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Sprocket Drag Mgr
Volume Number:11
Issue Number:4
Column Tag:Getting Started

Sprocket and the Drag Manager

Adding an important technology to Sprocket

By Dave Mark, MacTech Magazine Regular Contributing Author

Note: Source code files accompanying article are located on MacTech CD-ROM or source code disks.

This month’s column uses Sprocket to take the Drag Manager out for a quick spin.

I know we were originally scheduled to talk about Sprocket’s menuing model, but we just couldn’t bring everything together in time. We’ll definitely get to it next month.

If you’ve never used the Drag Manager before, bring up the Scrapbook and scroll over to your favorite PICT. Now click on the PICT and drag it out of the Scrapbook window. If you have the Drag Manager installed on your Mac (more on that in a second), you’ll notice a grey rectangle (representing the PICT) following your mouse. Drag the rectangle over any open Finder window. Each time your mouse enters a window, a hilighting rectangle is drawn, telling you that this window is the focus of this drag. If you move the mouse outside the window, the focus rectangle disappears. This focus lets you know which window is to receive the object you are dragging around. If you release the mouse button inside one of your Finder windows (or on the desktop), a clipping file will be created. The clipping file contains the picture you just dragged from the Scrapbook. If you double-click on a clipping file, the Finder displays its contents in a window. If you drag the clipping file around, it acts just like its contents. That is, if you drag a PICT clipping file, it is exactly as if you were dragging the PICT contained in the file. Try it. Drag a Scrapbook PICT onto the desktop, then drag the resulting clipping file back into the Scrapbook.

About the Drag Manager

Under System 7.5 or later, the Drag Manager is built right in. Earlier systems required the installation of the Dragging Enabler extension or its replacement, the Macintosh Drag and Drop extension (version 1.1 is the latest). No matter what System you have, you’ll also need the Clipping Extension if you want the Finder to work with clipping files.

Apple has released a Drag Manager SDK, which contains everything you’ll need to work with the Drag Manager, including some great sample code and two critical DocViewer documents. The first of these, the Drag Manager Programmer’s Guide is basically an Inside Macintosh chapter on the Drag Manager. The second document, Drag and Drop H.I. Guidelines, tells you how the Drag Manager is supposed to look to the user.

If you’ve never worked with the Drag Manager before, there are two excellent articles that will help ease you into the Drag Manager way of thinking. The first of these, was written by Steve Kiene and appears in the June 1994 issue of MacTech Magazine (write to custservice@xplain.com to see if you can order the back issue). The article is called “Macintosh Drag and Drop” and it takes you through the basic Drag Manager concepts and terminology. The second article, “Drag and Drop From the Finder” by Dave Evans and Greg Robbins appeared in the December 1993 issue of develop (issue 16). This article has a slightly different slant than the MacTech article. If you can, read them both before you dive into the Programmer’s Guide. You might also want to check out the article “Implementing Elegant Drag & Drop for Styled Text Fields”, by David Simmons, in the November 1994 issue of MacTech. The article is based on SmallTalk, but is very readable even if you don’t speak the language.

This Month’s Program

This month’s program provides a basic demonstration of the Drag Manager. First, we’ll create a new class called TPictureWindow. A TPictureWindow is a simple, non-growable, non-zoomable, non-scrollable window with a PICT centered in it. The TPictureWindow supports dragging in both directions. That is, you can drag a picture into a TPictureWindow and you can drag a picture from a TPictureWindow as well.

Once our TPictureWindow class is added to our project, we’ll modify our code so that a TPictureWindow is the default document type instead of a TDocWindow. This means that when you select New from the File menu, you’ll create a TPictureWindow instead of a TDocWindow.

Important note: We’ve changed our default Sprocket project from SprocketSample to SprocketStarter. From now on, all of our Sprocket-based programs will start from the latest baseline of SprocketStarter and add the resources, classes, and changes that relate to that month’s topic.

SprocketDragger

This month’s program is based on the files in the folder “SprocketStarter,95.02.01”. In order to distinguish it from the original, I renamed the modified SprocketStarter folder to be “SprocketDragger,95.02.01”. That’s the only reference to SprocketDragger you’ll see. To keep things as clear and as simple as possible, the file names were not changed when I went from SprocketStarter to SprocketDragger. This way, when you want to compare the old and new versions of SetupApplication(), for example, you’ll be comparing two different versions of SprocketStarter.cp.

Both “SprocketStarter,95.02.01” and “SprocketDragger,95.02.01” are based on the Sprocket files found in “Sprocket,95.02.01”. Since Symantec still hasn’t released a product that uses the new Universal Headers, all of this code was built using CodeWarrior CW5.

Building and Running SprocketDragger

Depending on whether you have a PowerMac or not, launch either SprocketStarter.68K.µ or SprocketStarterPPC.µ. You’ll need CodeWarrior CW5 (at least) to build either project. Two likely places where you might run into trouble: the Language and AccessPaths preference panes. Select Preferences from the Edit menu. Scroll to and click on the Access Paths icon. Be sure that an access path leading to your latest Sprocket folder is listed in the User: area (Figure 1).

Figure 1. Be sure a path to your Sprocket folder is added to the User: area.

Next, scroll to and click on the Language icon. Check to be sure that the file listed in the Prefix File field goes with the “.pch++” in your project (Figure 2). For example, if the precompiled header source file SprocketStarterHeadersPPC.pch++ is included in your project, CodeWarrior will build a file called SprocketStarterHeadersPPC. By specifying that file in the Language pane, you are asking CodeWarrior to include that precompiled header in each file it compiles. Why precompile? Since the header is mostly #include files, which likely won’t change during your development cycle, compiling them in advance will definitely speed up your build time. Take a minute to double-click on the “.pch++” file included in your project.

Figure 2. Be sure that the Prefix Header field points to the right
precompiled header for your machine.

By the way, if you get 3 link warnings concerning a possible duplicate ‘ckid’ resource, just ignore them. You’re seeing a CodeWarrior bug that comes up when you include your resource file in the project file. The bug won’t affect program execution.

Once CodeWarrior finishes compiling, it will run SprocketDragger. A splash screen will appear (however briefly) and a picture window will appear (Figure 3). An empty floating window will also appear, but since we don’t use that window, just ignore it. Better yet, can you figure out how to get rid of the floating window entirely? Hint: It is an object of class TToolWindow and it is created in the file SprocketStarter.cp.

Figure 3. The TPictureWindow that appears when SprocketDragger starts up.

The picture window displays the default picture defined by the TPictureWindow class. Basically, this picture appears when a TPictureWindow has not had a PICT dragged to it yet. With SprocketDragger still running, go to the Finder and drag an icon from the Finder onto the TPictureWindow. The TPictureWindow does not react to a non-PICT drag.

Now bring up the Scrapbook and drag a picture from the Scrapbook onto the picture window. This time, a highlighting rectangle appears around the border of the window, indicating that the window is willing to accept this data. If you release the drag inside the picture window, the picture you just dragged will appear in the window.

If you have the Clipping extension installed, try dragging the picture in the picture window into a Finder window. My favorite is to drag from the picture window into the trash. No matter what Finder window you select, a clipping file will appear containing the dragged PICT. Try dragging an image from the Scrapbook to the desktop to create a clipping file, then drag the clipping file onto the picture window. Once again, the highlighting rectangle appears in the picture window as the focus of your drag enters the window. This indicates that the picture window is accepting the drag. And why not, since the clipping file looks just like a PICT to the picture window.

Try dragging a picture from the picture window into a window that can’t receive a drag. For example, try running Microsoft Word or any other non-drag-friendly application and drag from the picture window into the Word window. When you release the mouse, the dragging outline will zoom back to the original window, indicating that the drag was rejected.

Next, select New from the File menu to create a second picture window. When the window appears, drag it to the side so you can see both picture windows at the same time. Notice that the windows are numbered so you can tell them apart. Assuming you now have a different picture in each window, try dragging from one window to the other.

There are a lot of other ways you can test out your new dragging environment. For now, though, let’s get into the resources and source code that makes this all possible.

SprocketDragger Resources

SprocketDragger added two new resources to the file SprocketStarter.rsrc. A PICT with a resource ID of 1025 was added to give us a default picture to display in windows that hadn’t received a drag yet. A WIND with a resource ID of 1028 acted as a template for the TPictureWindow window.

Modify SprocketStarter.cp

The first source code change I made was in the file SprocketStarter.cp. I modified the routine CreateNewDocument() to create a TPictureWindow instead of a TDocWindow:

OSErr
CreateNewDocument(void)
 {
 TPictureWindow  *aNewWindow = new TPictureWindow();
 
 if (aNewWindow)
 return noErr;
 else
 return memFullErr;
 }

Remember, Sprocket calls CreateNewDocument() whenever an ‘oapp’ Apple event is received or when New is selected from the File menu. Since we haven’t gotten into Sprocket’s menu model yet, we didn’t implement a separate, TPictureWindow test menu.

Add the TPictureWindow Class

Once those changes were made, the only other thing left to do was to create the TPictureWindow class and add it to the project. As you’d expect, the TPictureWindow class was implemented in the files PictureWindow.cp and PictureWindow.h. As we go through the source code in these two files, you’ll see how we took advantage of the Drag Manager code already built into Sprocket.

PictureWindow.h

PictureWindow.h starts off in the usual way, by defining a constant to prevent an infinite include loop and by including the declarations associated with its base class, TWindow.

#ifndef _PICTUREWINDOW_
#define _PICTUREWINDOW_

#ifndef _WINDOW_
#include"Window.h"
#endif

The TWindow class implements all the basic features that make up a general window object. The TDocWindow class (the one with the spinning cursor which we worked with last month) is based on the TWindow class. The TPictureWindow class borrows heavily from the design of the TDocWindow class and is also based on the TWindow class.

class TPictureWindow : public TWindow
{
  public:
 TPictureWindow();
 virtual  ~TPictureWindow();

 virtual WindowPtr MakeNewWindow( WindowPtr behindWindow );

 virtual void    Draw(void);
 
 virtual void    ClickAndDrag( EventRecord *eventPtr );
 
 virtualOSErr    DragEnterWindow( DragReference dragRef );
 virtualOSErr    DragInWindow( DragReference dragRef );
 virtualOSErr    DragLeaveWindow( DragReference dragRef );
 virtualOSErr    HandleDrop( DragReference dragRef );
 
// Non-TWindow methods...
 virtual PicHandle LoadDefaultPicture();
 virtual void    CenterPict( PicHandle picture, 
 Rect *destRectPtr );
 virtual Boolean IsPictFlavorAvailable( 
 DragReference dragRef );
 virtual Boolean IsMouseInContentRgn( 
 DragReference dragRef );

The TPictureWindow class uses 4 data members. fgWindowTitleCount is a static member, which means that a single unsigned long is shared among all TPictureWindow objects. fgWindowTitleCount is incremented every time you create a new TPictureWindow and provides the number you see in the TPictureWindow title bar.

protected:
 static unsigned longfgWindowTitleCount;

fCanAcceptDrag gets set to true if the current drag contains data that is acceptable to the TPictureWindow (in other words, PICT data). fDraggedPicHandle starts off as nil but points to a PICT if one is dragged into the window. fIsWindowHighlighted is true if the window’s drag highlighting is currently turned on.

 BooleanfCanAcceptDrag;
 PicHandlefDraggedPicHandle;
 BooleanfIsWindowHighlighted;
};

#endif

PictureWindow.cp

PictureWindow.cp starts off with a pair of constants that define the resource IDs for the WIND template and the default PICT.

const short kPictureWindowTemplateID = 1028;
const short kDefaultPICTResID = 1025;

“PictureWindow.h” contains the TPictureWindow class declaration. <ToolUtils.h> contains the declaration of the routines NumToString() and GetPicture().

#include "PictureWindow.h"
#include <ToolUtils.h>

Before we get into the TPictureWindow methods, we’ll initialize the static that tracks the index used in the window titles. We can’t initialize the static inside a method, becuase the initialization would be redone every time a new TPictureWindow was created (or the initializing method got called).

unsigned long    TPictureWindow::fgWindowTitleCount = 0;

The TPictureWindow constructor first initializes fDraggedPicHandle (since we don’t have a dragged-in picture yet). It then bumps fgWindowTitleCount so our first window starts with the number 1 instead of 0. Finally, it calls the inherited CreateWindow() to create a new window. CreateWindow() belongs to the TWindow class and calls the MakeNewWindow() method, which we have overridden (ours is right below the destructor).

TPictureWindow::TPictureWindow()
{
 fDraggedPicHandle = nil;

 TPictureWindow::fgWindowTitleCount++;
 this->CreateWindow();
}

The destructor doesn’t do anything. If we intended SprocketDragger to be a “real” application, we’d free up the memory allocated to any received picture, assuming fDraggedPicHandle was not nil.

TPictureWindow::~TPictureWindow()
{
}

MakeNewWindow() creates a new window based on our picture window WIND template. Basically, this method was lifted from the TDocWindow class.

WindowPtr
TPictureWindow::MakeNewWindow( WindowPtr behindWindow )
{
 WindowPtraWindow;
 Str255 titleString;
 GrafPtrsavedPort;
 
 GetPort(&savedPort);
 
 aWindow = GetNewColorOrBlackAndWhiteWindow( 
 kPictureWindowTemplateID,
 nil, behindWindow );
 
 if (aWindow)
 {
 GetWTitle(aWindow,titleString);
 if (StrLength(titleString) != 0)
 {
 Str255 numberString;
 
 NumToString( fgWindowTitleCount, numberString );
 BlockMove(&numberString[1],&titleString[titleString[0]+1],
 numberString[0]);
 titleString[0] += numberString[0];
 }
 SetWTitle(aWindow,titleString);

 SetPort(aWindow);

 ShowWindow(aWindow);
 }
 SetPort(savedPort);

 return aWindow;
}

The Draw method gets called in response to an update event. Draw() checks to see if we have a dragged in PICT. If so, we draw it, otherwise we draw the default picture. CenterPict() is an old centering routine I stole from volume I of the Primer.

void
TPictureWindow::Draw(void)
{
 PicHandlepic;
 Rect   r;
 
 r = fWindow->portRect;
 EraseRect( &r );
 
 if ( fDraggedPicHandle == nil )
 pic = this->LoadDefaultPicture();
 else
 pic = fDraggedPicHandle;

 this->CenterPict( pic, &r );
 DrawPicture( pic, &r );
}

ClickAndDrag() gets called when a click occurs in the window’s content region and is immediately followed by a drag. This means that the user is trying to drag a picture from our window. The drag might go outside our application, to another part of our application, or even to another part of our window. We’ll start a new drag by calling NewDrag().

void
TPictureWindow::ClickAndDrag( EventRecord *eventPtr )
{
 OSErr  err;
 DragReference   dragRef;
 RgnHandledragRegion, tempRgn;
 Rect   itemBounds;
 Handle flavorDataHandle;
    
    err = NewDrag( &dragRef );
    if ( err != noErr )
 return;

 if ( fDraggedPicHandle == nil )
 flavorDataHandle = (Handle)this->LoadDefaultPicture();
 else
 flavorDataHandle = (Handle)fDraggedPicHandle;

 HLock( flavorDataHandle );

We’ll then tell the Drag Manager that this drag contains PICT data. Think of flavors as types, such as those found in the scrap. The second parameter is a serial number we want to assign to this item. We’ll use the WindowPtr as a serial number, though we could have used the number 1L or even 599923L. When you get into drags containing multiple items, this becomes more of an issue.

 err = AddDragItemFlavor( dragRef,
                    (ItemReference)fWindow,
                    (FlavorType) 'PICT',
                    (Ptr)*flavorDataHandle,
                    GetHandleSize((Handle)flavorDataHandle ),
                    (FlavorFlags)0 );

We locked the PicHandle so we could use its master pointer. Once we return from AddDragItemFlavor(), we unlock the handle.

 HUnlock( flavorDataHandle );

If we encounter a problem, we’ll dispose of the drag and return.

    if ( err != noErr )
 {
 DisposeDrag( dragRef );
 return;
 }

Next, we’ll calculate the rectangle we want dragged out of the window. This rectangle has nothing to do with the data we are sending, but just defines the xor rectangle that represents the drag. Try modifying the drag so the dragged rectangle represents the PICT’s frame instead. Next, change the drag so it drags the true outline of the picture around instead of just its framing rectangle. Hint: check out the routine BitMapToRegion().

 itemBounds = (**((WindowPeek)fWindow)->contRgn).rgnBBox;
 
 err = SetDragItemBounds( dragRef, (ItemReference)fWindow, 
 &itemBounds );
 if ( err != noErr )
 {
 DisposeDrag( dragRef );
 return;
 }

This code takes a solid region and turns it into just the frame of the region. We then pass the rectangular region on to TrackDrag() which drags the rectangle around.

 dragRegion = NewRgn();
 RectRgn( dragRegion, &itemBounds );
 tempRgn = NewRgn();
 CopyRgn( dragRegion, tempRgn );
 InsetRgn( tempRgn, 1, 1 );
 DiffRgn( dragRegion, tempRgn, dragRegion );
 DisposeRgn( tempRgn );
 
 err = TrackDrag( dragRef, eventPtr, dragRegion );
 DisposeRgn( dragRegion );
 DisposeDrag( dragRef );
 return;
}

DragEnterWindow() gets called when the window receives a dragEnterWindow message, indicating that a drag is entering our window. The sender of the drag might be our window, our application, or a different application (like the Finder). We’ll first check to see if the incoming drag has PICT data and set fCanAcceptDrag accordingly. We’ll also set fIsWindowHighlighted to false, since we haven’t done any highlighting yet.

OSErr
TPictureWindow::DragEnterWindow( DragReference dragRef )
{
 fCanAcceptDrag = IsPictFlavorAvailable( dragRef );
 fIsWindowHighlighted = false;
 
 if ( fCanAcceptDrag )
 return noErr;
 else
 return dragNotAcceptedErr;
}

DragInWindow() gets called when the window receives a dragInWindow message. We’ll receive one dragEnterWindow, many dragInWindows, then one dragLeaveWindow messages each time a drag enters our window.

OSErr
TPictureWindow::DragInWindow( DragReference dragRef )
{
 DragAttributes  attributes;
 RgnHandletempRgn;

GetDragAttributes() gives us access to the dragHasLeftSenderWindow and dragInsideSenderWindow flags, which tell us if the drag ever left its originating window and if the drag is currently inside the sending window. Since we don’t want a window to receive a drag from itself (from another window in the same application is fine, though) we’ll return if the sender is us.

 GetDragAttributes( dragRef, &attributes );
 
 if ( (! fCanAcceptDrag) || (! (attributes & 
 dragHasLeftSenderWindow)) 
 || (attributes & dragInsideSenderWindow) )
 return dragNotAcceptedErr;

If the mouse is in our content region (as opposed to in our title bar - important difference!) we’ll highlight the window if it isn’t already highlighted.

 if ( this->IsMouseInContentRgn( dragRef ) )
 {
 if ( ! fIsWindowHighlighted )
 {
 tempRgn = NewRgn();
 RectRgn( tempRgn, &fWindow->portRect );
 
 if ( ShowDragHilite( dragRef, tempRgn, true ) == noErr)
 fIsWindowHighlighted = true;
 
 DisposeRgn(tempRgn);
 }
 }
 
 return noErr;
}

Finally, once the drag focus leaves our window, we’ll hide the highlighting and reset fIsWindowHighlighted and fCanAcceptDrag (just to be safe).

OSErr
TPictureWindow::DragLeaveWindow( DragReference dragRef )
{
 if ( fIsWindowHighlighted )
 HideDragHilite( dragRef );
 
 fIsWindowHighlighted = false;
 fCanAcceptDrag = false;
 
 return noErr;
}

HandleDrop() gets called when our window has accepted a drag and we are now supposed to save the data.

OSErr
TPictureWindow::HandleDrop( DragReference dragRef )
{
 OSErr  err;
 Size   dataSize;
 ItemReference   item;
 FlavorFlagsflags;
 DragAttributes  attributes;

 GetDragAttributes( dragRef, &attributes );
 
 if ( attributes & dragInsideSenderWindow )
 return dragNotAcceptedErr;

We’ll first make sure the first drag item has PICT data. If it does, we’ll get the data size, then create a new handle to store the new PICT. Notice that we first try to allocate memory using TempNewHandle() which gets its data from outside the application heap. If that fails, we’ll go the more normal route of calling NewHandle(). This isn’t necessarily the right way to do this, since we are stealing memory from other applications, but I thought you might want to play with this call.

 err = GetDragItemReferenceNumber( dragRef, 1, &item );
 if ( err == noErr )
 err = GetFlavorFlags( dragRef, item, 'PICT', &flags );

 if ( err == noErr )
 {
 err = GetFlavorDataSize( dragRef, item, 'PICT', &dataSize);
 if  (err == noErr )
 {
 fDraggedPicHandle = (PicHandle)TempNewHandle( dataSize, 
 &err );
 
 if ( fDraggedPicHandle == nil )
 fDraggedPicHandle = (PicHandle)NewHandle( dataSize );

If the memory was successfully allocated, we’ll load the data from the drag using GetFlavorData() then force a redraw assuming we got the data OK.

 if ( fDraggedPicHandle == nil )
 err = dragNotAcceptedErr;
 else
 {
 HLock( (Handle)fDraggedPicHandle );
 err = GetFlavorData( dragRef, item, 'PICT',
 *fDraggedPicHandle, &dataSize, 0L );
 HUnlock( (Handle)fDraggedPicHandle );

 if ( err != noErr)
 {
 err = dragNotAcceptedErr;
 DisposeHandle( (Handle)fDraggedPicHandle );
 fDraggedPicHandle = nil;
 }
 else
 {
 SetPort( fWindow );
 InvalRect( &(fWindow->portRect) );
 }
 }
 }
 }
 
 return( err );
}

LoadDefaultPicture() loads the PICT resource and drops into the debugger if the PICT resource is missing.

PicHandle
TPictureWindow::LoadDefaultPicture()
{
 PicHandlepic;
 
 pic = GetPicture( kDefaultPICTResID );
 
 if ( pic == nil )
 {
 DebugStr( (StringPtr) "\pCould not load PICT resource!" );
 return (PicHandle)nil;
 }
 else
 return( pic );
}

CenterPict() takes a PicHandle and a Rect as parameters. On input, the Rect contains the window’s portRect, that is, the rectangle the picture should be centered in. On output, the Rect contains a rectangle the size of the picture, but centered in the window and in the window’s local coordinate system..

void
TPictureWindow::CenterPict( PicHandle picture, Rect *destRectPtr )
{
 Rect windRect, pictRect;
 
 windRect = *destRectPtr;
 pictRect = (**( picture )).picFrame;
 OffsetRect( &pictRect, windRect.left - pictRect.left,
    windRect.top  - pictRect.top);
 OffsetRect( &pictRect,(windRect.right - pictRect.right)/2,
   (windRect.bottom - pictRect.bottom)/2);
 *destRectPtr = pictRect;
}

IsPictFlavorAvailable() returns true if the first item in the specified drag contains a PICT flavor.

Boolean
TPictureWindow::IsPictFlavorAvailable( DragReference dragRef )
{
 unsigned short  numItems;
 FlavorFlagsflags;
 OSErr  err;
 ItemReference   item;

We’ll call CountDragItems() to find out how many items are in the drag.

 CountDragItems( dragRef, &numItems );
 
 if ( numItems < 1 )
 return( false );

We call GetDragItemReferenceNumber() to retrieve the item reference number of the first item. We’ll pass that item reference number to GetFlavorFlags() to see if the item has a PICT flavor.

 err = GetDragItemReferenceNumber( dragRef, 1, &item );
 if ( err == noErr )
 err = GetFlavorFlags( dragRef, item, 'PICT', &flags );
 
 return( err == noErr );
}

IsMouseInContentRgn() returns true if the mouse is in the content region of the window. This is important because we don’t want to react to a drag into the title bar of our window. We only react to drags actually inside the window’s content region.

Boolean
TPictureWindow::IsMouseInContentRgn( DragReference dragRef )
{
 Point  globalMouse;
 OSErr  err;
 
 err = GetDragMouse( dragRef, &globalMouse, 0L );
 
 if ( err == noErr )
 return( PtInRgn( globalMouse, ((WindowPeek)fWindow)->contRgn
             ) );
 else
 return( false );
}

Till Next Month

I really wish I could have had about twice as much space in this month’s column. There is a lot more to the Drag Manager than what I was able to get into here, but this should get you started. The Drag Manager is extremely important. You should definitely support it in all of your applications. A universally available drag and drop capability will help distinguish future Macintosh applications and environments from Windows 95. Though Apple has recently introduced a number of important new technologies (OSA being a prime example), there are none that affect the user’s experience as directly as the Drag Manager. In the near future, applications that support the Drag Manager will feel “normal” and those that don’t will feel old-fashioned and clunky. The user will expect Drag and Drop support and will likely be pretty unforgiving if it is absent.

OK, stepping off my soapbox now. Next month, we’ll take a look at Sprocket’s menu handling model. As I said at the end of last month’s column, Sprocket handles menus in much the same way as OpenDoc, so if you learn how to handle menus in Sprocket, you’ll have a leg up when you start writing your first OpenDoc part.

 

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If you're tired ofPokémon GObut still want something to satisfy your mobilePokémon fix,Magikarp Jumpmay just do the trick. It's out now on Android devices the world over. While it looks like a simple arcade jumper, there's quite a bit more to it... | Read more »
Purrfectly charming open-world RPG Cat Q...
Cat Quest, an expansive open-world RPG from former Koei-Tecmo developers, got a new gameplay trailer today. The video showcases the combat and exploration features of this feline-themed RPG. Cat puns abound as you travel across a large map in a... | Read more »
Jaipur: A Card Game of Duels (Games)
Jaipur: A Card Game of Duels 1.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $1.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: ** WARNING: iPad 2, iPad Mini 1 & iPhone 4S are NOT compatible. ** *** Special Launch Price for a limited... | Read more »
Subdivision Infinity (Games)
Subdivision Infinity 1.03 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $2.99, Version: 1.03 (iTunes) Description: Launch sale! 40% Off! Subdivision Infinity is an immersive and pulse pounding sci-fi 3D space shooter. https://www.... | Read more »
Clash of Clans' gets a huge new upd...
Clash of Clans just got a massive new update, and that's not hyperbole. The update easily tacks on a whole new game's worth of content to the hit base building game. In the update, that mysterious boat on the edge of the map has been repaired and... | Read more »
Thimbleweed Park officially headed to iO...
Welp, it's official. Thimbleweed Park will be getting a mobile version. After lots of wondering and speculation, the developers confirmed it today. Thimbleweed Park will be available on both iOS and Android sometime in the near future. There's no... | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

Free Tread Wisely Mobile App Endorsed By Fath...
Just in time for the summer driving season, Cooper Tire & Rubber Company has announced the launch of a new Tread Wisely mobile app. Designed to promote tire and vehicle safety among teens and... Read more
Commercial Notebooks And Detachable Tablets W...
Worldwide shipments of personal computing devices (PCDs), comprised of traditional PCs (a combination of desktop, notebook, and workstations) and tablets (slates and detachables), are forecast to... Read more
Best value this Memorial Day weekend: Touch B...
Apple has Certified Refurbished 2016 15″ and 13″ MacBook Pros available for $230 to $420 off original MSRP. An Apple one-year warranty is included with each model, and shipping is free: - 15″ 2.6GHz... Read more
13-inch MacBook Airs on sale for up to $130 o...
Overstock.com has 13″ MacBook Airs on sale for up to $130 off MSRP including free shipping: - 13″ 1.6GHz/128GB MacBook Air (sku MMGF2LL/A): $869.99 $130 off MSRP - 13″ 1.6GHz/256GB MacBook Air (sku... Read more
2.8GHz Mac mini available for $973 with free...
Adorama has the 2.8GHz Mac mini available for $973, $16 off MSRP, including a free copy of Apple’s 3-Year AppleCare Protection Plan. Shipping is free, and Adorama charges sales tax in NY & NJ... Read more
15-inch 2.2GHz Retina MacBook Pro on sale for...
Amazon has 15″ 2.2GHz Retina MacBook Pros (MJLQ2LL/A) available for $1749.99 including free shipping. Apple charges $1999 for this model, so Amazon’s price is represents a $250 savings. Note that... Read more
Huawei Unveils New ‘Business-Styled’ MateBook...
Huawei has introduced a trio of new MateBook laptops, expanding its mobile portfolio and building on its success in delivering attractive and powerful high-end devices. The company claims the HUAWEI... Read more
Deal! Gold 12-inch 1.2GHz Retina MacBook for...
Amazon has the 2016 Gold 12″ 1.2GHz Retina MacBook (MLHF2LL/A) on sale for $350 off MSRP for a limited time. Shipping is free: - 12″ 1.2GHz Gold Retina MacBook: $1249.99 $350 off MSRP We expect this... Read more
13-inch 2.0GHz MacBook Pros on sale for $100...
B&H has the non-Touch Bar 13″ 2.0GHz MacBook Pros in stock today and on sale for $100 off MSRP. Shipping is free, and B&H charges NY & NJ sales tax only: - 13″ 2.0GHz MacBook Pro Space... Read more
15-inch 2.2GHz Retina MacBook Pro, Apple refu...
Apple has Certified Refurbished 2015 15″ 2.2GHz Retina MacBook Pros available for $1699. That’s $300 off MSRP, and it’s the lowest price available for a 15″ MacBook Pro. An Apple one-year warranty is... Read more

Jobs Board

Best Buy *Apple* Computing Master - Best Bu...
**509110BR** **Job Title:** Best Buy Apple Computing Master **Location Number:** 000048-Topeka-Store **Job Description:** **What does a Best Buy Apple Computing Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions - Apple,...
Job Description: Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions - Apple,...
Job Description:SalesSpecialist - Retail Customer Service and SalesTransform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, Read more
*Apple* Systems Engineer - California Polyte...
Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo Apple Systems Engineer Department: ITS - Customer & Tech Support (134900) College/Division: Academic Affairs Salary Range: Position Read more
Best Buy *Apple* Computing Master - Best Bu...
**508718BR** **Job Title:** Best Buy Apple Computing Master **Location Number:** 001526-Odessa-Store **Job Description:** **What does a Best Buy Apple Computing Read more
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