TweetFollow Us on Twitter

TCL and VA 2
Volume Number:11
Issue Number:11
Column Tag:Getting Started

TCL and Visual Architect, Part 2

By Dave Mark, MacTech Magazine Regular Contributing Author

Note: Source code files accompanying article are located on MacTech CD-ROM or source code disks.

In last month’s column, we took a look at Symantec’s latest development environment, including the Symantec Project Manager and Visual Architect. Following the example presented in Chapter 14 of the Symantec C++ User’s Guide, we used Visual Architect to generate source code to implement the single, default view named Main. We then returned to the Symantec Project Manager and compiled the code into a standalone application (See Figure 1).

Figure 1. The window that appeared when we ran last month’s program.

This month, we’re going to add a second view to our program. This second view will be a dialog that allows you to type a number into an editable text field. When you press the Beep button, the dialog will beep the specified number of times.

Adding a Second View

Go into the Button ƒ folder you created last month and double-click on the file Button.Π to launch the Symantec Project Manager. When the project window appears, double click on the file name Visual Architect.rsrc to bring up Visual Architect. This is where we’ll add the second view.

• Select New View from the View menu.

• When asked to name the new view, type BeeperDialog and make sure Modal Dialog is selected from the View Kind: popup menu (Figure 2), then press the OK button.

Figure 2. Naming the new view.

The name BeeperDialog will be used as the basis for a new class, called CBeeperDialog. The next time you select Generate from Visual Architect’s Symantec Project Manager menu, Visual Architect will generate the files CBeeperDialog.cp, CBeeperDialog.h, x_CBeeperDialog.cp, and x_CBeeperDialog.h. First, we’ll add a few items to this dialog and then add a button to our Main view that brings up the dialog.

Once you press the OK button, a view window will appear with the name BeeperDialog.

• Select View Info from the View menu.

A view info window titled Dialog Info will appear (Figure 3). The view info window, which looks a lot like a ResEdit or Resorcerer WIND templat, lets you customize the look of your new dialog window.

Figure 3. The view info window for the BeeperDialog view.

• Click on the movable modal dialog icon (the second from the right) or type “5” in the procID: field.

• Click on the OK button to dismiss the dialog.

Your next step is to add some items to the dialog.

• Click on the Tools menu and drag down until the tool palette outline appears.

When you release the mouse button, the Tools palette window will appear (Figure 4). Take a few minutes to play with the items in this palette. In the top row, you have the selection tool, the text tool, and the editable text tool. The second row features the pushbutton tool, the radio button tool, and the check box tool. The third row features the popup menu, icon, and PICT tools. We’ll get into the rest of the tools in a future column. For now, try creating items based on the tools in the first three rows. Click on a tool, then click and drag in the BeeperDialog view window. Once you get a feel for these tools, select the selection tool (the arrow), then click on each of the items you added and press the delete key. Keep on deleting until the BeeperDialog window is empty again.

Figure 4. The Tools palette.

Now let’s add the items that make up the Beeper dialog. We’ll add four items: an OK button, a Cancel button, a static text label, and an editable text field for entering the number of beeps. We’ll start with the OK and Cancel buttons.

• Click on the button tool in the palette window.

• Click on the BeeperDialog window and drag out an OK button.

As you drag, keep your eye on the lower left corner of the window. Notice that the two coordinates listed reflect the upper left and lower right corners of the button. I made my button 80 pixels wide and 20 pixels tall with an upper left corner of (200,42).

• Click on the BeeperDialog window and drag out a Cancel button.

My Cancel button was also 80 pixels wide and 20 pixels tall. This time, the upper left corner was (107,42). Notice that VA automatically filled in the text OK for the first button and Cancel for the second button. Nice feature! Let’s change the OK to say Beep.

• Double-click on the OK button (or click on it and select Pane Info... from the Pane menu) to bring up the Pane Info window.

• Click on the triangle to the left of the class name CControl, revealing the CControl data members.

• Change contrlTitle from OK to Beep and close the Pane Info window.

Notice that the button’s name changed from OK to Beep. Now let’s add the static text label.

• Click on the static text tool (the big letter A) in the palette window.

• Click in the BeeperDialog window and type the text Number of times to beep:

• Click outside the static text to stop entering text, then click on the static text to select it. Drag it to a satisfactory position in the BeeperDialog window.

I dragged my static text so its upper-left corner was at (23,13). You might want to use the arrow keys to move the static text around the window, 4 pixels at a time. Hold down the command (Apple) key to get the arrow keys to move 1 pixel at a time. Experiment with the Shift and option keys which let you resize an item by 1 or 4 pixels in any of 4 directions.

Finally, let’s add an editable text field.

• Click on the editable text tool (to the right of the static text tool) in the palette window.

• Click on the BeeperDialog window and drag out an editable text area.

Mine had and upper left corner of (205,13) and a lower right of (280,29). Once your items are in place, resize the dialog view so it comfortably encloses the dialog items. To do that, click on the handle in the lower-right corner of the grey rectangle embedded in the BeeperDialog window. Drag the handle to its new position. I dragged mine to (293,75). The finished Beeper dialog is shown in Figure 5.

Figure 5. The finished Beeper dialog with the Beep button selected.

If you like, you can try the dialog out by selecting Try Out from the View menu. Click on one of the buttons or select Close from the File menu to close the Try Out window once you are done admiring your handiwork.

Our next task is to tell VA that our edit-text field is designed to hold only integers (as opposed to any old text).

• Click on the editable text field.

• Select Class from the Pane menu, then select CIntegerText from the submenu that appears.

Next, we need to define a new command that will get sent when the Beep button is clicked. Right now the Beep button’s command is set to cmdOK. To see that, double-click on the Beep button to bring up the Pane Info window, then click on the CButton triangle. Take a look at the Command popup menu. If you click on it, you’ll find a whole bunch of commands, all of them built into the TCL. Since there is no Beep command, we’ll need to define it ourselves, then set the Beep button to send it when clicked.

• Close the Beep Pane Info window, if you opened it to look at the Command popup.

• With the BeeperDialog window frontmost, select Commands... from the Edit menu.

• When the Commands window appears, select New Command from the Edit menu.

• Type cmdBeep in the uppermost editable text field.

• Select CBeeperDialog from the In Class: popup menu.

This tells VA which class this command belongs to.

• Select Call from the Do: popup menu.

This tells VA what you want done in response to this command. You could do nothing, you could ask VA to call a function, or you could open another view. In our case, we’ve asked VA to call a CBeeperDialog member function. We’ll get to that function in a bit.

Notice that VA automatically generated the command number 512. This is not particularly important. You’ll use the constant cmdBeep instead of 512, so there’s no reason to memorize your command numbers.

• Click on the OK button to dismiss the Commands dialog.

As you’ve probably guessed, your next step is to associate the cmdBeep command with the Beep button.

• Double-click on the Beep button to bring up the Pane Info window.

• Click on the triangle to the left of the class CButton, revealing the Command popup menu.

• Select cmdBeep from the Command popup (Figure 6).

• Close the Pane Info window.

Figure 6. The Pane Info window associated with the Beep button.
Notice that the Command popup has been set to cmdBeep.

You may have noticed that the Beep button no longer has the bold, rounded rectangle around it, specifying it as the default button, the button pressed when the user hits return. This changed because VA specifies the cmdOK command as the default. Let’s fix that.

• Select Set Default Command from the View menu.

• Select cmdBeep from the Command popup menu, then press OK.

Notice that the bold, rounded rectangle is back around the Beep button (Figure 7).

Figure 7. The BeeperDialog window, once cmdBeep is set as the default command.

We are almost done! Now we have to add a button to the Main view that brings up the Beeper dialog.

• Close the BeeperDialog view window.

• Double-click on Main in the view list window to bring up the Main view window.

• Click on the grow box in the lower left corner of the Main view window and drag down about 50 pixels.

• Click on the handle in the lower right corner of the grey bounding rectangle inside the window and drag it down about 50 pixels.

You’ve just resized the Main view to be about 50 pixels taller, making room for a new pushbutton.

• Click on the pushbutton tool (under the arrow) in the palette window.

• Click in the Main view window and drag out a new button below the PICT.

• Before you click off the button, type the word Beeper...

The button will now bear the name Beeper....

• Double-click on the Beeper... button, bringing up the button’s Pane Info window.

• Click on the triangle next to the class name CButton to reveal the CButton data members.

• Choose Other... from the top of the Command popup menu.

• When the Commands dialog appears, choose New Command from the Edit menu.

• Enter the command name cmdBeeperDialog.

• Choose CMain from the In Class: popup menu to let VA know you want the new command associated with the CMain class.

• Choose Open from the Do: popup menu.

• Choose CBeeperDialog from the View: popup menu.

We’ve just told VA that we want this new command (cmdBeeperDialog) to open the CBeeperDialog view (See Figure 8).

Figure 8. The Commands window for the new cmdBeeperDialog command.

• Click on the OK button.

Now we’ve told VA to associate this command with the Beeper... button we just created.

• Close the button’s Pane Info window to return to the Main view window (Figure 9).

Figure 9. My Main view with my new Beeper... button.

If you like, select Try Out from the View menu and take your new version of Main for a spin. Note that we haven’t put the code in place that gets called when the Beeper... button is pressed, but the scrollbars should work and the button should highlight when clicked.

Our next step is to ask VA to regenerate our source code, reflecting the new panes and commands we’ve defined.

• Select Generate... from the Symantec Project Manager menu (diamond shaped menu to the right of the Windows menu).

• When prompted to save your changes, click OK.

VA will update your existing code base. If you selected Generate All..., VA would have replaced your existing code base. Be sure you understand this difference!

Adding the New Code

Our last step is to add a few lines of code to bring all our new interface elements together.

• Return to the Symantec Project Manager.

• In the project window, click on the triangle to the left of the folder labeled Source. Skip this step if the Source folder was already opened.

• Double click on the file name “CBeeperDialog.cp”.

• Add this code to the end of CBeeperDialog.cp:

void CBeeperDialog::DoCmdBeep()
 long n;
 n = fBeeperDialog_Edit15->GetIntValue();
 for ( long i=0; i<n; i++ )
 SysBeep( 20 );

This code references the data member fBeeperDialog_Edit15. When VA generates your code, it makes up a constant for each of your dialog items. You can find these definitions in the file BeeperDialogItems.h. Here’s the constants that were generated for my version of Beeper:

 kBeeperDialog_Butn12 = 1,
 kBeeperDialog_Butn12ID = 2049L,
 kBeeperDialog_Butn13 = 2,
 kBeeperDialog_Butn13ID = 2050L,
 kBeeperDialog_Stat14 = 3,
 kBeeperDialog_Stat14ID = 2051L,
 kBeeperDialog_Stat17 = 4,
 kBeeperDialog_Stat17ID = 2053L,
 kBeeperDialog_Edit15 = 5,
 kBeeperDialog_Edit15ID = 2052L,

The member function GetIntValue() retrieves the value from the field that calls it (in this case, the editable text field), translates the value into an integer, and returns it. The loop uses this value to beep the specified number of times.

• Go to the top of the file and remove the comment characters (//) at the beginning of the line:

// #include   “AppCommands.h”

You’ll need to do this last step whenever your view includes at least 1 command.

• Close CBeeperDialog.cp.

That’s it! When you run the program, the Main view should appear, featuring a brand new button (Figure 10).

Figure 10. The Main view, with the Beeper... button pressed.

Press the Beeper... button. The Beeper Dialog will appear.
Type a number in the text field and press the Beep button. Happy?

Figure 11. Pressing the Beep button.

Till Next Month...

Next month, we’ll go back to PowerPlant. I just got my copy of CW7, and I’m anxious to dig into it. Hope you got your upgrades, too. See you next month...


Community Search:
MacTech Search:

Software Updates via MacUpdate

TruckSimulation 16 guide: How to succeed...
Remember those strangely enjoyable truck missions in Grand Theft Auto V whereit was a disturbing amount of fun to deliver cargo? TruckSimulation 16 is reminiscent of that, and has you play the role of a truck driver who has to deliver various... | Read more »
The best GIF making apps
Animated GIFs have exploded in popularity recently which is likely thanks to a combination of Tumblr, our shorter attention spans, and the simple fact they’re a lot of fun. [Read more] | Read more »
The best remote desktop apps for iOS
We've been sifting through the App Store to find the best ways to do computer tasks on a tablet. That gave us a thought - what if we could just do computer tasks from our tablets? Here's a list of the best remote desktop apps to help you use your... | Read more »
Warhammer 40,000: Freeblade guide - How...
Warhammer 40,000: Freebladejust launched in the App Store and it lets you live your childhood dream of blowing up and slashing a bunch of enemies as a massive, hulking Space Marine. It's not easy being a Space Marine though - and particularly if... | Read more »
Gopogo guide - How to bounce like the be...
Nitrome just launched a new game and, as to be expected, it's a lot of addictive fun. It's called Gopogo, and it challenges you to hoparound a bunch of platforms, avoiding enemies and picking up shiny stuff. It's not easy though - just like the... | Read more »
Sago Mini Superhero (Education)
Sago Mini Superhero 1.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Education Price: $2.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: KAPOW! Jack the rabbit bursts into the sky as the Sago Mini Superhero! Fly with Jack as he lifts impossible weights,... | Read more »
Star Wars: Galaxy of Heroes guide - How...
Star Wars: Galaxy of Heroes is all about collecting heroes, powering them up, and using them together to defeat your foes. It's pretty straightforward stuff for the most part, but increasing your characters' stats can be a bit confusing because it... | Read more »
The best cooking apps (just in time for...
It’s that time of year again, where you’ll be gathering around the dinner table with your family and a huge feast in front of you. [Read more] | Read more »
Square Rave guide - How to grab those te...
Square Rave is an awesome little music-oriented puzzle game that smacks of games like Lumines, but with its own unique sense of gameplay. To help wrap your head around the game, keep the following tips and tricks in mind. [Read more] | Read more »
Snowboard Party 2 (Games)
Snowboard Party 2 1.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $1.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: Crowned the best snowboarding game available on the market, Snowboard Party is back to fulfill all your adrenaline needs in... | Read more »

Price Scanner via

Holiday weekend: Apple Watch on sale for $50-...
B&H Photo has the Apple Watch on sale today for $50-$100 off MSRP. Shipping is free, and B&H charges NY sales tax only: - Apple Watch Sport: $50 off - Apple Watch: $50-$100 off Read more
Holiday weekend: iPad Air 2s on sale for up t...
B&H Photo has iPad Air 2s on sale for up to $80 off MSRP including free shipping plus NY sales tax only: - 16GB iPad Air 2 WiFi: $459 $40 off - 64GB iPad Air 2 WiFi: $569 $30 off - 128GB iPad Air... Read more
Holiday weekend Mac sales roundup: B&H Ph...
B&H Photo continues to have all new Macs on sale for up to $500 off MSRP as part of their Black Friday/Holiday weekend sale. Shipping is free, and B&H charges NY tax only: - 15″ 2.2GHz Retina... Read more
iMobie Releases its Ace iOS Cleaner PhoneClea...
iMobie Inc. has announced the new update of PhoneClean 4, its iOS cleaner designed to reclaim wasted space on iPhone/iPad for use and keep the device fast. Alongside, iMobie hosts a 3-day giveaway of... Read more
U.S. Cellular Offering iPad Pro
U.S. Cellular today announced that it is offering the new iPad Pro with Wi-Fi + Cellular, featuring a 12.9-inch Retina display with 5.6 million pixels — the most ever in an iOS device. U.S. Cellular... Read more
Newegg Canada Unveils Black Friday Deals for...
Newegg Canada is offering more than 1,000 deep discounts to Canadian customers this Black Friday, available now through Cyber Monday, with new deals posted throughout the week. “Black Friday is... Read more
Black Friday: Macs on sale for up to $500 off...
BLACK FRIDAY B&H Photo has all new Macs on sale for up to $500 off MSRP as part of their early Black Friday sale including free shipping plus NY sales tax only: - 15″ 2.2GHz Retina MacBook Pro: $... Read more
Black Friday: Up to $125 off iPad Air 2s at B...
BLACK FRIDAY Walmart has the 16GB iPad Air 2 WiFi on sale for $100 off MSRP on their online store. Choose free shipping or free local store pickup (if available): - 16GB iPad Air 2 WiFi: $399, save $... Read more
Black Friday: iPad mini 4s on sale for $100 o...
BLACK FRIDAY Best Buy has iPad mini 4s on sale for $100 off MSRP on their online store for Black Friday. Choose free shipping or free local store pickup (if available): - 16GB iPad mini 4 WiFi: $299.... Read more
Black Friday: Apple Watch for up to $100 off...
BLACK FRIDAY Apple resellers are offering discounts and bundles with the purchase of an Apple Watch this Black Friday. Below is a roundup of the deals being offered by authorized Watch resellers:... Read more

Jobs Board

Specialist *Apple* /Mac Desktop - University...
…technical support, expertise and user training for a variety of Apple /Macintosh hardware, software and devices.Researches, analyzes and resolves complex Apple Read more
*Apple* Site Security Manager - Apple (Unite...
# Apple Site Security Manager Job Number: 42975010 Culver City, Califo ia, United States Posted: Oct. 2, 2015 Weekly Hours: 40.00 **Job Summary** The Apple Site Read more
WiSE *Apple* Pay Quality Engineer - Apple (...
# WiSE Apple Pay Quality Engineer Job Number: 44313381 Santa Clara Valley, Califo ia, United States Posted: Nov. 13, 2015 Weekly Hours: 40.00 **Job Summary** Join our Read more
Holiday Retail Associate with *Apple* Knowl...
…and assertive.Someone who can troubleshoot iOS devices (iPhone and iPad) and Apple Mail issues.Someone who can offer solutions.Someone who can work weekends.Someone with Read more
*Apple* Systems Engineer (Mclean, VA and NYC...
Summary:Assist in providing strategic direction and technical leadership within the Apple portfolio, including desktops, laptops, and printing environment. This person Read more
All contents are Copyright 1984-2011 by Xplain Corporation. All rights reserved. Theme designed by Icreon.