TweetFollow Us on Twitter

Krakatoa, East of Java

Volume Number: 20 (2004)
Issue Number: 1
Column Tag: Programming

QuickTime Toolkit

by Tim Monroe

Krakatoa, East of Java

Developing QuickTime Applications with Java


Java is an object-oriented programming language and set of associated class libraries developed by Sun Microsystems in the early- to mid-1990's. It was designed and written largely by James Gosling, who sought to provide a simpler, more secure version of C++. The Java designers began with a syntax based on the C programming language (to promote familiarity with the new language among existing developers) but eliminated elements that promoted unstructured code (like the goto statement) or increased the likelihood of programming error or system misuse (like pointer arithmetic). The result was a clean, simple language that allowed developers an easy migration path from the world of procedural programming into the world of object-oriented programming. Java virtual machines -- the runtime engines for compiled Java code -- have been developed for a wide array of operating systems and devices.

QuickTime for Java is a set of Java classes and methods that implement large parts of the QuickTime multimedia architecture. Introduced in 1998 at the JavaOne conference, it can be used to develop standalone applications and applets (that is, code that runs within a larger host application, such as a web browser) that harness QuickTime's multimedia capabilities. Because they require QuickTime, QuickTime for Java applications and applets can run only on Macintosh and Windows computers.

In this article and the next two articles, I want to take a look at using QuickTime for Java to develop QuickTime applications. As in the past few QuickTime Toolkit articles, I want to see how to build a multi-window movie playback and editing application. Let's call this application "JaVeez". I also want to investigate ways to extend our application to handle potentially more complicated tasks. For the moment we'll focus solely on building an application that runs on Mac OS X. After we've done that, we'll take a look at the kind of changes we need to make in order for JaVeez to run on Windows operating systems as well.

Throughout these articles, we'll be using the latest released versions of Java and QuickTime for Java. At the time of this writing, the current version of the Java runtime engine on Mac OS X is Java 2 Standard Edition (J2SE) version 1.4.1, which was released in early 2003. This version incorporates a number of changes that allow applications to conform more closely to the standard Mac OS X Aqua look-and-feel. In particular, it allows applications to receive and respond to Apple events, which is essential (for instance) in allowing applications to open files dropped onto the application icon. We'll also rely on the version of QuickTime for Java included with QuickTime 6.4, which is the first release of this product that supports J2SE 1.4.1 on Mac OS X. (The version number of this new QuickTime for Java is 6.1.) The differences between this version of QuickTime for Java and earlier versions are substantial, but here I'm more interested in seeing how things are done using the current versions of these tools than in enumerating the precise changes from earlier versions.

We'll begin this article by creating a new project based on the Java AWT application template project provided by the Xcode development environment. We'll modify that project as necessary to support opening QuickTime movie files and displaying their movies in windows on the screen. Then we'll see how to create the application's menus and menu bar, and how to handle a few of the menu items in those menus.

In the next article, we'll continue working on JaVeez. We'll add the ability to edit movies and to save edited movies into their movie files. We'll also see how to support the standard document-related behaviors (such as prompting a user to save or discard changes to an edited file when the movie window is closed).

The Project

So let's get started. Launch Xcode and select "New Project..." in the File menu. In the list of available projects, scroll down to find the Java projects and then select "Java AWT Application", as in Figure 1. Name the new project "JaVeez" and save it in any location you like.

Figure 1: The list of available Java projects

AWT (which is short for "Abstract Window Toolkit") is a set of Java classes for creating and managing an application's user interface. It allows us to create windows, dialog boxes, menus, scrollbars, text labels, and so forth, using code that is platform-independent. AWT also provides a framework for handling events on items in the application's user interface.

The main official alternative to AWT is a set of classes called Swing. Swing is built on top of AWT and in many cases provides greater functionality than pure AWT. For instance, it's not possible, using AWT, to set the window modification state (so that the close button of a window whose document has been edited is drawn with a dot inside, as in Figure 2). It's fairly easy to do this in Swing, however. Similarly, Swing provides classes to display help tags (also called tool tips) on objects in the user interface, while AWT does not.

Figure 2: A modified movie window

For this reason and others, Apple generally recommends that Mac OS X Java applications be built using Swing window components instead of AWT window components. (In Java parlance, a component is any object that can be drawn on the screen and become the target of user actions.) However, QuickTime for Java does not easily support embedding a movie inside of a Swing component, if we want to attach a movie controller to that movie. So we'll use AWT to handle our application's movie windows and menus. In the next article, though, we'll see how to work with a few Swing components.

Modifying the Project

Once we've given our new project a name and a location, the new project window opens (Figure 3).

Figure 3: The new project window

As you can see, there are three files with the filename extension ".java"; these are the source code files for this project. Let's go ahead and remove the files and, because our application will not support setting any preferences and because we'll develop a better way to handle our application's About box (in the next article).

Next, we need to add a file to the project. Select "Add Frameworks..." in the Project menu and navigate to the System/Library/Java/Extensions folder. Then select the file This file contains the QuickTime for Java packages that we'll need to use in our application. To make those packages available in our application, we need to import them. Add these lines near the top of the file, after any existing import statements.

import quicktime.*;
import quicktime.qd.*;
import quicktime.std.*;
import quicktime.std.clocks.*;
import quicktime.std.movies.*;

The first non-import statement in this file is the beginning of the declaration of the JaVeez class:

public class JaVeez extends Frame {

This indicates that JaVeez is a subclass of (or extends) the AWT class Frame, which is the class for top-level windows with title bars and borders. Our movie windows will be instances of this class.

Immediately following the class declaration, you'll find declarations of class variables and instance variables. Here are the class variables we want JaVeez to support:

private static int nextHorizPos = 50;
private static int nextVertPos = 50;
private static Application fApplication = null;
private static ResourceBundle resBundle = null;
private static boolean launchedFromDrop = false;

There will be only one copy of each class variable, no matter how many instances of the JaVeez class our application creates (that is, no matter how many windows it opens). On the other hand, each instance of the class will get its own set of instance variables. Here are the ones we'll need to use:

private Movie m = null;
private MovieController mc = null;   
private OpenMovieFile omf = null;   
private QTComponent qtc = null;
private FileDialog fd = null;
private String baseName = null;

We'll learn what each of these variables does as we go along.

Starting Application Execution

A Java application begins execution in its main function, which is declared like this:

public static void main (String args[]) { }

In JaVeez, we'll ignore the args parameter, which contains the command-line arguments specified by the user if the application is launched on the command line. The first thing we need to do is initialize QuickTime. We'll call the open method of the QTSession class, but only if QuickTime has not already been initialized:

if (QTSession.isInitialized() == false);

(This check is probably overkill for an application, but not for applets.) QTSession provides methods to initialize QuickTime and to provide information about the current operating environment. You must call its open method before using any other QuickTime for Java class.

If the QuickTime initialization completes successfully, we want to create a new empty movie window. We do this by calling the JaVeez constructor and passing it an empty string. Then we initialize the new frame by calling the method createNewMovieFromFile and display the frame to the user. If the user launched the application by dropping one or more movie files onto its icon, then we'll just hide that empty movie window. Listing 1 shows the main method of JaVeez. (We saw just above that launchedFromDrop is a class variable that is initialized to false; we'll see the conditions under which it's set to true in the next article.)

Listing 1: Opening the application

public static void main (String args[]) {
   try {
      // initialize QuickTime, but not if it's already been initialized
      if (QTSession.isInitialized() == false);
      // make an empty movie window
      JaVeez jvz = new JaVeez("");
      jvz.createNewMovieFromFile(null, false);
   // hide the movie if the application was opened by a dropped movie file
      if (launchedFromDrop)
   } catch (QTException err) {
      // close down QuickTime session if an exception was generated

If an exception is thrown, we'll call the close method of the QTSession class and exit the application.

Creating a New Window

The constructor method for the JaVeez class is quite simple, as you can see in Listing 2.

Listing 2: Constructing a new frame object

public JaVeez (String title) {
   // get the resource bundle
   if (resBundle == null)
      resBundle = ResourceBundle.getBundle("JaVeezstrings", 
   // turn off resizing

First, the constructor loads a resource bundle named "JaVeezstrings"; in JaVeez, this bundle contains a list of strings that specify menu titles, menu item titles, and the like. By loading strings from a resource bundle, we avoid having to hard-code them in our source code and thus facilitate localizing the application. For instance, when we build our menus, we retrieve the label for the New menu item in the File menu like this:


You can look into the file JaVeezstrings to see what strings are defined therein.

After loading the resource bundle, we call three methods defined by JaVeez to set up the application's menus and menu-handling logic. Then we set the window so that it cannot be resized by the user. For simplicity, a movie window created by our application JaVeez will be set to a size that exactly contains the movie and the movie controller bar (if it's visible).

Initializing a New Movie

Most of the work required to display a QuickTime movie in an AWT frame is handled by our createNewMovieFromFile method, which is usually called immediately after the JaVeez constructor (as in Listing 1 above). We pass createNewMovieFromFile the full pathname of the file to open, or an empty string if we want the window to contain a new, empty movie. To elicit a pathname from the user, we can use the standardGetFilePreview method of the QTFile class, as follows:

QTFile qtf = QTFile.standardGetFilePreview
JaVeez jvz = new JaVeez(qtf.getPath());
jvz.createNewMovieFromFile(qtf.getPath(), false);

The first line of code displays the standard file-opening dialog box, shown in Figure 4:

Figure 4: The file-opening dialog box

Passing kStandardQTFileTypes to standardGetFilePreview indicates that we want the user to be able to select any type of file that QuickTime can open.

The createNewMovieFromFile method opens the specified file for reading and writing by creating a QTFile object and then passing that object to the asWrite class method of the OpenMovieFile class:

QTFile qtf = new QTFile(theFullPath);
omf = OpenMovieFile.asWrite(qtf);

If these methods succeed, createNewMovieFromFile calls the Movie constructor to create a movie object from that movie file and the MovieController constructor to create a movie controller object associated with that movie object. The Movie and MovieController classes are wrappers for QuickTime movies and movie controllers. Once we've opened a movie in a new window, most of our subsequent operations on the movie will be accomplished using methods supplied by the MovieController class.

But we still need to embed the QuickTime movie into the AWT frame. QuickTime for Java defines the class QTComponent, which represents displayable QuickTime objects. We create an instance of that class by calling the makeQTComponent factory method, and we then add that instance to the AWT frame by executing the frame's add method:

qtc = QTFactory.makeQTComponent(mc);

Our instance variable qtc is of type QTComponent, but add requires a parameter of type Component. As you can see, we call the asComponent method to get an AWT representation of the QTComponent. (If you are using Swing, you should create a QTJComponent; however, as mentioned earlier, there is no QTJComponent constructor that accepts a movie controller. That's the main reason we are using AWT components for our basic movie windows.)

The createNewMovieFromFile method then enables editing and keyboard control of the movie, using methods in the MovieController class. It finishes up by moving the movie window to the next staggered position on the screen. Listing 3 shows our complete definition of createNewMovieFromFile.

Listing 3: Opening a movie file

public void createNewMovieFromFile 
            (String theFullPath, boolean useExistingWindow) {
   // set the window title
   baseName = basename(theFullPath);
   try {
      if (theFullPath != null) {
         QTFile qtf = new QTFile(theFullPath);
         omf = OpenMovieFile.asWrite(qtf);
         m = Movie.fromFile(omf);
      } else {
         m = new Movie();
      // create the movie controller
      mc = new MovieController(m);
      // create and add a QTComponent if we haven't done so yet;
      // otherwise set the movie controller
      if (qtc == null) {
         qtc = QTFactory.makeQTComponent(mc);
      } else {
      // enable editing (unless movie is interactive) and key handling
      if ((mc.getControllerInfo() &
                   StdQTConstants.mcInfoMovieIsInteractive) == 0)

       // set the initial state of the menus

      if (!useExistingWindow) {
         // set initial location of the movie window
         setLocation(nextHorizPos, nextVertPos);
         nextHorizPos += 20;
         nextVertPos += 20;
      // set the size of the enclosing frame to the size of the incoming movie
   } catch (QTException err) {

You might be wondering why be didn't just add all this code to the constructor of the JaVeez class. The main reason for breaking it out into a separate method is that that allows us to reinitialize an existing movie window from a different movie file. We'll need to do this when we handle the "Save As..." menu item in the next article.

Setting the Title of a Window

Listing 3 calls the basename method to get the base name of a movie file (that is, the portion of the full pathname that follows the rightmost path separator). It uses that name to set the window title. The basename method is defined in Listing 4.

Listing 4: Getting the base name of a pathname

public String basename (String pathName) {
   if ((pathName == null) || (pathName.length() == 0))
   // if we are passed a full pathname, trim it to the last segment
   File file = new File(pathName);


We return the default name for an empty movie file (which we read from the application's resource bundle) if the string passed into the method is null or an empty string. Otherwise, we call the getName method of a File object to get the name of the specified file. As you saw in Listing 3, we store the movie's returned base name in an instance variable so that we can use it in the method that displays the standard "Save Changes" dialog box, as we'll see in the next article.

Setting the Size of a Window

The pack method called in the createNewMovieFromFile method sets the size of the content area of the frame object to the size of the movie that was just opened, including the rectangle occupied by the movie controller bar (if visible). Occasionally, we'll need to adjust the size of the movie window, even though we don't allow the user to resize it manually. For instance, when the user cuts a segment from a movie, the size of the movie may change. In that case, we'll call our own method sizeWindowToMovie (Listing 5) to resize the movie window.

Listing 5: Setting the size of a movie window

public void sizeWindowToMovie () {
   try {
      QDRect rect = m.getBox();
      if (mc.getVisible())
         rect = mc.getBounds();
       // make sure that the movie has a non-zero width;
         // a zero height is okay (for example, with a music movie with no controller bar)
      if (rect.getWidth() == 0) {
       // resize the frame to the calculated size, plus window borders
      setSize(rect.getWidth() + 
                        (getInsets().left + getInsets().right),
                  rect.getHeight() + 
                        (getInsets().top + getInsets().bottom));
   } catch (QTException err) {

As you can see, we just use the MovieController method getBounds to get the size of the movie and controller bar; then we add in the heights and widths of the window borders.


Creating menus and handling user selection of menu items in Java applications is reasonably straightforward. Both AWT and Swing provide classes from which we can instantiate menu bars, menus, and menu items. The only "gotcha", at least for those of us who cut our programming eyeteeth on the Macintosh, is that Java menu bars are attached to individual frames -- that is, to individual windows. That means that if no movie window is open, then JaVeez' menu bar won't contain any menus other than the Application menu, which is provided automatically by the operating system. Figure 5 shows this minimal menu bar.

Figure 5: The JaVeez menu bar when no movie windows are open

This is not an ideal situation. For one thing, it means that if the user closes all the open movie windows, the File menu disappears and there is no way to open additional movies via the menu bar. (A clever user could of course drag a movie file onto the application's icon in the Finder or in the dock.) Still, it's not a situation worth worrying too much about, since there is an easy workaround: when the application is launched, just open an empty window and move it to an offscreen location where it will not be visible. (Implementing this simple workaround is left as an exercise for the reader.)

As I said, both AWT and Swing will allow us to create menu bars, menus, and menu items. Since we're already using an AWT frame for the movie window, let's continue down that path and use the AWT menu classes. Swing does not offer any additional menu-related capabilities that we need to use in JaVeez.

Creating Actions

When the user selects an item in a menu, the Java runtime engine sends an action event (which is an object of type ActionEvent) to the menu item. The menu item in turn passes the event to any registered listeners. These listeners are actions (of type Action). So the first thing we need to do is create an action for each menu item in our application.

To create an action object, we define a concrete subclass of the AbstractAction class. This subclass must implement the actionPerformed method. Listing 6 gives our definition of the NewActionClass class, which will be instantiated to handle the New menu item.

Listing 6: Handling the New menu item

public class NewActionClass extends AbstractAction {
   public NewActionClass (String text, KeyStroke shortcut) {
      putValue(ACCELERATOR_KEY, shortcut);
   public void actionPerformed (ActionEvent e) {
      JaVeez jvz = new JaVeez("");
      jvz.createNewMovieFromFile(null, false);

Similarly, Listing 7 gives our definition of the OpenActionClass class, which will be instantiated to handle the Open... menu item.

Listing 7: Handling the Open menu item

public class OpenActionClass extends AbstractAction {
   public OpenActionClass (String text, KeyStroke shortcut) {
      putValue(ACCELERATOR_KEY, shortcut);
   public void actionPerformed (ActionEvent e) {
      try {
         QTFile qtf = QTFile.standardGetFilePreview
         JaVeez jvz = new JaVeez(qtf.getPath());
         jvz.createNewMovieFromFile(qtf.getPath(), false);
      } catch (QTException err) {
         if (err.errorCode() != Errors.userCanceledErr)

Both of these class implementations call the method putValue to associate the action with a keystroke combination, which (as we'll see shortly) is passed to the class constructor. JaVeez declares AbstractAction subclasses for each of its dozen or so menu items. In the interest of saving space, I've omitted the remaining definitions.

Once we've defined a concrete subclass of AbstractAction for each menu item, we need to create actions for each such subclass. JaVeez declares instance variables for all of these actions:

protected Action newAction, openAction, closeAction, 
         saveAction, saveAsAction;
protected Action undoAction, cutAction, copyAction, 
         pasteAction, clearAction, selectAllAction, 
protected Action toggleBarAction, toggleSpeakerAction;

We create actions by invoking the class constructors. Listing 8 shows how we do this for three of these actions. Once again, the code for the remaining cases has been omitted in the interest of brevity.

Listing 8: Creating actions

public void createActions () {
   int shortcutKeyMask = 

   // create actions that can be used by menus, buttons, toolbars, etc.
   newAction = new NewActionClass(
   openAction = new OpenActionClass(

   // lots of lines omitted here...

   toggleBarAction = new ToggleControllerActionClass(

Creating Menus and Menu Items

Now that we've created the actions that will handle selections of menu items, we can proceed to create the menu items and insert them into menus. First, let's create the main menu bar, like this:

protected MenuBar mainMenuBar = new MenuBar();

A menu bar contains menus, which are objects of type Menu. JaVeez has three application-specific menus: the File menu, the Edit menu, and the Movie menu. We'll use these instance variables to refer to them:

protected Menu fileMenu;
protected Menu editMenu;
protected Menu movieMenu;

Listing 9 shows our definition of the addMenu method, which creates these menus and their items and then adds them to the menu bar. It also sets mainMenuBar as the menu bar for the frame under construction.

Listing 9: Configuring the menu bar

public void addMenus () {
   editMenu = new Menu(resBundle.getString("editMenu"));
   fileMenu = new Menu(resBundle.getString("fileMenu"));
   movieMenu = new Menu(resBundle.getString("movieMenu"));

All that remains is for us to write the addFileMenuItems, addEditMenuItems, and addMovieMenuItems methods. These methods create the individual menu items, set their keyboard shortcuts, add them to the appropriate menu, and then attach the action listeners created earlier. Listing 10 shows the complete definition of the addFileMenuItems method, which uses these instance variables:

protected MenuItem miNew;
protected MenuItem miOpen;
protected MenuItem miClose;
protected MenuItem miSave;
protected MenuItem miSaveAs;

Listing 10: Adding menu items to the File menu

public void addFileMenuItems () {
   miNew = new MenuItem(resBundle.getString("newItem"));
   miNew.setShortcut(new MenuShortcut(KeyEvent.VK_N, 
   miOpen = new MenuItem(resBundle.getString("openItem"));
   miOpen.setShortcut(new MenuShortcut(KeyEvent.VK_O, 
   miClose = new MenuItem(resBundle.getString("closeItem"));
   miClose.setShortcut(new MenuShortcut(KeyEvent.VK_W, 

   miSave = new MenuItem(resBundle.getString("saveItem"));
   miSave.setShortcut(new MenuShortcut(KeyEvent.VK_S, 
   miSaveAs = new MenuItem
   miSaveAs.setShortcut(new MenuShortcut(KeyEvent.VK_S,

Notice that we call the addSeparator method to insert a menu separator into the menu. Figure 6 shows the resulting File menu.

Figure 6: The File menu of JaVeez

Movie Playback

So, we've managed to open a movie file in a window, appropriately sized to exactly contain the movie at its natural size and the associated movie controller bar (if it's visible). Figure 7 shows a movie window displayed by JaVeez. As you can see, there is no grow button in the movie controller bar and the zoom button in the title bar is disabled; both of these result from our decision to disallow manual movie window resizing.

Figure 7: A JaVeez movie window

AWT handles all the low-level nitty-gritty of displaying and managing the open movie windows. It handles dragging windows around, as well as iconifying (that is, minimizing) and deiconifying them. And the MovieController object handles most events that occur within the window frame. It handles mouse clicks within the movie and, for QuickTime VR movies, zooming in and out using the Shift and Control keys.

Nonetheless, the movie controller is neglecting to handle some events that, in theory, it ought to be handling. It does not start or stop a linear movie when the spacebar is pressed, and it does not pan or tilt a QuickTime VR movie when the arrow keys are pressed. This is a bug in QuickTime for Java 6.1, which will be fixed in a future release. In the meantime, it's easy enough to work around this misbehavior. In this section, we'll see how to do that, and also how to handle the "Hide Controller Bar" menu item in the Movie menu.

Handling Keys

To get the movie controller to process key events, we can have the JaVeez class implement the key listener interface. To do this, we'll change the declaration of JaVeez slightly, so that it looks like this:

public class JaVeez extends Frame implements KeyListener {}

Then we need to provide implementations of each of the methods defined in that interface. There are three such methods: keyPressed, keyReleased, and keyTyped. The keyPressed method is invoked when a key is pressed; the keyReleased method is invoked when a key is released; the keyTyped method is invoked when a key is pressed and then released. For our purposes, we want to implement the keyPressed method, shown in Listing 11. (The remaining two methods are empty.)

Listing 11: Handling key-pressed events

public void keyPressed (KeyEvent e) {
   try {
      mc.key(e.getKeyCode(), e.getModifiers());
   } catch (QTException err) {

We simply pass the key code and the key modifiers to the key method of the MovieController. Problem solved.

Handling the Movie Menu

It's also quite easy to hide or show the movie controller bar. When the user selects the "Hide Controller Bar" menu item, JaVeez executes the method defined in Listing 12.

Listing 12: Toggling the visibility state of the controller bar

public void actionPerformed (ActionEvent e) {
   try {
   } catch (QTException err) {

We'll take a look at the adjustMenuItems method in the next article. In part, it changes the menu item text to reflect the current state of the controller bar visibility.


In this article, we've seen how to develop a basic Java application that can open one or more QuickTime movie files and display their movies in windows on the screen. We'll continue developing JaVeez -- by adding the ability to edit movies and then save those edited movies into their files -- in the next article.


Thanks are due to Anant Sonone and Tom Maremaa for reviewing this article and providing some helpful comments. Special thanks are also due to Chris Adamson (of Subsequently and Furthermore, Inc.) and Daniel H. Steinberg (of Dim Sum Thinking, Inc.) for their assistance and support.

Tim Monroe is a member of the QuickTime engineering team. You can contact him at The views expressed here are not necessarily shared by his employer.


Community Search:
MacTech Search:

Software Updates via MacUpdate

Apple Safari 10.0.1 - Apple's Web b...
Note: The direct download link is currently unavailable. It is available in the OS X 10.11.6 release, as well as in the Apple Security Updates. Apple Safari is Apple's web browser that comes with OS... Read more
Apple macOS Sierra 10.12.1 - The latest...
With Apple macOS Sierra, Siri makes its debut on Mac, with new features designed just for the desktop. Your Mac works with iCloud and your Apple devices in smart new ways, and intelligent... Read more
Apple iOS 10.1 - The latest version of A...
iOS 10 is the biggest release of iOS ever. A massive update to Messages brings the power of the App Store to your conversations and makes messaging more personal than ever. Find your route with... Read more
Hazel 4.0.7 - Create rules for organizin...
Hazel is your personal housekeeper, organizing and cleaning folders based on rules you define. Hazel can also manage your trash and uninstall your applications. Organize your files using a familiar... Read more
Opera 40.0.2308.90 - High-performance We...
Opera is a fast and secure browser trusted by millions of users. With the intuitive interface, Speed Dial and visual bookmarks for organizing favorite sites, news feature with fresh, relevant content... Read more
BetterTouchTool 1.93 - Customize Multi-T...
BetterTouchTool adds many new, fully customizable gestures to the Magic Mouse, Multi-Touch MacBook trackpad, and Magic Trackpad. These gestures are customizable: Magic Mouse: Pinch in / out (zoom... Read more
Backblaze - Online backup serv...
Backblaze is an online backup service designed from the ground-up for the Mac. With unlimited storage available for $5 per month, as well as a free 15-day trial, peace of mind is within reach with... Read more
Postbox 5.0.5 - Powerful and flexible em...
Postbox is a new email application that helps you organize your work life and get stuff done. It has all the elegance and simplicity of Apple Mail, but with more power and flexibility to manage even... Read more
Coda 2.5.19 - One-window Web development...
Coda is a powerful Web editor that puts everything in one place. An editor. Terminal. CSS. Files. With Coda 2, we went beyond expectations. With loads of new, much-requested features, a few surprises... Read more
Toast Titanium 15.1 - $99.99
Roxio Toast 15 Titanium, the leading DVD burner for Mac, makes burning even better, adding Roxio Secure Burn to protect your files on disc and USB in Mac- or Windows-compatible formats. Get more... Read more

Latest Forum Discussions

See All

WitchSpring2 (Games)
WitchSpring2 1.27 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $3.99, Version: 1.27 (iTunes) Description: This is the story of Luna, the Moonlight Witch as she sets out into the world. This is a sequel to Witch Spring. Witch Spring 2... | Read more »
4 popular apps getting a Halloween makeo...
'Tis the season for all things spooky. So much, so, in fact, that even apps are getting into the spirt of things, dressing up in costume and spreading jack o' lanterns all about the place. These updates bring frightening new character skins, scary... | Read more »
Pokémon GO celebrates Halloween with can...
The folks behind Pokémon GO have some exciting things planned for their Halloween celebration, the first in-game event since it launched back in July. Starting October 26 and ending on November 1, trainers will be running into large numbers of... | Read more »
Best Fiends Forever Guide: How to collec...
The fiendship in Seriously's hit Best Fiends has been upgraded this time around in Best Fiends Forever. It’s a fast-paced clicker with lots of color and style--kind of reminiscent of a ‘90s animal mascot game like Crash Bandicoot. The game... | Read more »
5 apps for the budding mixologist
Creating your own cocktails is something of an art form, requiring a knack for unique tastes and devising interesting combinations. It's easy to get started right in your own kitchen, though, even if you're a complete beginner. Try using one of... | Read more »
5 mobile strategy games to try when you...
Strategy enthusiasts everywhere are celebrating the release of Civilization VI this week, and so far everyone seems pretty satisfied with the first full release in the series since 2010. The series has always been about ultra-addictive gameplay... | Read more »
Popclaire talk to us about why The Virus...
Humanity has succumbed to a virus that’s spread throughout the world. Now the dead have risen with a hunger for human flesh, and all that remain are a few survivors. One of those survivors has just called you for help. That’s the plot in POPCLAIRE’... | Read more »
Oceans & Empires preview build sets...
Hugely ambitious sea battler Oceans & Empires is available to play in preview form now on Google Play - but download it quickly, as it’s setting sail away in just a few days. [Read more] | Read more »
Rusty Lake: Roots (Games)
Rusty Lake: Roots 1.1.4 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $2.99, Version: 1.1.4 (iTunes) Description: James Vanderboom's life drastically changes when he plants a special seed in the garden of the house he has inherited.... | Read more »
Flippy Bottle Extreme! and 3 other physi...
Flippy Bottle Extreme! takes on the bottle flipping craze with a bunch of increasingly tricky physics platforming puzzles. It's difficult and highly frustrating, but also addictive. When you begin to master the game, the sense of achievement is... | Read more »

Price Scanner via

Apple’s Thursday “Hello Again” Event A Largel...
KGI Securities analyst Ming-Chi Kuo, who has a strong record of Apple hardware prediction accuracy, forecasts in a new note to investors released late last week that a long-overdue redo of the... Read more
12-inch Retina MacBooks on sale for $100 off...
Amazon has 2016 12″ Apple Retina MacBooks on sale for $100 off MSRP. Shipping is free: - 12″ 1.1GHz Silver Retina MacBook: $1199.99 $100 off MSRP - 12″ 1.1GHz Gold Retina MacBook: $1199.99 $100 off... Read more
Save up to $600 with Apple refurbished Mac Pr...
Apple has Certified Refurbished Mac Pros available for up to $600 off the cost of new models. An Apple one-year warranty is included with each Mac Pro, and shipping is free. The following... Read more
PixelStyle Inexpensive Photo Editor For Mac W...
PixelStyle is an all-in-one Mac Photo Editor with a huge range of high-end filters including lighting, blurs, distortions, tilt-shift, shadows, glows and so forth. PixelStyle Photo Editor for Mac... Read more
13-inch MacBook Airs on sale for $100-$140 of...
B&H has 13″ MacBook Airs on sale for $100-$140 off MSRP for a limited time. Shipping is free, and B&H charges NY sales tax only: - 13″ 1.6GHz/128GB MacBook Air (sku MMGF2LL/A): $899 $100 off... Read more
2.8GHz Mac mini available for $988, includes...
Adorama has the 2.8GHz Mac mini available for $988, $11 off MSRP, including a free copy of Apple’s 3-Year AppleCare Protection Plan. Shipping is free, and Adorama charges sales tax in NY & NJ... Read more
21-inch 3.1GHz 4K on sale for $1379, $120 off...
Adorama has the 21″ 3.1GHz 4K iMac on sale $1379.99. Shipping is free, and Adorama charges NY & NJ sales tax only. Their price is $120 off MSRP. To purchase an iMac at this price, you must first... Read more
Check Apple prices on any device with the iTr...
MacPrices is proud to offer readers a free iOS app (iPhones, iPads, & iPod touch) and Android app (Google Play and Amazon App Store) called iTracx, which allows you to glance at today’s lowest... Read more
Apple, Samsung, Lead J.D. Power Smartphone Sa...
Customer satisfaction is much higher among smartphone owners currently subscribing to full-service wireless carriers, compared with those purchasing service through a non-contract carrier, according... Read more
Select 9-inch Apple WiFi iPad Pros on sale fo...
B&H Photo has select 9.7″ Apple WiFi iPad Pros on sale for up to $50 off MSRP, each including free shipping. B&H charges sales tax in NY only: - 9″ Space Gray 256GB WiFi iPad Pro: $799 $0 off... Read more

Jobs Board

*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions- Towson,...
Job Description: Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, Read more
Software Engineering Intern: Integration / QA...
Job Summary Apple is currently seeking enthusiastic interns who can work full-time for a minimum of 12-weeks between Fall 2015 and Summer 2016. Our software Read more
Software Engineering Intern: Frameworks at *...
Job Summary Apple is currently seeking enthusiastic interns who can work full-time for a minimum of 12-weeks between Fall 2015 and Summer 2016. Our software Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions- Nashua,...
Job Description: Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions- Napervi...
Job Description:SalesSpecialist - Retail Customer Service and SalesTransform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, Read more
All contents are Copyright 1984-2011 by Xplain Corporation. All rights reserved. Theme designed by Icreon.