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Odds and Ends
Volume Number:10
Issue Number:8
Column Tag:Getting Started

Odds and Ends

Universal headers and code building under THINK & CodeWarrior for 68K and PowerPC

By Dave Mark, MacTech Magazine Regular Contributing Author

Note: Source code files accompanying article are located on MacTech CD-ROM or source code disks.

Last month’s column walked through our MDEF and the test program that brought it to life. When I first wrote the MDEF and Tester, I did all my work using THINK C, version 6. Before the column went to press, I installed THINK C 7, as well as MetroWerks CodeWarrior, Developer Release 2 (more commonly referred to as DR/2). My goal was to develop a single set of source code that would build properly in both environments. I learned a lot along the way. That’s what this month’s column is all about.

We’ll look at porting code from THINK C 6 to THINK C 7. Next, we’ll go over the changes you’ll need to make to get all the Primer, Volume I programs running under both THINK C 7 and CodeWarrior. Finally, we’ll walk through the process of creating projects using CodeWarrior. We’ll generate both 68K and PowerPC versions of last month’s MDEF and Tester programs.

Moving From THINK C 6
to THINK C 7

Seems like every time Symantec comes out with a new version of their C compiler, I end up having to make a bunch of changes to my source code.

In writing a book, that can be a real pain, since I have no way of getting the source code changes to the people who have already purchased the book and then upgrade their compiler. Bottom line, if you know someone who has a copy of the Primer, please pass this column along to them. Better yet, help support MacTech and tell them to get a subscription...

The move from THINK 6 to THINK 7 was no exception. In the past, the changes were usually brought about by changes in the level of type checking mandated by the compiler. When I moved my code from THINK 5 to THINK 6, I ended up adding a bunch of typecasts to various Toolbox routines, casting the parameters so they matched the function prototypes in the Toolbox include files. Adding the typecasts was a pain, but it definitely made my code much better. Strict type checking is important. If your parameter types don’t match, strict type checking forces you to explicitly cast your parameters to the right type if they aren’t already of the right type. This helps you avoid a lot of simple mistakes, like passing a pointer to a short when you meant to pass a pointer to a long.

THINK 7 kept the strict type checking imposed by THINK 6. Much more importantly, THINK 7 replaced the THINK 6 Toolbox include files with Apple’s standardized universal headers.

Under THINK 6, you’d get to the Toolbox include files by diving into the THINK C folder, then into the folder Mac #includes, then into the folder Apple #includes. There you’ll see files like Dialogs.h and Quickdraw.h. Under THINK 7, the folder Apple #includes has been renamed (Apple #includes), the parentheses hiding the folder from the normal search path. In the Mac #includes folder, there is now a folder named Universal Headers, which contains most of the same files as (Apple #includes), but with some important changes, which we’ll get to in a bit.

Under CodeWarrior, the universal headers are found in the MetroWerks C/C++ ƒ folder, inside Headers ƒ, inside Universal Headers ƒ. Note that while THINK C keeps all its headers in the same folder, CodeWarrior splits some of their headers off into a folder called System Extras ƒ, which is in the MetroWerks C/C++ ƒ folder. I prefer the THINK C method, since I only have to go to one folder when I want to browse through a header file. On the other hand, maybe there’s a benefit to the CodeWarrior approach. Anyone have any opinions on this? Just curious...

One of the benefits of the universal headers is that, by using them, you’ll have a much easier time writing source code that compiles under all three of the major C compilers: THINK C, CodeWarrior, and MPW.

But a far more important benefit of the universal headers is the leg up it gives you on PowerPC compatibility. This compatibility assistance occurs in two different areas. First, the universal headers offer a set of macros you’ll use for accessing all low-memory globals.

These macros are found in the file <LowMem.h>. For example, here are two macros that let you get and set the height of the menu bar, which (in a highly irreverent earlier life) you might have set by directly touching (gasp!) the low-memory global MBarHeight:


/* 1 */
extern short LMGetMBarHeight(void);
extern void LMSetMBarHeight(short MBarHeightValue);

<LowMem.h> bottlenecks access to low-memory globals. By using these bottleneck macros, you’ll remove any dependencies in your code on a specific low-memory global model. The macros handle the differences in implementation by 68K and PowerPC machines. Use the macros and you’ll be fine.

Another PowerPC compatibility issue addressed by the universal headers concerns procedure pointers passed to the Toolbox. In a nutshell, the PowerPC uses a different mechanism to call routines than a 68K-based Mac does. Part of this is due to the PowerPC’s hardware architecture, and part is due to the fact that the PowerPC’s awesome 68K emulator. In simple terms, on a 68K, the Toolbox knows it is calling 68K code. There are no other options. On a PowerPC, the Toolbox (which might be PowerPC code or 68K code running in emulation) needs to know whether the code it is about to call is 68K code or PowerPC code. To learn more about this, read about the Mixed Mode Manager and the Code Fragment Manager, written about extensively in the last eight issues of MacTech magazine.

If you haven’t already, go dig out all your MacTech issues from January till now and read the ongoing Powering Up column, written by Richard Clark and Jordan Mattson. These columns will give you an overview of the now-and-future Macintosh architecture. You might also want to check out two new Inside Macintosh volumes. One is called PowerPC System Software and the other is called PowerPC Numerics. The first one is of more general interest, but both have some pretty essential information.

Here’s the declaration of ModalDialog() I pulled from THINK C 6:


/* 2 */
pascal void ModalDialog(ModalFilterProcPtr filterProc,short *itemHit)

Notice that the first parameter, filterProc, is declared as a ModalFilterProcPtr. Basically, you could pass any function pointer as the first parameter to ModalDialog(), as long as it was typecast to a ModalFilterProcPtr. In order for the routine to be called properly, you must use the pascal keyword when you declare the function being pointed to.

Now here’s the universal headers version of ModalDialog():


/* 3 */
pascal void ModalDialog( ModalFilterUPP modalFilter, short *itemHit )

Notice that the first parameter (now called modalFilter) was declared as a ModalFilterUPP. The key to this name change are the letters UPP, which stand for Universal Procedure Pointer. A UPP is a data structure that, in addition to the procedure pointer, contains information about the nature of the function being pointed to. If you would normally pass nil as a procedure pointer, you can continue to pass nil under the universal headers. If you want to pass a procedure pointer, you’ll have to create a UPP, fill the appropriate field with the desired function pointer, then pass the UPP instead of the function pointer. Finally, you’ll dispose of the UPP when the function pointer is no longer needed. Here’s how this works.

Every Toolbox routine that takes a function pointer now has a corresponding set of macros that make building a UPP a snap. I’ll walk through the macros for ModalDialog(). Once you see how this works, you should be able to figure out how to build a UPP for any other Toolbox routine.

First, declare a UPP variable. If you know the UPP will only be needed within a limited scope, declare the variable within that scope. For example, if you have a routine that handles a dialog box, and you know that there is no chance that the UPP will be called from outside the routine, declare the UPP local to that routine. If you are not sure, make the UPP a global, just to be safe. They’re not so big that they’d be wasting lots of space. Here’s a global UPP definition for ModalDialog():


/* 4 */
ModalFilterUPP   gMyModalFilterUPP;

Next, create and fill in the UPP by calling a macro named NewXXXX(), where XXXX is the UPP type you want to create:


/* 5 */
gMyModalFilterUPP = NewModalFilterUPP( MyFilterProc );

If you are not sure about the macro name, you can find it in the same include file that contains the Toolbox routine’s function prototype. For example, NewModalFilterUPP() is defined in <Dialogs.h>. NewModalFilterUPP() takes a single parameter, the procedure pointer you normally would have passed directly to ModalDialog(). The macro returns the UPP.

Once the UPP is created, your next step is to call the Toolbox routine, just as you would have before (only this time you’ll be passing in a UPP instead of a procedure pointer):


/* 6 */
ModalDialog( gMyModalFilterUPP, &itemHit );

Do not dispose of the UPP until you are completely done with it. For example, if you are calling AEInstallEventHandler(), you better make sure the AEEventHandlerUPP stays alive as long as that handler is valid. A UPP is not just a pointer passed by value. It is a data structure which you are passing to the Toolbox. If you are absolutely certain that you are done with the UPP, you can dispose of it by passing the UPP to the macro DisposeRoutineDescriptor(). If you do this while the UPP is still “live”, your code will bark like a wounded seal, spin around a few times, then shuffle off to MacsBug. Be safe. Use a global if you are not sure.

Note that a UPP is not necessary if you are generating 68K code. On the other hand, why not fix it now so you won’t have to make any changes when you recompile for the PowerPC? You can use exactly the same source code for 68K as you do for PowerPC, and the universal headers generate the appropriate code for whichever target you’re building for.

Updating Your Primer Code

If you’ve been through Volume I of the Macintosh C Programming Primer, this section will help you get your code running under THINK C 7 and CodeWarrior DR/3. If you’ve never read the Primer, you might want to read through these changes anyway, just to get an idea of what I had to go through to get my code running native on a PowerPC.

These changes follow a definite pattern:

• Programs that passed procedure pointers to the Toolbox were modified to take advantage of the Universal Procedure Pointer mechanism.

• References to QuickDraw globals (screenBits.bounds, for example) were prefaced with the three characters “qd.”. THINK C is nice enough to add the “qd.” for you; other environments need you to be explicit about it.

• Some include files changed names in the move to the universal headers.

• All low-memory globals are now accessed via calls to the macros in <LowMem.h>.

• For some reason, InitDialogs() doesn’t like nil as a parameter in all compilers. Passing 0L seems to work just fine.

Here are the changes to the Primer programs, broken down by program:

Hello2

1) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitGraf( &thePort );
 to
 InitGraf( &qd.thePort );

2) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitDialogs( nil );
 to
 InitDialogs( 0L );

Mondrian

1) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitGraf( &thePort );
 to
 InitGraf( &qd.thePort );

2) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitDialogs( nil );
 to
 InitDialogs( 0L );

3) In the routine MainLoop(), change:

 GetDateTime( (unsigned long *)(&randSeed) );
 to
 GetDateTime( (unsigned long *)(&qd.randSeed) );

ShowPICT

1) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitGraf( &thePort );
 to
 InitGraf( &qd.thePort );

2) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitDialogs( nil );
 to
 InitDialogs( 0L );

FlyingLine

1) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitGraf( &thePort );
 to
 InitGraf( &qd.thePort );

2) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitDialogs( NULL );
 to
 InitDialogs( 0L );

3) In the routine WindowInit(), get rid of the unused local variable totalRect.

4) In the routine WindowInit(), change:

 gOldMBarHeight = MBarHeight;
 MBarHeight = 0;
 to
 gOldMBarHeight = LMGetMBarHeight();
 LMSetMBarHeight( 0 );

5) In the routine WindowInit(), change:

 window = NewWindow( nil, &(screenBits.bounds),
 kEmptyTitle, kVisible, plainDBox, kMoveToFront,
 kNoGoAway, kNilRefCon );
 to
 window = NewWindow( nil, &(qd.screenBits.bounds),
 kEmptyTitle, kVisible, plainDBox, kMoveToFront,
 kNoGoAway, kNilRefCon );

6) In the routine WindowInit(), change:

 SetRect( &mBarRect, screenBits.bounds.left,
 screenBits.bounds.top,
 screenBits.bounds.right,
 screenBits.bounds.top+gOldMBarHeight );
 to
 SetRect( &mBarRect, qd.screenBits.bounds.left,
 qd.screenBits.bounds.top,
 qd.screenBits.bounds.right,
 qd.screenBits.bounds.top+gOldMBarHeight );

7) In the routine WindowInit(), change:

 FillRect( &(window->portRect), black );
 to
 FillRect( &(window->portRect), &qd.black );

8) In the routine LinesInit(), change:

 GetDateTime( (unsigned long *)(&randSeed) );
 to
 GetDateTime( (unsigned long *)(&qd.randSeed) );

9) In the routine MainLoop(), change:

 MBarHeight = gOldMBarHeight;
 to
 LMSetMBarHeight( gOldMBarHeight );

EventTracker

1) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitGraf( &thePort );
 to
 InitGraf( &qd.thePort );

2) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitDialogs( nil );
 to
 InitDialogs( 0L );

3) Change the #include:

 #include <Values.h>
 to
 #include <limits.h>

4) Change the #define:

 #define kSleep  MAXLONG
 to
 #define kSleep  LONG_MAX

5) Near the top of the file, just after the declaration of gDone, add the global declaration:

 AEEventHandlerUPP gDoOpenAppUPP,
 gDoOpenDocUPP,
 gDoPrintDocUPP,
 gDoQuitAppUPP;

6) In the routine WindowInit(), delete the unused local variable windRect.

7) In the routine EventInit(), change:

 err = AEInstallEventHandler( kCoreEventClass, kAEOpenApplication,
  DoOpenApp, 0L, false );
 to
 gDoOpenAppUPP = NewAEEventHandlerProc( DoOpenApp );
 err = AEInstallEventHandler( kCoreEventClass, kAEOpenApplication,
  gDoOpenAppUPP, 0L, false );

8) In the routine EventInit(), change:

 err = AEInstallEventHandler( kCoreEventClass, kAEOpenDocuments,
 DoOpenDoc, 0L, false );
 to
 gDoOpenDocUPP = NewAEEventHandlerProc( DoOpenDoc );
 err = AEInstallEventHandler( kCoreEventClass, kAEOpenDocuments,
 gDoOpenDocUPP, 0L, false );

9) In the routine EventInit(), change:

 err = AEInstallEventHandler( kCoreEventClass, kAEPrintDocuments,
 DoPrintDoc, 0L, false );
 to
 gDoPrintDocUPP = NewAEEventHandlerProc( DoPrintDoc );
 err = AEInstallEventHandler( kCoreEventClass, kAEPrintDocuments,
 gDoPrintDocUPP, 0L, false );

10) In the routine EventInit(), change:

 err = AEInstallEventHandler( kCoreEventClass, kAEQuitApplication,
 DoQuitApp, 0L, false );
 to
 gDoQuitAppUPP = NewAEEventHandlerProc( DoQuitApp );
 err = AEInstallEventHandler( kCoreEventClass, kAEQuitApplication,
 gDoQuitAppUPP, 0L, false );

11) In the routine HandleMouseDown(), change:

 DragWindow( window, eventPtr->where, &screenBits.bounds );
 to
 DragWindow( window, eventPtr->where, &qd.screenBits.bounds );

Updater

1) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitGraf( &thePort );
 to
 InitGraf( &qd.thePort );

2) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitDialogs( nil );
 to
 InitDialogs( 0L );

3) Change the #include:

 #include <Values.h>
 to
 #include <limits.h>

4) Change the #define:

 #define kSleep  MAXLONG
 to
 #define kSleep  LONG_MAX

5) In the routine HandleMouseDown(), change:

 growRect.bottom = MAXSHORT;
 growRect.right = MAXSHORT;
 to
 growRect.bottom = INT_MAX;
 growRect.right = INT_MAX;

6) In the routine HandleMouseDown(), change:

 DragWindow( window, eventPtr->where, &screenBits.bounds );
 to
 DragWindow( window, eventPtr->where, &qd.screenBits.bounds );

EventTrigger

1) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitGraf( &thePort );
 to
 InitGraf( &qd.thePort );

2) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitDialogs( nil );
 to
 InitDialogs( 0L );

WorldClock

1) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitGraf( &thePort );
 to
 InitGraf( &qd.thePort );

2) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitDialogs( nil );
 to
 InitDialogs( 0L );

3) In the routine HandleMouseDown(), delete the unused local variable oldPort.

4) In the routine HandleMouseDown(), change:

 DragWindow( window, eventPtr->where, &screenBits.bounds );
 to
 DragWindow( window, eventPtr->where, &qd.screenBits.bounds );

Reminder

1) Delete this struct definition (it’s built-in now):

 struct PopupPrivateData
 {
   MenuHandle  mHandle;
 short       mID;
 char        mPrivate[1];
 };

2) Delete these function prototypes (they’re built-in now):

pascal OSErr SetDialogDefaultItem(DialogPtr theDialog, short newItem) 

 = { 0x303C, 0x0304, 0xAA68 };        
pascal OSErr SetDialogCancelItem(DialogPtr theDialog, short newItem)
   = { 0x303C, 0x0305, 0xAA68 };
pascal OSErr SetDialogTracksCursor(DialogPtr theDialog, Boolean tracks)
 = { 0x303C, 0x0306, 0xAA68 };

3) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitGraf( &thePort );
 to
 InitGraf( &qd.thePort );

4) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitDialogs( nil );
 to
 InitDialogs( 0L );

5) Add this line to the global definitions at the top of the source code:

 NMUPP  gLaunchResponseUPP, gNormalResponseUPP;

6) In main(), add this code just before the call to EventLoop():

 gLaunchResponseUPP = NewNMProc( LaunchResponse );
 gNormalResponseUPP = NewNMProc( NormalResponse );

7) In the routine CopyDialogToReminder(), change:

 if( reminder->launch = GetCtlValue( (ControlHandle)itemHandle ) )
 reminder->notify.nmResp = (NMProcPtr)&LaunchResponse;
 else
 reminder->notify.nmResp = (NMProcPtr)&NormalResponse;
 to
 if( reminder->launch = GetCtlValue( (ControlHandle)itemHandle ) )
 reminder->notify.nmResp = gLaunchResponseUPP;
 else
 reminder->notify.nmResp = gNormalResponseUPP;

ResWriter

1) Delete these function prototypes (they’re built-in now):

pascal OSErr SetDialogDefaultItem(DialogPtr theDialog, short newItem) 

 = { 0x303C, 0x0304, 0xAA68 };        
pascal OSErr SetDialogCancelItem(DialogPtr theDialog, short newItem)
   = { 0x303C, 0x0305, 0xAA68 };
pascal OSErr SetDialogTracksCursor(DialogPtr theDialog, Boolean tracks)
 = { 0x303C, 0x0306, 0xAA68 };

2) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitGraf( &thePort );
 to
 InitGraf( &qd.thePort );

3) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitDialogs( nil );
 to
 InitDialogs( 0L );

Pager

1) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitGraf( &thePort );
 to
 InitGraf( &qd.thePort );

2) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitDialogs( nil );
 to
 InitDialogs( 0L );

3) Change the #include:

 #include <Values.h>
 to
 #include <limits.h>

4) Change the #define:

 #define kSleep  MAXLONG
 to
 #define kSleep  LONG_MAX

5) Near the top of the file, just after the declaration of gDone, add the definition:

 ControlActionUPPgActionUPP;

6) In the routine HandleMouseDown(), change:

 else
 thePart = TrackControl( theControl, thePoint, &ScrollProc );
 to
 else
 {
 gActionUPP = NewControlActionProc( ScrollProc );
 thePart = TrackControl( theControl, thePoint, gActionUPP );
 }

7) In the routine HandleMouseDown(), change:

 DragWindow( window, eventPtr->where, &screenBits.bounds );
 to
 DragWindow( window, eventPtr->where, &qd.screenBits.bounds );

ShowClip

1) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitGraf( &thePort );
 to
 InitGraf( &qd.thePort );

2) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitDialogs( nil );
 to
 InitDialogs( 0L );

SoundMaker

1) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitGraf( &thePort );
 to
 InitGraf( &qd.thePort );

2) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitDialogs( nil );
 to
 InitDialogs( 0L );

OpenPICT

1) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitGraf( &thePort );
 to
 InitGraf( &qd.thePort );

2) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitDialogs( nil );
 to
 InitDialogs( 0L );

PrintPICT

1) Change the #include:

 #include <PrintTraps.h>
 to
 #include <Printing.h>

2) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitGraf( &thePort );
 to
 InitGraf( &qd.thePort );

3) In the routine ToolBoxInit(), change:

 InitDialogs( nil );
 to
 InitDialogs( 0L );

HyperCard XCMD

1) You’ll need to move the file HyperXCmd.h from the (Apple #includes) folder into the Universal Headers folder. I’m not sure what THINK 7 intends you to do about XCMDs, but this will work for now. Other than that, the code should compile cleanly.

Getting Started With CodeWarrior

To close out this month’s column, we’re going to build last month’s MDEF and tester projects using CodeWarrior DR/3.

If you are using DR/2, go ahead and upgrade to DR/3. There appears to be a bug in DR/2 that prevents you from building certain kinds of projects (and, as you’ve probably guessed, the MDEF code resource is one of them).

Start off by creating a folder named Metrowerks MDEF. Next, copy the files MDEF.c, Tester.c, and Tester.Π.rsrc from the folder you created last month into the Metrowerks MDEF folder. Change the name of the file Tester.Π.rsrc to Tester.µ.rsrc. By convention, THINK names its project and resource files with the character Π (option-p), while CodeWarrior uses the character µ (option-m).

If you’ve already built a CodeWarrior project using DR/2, drag the project onto the “Project Updater” icon at the top level of the CodeWarrior folder. The “Project Updater” will convert a DR/2 project to a DR/3 project in place. This is a one-way process.

If you’re starting from scratch, you get to decide which flavor compiler you want to work with, 68K or PowerPC. Open the Metrowerks C/C++ ƒ folder and launch either MW C/C++ 68K 1.0 or MW C/C++ PPC 1.0. Either way, when the toolbar appears, select New Project... from the File menu and create a new project named MDEF.µ in the Metrowerks MDEF folder.

When the project window appears, select Add File... from the Project menu and add the file MDEF.c and either MacOS.lib or InterfaceLib to the project. MacOS.lib is in the folder named Libraries ƒ, in the MacOS 68K ƒ folder. InterfaceLib is also in the folder named Libraries ƒ, in the MacOS PPC ƒ folder. Figures 1a and 1b show the project window after these files are added.

Figure 1a. The MDEF.µ project window, 68K version.

Figure 1b. The MDEF.µ project window, PowerPC version.

Next, select Preferences from the Edit menu. Click on the Language icon (Figure 2). Be sure that the Prefix File field agrees with the type of machine you are compiling for, either MacHeaders68K or MacHeadersPPC.

Figure 2. The Language panel.

If you are generating code for the PowerPC, the Linker icon allows you to specify the entry points for your code resource. Since we are programming in C and don’t have C++’s constructor or destructor, we’ll leave the Initialization and Termination fields blank and enter main in the Main field (Figure 3).

Figure 3. The Linker panel in the PowerPC compiler.

Next, click on the Project icon and make sure your settings agree with those shown in Figure 4a or 4b, depending on your target machine. The Merge To File check box asks the compiler to add the resource to the Tester resource file.

Figure 4a. The Project panel, 68K version

Figure 4b. The Project panel, PowerPC version

Click on the OK button to save your changes, then select Make from the Project menu. If all goes well, the MDEF will be built and added to the file Tester.µ.rsrc (you did remember to rename it didn’t you?)...

Creating the Tester Project

Go through a similar process to build a project for the Tester application. Name the project file Tester.µ, to go with the resource file Tester.µ.rsrc. Just like THINK C, CodeWarrior automatically looks for a resource file having the same name as the project file with “.rsrc” added to the name. Figure 5a and 5b show my project windows, one for 68K and one for PowerPC. Notice that the PowerPC version required the addition of the file MWCRuntime.Lib.

Figure 5a. The project window, 68K version

Figure 5b. The project window, PowerPC version

Go into the Preferences... and be sure the project type is set to Application. That should do it. Select Make from the Project menu and take your MDEF for a spin.

Till Next Month

I’m not sure what I’m going to write about next month. If I get the time, I’d like to get into some of the cool tools that you might want to use to ease your Mac development. Till then, I’m going to convince Daniel to come down from the top of my bookshelf, where he has somehow managed to drag all of his trucks, as well as my cordless telephone. See you soon...

Resources Referenced In This Article

Powering Up, MacTech Magazine, ongoing monthly series, January 1994 to present.

Inside Macintosh: PowerPC System Software, Addison Wesley

Inside Macintosh: PowerPC Numerics, Addison Wesley

Macintosh C Programming Primer Volume I, Dave Mark & Cartwright Reed, 672 pgs.

 
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It’s Bird vs. Bird in the New PvP Mode for Angry Birds Epic Posted by Jessica Fisher on December 19th, 2014 [ permalink ] Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad | Read more »
Telltale Games and Mojang Announce Minec...
Telltale Games and Mojang Announce Minecraft: Story Mode – A Telltale Games Series Posted by Jessica Fisher on December 19th, 2014 [ permalink ] | Read more »
WarChest and Splash Damage Annouce Their...
WarChest and Splash Damage Annouce Their New Game: Tempo Posted by Jessica Fisher on December 19th, 2014 [ permalink ] WarChest Ltd and Splash Damage Ltd are teaming up again to work | Read more »
BulkyPix Celebrates its 6th Anniversary...
BulkyPix Celebrates its 6th Anniversary with a Bunch of Free Games Posted by Jessica Fisher on December 19th, 2014 [ permalink ] BulkyPix has | Read more »
Indulge in Japanese cuisine in Cooking F...
Indulge in Japanese cuisine in Cooking Fever’s new sushi-themed update Posted by Simon Reed on December 19th, 2014 [ permalink ] Lithuanian developer Nordcurrent has yet again updated its restaurant simulat | Read more »
Badland Daydream Level Pack Arrives to C...
Badland Daydream Level Pack Arrives to Celebrate 20 Million Downloads Posted by Ellis Spice on December 19th, 2014 [ permalink ] | Read more »
Far Cry 4, Assassin’s Creed Unity, Desti...
Far Cry 4, Assassin’s Creed Unity, Destiny, and Beyond – AppSpy Takes a Look at AAA Companion Apps Posted by Rob Rich on December 19th, 2014 [ permalink ] These day | Read more »
A Bunch of Halfbrick Games Are Going Fre...
A Bunch of Halfbrick Games Are Going Free for the Holidays Posted by Ellis Spice on December 19th, 2014 [ permalink ] Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

13-inch 2.6GHz Retina MacBook Pro on sale for...
Best Buy has lowered their price on the 2014 13″ 2.6GHz/128GB Retina MacBook Pro to $1149.99 on their online store for a limited time. That’s $150 off MSRP and the lowest price available for this... Read more
Kodak Returns to CES With New Consumer Produ...
Former photography colossus Kodak is returning to CES for the first time in three years where the Kodak booth (#21818 South Hall 1) will showcase a wide range of innovative, imaging-related products... Read more
Invaluable Launches New Eponymously -Named A...
Invaluable, the world’s largest online live auction marketplace, hhas announced the official launch of the Invaluable app for iPad, now available for download in the iTunes App Store. Invaluable... Read more
IDC Reveals Worldwide Mobile Enterprise Appli...
International Data Corporation (IDC) last week hosted the IDC FutureScape: Worldwide Mobile Enterprise Applications and Solutions 2015 Predictions Web conference. The session provided organizations... Read more
Hello Vino Wine App Launches “Safe Ride Home”...
Hello Vino has announced addition of a new “Get a Safe Ride Home” feature in its Food & Drink app with a direct connection to Uber, the technology platform that connects users with rides. The... Read more
DEVON-technologies Releases DEVONthink To Go...
Coeur d’Alene, Idaho based DEVON-technologies, LLC has updated DEVONthink To Go, its mobile companion to DEVONthink, to version 1.5. The update includes an iOS 8 extension, compatibility with the... Read more
The Apple Store offering free next-day shippi...
The Apple Store is now offering free next-day shipping on all in stock items if ordered before 12/23/14 at 10:00am PT. Local store pickup is also available within an hour of ordering for any in stock... Read more
It’s 1992 Again At Sony Pictures, Except For...
Techcrunch’s John Biggs interviewed a Sony Pictures Entertainment (SPE) employee, who quite understandably wished to remain anonymous, regarding post-hack conditions in SPE’s L.A office, explaining “... Read more
OtterBox Defender Series Case For iPad mini 3...
With their innovative Touch ID technology and ultrathin profile, the latest tranche of Apple iPads are more desirable than ever, and OtterBox has just announced the Defender Series custom-engineered... Read more
Holiday sales this weekend: MacBook Pros for...
 B&H Photo has new MacBook Pros on sale for up to $300 off MSRP as part of their Holiday pricing. Shipping is free, and B&H charges NY sales tax only: - 15″ 2.2GHz Retina MacBook Pro: $1699... Read more

Jobs Board

*Apple* Store Leader Program (US) - Apple, I...
…Summary Learn and grow as you explore the art of leadership at the Apple Store. You'll master our retail business inside and out through training, hands-on experience, Read more
Project Manager, *Apple* Financial Services...
**Job Summary** Apple Financial Services (AFS) offers consumers, businesses and educational institutions ways to finance Apple purchases. We work with national and Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions (US) - A...
Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, you're also the Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions (US) - A...
Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, you're also the Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions (US) - A...
Job Description: Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, Read more
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