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Odds and Ends
Volume Number:10
Issue Number:8
Column Tag:Getting Started

Odds and Ends

Universal headers and code building under THINK & CodeWarrior for 68K and PowerPC

By Dave Mark, MacTech Magazine Regular Contributing Author

Note: Source code files accompanying article are located on MacTech CD-ROM or source code disks.

Last month’s column walked through our MDEF and the test program that brought it to life. When I first wrote the MDEF and Tester, I did all my work using THINK C, version 6. Before the column went to press, I installed THINK C 7, as well as MetroWerks CodeWarrior, Developer Release 2 (more commonly referred to as DR/2). My goal was to develop a single set of source code that would build properly in both environments. I learned a lot along the way. That’s what this month’s column is all about.

We’ll look at porting code from THINK C 6 to THINK C 7. Next, we’ll go over the changes you’ll need to make to get all the Primer, Volume I programs running under both THINK C 7 and CodeWarrior. Finally, we’ll walk through the process of creating projects using CodeWarrior. We’ll generate both 68K and PowerPC versions of last month’s MDEF and Tester programs.

Moving From THINK C 6
to THINK C 7

Seems like every time Symantec comes out with a new version of their C compiler, I end up having to make a bunch of changes to my source code.

In writing a book, that can be a real pain, since I have no way of getting the source code changes to the people who have already purchased the book and then upgrade their compiler. Bottom line, if you know someone who has a copy of the Primer, please pass this column along to them. Better yet, help support MacTech and tell them to get a subscription...

The move from THINK 6 to THINK 7 was no exception. In the past, the changes were usually brought about by changes in the level of type checking mandated by the compiler. When I moved my code from THINK 5 to THINK 6, I ended up adding a bunch of typecasts to various Toolbox routines, casting the parameters so they matched the function prototypes in the Toolbox include files. Adding the typecasts was a pain, but it definitely made my code much better. Strict type checking is important. If your parameter types don’t match, strict type checking forces you to explicitly cast your parameters to the right type if they aren’t already of the right type. This helps you avoid a lot of simple mistakes, like passing a pointer to a short when you meant to pass a pointer to a long.

THINK 7 kept the strict type checking imposed by THINK 6. Much more importantly, THINK 7 replaced the THINK 6 Toolbox include files with Apple’s standardized universal headers.

Under THINK 6, you’d get to the Toolbox include files by diving into the THINK C folder, then into the folder Mac #includes, then into the folder Apple #includes. There you’ll see files like Dialogs.h and Quickdraw.h. Under THINK 7, the folder Apple #includes has been renamed (Apple #includes), the parentheses hiding the folder from the normal search path. In the Mac #includes folder, there is now a folder named Universal Headers, which contains most of the same files as (Apple #includes), but with some important changes, which we’ll get to in a bit.

Under CodeWarrior, the universal headers are found in the MetroWerks C/C++ ƒ folder, inside Headers ƒ, inside Universal Headers ƒ. Note that while THINK C keeps all its headers in the same folder, CodeWarrior splits some of their headers off into a folder called System Extras ƒ, which is in the MetroWerks C/C++ ƒ folder. I prefer the THINK C method, since I only have to go to one folder when I want to browse through a header file. On the other hand, maybe there’s a benefit to the CodeWarrior approach. Anyone have any opinions on this? Just curious...

One of the benefits of the universal headers is that, by using them, you’ll have a much easier time writing source code that compiles under all three of the major C compilers: THINK C, CodeWarrior, and MPW.

But a far more important benefit of the universal headers is the leg up it gives you on PowerPC compatibility. This compatibility assistance occurs in two different areas. First, the universal headers offer a set of macros you’ll use for accessing all low-memory globals.

These macros are found in the file <LowMem.h>. For example, here are two macros that let you get and set the height of the menu bar, which (in a highly irreverent earlier life) you might have set by directly touching (gasp!) the low-memory global MBarHeight:


/* 1 */
extern short LMGetMBarHeight(void);
extern void LMSetMBarHeight(short MBarHeightValue);

<LowMem.h> bottlenecks access to low-memory globals. By using these bottleneck macros, you’ll remove any dependencies in your code on a specific low-memory global model. The macros handle the differences in implementation by 68K and PowerPC machines. Use the macros and you’ll be fine.

Another PowerPC compatibility issue addressed by the universal headers concerns procedure pointers passed to the Toolbox. In a nutshell, the PowerPC uses a different mechanism to call routines than a 68K-based Mac does. Part of this is due to the PowerPC’s hardware architecture, and part is due to the fact that the PowerPC’s awesome 68K emulator. In simple terms, on a 68K, the Toolbox knows it is calling 68K code. There are no other options. On a PowerPC, the Toolbox (which might be PowerPC code or 68K code running in emulation) needs to know whether the code it is about to call is 68K code or PowerPC code. To learn more about this, read about the Mixed Mode Manager and the Code Fragment Manager, written about extensively in the last eight issues of MacTech magazine.

If you haven’t already, go dig out all your MacTech issues from January till now and read the ongoing Powering Up column, written by Richard Clark and Jordan Mattson. These columns will give you an overview of the now-and-future Macintosh architecture. You might also want to check out two new Inside Macintosh volumes. One is called PowerPC System Software and the other is called PowerPC Numerics. The first one is of more general interest, but both have some pretty essential information.

Here’s the declaration of ModalDialog() I pulled from THINK C 6:


/* 2 */
pascal void ModalDialog(ModalFilterProcPtr filterProc,short *itemHit)

Notice that the first parameter, filterProc, is declared as a ModalFilterProcPtr. Basically, you could pass any function pointer as the first parameter to ModalDialog(), as long as it was typecast to a ModalFilterProcPtr. In order for the routine to be called properly, you must use the pascal keyword when you declare the function being pointed to.

Now here’s the universal headers version of ModalDialog():


/* 3 */
pascal void ModalDialog( ModalFilterUPP modalFilter, short *itemHit )

Notice that the first parameter (now called modalFilter) was declared as a ModalFilterUPP. The key to this name change are the letters UPP, which stand for Universal Procedure Pointer. A UPP is a data structure that, in addition to the procedure pointer, contains information about the nature of the function being pointed to. If you would normally pass nil as a procedure pointer, you can continue to pass nil under the universal headers. If you want to pass a procedure pointer, you’ll have to create a UPP, fill the appropriate field with the desired function pointer, then pass the UPP instead of the function pointer. Finally, you’ll dispose of the UPP when the function pointer is no longer needed. Here’s how this works.

Every Toolbox routine that takes a function pointer now has a corresponding set of macros that make building a UPP a snap. I’ll walk through the macros for ModalDialog(). Once you see how this works, you should be able to figure out how to build a UPP for any other Toolbox routine.

First, declare a UPP variable. If you know the UPP will only be needed within a limited scope, declare the variable within that scope. For example, if you have a routine that handles a dialog box, and you know that there is no chance that the UPP will be called from outside the routine, declare the UPP local to that routine. If you are not sure, make the UPP a global, just to be safe. They’re not so big that they’d be wasting lots of space. Here’s a global UPP definition for ModalDialog():


/* 4 */
ModalFilterUPP   gMyModalFilterUPP;

Next, create and fill in the UPP by calling a macro named NewXXXX(), where XXXX is the UPP type you want to create:


/* 5 */
gMyModalFilterUPP = NewModalFilterUPP( MyFilterProc );

If you are not sure about the macro name, you can find it in the same include file that contains the Toolbox routine’s function prototype. For example, NewModalFilterUPP() is defined in <Dialogs.h>. NewModalFilterUPP() takes a single parameter, the procedure pointer you normally would have passed directly to ModalDialog(). The macro returns the UPP.

Once the UPP is created, your next step is to call the Toolbox routine, just as you would have before (only this time you’ll be passing in a UPP instead of a procedure pointer):


/* 6 */
ModalDialog( gMyModalFilterUPP, &itemHit );

Do not dispose of the UPP until you are completely done with it. For example, if you are calling AEInstallEventHandler(), you better make sure the AEEventHandlerUPP stays alive as long as that handler is valid. A UPP is not just a pointer passed by value. It is a data structure which you are passing to the Toolbox. If you are absolutely certain that you are done with the UPP, you can dispose of it by passing the UPP to the macro DisposeRoutineDescriptor(). If you do this while the UPP is still “live”, your code will bark like a wounded seal, spin around a few times, then shuffle off to MacsBug. Be safe. Use a global if you are not sure.

Note that a UPP is not necessary if you are generating 68K code. On the other hand, why not fix it now so you won’t have to make any changes when you recompile for the PowerPC? You can use exactly the same source code for 68K as you do for PowerPC, and the universal headers generate the appropriate code for whichever target you’re building for.

Updating Your Primer Code

If you’ve been through Volume I of the Macintosh C Programming Primer, this section will help you get your code running under THINK C 7 and CodeWarrior DR/3. If you’ve never read the Primer, you might want to read through these changes anyway, just to get an idea of what I had to go through to get my code running native on a PowerPC.

These changes follow a definite pattern:

• Programs that passed procedure pointers to the Toolbox were modified to take advantage of the Universal Procedure Pointer mechanism.

• References to QuickDraw globals (screenBits.bounds, for example) were prefaced with the three characters “qd.”. THINK C is nice enough to add the “qd.” for you; other environments need you to be explicit about it.

• Some include files changed names in the move to the universal headers.

• All low-memory globals are now accessed via calls to the macros in <LowMem.h>.

• For some reason, InitDialogs() doesn’t like nil as a parameter in all compilers. Passing 0L seems to work just fine.

Here are the changes to the Primer programs, broken down by program:

Hello2

1) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitGraf( &thePort );
 to
 InitGraf( &qd.thePort );

2) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitDialogs( nil );
 to
 InitDialogs( 0L );

Mondrian

1) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitGraf( &thePort );
 to
 InitGraf( &qd.thePort );

2) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitDialogs( nil );
 to
 InitDialogs( 0L );

3) In the routine MainLoop(), change:

 GetDateTime( (unsigned long *)(&randSeed) );
 to
 GetDateTime( (unsigned long *)(&qd.randSeed) );

ShowPICT

1) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitGraf( &thePort );
 to
 InitGraf( &qd.thePort );

2) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitDialogs( nil );
 to
 InitDialogs( 0L );

FlyingLine

1) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitGraf( &thePort );
 to
 InitGraf( &qd.thePort );

2) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitDialogs( NULL );
 to
 InitDialogs( 0L );

3) In the routine WindowInit(), get rid of the unused local variable totalRect.

4) In the routine WindowInit(), change:

 gOldMBarHeight = MBarHeight;
 MBarHeight = 0;
 to
 gOldMBarHeight = LMGetMBarHeight();
 LMSetMBarHeight( 0 );

5) In the routine WindowInit(), change:

 window = NewWindow( nil, &(screenBits.bounds),
 kEmptyTitle, kVisible, plainDBox, kMoveToFront,
 kNoGoAway, kNilRefCon );
 to
 window = NewWindow( nil, &(qd.screenBits.bounds),
 kEmptyTitle, kVisible, plainDBox, kMoveToFront,
 kNoGoAway, kNilRefCon );

6) In the routine WindowInit(), change:

 SetRect( &mBarRect, screenBits.bounds.left,
 screenBits.bounds.top,
 screenBits.bounds.right,
 screenBits.bounds.top+gOldMBarHeight );
 to
 SetRect( &mBarRect, qd.screenBits.bounds.left,
 qd.screenBits.bounds.top,
 qd.screenBits.bounds.right,
 qd.screenBits.bounds.top+gOldMBarHeight );

7) In the routine WindowInit(), change:

 FillRect( &(window->portRect), black );
 to
 FillRect( &(window->portRect), &qd.black );

8) In the routine LinesInit(), change:

 GetDateTime( (unsigned long *)(&randSeed) );
 to
 GetDateTime( (unsigned long *)(&qd.randSeed) );

9) In the routine MainLoop(), change:

 MBarHeight = gOldMBarHeight;
 to
 LMSetMBarHeight( gOldMBarHeight );

EventTracker

1) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitGraf( &thePort );
 to
 InitGraf( &qd.thePort );

2) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitDialogs( nil );
 to
 InitDialogs( 0L );

3) Change the #include:

 #include <Values.h>
 to
 #include <limits.h>

4) Change the #define:

 #define kSleep  MAXLONG
 to
 #define kSleep  LONG_MAX

5) Near the top of the file, just after the declaration of gDone, add the global declaration:

 AEEventHandlerUPP gDoOpenAppUPP,
 gDoOpenDocUPP,
 gDoPrintDocUPP,
 gDoQuitAppUPP;

6) In the routine WindowInit(), delete the unused local variable windRect.

7) In the routine EventInit(), change:

 err = AEInstallEventHandler( kCoreEventClass, kAEOpenApplication,
  DoOpenApp, 0L, false );
 to
 gDoOpenAppUPP = NewAEEventHandlerProc( DoOpenApp );
 err = AEInstallEventHandler( kCoreEventClass, kAEOpenApplication,
  gDoOpenAppUPP, 0L, false );

8) In the routine EventInit(), change:

 err = AEInstallEventHandler( kCoreEventClass, kAEOpenDocuments,
 DoOpenDoc, 0L, false );
 to
 gDoOpenDocUPP = NewAEEventHandlerProc( DoOpenDoc );
 err = AEInstallEventHandler( kCoreEventClass, kAEOpenDocuments,
 gDoOpenDocUPP, 0L, false );

9) In the routine EventInit(), change:

 err = AEInstallEventHandler( kCoreEventClass, kAEPrintDocuments,
 DoPrintDoc, 0L, false );
 to
 gDoPrintDocUPP = NewAEEventHandlerProc( DoPrintDoc );
 err = AEInstallEventHandler( kCoreEventClass, kAEPrintDocuments,
 gDoPrintDocUPP, 0L, false );

10) In the routine EventInit(), change:

 err = AEInstallEventHandler( kCoreEventClass, kAEQuitApplication,
 DoQuitApp, 0L, false );
 to
 gDoQuitAppUPP = NewAEEventHandlerProc( DoQuitApp );
 err = AEInstallEventHandler( kCoreEventClass, kAEQuitApplication,
 gDoQuitAppUPP, 0L, false );

11) In the routine HandleMouseDown(), change:

 DragWindow( window, eventPtr->where, &screenBits.bounds );
 to
 DragWindow( window, eventPtr->where, &qd.screenBits.bounds );

Updater

1) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitGraf( &thePort );
 to
 InitGraf( &qd.thePort );

2) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitDialogs( nil );
 to
 InitDialogs( 0L );

3) Change the #include:

 #include <Values.h>
 to
 #include <limits.h>

4) Change the #define:

 #define kSleep  MAXLONG
 to
 #define kSleep  LONG_MAX

5) In the routine HandleMouseDown(), change:

 growRect.bottom = MAXSHORT;
 growRect.right = MAXSHORT;
 to
 growRect.bottom = INT_MAX;
 growRect.right = INT_MAX;

6) In the routine HandleMouseDown(), change:

 DragWindow( window, eventPtr->where, &screenBits.bounds );
 to
 DragWindow( window, eventPtr->where, &qd.screenBits.bounds );

EventTrigger

1) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitGraf( &thePort );
 to
 InitGraf( &qd.thePort );

2) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitDialogs( nil );
 to
 InitDialogs( 0L );

WorldClock

1) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitGraf( &thePort );
 to
 InitGraf( &qd.thePort );

2) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitDialogs( nil );
 to
 InitDialogs( 0L );

3) In the routine HandleMouseDown(), delete the unused local variable oldPort.

4) In the routine HandleMouseDown(), change:

 DragWindow( window, eventPtr->where, &screenBits.bounds );
 to
 DragWindow( window, eventPtr->where, &qd.screenBits.bounds );

Reminder

1) Delete this struct definition (it’s built-in now):

 struct PopupPrivateData
 {
   MenuHandle  mHandle;
 short       mID;
 char        mPrivate[1];
 };

2) Delete these function prototypes (they’re built-in now):

pascal OSErr SetDialogDefaultItem(DialogPtr theDialog, short newItem) 

 = { 0x303C, 0x0304, 0xAA68 };        
pascal OSErr SetDialogCancelItem(DialogPtr theDialog, short newItem)
   = { 0x303C, 0x0305, 0xAA68 };
pascal OSErr SetDialogTracksCursor(DialogPtr theDialog, Boolean tracks)
 = { 0x303C, 0x0306, 0xAA68 };

3) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitGraf( &thePort );
 to
 InitGraf( &qd.thePort );

4) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitDialogs( nil );
 to
 InitDialogs( 0L );

5) Add this line to the global definitions at the top of the source code:

 NMUPP  gLaunchResponseUPP, gNormalResponseUPP;

6) In main(), add this code just before the call to EventLoop():

 gLaunchResponseUPP = NewNMProc( LaunchResponse );
 gNormalResponseUPP = NewNMProc( NormalResponse );

7) In the routine CopyDialogToReminder(), change:

 if( reminder->launch = GetCtlValue( (ControlHandle)itemHandle ) )
 reminder->notify.nmResp = (NMProcPtr)&LaunchResponse;
 else
 reminder->notify.nmResp = (NMProcPtr)&NormalResponse;
 to
 if( reminder->launch = GetCtlValue( (ControlHandle)itemHandle ) )
 reminder->notify.nmResp = gLaunchResponseUPP;
 else
 reminder->notify.nmResp = gNormalResponseUPP;

ResWriter

1) Delete these function prototypes (they’re built-in now):

pascal OSErr SetDialogDefaultItem(DialogPtr theDialog, short newItem) 

 = { 0x303C, 0x0304, 0xAA68 };        
pascal OSErr SetDialogCancelItem(DialogPtr theDialog, short newItem)
   = { 0x303C, 0x0305, 0xAA68 };
pascal OSErr SetDialogTracksCursor(DialogPtr theDialog, Boolean tracks)
 = { 0x303C, 0x0306, 0xAA68 };

2) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitGraf( &thePort );
 to
 InitGraf( &qd.thePort );

3) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitDialogs( nil );
 to
 InitDialogs( 0L );

Pager

1) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitGraf( &thePort );
 to
 InitGraf( &qd.thePort );

2) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitDialogs( nil );
 to
 InitDialogs( 0L );

3) Change the #include:

 #include <Values.h>
 to
 #include <limits.h>

4) Change the #define:

 #define kSleep  MAXLONG
 to
 #define kSleep  LONG_MAX

5) Near the top of the file, just after the declaration of gDone, add the definition:

 ControlActionUPPgActionUPP;

6) In the routine HandleMouseDown(), change:

 else
 thePart = TrackControl( theControl, thePoint, &ScrollProc );
 to
 else
 {
 gActionUPP = NewControlActionProc( ScrollProc );
 thePart = TrackControl( theControl, thePoint, gActionUPP );
 }

7) In the routine HandleMouseDown(), change:

 DragWindow( window, eventPtr->where, &screenBits.bounds );
 to
 DragWindow( window, eventPtr->where, &qd.screenBits.bounds );

ShowClip

1) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitGraf( &thePort );
 to
 InitGraf( &qd.thePort );

2) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitDialogs( nil );
 to
 InitDialogs( 0L );

SoundMaker

1) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitGraf( &thePort );
 to
 InitGraf( &qd.thePort );

2) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitDialogs( nil );
 to
 InitDialogs( 0L );

OpenPICT

1) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitGraf( &thePort );
 to
 InitGraf( &qd.thePort );

2) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitDialogs( nil );
 to
 InitDialogs( 0L );

PrintPICT

1) Change the #include:

 #include <PrintTraps.h>
 to
 #include <Printing.h>

2) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitGraf( &thePort );
 to
 InitGraf( &qd.thePort );

3) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitDialogs( nil );
 to
 InitDialogs( 0L );

HyperCard XCMD

1) You’ll need to move the file HyperXCmd.h from the (Apple #includes) folder into the Universal Headers folder. I’m not sure what THINK 7 intends you to do about XCMDs, but this will work for now. Other than that, the code should compile cleanly.

Getting Started With CodeWarrior

To close out this month’s column, we’re going to build last month’s MDEF and tester projects using CodeWarrior DR/3.

If you are using DR/2, go ahead and upgrade to DR/3. There appears to be a bug in DR/2 that prevents you from building certain kinds of projects (and, as you’ve probably guessed, the MDEF code resource is one of them).

Start off by creating a folder named Metrowerks MDEF. Next, copy the files MDEF.c, Tester.c, and Tester.Π.rsrc from the folder you created last month into the Metrowerks MDEF folder. Change the name of the file Tester.Π.rsrc to Tester.µ.rsrc. By convention, THINK names its project and resource files with the character Π (option-p), while CodeWarrior uses the character µ (option-m).

If you’ve already built a CodeWarrior project using DR/2, drag the project onto the “Project Updater” icon at the top level of the CodeWarrior folder. The “Project Updater” will convert a DR/2 project to a DR/3 project in place. This is a one-way process.

If you’re starting from scratch, you get to decide which flavor compiler you want to work with, 68K or PowerPC. Open the Metrowerks C/C++ ƒ folder and launch either MW C/C++ 68K 1.0 or MW C/C++ PPC 1.0. Either way, when the toolbar appears, select New Project... from the File menu and create a new project named MDEF.µ in the Metrowerks MDEF folder.

When the project window appears, select Add File... from the Project menu and add the file MDEF.c and either MacOS.lib or InterfaceLib to the project. MacOS.lib is in the folder named Libraries ƒ, in the MacOS 68K ƒ folder. InterfaceLib is also in the folder named Libraries ƒ, in the MacOS PPC ƒ folder. Figures 1a and 1b show the project window after these files are added.

Figure 1a. The MDEF.µ project window, 68K version.

Figure 1b. The MDEF.µ project window, PowerPC version.

Next, select Preferences from the Edit menu. Click on the Language icon (Figure 2). Be sure that the Prefix File field agrees with the type of machine you are compiling for, either MacHeaders68K or MacHeadersPPC.

Figure 2. The Language panel.

If you are generating code for the PowerPC, the Linker icon allows you to specify the entry points for your code resource. Since we are programming in C and don’t have C++’s constructor or destructor, we’ll leave the Initialization and Termination fields blank and enter main in the Main field (Figure 3).

Figure 3. The Linker panel in the PowerPC compiler.

Next, click on the Project icon and make sure your settings agree with those shown in Figure 4a or 4b, depending on your target machine. The Merge To File check box asks the compiler to add the resource to the Tester resource file.

Figure 4a. The Project panel, 68K version

Figure 4b. The Project panel, PowerPC version

Click on the OK button to save your changes, then select Make from the Project menu. If all goes well, the MDEF will be built and added to the file Tester.µ.rsrc (you did remember to rename it didn’t you?)...

Creating the Tester Project

Go through a similar process to build a project for the Tester application. Name the project file Tester.µ, to go with the resource file Tester.µ.rsrc. Just like THINK C, CodeWarrior automatically looks for a resource file having the same name as the project file with “.rsrc” added to the name. Figure 5a and 5b show my project windows, one for 68K and one for PowerPC. Notice that the PowerPC version required the addition of the file MWCRuntime.Lib.

Figure 5a. The project window, 68K version

Figure 5b. The project window, PowerPC version

Go into the Preferences... and be sure the project type is set to Application. That should do it. Select Make from the Project menu and take your MDEF for a spin.

Till Next Month

I’m not sure what I’m going to write about next month. If I get the time, I’d like to get into some of the cool tools that you might want to use to ease your Mac development. Till then, I’m going to convince Daniel to come down from the top of my bookshelf, where he has somehow managed to drag all of his trucks, as well as my cordless telephone. See you soon...

Resources Referenced In This Article

Powering Up, MacTech Magazine, ongoing monthly series, January 1994 to present.

Inside Macintosh: PowerPC System Software, Addison Wesley

Inside Macintosh: PowerPC Numerics, Addison Wesley

Macintosh C Programming Primer Volume I, Dave Mark & Cartwright Reed, 672 pgs.

 

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Gaia is being invaded by the Devil Prince and the demonic Devil Army at his disposal, and it’s up to you and your avatar to defeat him in League of Angels – Fire Raiders. Raise a mighty army from hundreds of recruitable angel heroes and take the... | Read more »
Burn Rubber on the Ice With a New Cars:...
Burn Rubber on the Ice With a New Cars: Fast as Lightning Update Posted by Jessica Fisher on February 26th, 2015 [ permalink ] Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad | Read more »
AdVenture Capitalist Review
AdVenture Capitalist Review By Jordan Minor on February 26th, 2015 Our Rating: :: DAS KAPITALUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad An inadvertent Marxist manifesto.   | Read more »
Monster vs Sheep Review
Monster vs Sheep Review By Jennifer Allen on February 25th, 2015 Our Rating: :: SAMEY FUNUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad What Monster vs Sheep lacks in variety it makes up for with stress relieving fun. At least, for a... | Read more »
Is Your Face Ready for the New Outwitter...
Is Your Face Ready for the New Outwitters 2.0 Trailer? Posted by Jessica Fisher on February 25th, 2015 [ permalink ] One Man Left Studios has announced that their turn-based strategy game, | Read more »
HowToFormat Review
HowToFormat Review By Jennifer Allen on February 25th, 2015 Our Rating: :: USEFUL TIPSiPhone App - Designed for the iPhone, compatible with the iPad Making a presentation and want to get it just right? HowToFormat teaches you how... | Read more »
Thermo Diem Review
Thermo Diem Review By Jennifer Allen on February 25th, 2015 Our Rating: :: GETS TO THE POINTUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad Want to know whether it’s warmer or colder tomorrow? That’s precisely what Thermo Diem will... | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

New Travel Health App “My Travel Health” iOS...
Rochester, Minnesota based Travel Health and Wellness LLC has announced that its new iOS app help safeguard the user’s health when traveling abroad — “My Travel Health” is now available on the Apple... Read more
Sale! MacBook Airs for up to $115 off MSRP
B&H Photo has MacBook Airs on sale for up to $100 off MSRP. Shipping is free, and B&H charges NY sales tax only: - 11″ 128GB MacBook Air: $799 100 off MSRP - 11″ 256GB MacBook Air: $999 $100... Read more
15-inch 2.0GHz Retina MacBook Pro (refurbishe...
The Apple Store has Apple Certified Refurbished previous-generation 15″ 2.0GHz Retina MacBook Pros available for $1489 including free shipping plus Apple’s standard one-year warranty. Their price is... Read more
Wither The iPad mini? End Of The Road Imminen...
AppleDailyReport’s Dennis Sellers predicts that the iPad mini is going to be left to wither on the vine, as it were, and then just allowed to fade away — a casualty of the IPhone 6 Plus and other... Read more
Android and iOS Duopoly Owns 96.3% of Smartph...
IDC reports that Android and iOS inched closer to total domination of the worldwide smartphone market in both the fourth quarter (4Q14) and the calendar year 2014 (CY14). According to data from the... Read more
13-inch 2.4GHz Retina MacBook Pro available f...
MacMall has the 2013 13″ 2.4GHz/128GB Retina MacBook Pro available for $999.99 for a limited time. Shipping is free. Their price is $300 off original MSRP, and it’s the only sub-$1000 new Retina... Read more
Save up to $300 on a new Mac, $30 on an iPad,...
Purchase a new Mac or iPad at The Apple Store for Education and take up to $300 off MSRP. All teachers, students, and staff of any educational institution qualify for the discount. Shipping is free,... Read more
Mac minis available for up to $75 off MSRP
MacMall has Mac minis on sale for up to $75 off MSRP including free shipping. Their prices are the lowest available for these models from any reseller: - 1.4GHz Mac mini: $459.99 $40 off - 2.6GHz Mac... Read more
WaterField Unveils Versatile Padded Gear Pouc...
San Francisco manufacturer WaterField Design’s new Padded Gear Pouch is a light and handy-sized, yet protective, organizer for every kind of take-along gear: technology, travel, toiletries,... Read more
College Student Deals: Additional $50 off Mac...
Take an additional $50 off all MacBooks and iMacs at Best Buy Online with their College Students Deals Savings, valid through April 11, 2015. Anyone with a valid .EDU email address can take advantage... Read more

Jobs Board

*Apple* Solutions Consultant - Retail Sales...
**Job Summary** The ASC is an Apple employee who serves as an Apple brand ambassador and influencer in a Reseller's store. The ASC's role is to grow Apple Read more
*Apple* Solutions Consultant - Retail Sales...
**Job Summary** As an Apple Solutions Consultant (ASC) you are the link between our customers and our products. Your role is to drive the Apple business in a retail Read more
*Apple* Solutions Consultant (ASC)- Retail S...
**Job Summary** The ASC is an Apple employee who serves as an Apple brand ambassador and influencer in a Reseller's store. The ASC's role is to grow Apple Read more
*Apple* Solutions Consultant - Retail Sales...
**Job Summary** As an Apple Solutions Consultant (ASC) you are the link between our customers and our products. Your role is to drive the Apple business in a retail Read more
Sr. Technical Services Consultant, *Apple*...
**Job Summary** Apple Professional Services (APS) has an opening for a senior technical position that contributes to Apple 's efforts for strategic and transactional Read more
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