TweetFollow Us on Twitter

Apr 96 Challenge
Volume Number:12
Issue Number:4
Column Tag:Programmer’s Challenge

Programmer’s Challenge

By Bob Boonstra, Westford, Massachusetts

Note: Source code files accompanying article are located on MacTech CD-ROM or source code disks.

Mutant Life

Time for a little nostalgia this month. Most of you probably remember John Conway’s exploration of cellular automata known as the game of Life. The game is played on a grid of square cells. A cell has one of two states - it can be occupied (“alive”) or empty (“dead”). Time proceeds in discrete increments, or generations, and the state of a cell at time N+1 is determined by its state and that of its eight neighbors at time N. In the simplest variations of the game, a “birth” occurs in an empty cell if exactly three of its neighbors were alive in the previous generation. A “death” occurs in an occupied cell surrounded by four or more living cells, or by fewer than two living cells.

This month, the challenge is to write code that will compute the state of a Life-like world some number of generations into the future. The prototype for the code you should write is:

pascal long PropagateLife(
 BitMap cells,   /* the boundaries and population of your automata */
 long numGenerations,/* number of generations to propagate */
 short birthRules, /* defines when cells become alive */
 short deathRules/* defines when cells die */
);

Your automata live in a world defined by the rectangle cells.bounds (with top and left coordinates guaranteed to be 0). Their world is actually a torus instead of a rectangle: the cells.bounds.right-1 column of cells is adjacent to column 0, and the cells.bounds.bottom-1 row of cells is adjacent to row 0. The rules for birth and death are generalized from those in the first paragraph and defined by birthRules and deathRules. An empty cell with X occupied neighbors becomes alive in the next generation if the bit (birthRules & (1<<X)) is set. An occupied cell with Y occupied neighbors dies in the next generation if the bit (deathRules & (1<<Y)) is set. Any other cell retains its previous state (occupied or empty) from one generation to the next. As an example, the version of the game described in the first paragraph would have birthRules=0x0008 and deathRules=0x01F3.

The initial population of automata is pointed to by cells.baseAddr, one bit per cell, when PropagateLife is called. An occupied cell has the value 1, and an empty cell has the value 0. The cells BitMap is defined in the usual way, with row R found starting at *(cells.baseAddr + R*cells.rowBytes). You are to use birthRules and deathRules to propagate this population ahead for numGenerations generations, stopping only in the event that the population of generation N is identical to that of the immediately preceeding generation. Your code must return the number of generations processed (which will be numGenerations unless a static population was reached). When you return, the memory pointed to by cells.baseAddr must contain the propagated population.

You may allocate a reasonable amount of auxiliary storage if that is helpful, provided (as always) that you deallocate any memory before returning, as I will be calling your code many times.

This month, we continue the language experiment that permits your solution to the Challenge to be coded in C, C++, or Pascal, using your choice among the MPW, Metrowerks, or Symantec compilers for these languages. The environment you choose must support linking your solution with test code written in C. Along with your solution, you should provide a project file or make file that will generate a stand-alone application that calls your solution from C test code.

This will be a native PowerPC Challenge. Now, start propagating

Two Months Ago Winner

Congratulations to Ernst Munter (Kanata, Ontario) for submitting the fastest entry to the Intersecting Rectangles Challenge. Of the eighteen contestants who submitted entries, sixteen provided correct solutions. Recall that the Challenge was to provide code that would return a set of output rectangles containing all points inside in an odd number (or an even number, depending on an input parameter) of input rectangles.

A number of solutions scanned the list of input rectangles and created a list of rectangles formed by the intersections, keeping track of whether the resulting subrectangles were inside an odd or an even number of input rectangles. Other solutions used a bitmap approach, calculating the exclusive OR of the input rectangles (for the odd parity case). The bitmap technique tended to suffer when the rectangles spanned a large x/y space.

The winning solution combines these techniques in an interesting way. Ernst first scans the input rectangles to collect and sort the unique x and y vertex coordinates. He then forms a reduced-scale bitmap using these virtual pixels (dubbed “vixels”), applying the XOR technique to compute the odd or even parity intersections of the input rectangles. Finally, Ernst scans the “vixelMap” to form output rectangles of the appropriate parity. An innovative technique that was not only fast but also space-efficient compared with many of the other entries.

The table below summarizes the results for entries that worked correctly. It shows the total time required for 60 test cases of up to 250 input rectangles per test case, the number of output rectangles produced, and the total code/data size of each entry. (The limit of 250 input rectangles resulted from the large memory requirements of some of the solutions.) Numbers in parentheses after a person’s name indicate that person’s cumulative point total for all previous Challenges, not including this one.

Nametime# of rectssize
Ernst Munter (112)3121054602264
ACC Murphy3984465561210
John Nevard (10)551988043092
Miguel Cruz Picão (7)10322615621328
Xan Gregg (88)17161036731232
Cathy Saxton18544575081148
David Cary43614369932205
Elden Wood582417857101012
Bob Clark601617897491572
Randy Boring60334465562589
Alex Kipnis1015817857101218
Tom Saxton (10)15206980411264
Richard Cann231032821243581
Erik Sea548384350491125
Rishi Khan18020527951361288
Michael White9381912399241796

Top 20 Contestants of All Time

Here are the Top Contestants for the Programmer’s Challenges to date, including everyone who has accumulated more than 20 points. The numbers below include points awarded for this month’s entrants.

Rank Name Points Rank Name Points

1. [Name deleted] 176 11. Mallett, Jeff 44

2. Munter, Ernst 132 12. Kasparian, Raffi 42

3. Gregg, Xan 92 13. Vineyard, Jeremy 42

4. Larsson, Gustav 87 14. Lengyel, Eric 40

5. Karsh, Bill 80 15. Darrah, Dave 31

6. Stenger, Allen 65 16. Brown, Jorg 30

7. Riha, Stepan 51 17. Landry, Larry 29

8. Cutts, Kevin 50 18. Elwertowski, Tom 24

9. Goebel, James 49 19. Lee, Johnny 22

10. Nepsund, Ronald 47 20. Noll, Robert 22

There are three ways to earn points: (1) scoring in the top 5 of any Challenge, (2) being the first person to find a bug in a published winning solution or, (3) being the first person to suggest a Challenge that I use. The points you can win are:

1st place 20 points 5th place 2 points

2nd place 10 points finding bug 2 points

3rd place 7 points suggesting Challenge 2 points

4th place 4 points

Xan Gregg earns two points this month for being the first to point out an error in the winning Find Again and Again solution by Gustav Larsson published in the February issue. The error occurs because the routines BMH_Search() and SimpleSearch() use signed declarations char * when they ought to use unsigned char *. As a result, processing is not correct in some cases when the textToSearch contains characters >= 0x80. There was confusion on this point in a number of the entries, and I did not penalize any of the solutions for making this error.

Here is Ernst’s winning Intersecting Rectangles solution:

IntersectRects.c

Copyright 1996, Ernst Munter, Kanata, ON, Canada

/*
  The Problem
  -----------
  Given a bunch of overlapping rectangles, compute a set
  of rectangles which covers the area of either an odd or
  an even number of overlaps.  The output rects should only
  use edges from the repertoire of edges contained in the
  input set of rects.

  General Strategy
  ----------------
  We create a virtual raster with a (variable) resolution,
  where each x or y coordinate value corresponds to an
  edge of at least one input rectangle.  Depending on the
  number of input rects, and their coincidence of edges,
  this raster may be very small, or fairly large, but never
  larger than the screen it represents.

  We then paint rectangles into the raster, each raster
  point being represented by 1 bit, regardless how many
  pixels are within the corresponding edges on the real
  screen.  I call these bits “virtual pixels” or “vixels”.

  After all vixels are painted, the bit map is scanned
  to identify rectangular areas of set bits.

  The vertical extent of each output rect is at least equal
  to the distance between the two neighboring input edges.

  We then follow the slice down over as many slices as
  possible to maximize the height of the rectangle.

  Memory Use
  ----------
  The maximum amount of memory allocated dynamically is
  determined by the number of input rects.  The actual
  amount will be less if some input rects share edge
  coordinate values.

  Approximate size of the index heap:
  (16 * numRectsIn)  bytes
     plus a few overhead bytes

  Approximate combined size of the two vixel maps:
  (numRectsIn * numRectsIn) bytes
     plus a few overhead bytes,
     minus gain from elimination of duplicate values

  A double size vixel map is always allocated although
  only the even parity case needs both.

  For example, total dynamic memory for 100 rectangles will
  be about 16K.  1000 rectangles might need 1MB, but on
  any reasonable size screen, 1000 rectangles will share
  a very large number of edges, and will have considerably
  less memory allocated.


  Other assumptions (these are not checked)
  -----------------------------------------
  There is at least one input rect.

  All input rects are legal and not empty, that is:
      top<bottom, and left<right.
*/

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#define MAXLONG 0x7fffffff

void RectangleIntersections(
     const Rect inputRects[],
     const long numRectsIn,
     Rect  outputRects[],
     long  *numRectsOut,
     const Boolean oddParity);

// Local function prototypes:
void  PaintOdd(long* vm,long H,long L,long R,long mapWidth);
void  PaintEven(long* vm,long H,long L,long R,long mapWidth);
void  PackMap(long* vm,long mapSize);
void  Insert(long* h,long size,long x);
long* Sort(long* h,long size);
long  GetIndex(long size,long* index,long z);

//Some shorthand macros:
#define IRT (inputRects[i].top)
#define IRL (inputRects[i].left)
#define IRB (inputRects[i].bottom)
#define IRR (inputRects[i].right)

#define ORT (ORptr->top)
#define ORL (ORptr->left)
#define ORB (ORptr->bottom)
#define ORR (ORptr->right)

/* Masks needed to process the edges of vixel blocks
   which are not necessarily aligned with bitmap words.
*/
long leftMask[32] =
   {0xFFFFFFFF, 0x7FFFFFFF, 0x3FFFFFFF, 0x1FFFFFFF,
    0x0FFFFFFF, 0x07FFFFFF, 0x03FFFFFF, 0x01FFFFFF,
    0x00FFFFFF, 0x007FFFFF, 0x003FFFFF, 0x001FFFFF,
    0x000FFFFF, 0x0007FFFF, 0x0003FFFF, 0x0001FFFF,
    0x0000FFFF, 0x00007FFF, 0x00003FFF, 0x00001FFF,
    0x00000FFF, 0x000007FF, 0x000003FF, 0x000001FF,
    0x000000FF, 0x0000007F, 0x0000003F, 0x0000001F,
    0x0000000F, 0x00000007, 0x00000003, 0x00000001};

long rightMask[32] =
   {0x80000000, 0xC0000000, 0xE0000000, 0xF0000000,
    0xF8000000, 0xFC000000, 0xFE000000, 0xFF000000,
    0xFF800000, 0xFFC00000, 0xFFE00000, 0xFFF00000,
    0xFFF80000, 0xFFFC0000, 0xFFFE0000, 0xFFFF0000,
    0xFFFF8000, 0xFFFFC000, 0xFFFFE000, 0xFFFFF000,
    0xFFFFF800, 0xFFFFFC00, 0xFFFFFE00, 0xFFFFFF00,
    0xFFFFFF80, 0xFFFFFFC0, 0xFFFFFFE0, 0xFFFFFFF0,
    0xFFFFFFF8, 0xFFFFFFFC, 0xFFFFFFFE, 0xFFFFFFFF};


RectangleIntersections
void RectangleIntersections(
     const Rect inputRects[],
     const long numRectsIn,
     Rect  outputRects[],
     long  *numRectsOut,
     const Boolean oddParity) {

    long* xHeap;
    long* yHeap;
    long* vixelMap;

    long* xIndex;
    long* yIndex;
    long  xIndexMax;
    long  yIndexMax;
    long  xHeapSize;
    long  yHeapSize;

    long  i;
    long  mapWidth;
    long  mapSize;
    Rect* ORptr = outputRects;

//  First, we collect all X and Y coordinate values of
//  all input rectangles in a heap (priority queue), which
//  is then sorted into an index without duplicates for each
//  dimension, using a modified form of Heapsort.

    *numRectsOut=0;
    if (0==(yHeap=(long*)malloc((numRectsIn+3)*sizeof(long)*4)))
      return;
    xHeap=yHeap+(numRectsIn+3)*2;

    *xHeap=*yHeap=MAXLONG;
    xHeapSize=yHeapSize=1;

    for (i=0;i<numRectsIn;i++) {
      Insert(yHeap,yHeapSize,IRT);    yHeapSize++;
      Insert(yHeap,yHeapSize,IRB);    yHeapSize++;
      Insert(xHeap,xHeapSize,IRL);    xHeapSize++;
      Insert(xHeap,xHeapSize,IRR);    xHeapSize++;
    }

    xIndex=Sort(xHeap,xHeapSize);
    xIndexMax=xHeapSize-(xIndex-xHeap);
    yIndex=Sort(yHeap,yHeapSize);
    yIndexMax=yHeapSize-(yIndex-yHeap);

//note: IndexMax indexes to the last entry index[indexMax]
//      in each index list.  index[0] and index[indexMax]
//      are the edges of the enclosing rectangle.

//  Each block of real pixels that is defined by adjacent
//  X and Y edges (from any input rectangle) is considered
//  as a single virtual pixel (“vixel”).  The map of these
//  vixels will then be populated by the input rectangles.
//  Each vixel is represented by a bit in vixelMap.

//  We get memory for the vixel map and clear it to 0.
//  Vixels are stored as bitmaps in 32-bit words.

//  The vixel map is initially organized as either 1 word
//  per 32 vixels (odd parity) or 2 words (even parity).

    mapWidth=(32+xIndexMax) >> 5;
    mapSize=mapWidth*(yIndexMax+1);
    if (0==(vixelMap=
       (long*)malloc(2*mapSize*sizeof(long)))) return;
    if (oddParity) memset(vixelMap,0,mapSize*sizeof(long));
    else memset(vixelMap,0,2*mapSize*sizeof(long));

//  With odd parity, it is only necessary to XOR the vixels
//  of all input rects (PaintOdd).

//  With even parity, we also need to OR all vixels.  This
//  is done in the alternate words of vixelMap (PaintEven);
//  hence the vixelMap is stretched with even parity.

//  Accumulate the enclosed vixels of each input rect:

    for (i=0;i<numRectsIn;i++) {
      long  T,L,B,R,x,y;
      long* vm;
      T=GetIndex(yIndexMax,yIndex,IRT);
      L=GetIndex(xIndexMax,xIndex,IRL);
      B=GetIndex(yIndexMax,yIndex,IRB);
      R=GetIndex(xIndexMax,xIndex,IRR);
      if (oddParity) {
        vm=vixelMap+mapWidth*T+(L>>5);
        PaintOdd(vm,B-T,L,R-1,mapWidth);
      } else {
        vm=vixelMap+2*(mapWidth*T+(L>>5));
        PaintEven(vm,B-T,L,R-1,mapWidth);
      }
    }

//  For even parity, XOR all pairs of words in the vixelMap
//  to pack it into the same format as the odd parity
//  vixelMap.

    if (!oddParity) PackMap(vixelMap,mapSize);

//  Now the vixelMap (the bitmap of all vixels, that is
//  areas of the screen), is set to 1 for every vixel
//  meeting the criteria of either odd or even parity.

//  We scan the vixel map to find contiguous regions of
//  non-zero vixels in order to generate the output
//  rectangles.  For each row, we successively look for
//  blocks of set vixels. This will define one output rect.
//  The X/Y index arrays serve to convert the vixel
//  coordinates back to the real pixel coordinates which
//  define the output rectangles.

  { long word,bit,bb,c,u,L,B;
    long* vm=vixelMap;
    for (i=0;i<yIndexMax;i++) {
      bit=0;
      c=0;
      for (word=0;word<mapWidth;word++) {
        u=vm[word];c=0;
        if (u) {
          long* vmBelow=vm+word+mapWidth;
          bb=0;
          do {
            while (u>0) {bb++;u<<=1;}
            if (c==0) {
              L=bb;
              ORL=xIndex[bit+L]; c--;
            } else {
              long* vmx=vmBelow;
              long mask=~(leftMask[L] & rightMask[bb-1]);
              B=i+1;
//Default: the rectangle is 1 vixel high.
//We try to extend rectangle down as far as possible:
              while (-1==(mask | *vmx)) {
                B++;*vmx &= mask;vmx+=mapWidth;
              }
              ORB=yIndex[B];
              ORR=xIndex[bit+bb];
              ORT=yIndex[i];
              ORptr++;
              c=0;
            }
            if (0==(u=(~u) & rightMask[31-bb])) break;
          } while(bb<32);
          if (c) {
            long* vmx=vmBelow;
            long mask=~leftMask[L];
            B=i+1;
            while (-1==(mask | *vmx)) {
              B++;*vmx &= mask;vmx+=mapWidth;
            }
            ORB=yIndex[B];
            ORR=xIndex[bit+32];
            ORT=yIndex[i];
            ORptr++;
          }
        }
        bit+=32;
      }
      vm+=mapWidth;
    }

  }
  free(yHeap);                  //free allocated memory
  free(vixelMap);
  *numRectsOut=ORptr-outputRects;
}

//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// Auxiliary functions called by RectangleIntersections: //
/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Insert
/* Insert grows a heap, that is a partially sorted balanced
   binary tree, where each node’s children must be less or
   equal, but not in any particular order.

   Each value x is inserted by appending it as the last node
   and then sifting it up (exchanging father and child
   nodes) until the heap property is restored.
*/
void Insert(long* h,long size,long x) {
  long i,j,z;
  i=size;
  do {
    j=i>>1;
    if (x<=(z=h[j])) break;
    h[i]=z;
    i=j;
  } while(1);
  h[i]=x;
}

Sort
/* The heap keeps the largest value at the root, at h[1].
   We sort as follows: each root value is removed and put
   at the end of the array;  then the last item in the heap
   is put into the root and sifted down until the heap
   property is restored.
   When we are done, the array is sorted.
   As we go along, we recognize duplicate values and remove
   them but do not put them back.  The result is that the
   start of the sorted list may be further up in the array.
*/
long* Sort(long* h,long size) {
  long  x,z,i,j;
  long* b=h+size+1;
  *b=MAXLONG;
  if (size>1) do {
    size--;
    i=1;
    j=2;
    if (*b != (z=h[1])) *(--b) = z;
    if (size<=1) break;
    x=h[size];
    h[size]=-MAXLONG;
    while (j<size) {
      long h0=h[j],h1=h[1+j];
      if (h0<h1) {j++; h0=h1;}
      if (x>=h0) break;
      h[i]=h0;
      i=j;
      j+=j;
    }
    h[i]=x;
  } while(1);
  return b;
}

GetIndex
/* GetIndex uses a binary search to locate a particular
   entry and returns its index.
*/
long GetIndex(long r,long* index,long z) {
  long l=0,m=r>>1,y;
  do {
    if (z>(y=index[m])) l=m+1;
    else if (z<y)       r=m-1;
    else return m;
    m=(l+r)>>1;
  } while (l<r);
  return r;
}


PaintOdd
/* The PaintOdd and PaintEven routines paint rectangles
   into the vixel map.
   PaintOdd only XORs a single bit map with a rectangle.
   PaintEven also ORs a second bit map with the same
   rectangle.  The 2 bit maps are word interleaved.
   It is hoped that this reduces cache misses by keeping
   to one area of memory for each row of a rectangle.
*/
void  PaintOdd(long* vm,long H,long L,long R,long mapWidth) {
long LM=leftMask[L & 31];
long RM=rightMask[R & 31];
long numMid=(>>R5)-(L>>5)-1;
long x,y,pad=mapWidth-numMid-2;

  if (numMid<0) {LM&=RM;RM=0;}

  for (y=0;y<H;y++) {
    *vm ^= LM; vm++;
    for (x=0;x<numMid;x++) {
      *vm ^= 0xFFFFFFFF; vm++;
    }
    if (RM) {
      *vm ^= RM; vm++;
    }
    vm+=pad;
  }
}

PaintEven 
void  PaintEven (long* vm,long H,long L,long R,long mapWidth) {
long LM=leftMask[L & 31];
long RM=rightMask[R & 31];
long numMid=(>>R5)-(L>>5)-1;
long x,y,pad=(mapWidth-numMid-2)<<1;

  if (numMid<0) {LM&=RM;RM=0;}

  for (y=0;y<H;y++) {
    *vm ^= LM; vm++;
    *vm |= LM; vm++;
    for (x=0;x<numMid;x++) {
      *vm ^= 0xFFFFFFFF; vm++;
      *vm |= 0xFFFFFFFF; vm++;
    }
    if (RM) {
      *vm ^= RM; vm++;
      *vm |= RM; vm++;
    }
    vm+=pad;
  }
}

PackMap
/* PackMap reduces the two interleaved bit maps used for
   the even parity case, into a single bit map.  Each
   pair of words, of the entire bitmap, is XORed together
   regardless of rectangle boundaries.
*/
void PackMap(long* vm,long mapSize) {
long* vmE=vm;
long* endOfMap=vm+mapSize;
  while (vm<endOfMap) {
    *vm++ = *vmE ^ vmE[1];
    vmE+=2;
  }
}

 
AAPL
$106.98
Apple Inc.
-0.36
MSFT
$46.05
Microsoft Corpora
-0.57
GOOG
$550.31
Google Inc.
+0.98

MacTech Search:
Community Search:

Software Updates via MacUpdate

Cocktail 8.0.1 - General maintenance and...
Cocktail is a general purpose utility for OS X that lets you clean, repair and optimize your Mac. It is a powerful digital toolset that helps hundreds of thousands of Mac users around the world get... Read more
LibreOffice 4.3.3.2 - Free Open Source o...
LibreOffice is an office suite (word processor, spreadsheet, presentations, drawing tool) compatible with other major office suites. The Document Foundation is coordinating development and... Read more
VMware Fusion 7.0.1 - Run Windows apps a...
VMware Fusion allows you to create a Virtual Machine on your Mac and run Windows (including Windows 8.1) and Windows software on your Mac. Run your favorite Windows applications alongside Mac... Read more
OneNote 15.3.2 - Free digital notebook f...
OneNote is your very own digital notebook. With OneNote, you can capture that flash of genius, that moment of inspiration, or that list of errands that's too important to forget. Whether you're at... Read more
Audio Hijack Pro 2.11.4 - Record and enh...
Audio Hijack Pro drastically changes the way you use audio on your computer, giving you the freedom to listen to audio when you want and how you want. Record and enhance any audio with Audio Hijack... Read more
Iridient Developer 3.0.0 beta 3 - Powerf...
Iridient Developer (was RAW Developer) is a powerful image conversion application designed specifically for OS X. Iridient Developer gives advanced photographers total control over every aspect of... Read more
TextWrangler 4.5.11 - Free general purpo...
TextWrangler is the powerful general purpose text editor, and Unix and server administrator's tool. Oh, and also, like the best things in life, it's free. TextWrangler is the "little brother" to... Read more
NeoFinder 6.6 - Catalog your external me...
NeoFinder (formerly CDFinder) rapidly organizes your data, either on external or internal disks, or any other volumes. It catalogs all your data, so you stay in control of your data archive or disk... Read more
Chromium 38.0.2125.111 - Fast and stable...
Chromium is an open-source browser project that aims to build a safer, faster, and more stable way for all Internet users to experience the web. FreeSMUG-Free OpenSource Mac User Group build is... Read more
Default Folder X 4.6.11 - Enhances Open...
Default Folder X attaches a toolbar to the right side of the Open and Save dialogs in any OS X-native application. The toolbar gives you fast access to various folders and commands. You just click... Read more

Latest Forum Discussions

See All

Audio Defence : Zombie Arena (Games)
Audio Defence : Zombie Arena 1.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $4.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: A zombie shooter audio game. Made from gut-wrenching 3D binaural sound, for a new kind of weird immersion. You... | Read more »
RPG Asdivine Hearts (Games)
RPG Asdivine Hearts 1.1.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $3.99, Version: 1.1.0 (iTunes) Description: SPECIAL PRICE50% OFF (USD 7.99 -> USD 3.99)!!! Travel alongside four companions and a cat in the adventure of a... | Read more »
Haunt the House: Terrortown (Games)
Haunt the House: Terrortown 1.0.1 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $.99, Version: 1.0.1 (iTunes) Description: 66.6% OFF! SPECIAL SPOOKY HALLOWEEN LAUNCH PRICE! 66.6% OFF! ...What was that sound? Is somebody there? | Read more »
SAS: Zombie Assault 4 Review
SAS: Zombie Assault 4 Review By Jennifer Allen on October 30th, 2014 Our Rating: :: FLAWED SHOOTERUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad Shoot everything that moves in this fun, if flawed, twin-stick shooter.   | Read more »
Naailde the Witch Review
Naailde the Witch Review By Amy Solomon on October 30th, 2014 Our Rating: :: PITCH-PERFECT STORYTELLINGUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad Marvelous storytelling, narration, and moving illustrations make this storybook... | Read more »
1st & Goal Review
1st & Goal Review By Andrew Fisher on October 30th, 2014 Our Rating: :: FOR THE D&D LOVING QBUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad 1st & Goal is a board gamer’s football game, a football fan’s board game, and... | Read more »
French Developer Pated Unveils Seashine
French Developer Pated Unveils Seashine Posted by Ellis Spice on October 30th, 2014 [ permalink ] French one-man studio Pated has unveiled Seashine, “a poetic journey into the abyss.” Players take on the role of a jellyfish strugglin | Read more »
Agents of Storm: Tips, Tricks, and Strat...
Calling all agents: Would you like to see what we thought of this rather pretty base builder? Check out our Agents of Storm review! Have you downloaded Agents of Storm, been bowled over by the graphics, and aren’t quite sure what to do next? Never... | Read more »
Any.DO 2.0 Hopes to Help Manage Producti...
Any.DO 2.0 Hopes to Help Manage Productivity Posted by Ellis Spice on October 30th, 2014 [ permalink ] iPhone App - Designed for the iPhone, compatible with the iPad | Read more »
Base Busters Review
Base Busters Review By Jennifer Allen on October 30th, 2014 Our Rating: :: FUN BUT RESTRICTED MIXUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad Mixing up two forms of tower defense gaming and collectible cards, Base Busters is a fun... | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

Apple Regains Momentum As Windows Stutters An...
The latest smartphone sales data from Kantar Worldpanel ComTech, for the three months to March 2014, shows Apple performing strongly in the first quarter of the year, with sales bouncing back in... Read more
Worldwide Smartphone Shipments Increase 25.2%...
New smartphone releases and an increased emphasis on emerging markets drove global smartphone shipments above 300 million units for the second consecutive quarter, according to preliminary data from... Read more
Apple now offering refurbished 2014 15-inch M...
The Apple Store is now offering Apple Certified Refurbished 2014 15″ Retina MacBook Pros for up to $400 off the cost of new models. An Apple one-year warranty is included with each model, and... Read more
Apple drops prices on refurbished 2013 Retina...
The Apple Store has dropped prices on 2013 Apple Certified Refurbished 13″ and 15″ Retina MacBook Pros, with Retina models now available starting at $999. Apple’s one-year warranty is standard, and... Read more
New 2.8GHz Mac mini on sale for $949, save $5...
Abt Electronics has the new 2.8GHz Mac mini in stock and on sale for $949.05 including free shipping. Their price is $50 off MSRP, and it’s the lowest price available for this model from any reseller... Read more
Sale! 3.7GHz Quad Core Mac Pro available for...
 B&H Photo has the 3.7GHz Quad Core Mac Pro on sale for $2649 including free shipping plus NY sales tax only. Their price is $350 off MSRP, and it’s the lowest price for this model from any... Read more
Mujjo Steps Up The Game With Refined Touchscr...
Netherlands based Mujjo have just launched their Refined Touchscreen Gloves, stepping up their game. The gloves feature a updated elegant design that takes these knitted gloves to the next level. A... Read more
Sale! Preorder the new 27-inch 5K iMac for $2...
 Abt Electronics has the new 27″ 3.5GHz 5K iMac on sale and available for preorder for $2374.05 including free shipping. Their price is $125 off MSRP, and it’s the lowest price available for this... Read more
Simplex Solutions Inc. Brings Secure Web Surf...
New York based Simplex Solutions Inc. has announced the release and immediate availability of Private Browser 1.0, its revolutionary new secure web browser developed for iPhone, iPad and iPod touch... Read more
Save up to $180 off MSRP with an Apple refurb...
The Apple Store has Apple Certified Refurbished 2014 MacBook Airs available for up to $180 off the cost of new models. An Apple one-year warranty is included with each MacBook, and shipping is free.... Read more

Jobs Board

Position Opening at *Apple* - Apple (United...
**Job Summary** Every day, business customers come to the Apple Store to discover what powerful, easy-to-use Apple products can do for them. As a Business Leader, Read more
Sr. Manager, *Apple* Deployment Programs fo...
**Job Summary** Apple is seeking candidates for a new position on the Education Content and Technology team. iPad and Mac is in the hands of millions of teachers and Read more
*Apple* Solutions Consultant (ASC) - Apple I...
…important role that the ASC serves is that of providing an excellent Apple Customer Experience. Responsibilities include: * Promoting Apple products and solutions Read more
*Apple* Solutions Consultant (ASC) - Apple I...
…important role that the ASC serves is that of providing an excellent Apple Customer Experience. Responsibilities include: * Promoting Apple products and solutions Read more
*Apple* Solutions Consultant (ASC) - Apple I...
…important role that the ASC serves is that of providing an excellent Apple Customer Experience. Responsibilities include: * Promoting Apple products and solutions Read more
All contents are Copyright 1984-2011 by Xplain Corporation. All rights reserved. Theme designed by Icreon.