the amount of time this process has spent waiting.

The final block of information is only displayed once the program starts to make calls, and is displayed from the bottom of the terminal up. The columns in this group are:

    Current_type - the system call currently being made

    Last_pathname_waited_for - The last pathname referenced by a system call that blocked.

    Cur_wait_time - Time a thread has been blocked.

    Thrd# - the thread number in question

    Pri - the scheduling priority.

The overwhelming majority of the time, when you run sc_usage, you'll have 'mach_msg_trap' in the system call list. Popular system call? Not quite; this shows that a call is blocked and waiting for something to happen.

Watching the Files

Sometimes, troubleshooting - or just your curiosity - leads to a more specific query: which files does this application touch? Either read, create or write; what's it accessing? sc_usage might only give you half of the picture. Enter fs_usage. As you may have guessed, this utility will display file system usage. fs_usage will run with no switches, displaying all file system calls. But, we can show more finesse than that. You can also pass in a process id or process name that will constrain the output to that process only - very wise, as fs_usage generates a huge amount of output. If you use a process name, fs_usage will match all occurrences of that name. Let's watch it in action against the same httpd process from earlier:

# fs_usage 134
20:58:33.660  PAGE_IN      A=0x00015000  B=0x2000   0.020402 W httpd               
20:58:33.897  PAGE_IN      A=0xa0002000  B=0x1000   0.236411 W httpd               
20:58:33.991  PAGE_IN      A=0x00019000  B=0x1000   0.001612 W httpd               
20:58:33.991  PAGE_IN      A=0x00014000  B=0x0   0.000008   httpd               
20:58:33.991  read         F=4    B=0x114   0.000030   httpd               
20:58:33.992  PAGE_IN      A=0x0004c000  B=0x1000   0.000278 W httpd               
20:58:33.992  PAGE_IN      A=0x0001a000  B=0x1000   0.000167 W httpd               
20:58:33.996  PAGE_IN      A=0x0002f000  B=0x1000   0.000322 W httpd               
20:58:33.997  PAGE_IN      A=0x00017000  B=0x3000   0.000315 W httpd               
20:58:33.997  PAGE_IN      A=0x00016000  B=0x0   0.000007   httpd               
20:58:33.093  stat               /www/wheresspot/html   0.095943 W httpd               
20:58:33.093  open    [  2]      /www/wheresspot/html/.htaccess   0.000227 W httpd               
20:58:33.093  statfs   0.000018   httpd               
20:58:33.094  statfs            /Library/WebServer/Documents   0.000115   httpd               
20:58:33.094  statfs            /Library/WebServer/CGI-Executables   0.000063   httpd               
20:58:33.094  statfs            /Users/bdd/Sites   0.000028   httpd               
20:58:33.094  statfs            /Users/test/Sites   0.000009   httpd               
20:58:33.094  statfs            /Users/marczak/Sites   0.000009   httpd               
20:58:33.094  statfs            /Users/supervisor/Sites   0.000009   httpd               
20:58:33.094  statfs            /www/wheresspot/html   0.000265 W httpd               
20:58:33.120  statfs            /usr/share/httpd/icons   0.025489 W httpd               
20:58:33.161  statfs            [  2]        .*\.\.namedfork   0.000035   httpd               
20:58:33.186  PAGE_IN      A=0x000a2000  B=0x2000   0.024381 W httpd               
20:58:33.198  PAGE_IN      A=0x0020a000  B=0x1000   0.011685 W httpd               
20:58:33.214  stat              /www/wheresspot/html/index.html   0.015356 W httpd               
20:58:33.214  PAGE_IN      A=0x0002d000  B=0x2000   0.000318 W httpd               
20:58:33.214  PAGE_IN      A=0x0002e000  B=0x0   0.000012   httpd               
20:58:33.215  PAGE_IN      A=0x00018000  B=0x0   0.000014   httpd               
20:58:33.215  stat              /www/wheresspot/html/index.html   0.000119   httpd

That's some great output! What's it telling us? The first column is the time that the event occurred. The second column is the actual call or page event. The next column represents the data of the call. On a page fault, the data shows the address, represented by "A=" and, the number of bytes read or written, shown by "B=". A read call is similar, showing the file descriptor read from in "F=", and the number of bytes read. The next column shows the time spent on the call. A "W" next to the time means that the process was scheduled out during this time, and the value includes wait time (like waiting for some 'long' I/O process). The final column shows the process name; useful when you're monitoring multiple processes.

In this example, I particularly like the section where we can really see Apache listening to the default Apple configuration (about 16 lines in starting with the 'statfs' block) - it walks each of the user's "Sites" folders. Of course, there was a lot more output from fs_usage, but we could only look at a small portion here. Also, note that errors are displayed in square brackets. For example, Apache needs to look for an htaccess file, but not every directory will have or need one. Because of this, you'll see the open call return with an error [2] on line 12 in the output.

Naturally, you need to be root to allow fs_usage to dig in where it needs to. I should also point out that fs_usage is sensitive to the size of your terminal. The more columns you have, the more it'll display (to a point). If you always want to enable wide output, regardless of your actual terminal width, use the '-w' flag. Also, note that you can exclude processes with the "-e" switch. By itself, the "-e" switch will exclude the fs_usage program itself.

Watching the Watcher

As handy as sc_usage and fs_usage are, sometimes you just need more insight. When you need to reach into the nuclear arsenal, the first thing you should pull out is ktrace. If you've never used ktrace, please read this entire section before trying on a production machine!

ktrace is the kernel trace facility, and allows kernel tracing of a given process. Unlike the previous utilities demonstrated, ktrace logs its output to a file rather than the screen. By default, this output goes to a file named 'ktrace.out'. Also, if you think fs_usage is verbose, ktrace is even more so. Due to this, ktrace writes its output in a more efficient binary format. A separate utilty, kdump, will read a ktrace file - again, by default, ktrace.out - and display it in "human readable" format. Like most things, once you see it in action, you'll get it immediately. Back to httpd:

# ktrace -p 134

...and that's it. ktrace is silently logging in the background. Once again: ktrace can generate huge amounts of output. If you run this on a production machine, you can fill a disk very quickly, depending on the process you're tracing. Since ktrace launches a kernel process, you won't see any evidence of ktrace running in a 'ps' listing, so you can easily forget about it. Take care with this one! Back to usage...While this is tracing, I'll go load my web page. Then, we need to stop ktrace. While tracing can be stopped on a particular process, it's very rare that I'm tracing more than one process at a time, or that I wouldn't want to stop them all at the same time, so I go for the panic button: ktrace -C (note the capital 'C'). The '-C' switch stops all traces belonging to the current user. Unlike other utilities of its type, you do not have to be root to use ktrace, however, it certainly helps. If you own a process, though, you can ktrace it. For completeness sake, you cancel a specific trace by using the '-p' switch again: ktrace -p 134. Now, to look at our output:

# kdump | less
134 httpd    RET   accept 4
   134 httpd    CALL  sigaction(0x1e,0xbffff988,0xbffffa00)
   134 httpd    RET   sigaction 0
   134 httpd    CALL  fcntl(0x4,0x2,0x1)
   134 httpd    RET   fcntl 0
   134 httpd    CALL  getsockname(0x4,0xbffffa60,0xbffffa80)
   134 httpd    RET   getsockname 0
   134 httpd    CALL  setsockopt(0x4,0x6,0x1,0xbffffa00,0x4)
   134 httpd    RET   setsockopt 0
   134 httpd    CALL  read(0x4,0x180ee90,0x1000)
   134 httpd    GIO   fd 4 read 320 bytes
       "GET / HTTP/1.1\r
        Accept: */*\r
        Accept-Language: en\r
        Accept-Encoding: gzip, deflate\r
        Cookie: PHPSESSID=43edcdc80eaadb4a7ed7778acebbd8d6; AWSUSER_ID=awsuser_id1137205739363r9609\r
        User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; U; PPC Mac OS X; en) AppleWebKit/418 (KHTML, like Gecko) 
           Safari/417.9.2\r
        
        Connection: keep-alive\r
        Host: ws\r
        \r
       "
   134 httpd    RET   read 320/0x140
   134 httpd    CALL  sigaction(0x1e,0xbfffd8a8,0xbfffd920)
   134 httpd    RET   sigaction 0
   134 httpd    CALL  stat(0x188eeb0,0x188d500)
   134 httpd    NAMI  "/www/wheresspot/html"
   134 httpd    RET   stat 0
   134 httpd    CALL  open(0x188f0f0,0,0x1b6)
   134 httpd    NAMI  "/www/wheresspot/html/.htaccess"
   134 httpd    RET   open -1 errno 2 No such file or directory
   134 httpd    CALL  sigaction(0xe,0,0xbffff830)
   134 httpd    RET   sigaction 0
   134 httpd    CALL  stat(0x188fba8,0x188f700)
   134 httpd    NAMI  "/www/wheresspot/html/index.html"
   134 httpd    RET   stat 0
   134 httpd    CALL  stat(0x188fa00,0x188f260)
   134 httpd    NAMI  "/www/wheresspot/html/index.html"
   134 httpd    RET   stat 0
   134 httpd    CALL  sigprocmask(0x1,0,0x13d9aa4)
   134 httpd    RET   sigprocmask 0
   134 httpd    CALL  umask(0x3f)
   134 httpd    RET   umask 18/0x12
   134 httpd    CALL  umask(0x12)
   134 httpd    RET   umask 63/0x3f
   134 httpd    CALL  sigprocmask(0x1,0,0x13d9aa4)
   134 httpd    RET   sigprocmask 0
   134 httpd    CALL  setitimer(0x2,0xbfffe7d0,0)
   134 httpd    RET   setitimer 0
   134 httpd    CALL  sigaction(0x1b,0xbfffe6f8,0xbfffe764)
   134 httpd    RET   sigaction 0
   134 httpd    CALL  sigprocmask(0x2,0xbfffe7e0,0)
   134 httpd    RET   sigprocmask 0
   134 httpd    CALL  sigprocmask(0x1,0,0x13d9aa4)
   134 httpd    RET   sigprocmask 0
   134 httpd    CALL  stat(0x901a0ad0,0xbfffe2f8)
   134 httpd    NAMI  "/"
   134 httpd    RET   stat 0
   134 httpd    CALL  lstat(0x1886400,0xbfffe2f8)
   134 httpd    NAMI  "."
   134 httpd    RET   lstat 0
   134 httpd    CALL  chdir(0xbfffe360)
   134 httpd    NAMI  "/www/wheresspot/html"
   134 httpd    RET   chdir 0
   134 httpd    CALL  getattrlist(0xbfffe730,0xa0000494,0xbfffdf34,0x41c,0x1)
   134 httpd    NAMI  "/www"
   134 httpd    RET   getattrlist 0
   134 httpd    CALL  getattrlist(0xbfffe730,0xa0000494,0xbfffdf34,0x41c,0x1)
   134 httpd    NAMI  "/www/wheresspot"
   134 httpd    RET   getattrlist 0
   134 httpd    CALL  getattrlist(0xbfffe730,0xa0000494,0xbfffdf34,0x41c,0x1)
   134 httpd    NAMI  "/www/WheresSpot/html"
   134 httpd    RET   getattrlist 0
   134 httpd    CALL  getattrlist(0xbfffe730,0xa0000494,0xbfffdf34,0x41c,0x1)
   134 httpd    NAMI  "/www/WheresSpot/html/index.html"

This was just a tiny piece of the output! If you compare this ktrace data with the sc_usage display, you'll see many of the same calls, as one would expect. Also, comparing the ktrace output with the fs_usage data shows the same files being opened, and the same errors returned. The ktrace output, though, is much more detailed. Additionally, as files are opened and read, ktrace will actually show the content - look at the http header get passed across in the sample we're using.

As you may expect, ktrace can get even more advanced. First, you can use ktrace to launch a process, just so you get every drop of info, right from the start. Just pass the name on the command line: ktrace SomeApplication. Second, you can instruct ktrace to trace current and/or future descendants of a process, also. Very important stuff! In part two of this series we talked about Activity Monitor and using it to see parent processes - the process that spawned the process you're interested in. Thanks to launchd, SystemStarter and their ilk, this happens a lot under Tiger. ktrace doesn't disappoint. The '-d' switch immediately starts tracing descendants of the process you specify. A nice alternative is the '-i' switch, which will trace only newly created child processes (created after you begin tracing). This is exceptionally handy if you want to trace a process that is a launchd child whose "OnDemand" flag is false - in other words, launchd will keep it alive by restarting it, if it goes away. A perfect example is lookupd: how do you trace this cleanly? Use the '-i' switch:

# ktrace -p 1 -i ; killall lookupd

Here, we trace launchd and whatever it spawns - but we know it's going to re-spawn lookupd pretty soon, because we're going to kill it off. Check the process list with ps, and when lookupd shows up again, stop tracing with ktrace -C. When you look at the results with kdump, you can see the switch from launchd to lookupd:

 27414 launchd  CALL  setsid
 27414 launchd  RET   setsid 27414/0x6b16
 27414 launchd  CALL  sigprocmask(0x3,0xf0101c54,0)
 27414 launchd  RET   sigprocmask 0
 27414 launchd  CALL  setpriority(0,0,0)
 27414 launchd  RET   setpriority 0
 27414 launchd  CALL  execve(0x107d4,0x10644,0x3001e0)
 27414 launchd  NAMI  "/usr/sbin/lookupd"
 27414 launchd  NAMI  "/usr/lib/dyld"
 27414 lookupd  RET   execve 0
 27414 lookupd  CALL  __sysctl(0xbffff9cc,0x2,0xbffff9d4,0xbffff9c8,0x8fe4591c,0xa)
 27414 lookupd  RET   __sysctl 0
 27414 lookupd  CALL  __sysctl(0xbffff9d4,0x2,0x8fe5899c,0xbffffa78,0,0)
 27414 lookupd  RET   __sysctl 0
 27414 lookupd  CALL  __sysctl(0xbffff9cc,0x2,0xbffff9d4,0xbffff9c8,0x8fe45948,0xd)
 27414 lookupd  RET   __sysctl 0
 27414 lookupd  CALL  __sysctl(0xbffff9d4,0x2,0x8fe58998,0xbffffa78,0,0)
 27414 lookupd  RET   __sysctl 0
 27414 lookupd  CALL  open(0x191c,0,0)
 27414 lookupd  NAMI  "/usr/lib/libobjc.A.dylib"
 27414 lookupd  RET   open 3
 27414 lookupd  CALL  fstat(0x3,0xbfffd950)

As I mentioned, ktrace might stay at the bottom of your toolbox for a while, but in certain cases, there is no substitute.

Homework

Over the course of this series, we've looked at many different troubleshooting techniques and utilities. But wait, there's more! More than I can cover, unfortunately. If ktrace gives you happy dreams of watching a program run, how about interaction? I'd be remiss if I didn't mention gdb, the GNU debugger. Available on OS X as part of the Xcode installation, gdb will let you be in control of any application. There are some great documents to get you started, including:

Richard Stallman's, "Debugging with gdb" <http://developer.apple.com/documentation/DeveloperTools/gdb/gdb/gdb_toc.html>

Apple Computer's Technical Note 2032, "Getting Started with gdb" <http://developer.apple.com/technotes/tn/tn2032.html>

Apple Computer, "Using gdb" <http://developer.apple.com/documentation/DeveloperTools/gdb/gdb/gdb_toc.html>

Apple Computer's Technical Note 2030, "Using gdb for MacsBug Veterans" <http://developer.apple.com/technotes/tn/tn2030.html>

Breathe Out

So closes this series on troubleshooting OS X. Hope it transforms the way you attack problems and get answers to questions when dealing with OS X. Despite all of these great tools, there are issues that can be solved more easily and efficiently with a fresh install - and there will always be nasty little things that only the programmers at Apple can deal with effectively. Now, however, there will be a host of new things you have insight to.

I missed recommending a "media of the month" in June, so I need to make up for it this time. A college professor of mine made me read "The Mythical Man Month" by Frederick P. Brooks back in the day. While I really just wanted to dive into some code, I had then, and still do have tremendous respect for this professor, so I begrudgingly read it. It's a text that has stuck with me to this day. It's now available in a 20th Anniversary edition. If you've never read it, I highly recommend it. For those that still do want to 'just geek out', I suppose I should mention some sys-admin-y kind of reading. I've mentioned in the past that you can rule the universe if you know regular expressions, so, let's get everyone back on track. "Mastering Regular Expressions" by Jeffrey E. F. Friedl, published by O'Reilly really will get you on the right track regarding the basics, and all of the things that tend to trip people up with more complex regex.

July! Ready for WWDC? Whether or not you're going to be in San Francisco for the event, I think there's a lot of excitement this year, and you'll be able to live vicariously through MacTech, if you need to! I will be attending, and hope to meet up with readers old and new alike. Send along an e-mail if you'd like to meet up and shake hands, or, if you'd like to introduce a new author for MacTech. In person or in print, see you next month!

References

Just about everything at http://developer.apple.com

The respective source and man page for each utility mentioned.


Ed Marczak owns and operates Radiotope, a technology consulting company. Radiotope helps separate technology issues from policy issues, cool-tech from needed-tech. Guide your decision at http://www.radiotope.com

 

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The Enchanted Cave 2 (Games)
The Enchanted Cave 2 2.1 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $2.99, Version: 2.1 (iTunes) Description: Delve into a strange cave with a seemingly endless supply of treasure, strategically choosing your battles to gather as... | Read more »
Crystal Siege is on Sale With a New Univ...
Crystal Siege,  FDG Entertainment's RPG  Tower Defense game, has gone universal in its latest update. [Read more] | Read more »
Platforming Action RPG Swordigo is Curre...
Touch Foo's 2D action-platformer, Swordigo, is free for a limited time on the App Store. Now you can run, jump, and slash your way through adventure for absolutely nothing. [Read more] | Read more »
Watch This Homerun Slides into Home on t...
Eyes Wide Games has launched their one-touch baseball game, Watch This Homerun, for the Apple Watch. [Read more] | Read more »
Disney Celebrates May 4th With Galaxy Si...
For Star Wars Day, May 4, join Disney Interactive and Lucasfilm as they celebrate with a whole lot of in=-app sales for their Star Wars apps. [Read more] | Read more »
Oh My Pixel! We Go Hands-on With The Kni...
I recently had a chance to play around with the upcoming Knights of Pen & Paper 2 from Paradox Interactive. I was a huge fan of the first game, so I had a lot of expectations going into it - and I wasn't disappointed. The game has gotten some... | Read more »
Throw Out Your Stylus and Sketch With Pe...
Penpoint Drawing, by Damin Liu,  is a new creative drawing app that uses your finger as your stylus. [Read more] | Read more »
Oceanhouse has Released Just So Thankful...
Oceanhouse Media, makers of digital book apps, are celebrating Mother's Day with a giveaway and a new app. [Read more] | Read more »
Get Dressed, the Virtual Wardrobe App fo...
Dressed, by  Kabuki Vision, is one of the first fashion apps for the Apple Watch. It pairs your watch with your iPhone to let you browse garments from your closet and mix and match them to create the perfect outfit. To add new pieces you just use... | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

12-inch 1.1GHz Silver MacBook in stock today
B&H Photo has the new 12″ 1.1GHz Silver MacBook in stock today for $1299 including free shipping plus NY sales tax only. Act now if you’re interested, since we don’t expect B&H to have this... Read more
iPad Air 2s on sale for up to $50 off, NY tax...
B&H Photo has iPad Air 2s on sale for up to $64 off MSRP including free shipping plus NY sales tax only: - 16GB iPad Air 2 WiFi: $469 $30 off - 64GB iPad Air 2 WiFi: $549.99 $50 off - 128GB iPad... Read more
Check Apple prices on any device with the iTr...
MacPrices is proud to offer readers a free iOS app (iPhones, iPads, & iPod touch) and Android app (Google Play and Amazon App Store) called iTracx, which allows you to glance at today’s lowest... Read more
Sale! New 13-inch 256GB MacBook Air for $1099...
B&H Photo has the new 2015 13″ 1.6GHz/256GB MacBook Air on sale for $1099.99 including free shipping plus NY tax only. Their price is $100 off MSRP. Read more
Japan Post Group, IBM and Apple Deliver iPads...
Japan Post Group, IBM and Apple executives meeting in in New York City yesterday announced a first-of-its-kind initiative aimed at improving the quality of life for millions of Japanese senior... Read more
Worldwide Tablet Market Contracts For Second...
Worldwide tablet shipments recorded a second consecutive quarter of year-over-year decline in the first calendar quarter of 2015 (1Q15), according to preliminary data from the International Data... Read more
Apple restocks refurbished Mac minis for up t...
The Apple Store has restocked Apple Certified Refurbished 2014 Mac minis, with models available starting at $419. Apple’s one-year warranty is included with each mini, and shipping is free: - 1.4GHz... Read more
13-inch 2.5GHz MacBook Pro available for $999...
Adorama has the 13-inch 2.5GHz MacBook Pro on sale for $999 including free shipping plus NY & NJ sales tax only. Their price is $100 off MSRP. Read more
New 13-inch Retina MacBook Pros available for...
Save up to $80 on the purchase of a new 2015 13″ Retina MacBook Pro at the following resellers. Shipping is free with each model: 2.7GHz/128GB MSRP $1299 2.7GHz/256GB... Read more
13-inch 128GB MacBook Air on sale for $50 off...
Save $50 on the purchase of a new 2015 13″ 1.6GHz/128GB MacBook Air at the following resellers. Shipping is free: $949.99 $949.99 $949.99 $949.99 $949.99 B&H Photo charges NY sales tax only.... Read more

Jobs Board

Senior Identity Architect - *Apple* Pay - A...
Changing the world is all in a day039s work at Apple . If you love innovation, here039s your chance to make a career of it. You039ll work hard. But the job comes with Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions (US) - A...
Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, you're also the Read more
Hardware Systems Integration Engineer - *App...
Changing the world is all in a day039s work at Apple . If you love innovation, here039s your chance to make a career of it. You039ll work hard. But the job comes with Read more
Senior Identity Architect - *Apple* Pay - A...
Changing the world is all in a day039s work at Apple . If you love innovation, here039s your chance to make a career of it. You039ll work hard. But the job comes with Read more
Hardware Systems Integration Engineer - *App...
Changing the world is all in a day039s work at Apple . If you love innovation, here039s your chance to make a career of it. You039ll work hard. But the job comes with Read more
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