TweetFollow Us on Twitter

May 00 Challenge

Volume Number: 16 (2000)
Issue Number: 5
Column Tag: Programmer's Challenge

Programmer's Challenge

by Bob Boonstra, Westford, MA

BigNum Math

Back in September, 1995, we conducted an RSA Challenge that involved raising large integers to integral powers, modulo a third integer. The representation we used for those large integers was a BigNum type, where each digit of the large integer was stored in a byte. That representation and the operations on it were not particularly efficient, and this month we will belatedly recitfy that situation. Your Challenge is to implement a new BigNum type, of your own design, along with a number of arithmetic operations on these BigNums..

The prototype for the code you should write is:

typedef struct BigNum {
	long lengthInDigits;	/* length of the BigNum in digits */
	void *bigNumData;			/* pointer to BigNum data */
} BigNum;

BigNum NewBigNum (			/* create a BigNum */
	char sign,						/* +1 or -1 */
	char digits[],				/* digits to be made into a BigNum */
	long numDigits				/* number of digits */
);

void DisposeBigNum (		/* dispose of a BigNum */
	BigNum theBigNum			/* the BigNum to be disposed of */
);

BigNum AddBigNums (			/* sum two BigNums, returning a new one */
	BigNum bigNumA,				/* return the sum A+B */
	BigNum bigNumB
);

BigNum SubtractBigNums (	/* subtract two BigNums, returning a new one */
	BigNum bigNumA,				/* return the difference A-B */
	BigNum bigNumB
);

BigNum MultiplyBigNums (	/* multiply two BigNums, returning a new one */
	BigNum bigNumA,				/* return the product A*B */
	BigNum bigNumB
);

BigNum DivideBigNums (		/* divide two BigNums, returning a new one */
	BigNum bigNumA,				/* return the quotient A/B, discarding the remainder */
	BigNum bigNumB
);

BigNum ModBigNums (			/* divide two BigNums, returning a new one */
	BigNum bigNumA,				/* return the remainder A%B, discarding the quotient */
	BigNum bigNumB
);

BigNum PowerBigNums (		/* calculate one Bignum to the power of another, returning a new one */
	BigNum bigNumA,				/* return A raised to the power B, discarding the quotient */
	BigNum bigNumB
);

BigNum SqrtBigNum (			/* find the sqrt of a BigNum, returning a new one */
	BigNum bigNumA				/* return the square root of A */
);

long /* numDigits */ BigNumToDigits( /* convert a bigNum to decimal digits */
	BigNum bigNumA,				/* bigNum to be converted to decimal digits 0-9 */
	char *sign,						/* return +1 or -1 */
	char digits[]					/* decimal digits of bigNumA, preceeded by '-' if negative */
									/* storage for digits preallocated based on bigNumA.lengthInDigits */
);

The first thing you need to do is decide on an internal representation for BigNums. Then you need to write a NewBigNum routine that will create a BigNum from a sequence of numDigits digits and a sign value. Your NewBigNum code is responsible for allocating memory for the BigNumData. The DisposeBigNum routine is responsible for deallocating that memory. The caller of your code is responsible for pairing every NewBigNum call with a DisposeBigNum call, and the two routines should be implemented so as not to create any memory leaks. In addition to these allocation and deallocation routines, you need to write code to perform addition (AddBigNums), subtraction (SubtractBigNums), multiplication (MultiplyBigNums), division (DivideBigNums), remainders (ModBigNums), and exponentiation (PowerBigNums). Each of these routines takes two arguments, calculates the result, and returns the result in a new BigNum allocated by your code. Each of these returned BigNums will also be disposed of by a call to DisposeBigNum before the test is over, although they might be used for calculations in the interim.

Just to spice things up, you also need to provide a SqrtBigNum routine that calculates and returns the integer square root of a BigNum, the largest BigNum whose square is no larger than the original number.

And finally, to help me decipher your BigNums, you need to provide a BigNumToDigits conversion routine that converts your private BigNum data structure into a sequence of digits, along with a sign, and returns the number of digits in the decimal representation of the BigNum.

I'm not providing information on the distribution of calls to the various routines, except to say that the arithmetic routines will significantly outnumber the allocation and deallocation routines. The winner will be the solution that correctly completes a sequence of arithmetic operations on BigNums in the least amount of time. You are strongly encouraged to adequately comment the code in your submissions. Not only does that make your code more understandable if it is published as the winning solution, but it also helps me track down any minor problems that might occur.

I'll close with a plug for the Challenge mailing list, where you can receive notice of the problems before the hard-copy magazine reaches your mailbox, and where any post-publication clarifications are distributed. Subscription instructions can be found at www.mactech.com/progchallenge/. This will be a native PowerPC Challenge, using the CodeWarrior Pro 5 environment. Solutions may be coded in C, C++, or Pascal.

Three Months Ago Winner

The February Challenge required readers to calculate a minimal Latin square of a given order. Latin Squares are nxn arrays of integers, where each row and each column contains each integer from 1 to n exactly once. Congratulations to Willeke Rieken (The Netherlands) for coming up with the winning solution to the Latin Squares Challenge.

Eleven readers submitted entries to this Challenge, and their performance varied widely in efficiency. My test scenario was based on 28 test cases, consisting of the Latin Squares of orders 4, 5, 8, 9, 12, 13, 16, 17, 20, 21, 24, 25, 28, 29, 32, 33, 36, 37, 40, 41, 44, and 45. I selected those numbers because they formed a regular pattern that could be continued as far as the solutions would allow, and because they contained a mix of odd numbers, even numbers, perfect squares, prime numbers, and powers of two. My original intent was to test even larger numbers, but even the best solutions took too long to calculate some of the larger numbers.

Even limiting the tests to these cases, some of the solutions took a long time to execute, so I divided the tests into three sets. The first set consisted of the first ten test cases, and I ran all of the entries against that set. Three of the entries either did not complete all of the cases, or calculated a Latin Square that was larger than the squares calculated by other solutions. Three of the entries had fast execution times for the ten cases, and one more had an execution time within roughly two orders of magnitude of the best ones. So I ran the top four solutions against the next six test cases. Two of the entries completed those cases correctly, so I ran those cases against the final six test cases. The second place solution by Ernst Munter was by far the faster of the two, but unfortunately, it did not compute the minimal solution for the square of order 37. Where Ernst calculated a solution that included the following as the 28th row:

 28 27 26 25 32 31 30 35 36 37 33 34 19 20 17 21 7 8 9 5 6 4 ...

... Willeke's entry produced the following smaller value:

 28 27 26 25 32 31 30 35 36 37 33 34 19 20 17 21 7 8 9 5 6 3 ...

I decided not to disqualify solutions that produced suboptimal Latin Squares, or that failed to produce a result in a reasonable time. Instead, I ranked solutions by how many test cases they were able to complete, then how many they completed correctly, and then in order of increasing execution time. The problem statement called for the use of execution time only for correct solutions, but I felt that it was fairest to allow solutions that produced a suboptimal result to compete based on how well they did.

Willeke's algorithm takes advantage of the fact that squares whose size is a power of two can be generated with a systematic pattern of switching pairs of numbers in row n to create rows a power of 2 away from row n. He accomplishes this in his FillSquare2 routine. Squares of other sizes are filled by first filing the largest subsquare of size k (k a power of 2), filling the top right n-k square optimally, filling the diagonal, and then completing the square by trial and error. Ernst's entry makes more efficient use of information about which digits are forced into use before a particular column in a given row because the digit has already been used in subsequent columns. Ernst observes in his entry that execution time does not grow with problem size, and that problems of certain sizes (e.g., 41) take much longer to execute than one might expect based on the time required for squares of dimensions close in value.

The first table below lists, for each of the entries submitted, the final ranking based on all test cases completed, total execution time for the first ten cases, the number of test cases completed, the number completed incorrectly, and the code size, data size, and language parameters. As usual, the number in parentheses after the entrant's name is the total number of Challenge points earned in all Challenges prior to this one. The second and third tables provide the results for the remaining twelve test cases.

Note that while the top four positions in this Challenge were won by four of our top contestants in the points standing (the fifth did not compete), there are a number of new names in the list of contestants. Keep trying, folks, I know from personal experience that it takes a while to become good at this, but it is possible to knock the leaders from their perches.

Cases 1-10

Name Rank Time (msec) Completed Cases Incorrect Cases Code Size Data Size Lang
Willeke Rieken 68) 1 4.1 10 0 3976 8 C++
Ernst Munter (557) 2 2.4 10 0 3224 96 C++
Randy Boring (116) 3 3.7 10 0 3828 42 C++
Sebastian Maurer (97) 4 524.5 10 0 1336 52 C++
Claes Wihlborg 5 5271.1 10 0 2596 73 C
Bjorn Davidsson (6) 6 141740.7 10 0 2232 120 C++
Michael Lewis 7 155346.4 10 0 5112 207 C++
Paul Russell 8 1436033.6 10 0 1660 8 C
Jonny Taylor (24) 9 4.3 9 0 5788 156 C
Derek Ledbetter (4) 10 1917.3 10 2 13088 312 C++
S. S. (withdrawn) 11 2.4 7 0 592 8 C++

Cases 11-16

Name Time (msec) Completed Cases Incorrect Cases
Ernst Munter 6.1 6 0
Willeke Rieken 1968.2 6 0
Randy Boring 40604.8 3 0
Sebastian Maurer N/A 0 0

Cases 17-22

Name Time (msec) Completed Cases Incorrect Cases
Ernst Munter 3200253.1 6 1
Willeke Rieken 13013297.2 6 0

Top Contestants

Listed here are the Top Contestants for the Programmer's Challenge, including everyone who has accumulated 10 or more points during the past two years. The numbers below include points awarded over the 24 most recent contests, including points earned by this month's entrants.

Rank Name Points
1. Munter, Ernst 215
2. Saxton, Tom 139
3. Maurer, Sebastian 91
4. Rieken, Willeke 61
5. Boring, Randy 50
6. Heathcock, JG 43
7. Shearer, Rob 43
8. Taylor, Jonathan 24
9. Brown, Pat 20
9. Hostetter, Mat 20
10. Downs, Andrew 12
11. Jones, Dennis 12
12. Hart, Alan 11
13. Duga, Brady 10
14. Hewett, Kevin 10
15. Murphy, ACC 10
16. Selengut, Jared 10
17. Strout, Joe 10

There are three ways to earn points: (1) scoring in the top 5 of any Challenge, (2) being the first person to find a bug in a published winning solution or, (3) being the first person to suggest a Challenge that I use. The points you can win are:

1st place 20 points
2nd place 10 points
3rd place 7 points
4th place 4 points
5th place 2 points
finding bug 2 points
suggesting Challenge 2 points

Here is Willeke's winning Latin Squares solution:

LatinSquares.cp
Copyright © 2000
Welleke Rieken

/*
	After generating several squares a pattern emerged.
	If n is even, every second row can be generated by
	switching pairs of numbers of the row above.
	If n can be divided by 4, every third and fourth
	row can be generated by switching squares of 2 by 2
	numbers of the 2 rows above.
	Example: n = 12 is generated by generating
	n = 3 and replacing every number by a square with
	n = 4.
	Other n's are generated by generating the biggest
	power of n that fits in the square and generating
	a square of n - 2^x at the top right. This square can
	be repeated to the bottom left till the first square ends.
	the numbers in the first column are in ascending order.
	the diagonal from top rigth to bottom left is filled with n.
	Example: n = 7
	1234567
	2143675
	3412756
	4567xxx
	5x7xxxx
	67xxxxx
	7xxxxxx
	The remaining numbers are generated by trial and error.
*/

#include "LatinSquares.h"

FillSquare2
static void FillSquare2(long n, short *latinSquare,
												long theDim,
												long theStartRow, long theStartCol,
												long theStartVal, long theNrOfRows)
// n is a power of 2. fill the first row with ascending numbers
// and switch them around to generate the other rows.
{
	short *aFrom1, *aTo1, *aFrom2, *aTo2;
	long 	aValue = theStartVal + 1, aRowsDone, aMultiple;
	short	*aStartSquare = latinSquare + (theStartRow * n) + 
			theStartCol;
	
	// fill first row
	aFrom1 = aStartSquare;
	for (long aCol = 0; aCol < theDim; aCol++)
	{
		*aFrom1  = aValue;
		aValue++;
		aFrom1++;
	}
	aRowsDone = 1;
	aMultiple = 1;
	while (aRowsDone < theNrOfRows)
	{
		for (long aRow = 0; aRow < aMultiple; aRow++)
		{
			if (aRow >= theNrOfRows)
				break;
			for (long anOffset = 0; anOffset < theDim; anOffset += 
							(aMultiple * 2))
			{
				aFrom2 = aStartSquare + (aRow * n) + anOffset;
				aFrom1 = aFrom2 + aMultiple;
		aTo1 = aStartSquare + ((aMultiple + aRow) * n) + anOffset;
				aTo2 = aTo1 + aMultiple;
				for (long aCol = 0; aCol < aMultiple; aCol++)
				{
					*aTo1 = *aFrom1;
					aFrom1++;
					aTo1++;
					*aTo2 = *aFrom2;
					aFrom2++;
					aTo2++;
				}
			}
		}
		aRowsDone += aMultiple;
		aMultiple <<= 1;
	}
}

CopySquare
static inline void CopySquare(long n, short *theFrom, short *theTo,
															long theDim)
{
// copy a square of size theDim from theFrom to theTo
	short *aFrom, *aTo;
	
	for (long aRow = 0; aRow < theDim; aRow++)
	{
		aFrom = theFrom + (aRow * n);
		aTo = theTo + (aRow * n);
		for (long aCol = 0; aCol < theDim; aCol++)
		{
			*aTo = *aFrom;
			aFrom++;
			aTo++;
		}
	}
}

CantFillRow
static short CantFillRow(long theDim, short *theValInCol,
													short *theValInRow, long theCol,
													long *theValue)
// check if there are numbers that can't be placed and if there
// are enough columns for the bigger numbers
{
	long	aGreaterPlacesNeeded = 0;
	short	aValOK = 0;
	for (long i = *theValue + 1; i < theDim; i++)
		if (!theValInRow[i])
		{
			aGreaterPlacesNeeded++;
			aValOK = 0;
			for (long j = theCol + 1; j < theDim; j++)
				if (!theValInCol[j * theDim + i])
				{
					aValOK = 1;
					break;
				}
			if (!aValOK)
			{
				*theValue = i - 1;
				return 1;
			}
		}
	for (long j = theCol + 1; j < theDim; j++)
	{
		aValOK = 0;
		for (long i = *theValue + 1; i < theDim; i++)
			if (!(theValInRow[i] || theValInCol[j * theDim + i]))
			{
				aValOK = 1;
				break;
			}
		if (aValOK)
			aGreaterPlacesNeeded-;
	}
	if (aGreaterPlacesNeeded > 0)
		return 1;
	return 0;	
}

CompleteSquare
static void CompleteSquare(long n, short *latinSquare,
						long theDim, long theSubDim,
						long theStartRow, long theStartCol,
						long theStartVal)
// fill remaining numbers by trial and error
{
	short	*aStartSquare = latinSquare +
												((theStartRow * n) << theSubDim) +
												(theStartCol << theSubDim);
	short	*aValInRow = new short[theDim];
	short	*aValInCol = new short[theDim * theDim];
	short	*aToBeFilled = new short[theDim * theDim];
	long	aRow, aCol, aValue, aSubDimvalue;
	short	*p, *q;

	aSubDimvalue = 1 << theSubDim;
	// fill left row and diagonal
	p = aStartSquare + ((n + theDim - 2) << theSubDim);
	q = aStartSquare + (n << theSubDim);
	for (aCol = 1; aCol < theDim; aCol++)
	{
		CopySquare(n, aStartSquare + ((theDim - 1) << theSubDim),
								p, aSubDimvalue);
		p += ((n - 1) << theSubDim);
		CopySquare(n, aStartSquare + (aCol << theSubDim),
								q, aSubDimvalue);
		q += (n << theSubDim);
	}
	// which numbers are used and which numbers have to be filled in
	for (aCol = 0; aCol < theDim * theDim; aCol++)
	{
		aValInCol[aCol] = 0;
		aToBeFilled[aCol] = 1;
	}
	for (aRow = 0; aRow < theDim; aRow++)
	{
		p = aStartSquare + ((aRow * n) << theSubDim);
		for (aCol = 0; aCol < theDim; aCol++)
		{
			if (*p)
			{
				aValue = aCol * theDim +
									(((*p - 1) >> theSubDim) - theStartVal);
				aValInCol[aValue] = 1;
				aToBeFilled[aValue] = 0;
			}
			p += (aSubDimvalue);
		}
	}

	// which numbers are in this row
	for (aValue = 0; aValue < theDim; aValue++)
		aValInRow[aValue] = 0;
	aValue = 0;
	aRow = 1;
	aCol = 0;
	p = aStartSquare + (n << theSubDim);
	while (1)
	{
		// find next place to ve filled
		while (*p)
		{
			aValInRow[((*p - 1) >> theSubDim) - theStartVal] = 1;
			aCol++;
			p += (aSubDimvalue);
			if (aCol >= theDim)
			{
				aCol = 0;
				aRow++;
				p = aStartSquare + ((aRow * n) << theSubDim);
				for (aValue = 0; aValue < theDim; aValue++)
					aValInRow[aValue] = 0;
				aValue = 0;
			}
		}
		// find next posible value
		while ((aValue < theDim) &&
						(aValInCol[aCol * theDim + aValue] ||
							aValInRow[aValue] ||
							CantFillRow(theDim, aValInCol, aValInRow,
													aCol, &aValue)))
			aValue++;
		if (aValue < theDim)
		{
			// place value
			aValInCol[aCol * theDim + aValue] = 1;
			aValInRow[aValue] = 1;
			CopySquare(n, aStartSquare + (aValue << theSubDim),
									p, aSubDimvalue);
			
			// next column
			aCol++;
			p += (aSubDimvalue);
			if (aCol >= theDim)
			{
				// next row
				aRow++;
				if (aRow < theDim)
				{
					p = aStartSquare + ((aRow * n) << theSubDim);
					for (aValue = 0; aValue < theDim; aValue++)
						aValInRow[aValue] = 0;
					for (aCol = 0; aCol < theDim; aCol++)
					{
						aValInRow[aValue] = 0;
						if (*p)
					aValInRow[((*p - 1) >> theSubDim) - theStartVal] = 1;
						p += (aSubDimvalue);
					}
					aCol = 0;
					p = aStartSquare + ((aRow * n) << theSubDim);
				}
				else
				{
					return;
				}
			}
			aValue = 0;
		}
		else
		{
			// undo
			aCol-;
			p -= (aSubDimvalue);
			aValue = ((*p - 1) >> theSubDim) - theStartVal;
			while (aCol >= 0 && !aToBeFilled[aCol * theDim + aValue])
			{
				aCol-;
				if (aCol >= 0)
				{
					p -= (aSubDimvalue);
					aValue = ((*p - 1) >> theSubDim) - theStartVal;
				}
			}
			if (aCol < 0)
			{
				aRow-;
				p = aStartSquare +
						(((aRow * n) + theDim - 1) << theSubDim);
				aCol = theDim - 1;
				for (aValue = 0; aValue < theDim; aValue++)
					aValInRow[aValue] = 1;
			}
			aValue = ((*p - 1) >> theSubDim) - theStartVal;
			*p = 0;
			aValInCol[aCol * theDim + aValue] = 0;
			aValInRow[aValue] = 0;
			aValue++;
		}
	}
	delete[] aValInCol;
	delete[] aValInRow;
	delete[] aToBeFilled;
}

FillSquare
static void FillSquare(long n, short *latinSquare,
						long theDim, long theSubDim,
						long theStartRow, long theStartCol,
						long theStartVal, long theNrOfRows)
// fill latin square
// if n can be divided by a power of 2,
// theSubDim is 2^x, theDim is n/(2^x)
{
	if (theDim == 1)	// n is a power of 2
		FillSquare2(n, latinSquare, 1 << theSubDim,
				theStartRow << theSubDim, theStartCol << theSubDim,
				theStartVal << theSubDim, theNrOfRows << theSubDim);
	else
	{
		long	aMaxPower2, aNrOfRows, aStartCol, aStartRow;
		short	*aStartSquare = latinSquare +
												((theStartRow * n) << theSubDim) +
															(theStartCol << theSubDim);
		aMaxPower2 = 1;
		while (aMaxPower2 <= theDim) aMaxPower2 <<= 1;
		aMaxPower2 >>= 1;
		// fill top left of the square with a square with n = 2^aMaxPower2
		FillSquare2(n, latinSquare, aMaxPower2 << theSubDim,
				theStartRow << theSubDim, theStartCol << theSubDim,
				theStartVal << theSubDim, aMaxPower2 << theSubDim);
		aNrOfRows = theDim - aMaxPower2;
		if (aNrOfRows > theNrOfRows) aNrOfRows = theNrOfRows;
		// fill top right of the square with a square with n = theDim - 2^aMaxPower2
		FillSquare(n, latinSquare, theDim - aMaxPower2, theSubDim,
								theStartRow, theStartCol + aMaxPower2,
								theStartVal + aMaxPower2, aNrOfRows);
		// copy the square from the top right along the diagonal to the bottom left
		aStartCol = aMaxPower2 - aNrOfRows;
		aStartRow = aNrOfRows;
		while (aStartCol >= 0 && aStartRow < theNrOfRows)
		{
			if (aStartRow + aNrOfRows > theNrOfRows)
				aNrOfRows = theNrOfRows - aStartRow;
			if (aNrOfRows > aStartCol && aStartCol > 0)
				aNrOfRows = aStartCol;
	for (long aRow = 0; aRow < (aNrOfRows << theSubDim); aRow++)
			{
				short	*aFrom = aStartSquare + (aRow * n) +
												(aMaxPower2 << theSubDim);
				short	*aTo = aStartSquare +
									(((aStartRow << theSubDim) + aRow) * n) +
											(aStartCol << theSubDim);
				for (long aCol = 0; aCol < ((theDim - aMaxPower2) << 
							theSubDim); aCol++)
				{
					*aTo = *aFrom;
					aFrom++;
					aTo++;
				}
			for (long aCol = ((aStartCol + (theDim - aMaxPower2)) <<
				theSubDim); aCol < (aMaxPower2 << theSubDim); aCol++)
				{
					*aTo = 0;
					aTo++;
				}
			}
			aStartCol -= (theDim - aMaxPower2);
			aStartRow += (theDim - aMaxPower2);
		}
		// generate the remaning numbers
		CompleteSquare(n, latinSquare, theDim, theSubDim,
										theStartRow, theStartCol, theStartVal);
	}
}

LatinSquares
void LatinSquares(
  short n, /* dimension of the latin square to be generated */
  short *latinSquare /* set latinSquare[c + r*n] to square value row r, col c */
) {
	short	*p = latinSquare;
	long	aSubDim = 0;
	// init
	for (long i = 0; i < n * n; i++, p++)
		*p = 0;
	// can n be divided by a power of 2
	while (!(n & (1 << aSubDim))) aSubDim++;
	FillSquare(n, latinSquare, n >> aSubDim, aSubDim,
							0, 0, 0, n >> aSubDim);
}
 
AAPL
$97.03
Apple Inc.
-0.16
MSFT
$44.40
Microsoft Corpora
-0.47
GOOG
$593.35
Google Inc.
-2.63

MacTech Search:
Community Search:

Software Updates via MacUpdate

Audio Hijack Pro 2.11.0 - Record and enh...
Audio Hijack Pro drastically changes the way you use audio on your computer, giving you the freedom to listen to audio when you want and how you want. Record and enhance any audio with Audio Hijack... Read more
Intermission 1.1.1 - Pause and rewind li...
Intermission allows you to pause and rewind live audio from any application on your Mac. Intermission will buffer up to 3 hours of audio, allowing users to skip through any assortment of audio... Read more
Airfoil 4.8.7 - Send audio from any app...
Airfoil allows you to send any audio to AirPort Express units, Apple TVs, and even other Macs and PCs, all in sync! It's your audio - everywhere. With Airfoil you can take audio from any... Read more
Microsoft Remote Desktop 8.0.8 - Connect...
With Microsoft Remote Desktop, you can connect to a remote PC and your work resources from almost anywhere. Experience the power of Windows with RemoteFX in a Remote Desktop client designed to help... Read more
xACT 2.30 - Audio compression toolkit. (...
xACT stands for X Aaudio Compression Toolkit, an application that encodes and decodes FLAC, SHN, Monkey’s Audio, TTA, Wavpack, and Apple Lossless files. It also can encode these formats to MP3, AAC... Read more
Firefox 31.0 - Fast, safe Web browser. (...
Firefox for Mac offers a fast, safe Web browsing experience. Browse quickly, securely, and effortlessly. With its industry-leading features, Firefox is the choice of Web development professionals... Read more
Little Snitch 3.3.3 - Alerts you to outg...
Little Snitch gives you control over your private outgoing data. Track background activityAs soon as your computer connects to the Internet, applications often have permission to send any... Read more
Thunderbird 31.0 - Email client from Moz...
As of July 2012, Thunderbird has transitioned to a new governance model, with new features being developed by the broader free software and open source community, and security fixes and improvements... Read more
Together 3.2 - Store and organize all of...
Together helps you organize your Mac, giving you the ability to store, edit and preview your files in a single clean, uncluttered interface. Smart storage. With simple drag-and-drop functionality,... Read more
Cyberduck 4.5 - FTP and SFTP browser. (F...
Cyberduck is a robust FTP/FTP-TLS/SFTP browser for the Mac whose lack of visual clutter and cleverly intuitive features make it easy to use. Support for external editors and system technologies such... Read more

Latest Forum Discussions

See All

LEX Goes Free For One Day In Honor of Ne...
LEX Goes Free For One Day In Honor of New Update Posted by Jennifer Allen on July 24th, 2014 [ permalink ] Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad | Read more »
Thomas Was Alone Goes Universal, Slashes...
Thomas Was Alone Goes Universal, Slashes Price to $3.99 Posted by Ellis Spice on July 24th, 2014 [ permalink ] Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad | Read more »
Meerkatz Challenge Review
Meerkatz Challenge Review By Jennifer Allen on July 24th, 2014 Our Rating: :: FONDLY PUZZLINGUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad Cute and challenging, Meerkatz Challenge is a fun puzzle game, particularly for fans of... | Read more »
Book Your Appointment with F.E.A.R. this...
Book Your Appointment with F.E.A.R. | Read more »
It Came From Canada: Epic Skater
For all the hate that it gets for being a pastime for slackers, skateboarding really does require a lot of skill. All those flips and spins take real athleticism, and there’s all the jargon to memorize. Fortunately for us less extreme individuals,... | Read more »
Cultures Review
Cultures Review By Jennifer Allen on July 24th, 2014 Our Rating: :: SLOW-PACED EMPIRE BUILDINGiPad Only App - Designed for the iPad Cute it might seem, but Cultures is a bit too slow paced when it comes to those pesky timers to... | Read more »
More Paintings Have Been Added to Paint...
More Paintings Have Been Added to Paint it Back! Posted by Jessica Fisher on July 24th, 2014 [ permalink ] Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad | Read more »
The Order of Souls Review
The Order of Souls Review By Campbell Bird on July 24th, 2014 Our Rating: :: STORY GRINDUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad The Order of Souls is a free-to-play, turn-based RPG with a genre-mixing art style, interesting... | Read more »
Revolution 60 Review
Revolution 60 Review By Jordan Minor on July 24th, 2014 Our Rating: :: LASS EFFECTUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad Revolution 60 is a bold, cinematic action game with ambition to spare.   | Read more »
Matter (Photography)
Matter 1.0.1 Device: iOS Universal Category: Photography Price: $1.99, Version: 1.0.1 (iTunes) Description: Add stunning 3D effects to your photos with real-time shadows and reflections. Export your creations as photos or video loops... | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

Save on 5th generation refurbished iPod touch...
The Apple Store has Apple Certified Refurbished 5th generation iPod touches available starting at $149. Apple’s one-year warranty is included with each model, and shipping is free. Many, but not all... Read more
What Should Apple’s Next MacBook Priority Be;...
Stabley Times’ Phil Moore says that after expanding its iMac lineup with a new low end model, Apple’s next Mac hardware decision will be how it wants to approach expanding its MacBook lineup as well... Read more
ArtRage For iPhone Painting App Free During C...
ArtRage for iPhone is currently being offered for free (regularly $1.99) during Comic-Con San Diego #SDCC, July 24-27, in celebration of the upcoming ArtRage 4.5 and other 64-bit versions of the... Read more
With The Apple/IBM Alliance, Is The iPad Now...
Almost since the iPad was rolled out in 2010, and especially after Apple made a 128 GB storage configuration available in 2012, there’s been debate over whether the iPad is a serious tool for... Read more
MacBook Airs on sale starting at $799, free s...
B&H Photo has the new 2014 MacBook Airs on sale for up to $100 off MSRP for a limited time. Shipping is free, and B&H charges NY sales tax only. They also include free copies of Parallels... Read more
Apple 27″ Thunderbolt Display (refurbished) a...
The Apple Store has Apple Certified Refurbished 27″ Thunderbolt Displays available for $799 including free shipping. That’s $200 off the cost of new models. Read more
WaterField Designs Unveils Cycling Ride Pouch...
High end computer case and bag maker WaterField Designs of San Francisco now enters the cycling market with the introduction of the Cycling Ride Pouch – an upscale toolkit with a scratch-free iPhone... Read more
Kingston Digital Ships Large Capacity Near 1T...
Kingston Digital, Inc., the Flash memory affiliate of Kingston Technology Company, Inc.,has announced its latest addition to the SSDNow V300 series, the V310. The Kingston SSDNow V310 solid-state... Read more
Apple’s Fiscal Third Quarter Results; Record...
Apple has announced financial results for its fiscal 2014 third quarter ended June 28, 2014, racking up quarterly revenue of $37.4 billion and quarterly net profit of $7.7 billion, or $1.28 per... Read more
15-inch 2.0GHz MacBook Pro Retina on sale for...
B&H Photo has the 15″ 2.0GHz Retina MacBook Pro on sale for $1829 including free shipping plus NY sales tax only. Their price is $170 off MSRP. B&H will also include free copies of Parallels... Read more

Jobs Board

*Apple* Solutions Consultant (ASC) - Apple (...
**Job Summary** The ASC is an Apple employee who serves as an Apple brand ambassador and influencer in a Reseller's store. The ASC's role is to grow Apple Read more
Project Manager / Business Analyst, WW *Appl...
…a senior project manager / business analyst to work within our Worldwide Apple Fulfillment Operations and the Business Process Re-engineering team. This role will work Read more
Sr. Manager, *Apple* Deployment Programs fo...
**Job Summary** Apple is seeking candidates for a new position on the Education Content and Technology team. iPad and Mac is in the hands of millions of teachers and Read more
Sr Software Lead Engineer, *Apple* Online S...
Sr Software Lead Engineer, Apple Online Store Publishing Systems Keywords: Company: Apple Job Code: E3PCAK8MgYYkw Location (City or ZIP): Santa Clara Status: Full Read more
Senior Interaction Designer, *Apple* Online...
**Job Summary** Apple is looking for a hands on Senior…will be a key player in designing for the Apple Online Store. The ideal designer will have a Read more
All contents are Copyright 1984-2011 by Xplain Corporation. All rights reserved. Theme designed by Icreon.