TweetFollow Us on Twitter

Mar 97 Factory Floor

Volume Number: 13 (1997)
Issue Number: 3
Column Tag: From The Factory Floor

Jon Watte, Metrowerks BeMeister

By Dave Mark, ©1996 by Metrowerks, Inc., all rights reserved.

This month's Factory Floor interview is with Jon Watte, leader of Metrowerks BeOS tools effort. With all the interest in the BeOS brought on by prospective deals with Apple (as of this writing, not yet decided) and a bundling deal with Power Computing, I asked Jon if he wouldn't mind answering some questions about his involvement with Be.

Dave: How did you hook up with Metrowerks?

Jon: All the applications I wrote and designed at SCOOP were coded using the Think Class Library, using Think C versions 6 and 7. When the time came for Apple to roll out the PowerMacs, Symantec did not have a solution for us, so I went ahead and ported the TCL from Think C+- to "real" C++. I also wrote some utilities that would do the hard work of converting a TCL application to use this TCL version for PowerMac. I released this port publicly in several versions and, through it, got the attention of people at Metrowerks.

Meanwhile, my wife and I entered into something called the Diversity of Immigration Visa Lottery, or "green card lottery" for short, where US immigrations randomly selects among qualified applicants from nations with under-representation in US immigration statistics. Most people don't "win" this lottery, but my wife did. The only crux was that you had to secure an offer of employment from the US to be able to enter. I guess they were afraid people would move from the Swedish welfare system to live on American welfare. I e-mailed everybody I knew in the US from the ‘net and visits to trade shows, and literally thirty minutes later I had a reply from Greg Galanos, saying he had just thought about me for this secret new project they were starting... the Be port of CodeWarrior.

Dave: What were the early days in the Be universe like?

Jon: I actually had one of the first BeBoxes at home in Stockholm, a machine based on the AT&T Hobbit. The hardware wasn't very fast, but the machine was nice anyway. Once I managed to clear through the US visa process (which took much longer than I would have liked), I moved to the US at the same time as the PowerPC-based BeBox prototype appeared.

At first, the machines were very bare-bones; I had the deluxe model with a sheet metal frame (no cover) whereas people at Be usually kept their machines as circuit boards laying on their desks (they still do.) Back then, there wasn't even any debugging except for printf(). You compiled your program on a Mac using CodeWarrior, FTP'ed it to the BeBox, ran it there and watched it spit out text in a terminal window.

There was only a small circle of developers then, many of them from France where Be got much of their initial capital. There were also no mailing lists or news groups in which to discuss the system - they were keeping a very low profile in order not to hype the machine before it was ready to be shown. We all worked under NDA and had to cover the machine with blankets when relatives were visiting. Every two to three months, we would go to Be to talk about what we were doing and in which direction to move, as well as bug them until they fixed the bugs we were running into.

Dave: How did CodeWarrior for BeOS evolve?

Jon: My initial task once I moved to the US was to design and write an IDE, while the other team member (another John) ported the compiler and linker. One interesting quirk soon developed; Be was doing all the compilation under SCO unix and Linux, because those boxes could run NFS which was needed for their source-code control system. In fact, I think they still do. That meant that we had to port our compiler to run under unix on a little-endian machine, a job which later turned out to benefit us when we ported to Windows.

Anyway, while we were cross-developing from the Mac, we soon felt the need for a cross-debugger as well. The only problem was that the BeOS did not support debugging - and since it has protected memory, you can't just write breakpoints into code as you can on the Mac. I put the IDE work on the back-burner and helped Be co-design the system API for debugging, based on the requirements the Metrowerks debugger had at that time. Once that was done, I could write a debugger Nub that ran on Be and adapt the Metrowerks debugger to talk to this Nub instead of a local Mac Nub. This was still back when the machine was secret, and we wrote the debugger mostly for our own use and that of the few select developers in on the secret.

When I was almost finished with this, the other team member left Metrowerks, and I was left alone in charge of the Be team. Quickly finding another programmer to help out (Brian Stern) as well as leveraging the skills of the MPW/command-line tools guy (Mark Anderson) I put together a new Be team within Metrowerks, and showed Brian the design I had for the IDE. Mark already did MPW compilers and linkers, and quickly caught on to Be, which left me with the task of writing the "real" Be debugger.

Dave: Is that where the Be version of PowerPlant came to be?

Jon: Yes. We looked at the cross-debugger, and wondered how to move the technology over to BeOS. It turned out that the debugger source code had some ugly interrelations between UI and functionality that made perfect sense on the Mac but wouldn't work in the multi-threaded Be world. So we had the choice of developing a new debugger from scratch, or somehow porting the MacOS debugger. After some going back and forth, we settled on making the debugger believe it was running on a weird kind of Mac. Since the debugger code was non-reentrant, we had to re-implement the entire event loop layer; the current Be debugger still sits in WaitNextEvent() waiting for things to be thrown at it. Since all of the former Mac code runs in the same thread because of that, the reentrancy problems went away, at the cost of implementing about 300 toolbox calls and some PowerPlant classes.

Dave: What is the state of Be development today?

Jon: The larger companies that have lots of code vested in other OSes are being silent. I'm sure they're working with BeOS internally, but need more time to see if it'll be a viable platform. Meanwhile, smaller, nimbler developers who don't mind throwing away lots of code and starting over are waking up and smelling the coffee - a brand new frontier waiting for fortunes to be made off of it.

If you're thinking of moving a Mac program to the BeOS, you have to realize that, PowerPlant portability or not, it may be hard, or not even make sense. The BeOS is different; it has a different UI and a very multi-threaded concept. Users are quickly getting used to being able to perform all kinds of actions simultaneously, and modal dialogs are few and far between. Mostly because they're so hard to implement, I think, and I love it that way. It's easier to create a modeless dialog than a modal!

If we make the PowerPlant layer available, it'll probably be useful if you have a PowerPlant application on the Mac, but it'll also still require work in the app. It's not a miracle pill. The current version "solves" the re-entrancy problem by having all the windows and menus send messages to the one "Mac Toolbox" thread, which means that the program will never truly feel and behave like a real Be program.

The right thing to do is to re-map the interface classes you may be using currently onto Be classes, and make sure that the underlying "engine" code is thread-safe and re-entrant. Maybe you can even take advantage of some BeOS features on your code, such as easy add-ins, pre-emptive multitasking or memory mapping of data files. That will make an application sing, and is of course the direction we want to take our internal code in. Whether this will be done in the PowerPlant context, or by separating engine from UI remains to be seen.

Dave: How stable is the Be platform for development?

Jon: Well, I don't have to reboot the machine every time I crash. It's sometimes also nice to have a command-line in the system - even though I'm a die-hard CodeWarrior IDE user, I had to go to MPW now and then on the Mac. On Be, it's GNU "bash" that's the shell, and there's a gazillion little utilities already written for it that you can use.

CodeWarrior runs well under the BeOS, although we spend much time waiting for the file system. The new file system promised in DR9 looks as if it'll fix that problem. Being able to type and edit unhindered while running a compile - or two! - at the same time is something I miss everytime I go back to the Mac.

However, every four or five months, Be comes out with a new version of the OS, and lots of things changed that you have to catch up with. Old programs don't usually work on the new version of the OS, since they have the luxury of changing the APIs. That will stop once they reach larger, non-developer markets; currently release DR9 (the next after the MacTech release) is supposed to be "Compatibility Lock".

It's extra hard for us, because our tools ship with the OS and have to be developed, debugged, and tested by the time the OS ships - but Be typically fixes bugs that breaks compatibility while we do that, and once the "last bug" is fixed, they document it, test it, and ship, so we have to get in early, roll with the flow, and hope the APIs work as we think they do...

Dave: How do you feel about Be's choice of C++ as the Be API standard?

Jon: I don't mind C++. It's certainly a language with wide industry adoption and also well understood system characteristics. Many of the nicer, more dynamic languages would need special hardware (mark and type bits in memory) to run really well, which would drive prices up. Meanwhile, there's a lot of C and C++ source available for porting; most public source is C or C++, so it's an obvious language to support.

Pascal affecionados will of course be somewhat unhappy, but in the grim world of business, I think the sentiment is that they're not a big enough force to cater to initially, although I hope Pascal and other languages will arrive at some point. We've done some looking into this at Metrowerks, and there is no reason why you can't make Object Pascal code generate C++ compatible objects; it's just a SMOP. ("Small Matter Of Programming" - a term that means lots of sweaty work.)

The fragile base class problem has several different solutions, and I think it will not be a big impediment to the BeOS. We've talked to them, and they're on the ball with a solution.

Dave: Many prospective developers ask about the types of software they should develop for the BeBox. Any advice?

Jon: There are lots of things I want to see. Sticking to the "content development" niche that Be says they want to target, I could see how you could write an integrated radio station program that kept all of the play lists, spot lists, helped out with traffic planning, and generated all the reports you'd want. Storing the actual songs and "canned" shows and interviews in MPEG and playing them back in real time from disk or network would also come in handy. The BeOS is really tuned for this combination of "soft real-time" and GUI tasks. Connecting back to my previous work in publishing, given some people and some dollars, the right person could create a kick-ass integrated newspaper publishing solution; the only problem being that Quark XPress is a formidable competitor in page layout. But that is only part of the publishing chain; the BeBox has everything else it takes to implement that kind of solution already.

Dave: Can you tell me about Datatypes.lib? (a data translation library Jon wrote in his "copious" spare time and which is starting to see major adoption among Be developers.)

Jon: The cool thing about BeOS is that everything is new. The bad thing is that it's pretty sparse on the nicer amenities. However, the design of the BeOS makes it so that Be doesn't have to provide every system service an application might want to rely on.

A case in point is Datatypes.lib, a generic data translation service much like EasyOpen on the Mac, except with an API mere mortals can understand. It started as a request to Be from some old Amiga developers to adopt the Amiga "datatypes" system service, which apparently is a very basic way of identifying and loading the contents of a disk file into an application. Many people liked the idea, but thought the Amiga implementation was flawed, and a lot of discussion ensued. To cut down on the clutter and flames, I decided one weekend to take the best of the discussion and just implement it. I did, and posted the result for comments. The first round was pretty harsh (and rightly so) but version 1.1 really had everything you'd need in a basic data translation package, including identification, import, export, making it easy to write add-on translators, and abstracting translation from storage so you could use any translator going to/from any source (such as disk, memory, or a network connection). Judicious use of C++ abstract base classes made this both forward compatible and easy to implement.

The library wasn't all that hard to write, thanks to the Be kernel threading and code add-on model, and people are already both using it in applications and writing translator plug-ins for it. This means that your, say, sound editor program doesn't have to know about every imaginable sound file format, just the "standard" format and rely on Datatypes.lib to provide translation.

 

Community Search:
MacTech Search:

Software Updates via MacUpdate

Bookends 12.8 - Reference management and...
Bookends is a full-featured bibliography/reference and information-management system for students and professionals. Bookends uses the cloud to sync reference libraries on all the Macs you use.... Read more
Adobe Creative Cloud 4.0.0.185 - Access...
Adobe Creative Cloud costs $19.99/month for a single app, or $49.99/month for the entire suite. Introducing Adobe Creative Cloud desktop applications, including Adobe Photoshop CC and Illustrator CC... Read more
Default Folder X 5.1.4 - Enhances Open a...
Default Folder X attaches a toolbar to the right side of the Open and Save dialogs in any OS X-native application. The toolbar gives you fast access to various folders and commands. You just click on... Read more
Amazon Chime 4.1.5587 - Amazon-based com...
Amazon Chime is a communications service that transforms online meetings with a secure, easy-to-use application that you can trust. Amazon Chime works seamlessly across your devices so that you can... Read more
Persecond 1.0.9 - Timelapse video made e...
Persecond is the easy, fun way to create a beautiful timelapse video. Import an image sequence from any camera, trim the length of your video, adjust the speed and playback direction, and you’re done... Read more
CrossOver 16.2 - Run Windows apps on you...
CrossOver can get your Windows productivity applications and PC games up and running on your Mac quickly and easily. CrossOver runs the Windows software that you need on Mac at home, in the office,... Read more
MegaSeg 6.0.2 - Professional DJ and radi...
MegaSeg is a complete solution for pro audio/video DJ mixing, radio automation, and music scheduling with rock-solid performance and an easy-to-use design. Mix with visual waveforms and Magic... Read more
Apple iTunes 12.6 - Play Apple Music and...
Apple iTunes lets you organize and stream Apple Music, download and watch video and listen to Podcasts. It can automatically download new music, app, and book purchases across all your devices and... Read more
GraphicConverter 10.4 - $39.95
GraphicConverter is an all-purpose image-editing program that can import 200 different graphic-based formats, edit the image, and export it to any of 80 available file formats. The high-end editing... Read more
OpenEmu 2.0.5 - Open Source game-emulati...
OpenEmu is about to change the world of video game emulation, one console at a time... For the first time, the 'It just works' philosophy now extends to open source video game emulation on the Mac.... Read more

The Elder Scrolls: Legends is now availa...
| Read more »
Ticket to Earth beginner's guide: H...
Robot Circus launched Ticket to Earth as part of the App Store's indie games event last week. If you're not quite digging the space operatics Mass Effect: Andromeda is serving up, you'll be pleased to know that there's a surprising alternative on... | Read more »
Leap to victory in Nexx Studios new plat...
You’re always a hop, skip, and a jump away from a fiery death in Temple Jump, a new platformer-cum-endless runner from Nexx Studio. It’s out now on both iOS and Android if you’re an adventurer seeking treasure in a crumbling, pixel-laden temple. | Read more »
Failbetter Games details changes coming...
Sunless Sea, Failbetter Games' dark and gloomy sea explorer, sets sail for the iPad tomorrow. Ahead of the game's launch, Failbetter took to Twitter to discuss what will be different in the mobile version of the game. Many of the changes make... | Read more »
Splish, splash! The Pokémon GO Water Fes...
Niantic is back with a new festival for dedicated Pokémon GO collectors. The Water Festival officially kicks off today at 1 P.M. PDT and runs through March 29. Magikarp, Squirtle, Totodile, and their assorted evolved forms will be appearing at... | Read more »
Death Road to Canada (Games)
Death Road to Canada 1.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $7.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: Get it now at the low launch price! Price will go up a dollar every major update. Update news at the bottom of this... | Read more »
Bean's Quest Beginner's Guide:...
Bean's Quest is a new take on both the classic platformer and the endless runner, and it's free on the App Store for the time being. Instead of running constantly, you can't stop jumping. That adds a surprising new level of challenge to the game... | Read more »
How to rake in the cash in Bit City
Our last Bit City guide covered the basics. Now it's time to get into some of the more advanced techniques. In the later cities, cash flow becomes much more difficult, so you'll want to develop some strategies if you want to complete each level.... | Read more »
PixelTerra (Games)
PixelTerra 1.1.1 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $.99, Version: 1.1.1 (iTunes) Description: The world of PixelTerra is quite dangerous so you need to build a shelter, find some food supply and get ready to protect... | Read more »
Tokaido™ (Games)
Tokaido™ 1.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $6.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: Discover the digital adaptation of Tokaido, the boardgame phenomenon that has already sold more than 250,000 copies worldwide, and... | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

SSD Speeder RAM Disk SSD Life Extender App Fo...
Fehraltorf, Switzerland based B-Eng has announced they are making their SSD Speeder app for macOS publicly available for purchase on their website. SSD Speeder is a RAM disk utility that prevents... Read more
iPhone Scores Highest Overall in Smartphone D...
Customer satisfaction is much higher among smartphone owners who use their device to operate other connected home services such as smart thermostats and smart appliances, according to the J.D. Power... Read more
Swipe CRM Free Photo-Centric CRM Sales DEal C...
Swipe CRM LLC has introduced Swipe CRM: Visual Sales 1.0 for iPad, an app for creating, managing, and sharing visually stunning sales deals. Swipe CRM is targeted to small-and-medium creative... Read more
13-inch 2.0GHz Apple MacBook Pros on sale for...
B&H has the non-Touch Bar 13″ 2.0GHz MacBook Pros in stock today and on sale for $150 off MSRP. Shipping is free, and B&H charges NY sales tax only: - 13″ 2.0GHz MacBook Pro Space Gray (... Read more
15-inch Touch Bar MacBook Pros on sale for up...
B&H Photo has the new 2016 15″ Apple Touch Bar MacBook Pros in stock today and on sale for up to $150 off MSRP. Shipping is free, and B&H charges NY sales tax only: - 15″ 2.7GHz Touch Bar... Read more
Apple’s iPhone 6s Tops Best-Selling Smartphon...
In terms of shipments, the iPhone 6s from Apple bested all competitors for sales in 2016, according to new analysis from IHS Markit, a world leader in critical information, analytics and solutions.... Read more
Logitech Rugged Combo Protective iPad Case an...
Logitech has announced its Logitech Rugged Combo, Logitech Rugged Case, and Logitech Add-on Keyboard for Rugged Case for Apple’s new, more affordable $329 9.7-inch iPad, a complete solution designed... Read more
T-Mobile To Offer iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus...
T-Mobile has announced it will offer iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus (PRODUCT)RED Special Edition in a vibrant red aluminum finish. The introduction of this special edition iPhone celebrates Apple’s 10... Read more
9-inch 128GB iPad Pros on sale for $50-$70 of...
B&H Photo has 9.7″ 128GB Apple WiFi iPad Pros on sale for up to $70 off MSRP, each including free shipping. B&H charges sales tax in NY only: - 9″ Space Gray 128GB WiFi iPad Pro: $649 $50... Read more
27-inch iMacs on sale for up to $200 off MSRP...
B&H Photo has 27″ Apple iMacs on sale for up to $200 off MSRP, each including free shipping plus NY sales tax only: - 27″ 3.3GHz iMac 5K: $2099 $200 off MSRP - 27″ 3.2GHz/1TB Fusion iMac 5K: $... Read more

Jobs Board

*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions- Chicago...
SalesSpecialist - Retail Customer Service and SalesTransform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, you're also the Read more
Fulltime aan de slag als shopmanager in een h...
Ben jij helemaal gek van Apple -producten en vind je het helemaal super om fulltime shopmanager te zijn in een jonge en hippe elektronicazaak? Wil jij werken in Read more
Starte Dein Karriere-Abenteuer in den Hauptst...
…mehrsprachigen Teams betreust Du Kunden von bekannten globale Marken wie Apple , Mercedes, Facebook, Expedia, und vielen anderen! Funktion Du wolltest schon Read more
*Apple* macOS Systems Integration Administra...
…most exceptional support available in the industry. SCI is seeking an Junior Apple macOS systems integration administrator that will be responsible for providing Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions - Apple,...
Job Description: Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, Read more
All contents are Copyright 1984-2011 by Xplain Corporation. All rights reserved. Theme designed by Icreon.