TweetFollow Us on Twitter

Ext Code Modules
Volume Number:9
Issue Number:9
Column Tag:Pascal Workshop

External Code Modules
in Pascal

Put code and resources into external modules for expandable applications

By Rob Spencer, East Lyme, Connecticut

Note: Source code files accompanying article are located on MacTech CD-ROM or source code disks.

About the author

Rob Spencer is a biochemist at Pfizer Central Research, and when he’s not helping to develop new pharmaceuticals he’s an avid Mac enthusiast.

Code resources are everywhere. They’re in our operating system as drop-in Extensions. Our applications use them as familiar WDEFs, CDEFs, LDEFs, and MDEFs. We can write our own for extendible applications and development tools like HyperCard, Excel, 4th Dimension, ProGraph, Serius Developer, and LabView. We even see them in screen savers with zillions of drop-in modules. So how do these external chunks of code work, and how can you write your own application to make use of them? Here’s a set of seven successively more complex Pascal experiments that result in a simple structure to support powerful and flexible external code modules.

EXPERIMENT 1: ONE-WAY JUMPS

First comes the most important trick: how to call procedures by address, with parameter passing. I’ve seen this code snippet in many places, including the original HyperCard glue routines (as in Danny Goodman’s HyperCard Developer’s Guide, Bantam Books, 1988, appendix C), MacTutor (Jean de Combret, The Best of MacTutor, vol 5, pp. 246-260), and Symantec magazine (Spring and Autumn 1991 in the THINK Pascal section). All that’s needed is a small inline procedure with a parameter list that exactly matches (in number and type) the procedure we want to remote-call, plus a ProcPtr. The code for Experiment 1 demonstrates; it’s very short:

{1}

program ExperimentOne;

 { ---------------- }

 procedure CallCodeRes (paramA, paramB: integer; var paramC: integer; 
addr: ProcPtr);
 { Note that the param list must exactly  }
 { match that of the called procedure in  }
 { order and type, with the address added }
 { at the end. }
 inline
 $205F, { MOVE.L (A7)+,A0 }
 $4E90; { JSR (A0)        }

 { ---------------- }

 procedure xmMain (x, y: integer; var z: integer);
 { Accept input parameters and do something. }
 begin
 z := x + y;
 end;

 { ============ main ============= }
var
 a, b, c: integer;
begin
 a := 2;
 b := 3;
 c := 0;
 CallCodeRes(a, b, c, @xmMain);
 { Use THINK’s lazy I/O for this demo. }
 ShowText;
 writeLn(‘ a,b,c = ‘, a, b, c);
end.

When this program runs, the correspondence of parameter lists in the CallCodeRes and xmMain procedures makes the compiler set up the stack correctly before it goes to the inline code and makes the jump. We can pass parameters by value or address (var), and in the latter case get information back from the code module (i.e., 2 + 3 = 5). This is all in one little program here, but the descendants of xmMain (the prefix “xm” stands for “external module”) will reside in independently compiled code modules, while y will remain in the host application.

EXPERIMENT 2: ADD A PARAMETER BLOCK

This structure is very useful for debugging code resources inside the THINK environment (such as CDEFs, MDEFs, and WDEFs; see Jean de Combret’s article), but for our purposes it’s not enough. In Experiment 2 (see the Listings section) we pass only one parameter, but it’s a pointer to a parameter block:

{2}

 type
 xmPtr = ^xmBlock;
 xmBlock = record
 request: integer;
 result: integer;
 params: array[1..8] of longint;
 callbackAddr: ProcPtr;
 end;

This block is modeled after HyperCard’s XCMD parameter block. The param longints are used to pass information between the code module and the application, in either direction. These replace the explicit list of parameters in the procedures of Experiment 1. With type coercion these longints can be points, pointers, handles, etc. If you want to pass a string, cast one of these as a StringHandle or StringPtr. The other fields in the parameter block (request, result, callbackAddr) are there to support two-way communication to the module - which is what Experiments 3 and 4 are all about.

EXPERIMENT 3: ADD CALLBACKS

Experiments 1 and 2 satisfy the first reason why you might want to use external code modules: to have a way to send data out to a drop-in module and get answers back. However, external modules can be more useful if they have the ability to manage their own windows, menus, events, and script language commands, as well as specialized data. The difficulty is that there are many things in the application that a separately compiled code module can’t get access to, such as events and globals like window pointers and menu handles. We aren’t going to re-write and re-compile our application every time we write a new module (that’s the whole point), so we need a way for the application to know which modules are “out there” and what messages they know how to receive. All this means that really useful modules need two-way communication to the host application - not just by passing parameters, but by calling each other’s procedures. This is what callbacks allow.

Implementing callbacks takes another copy of the little inline routine to jump back to the application. All we have to do is include the return address (the app’s procedure to which we return) in the parameter block that we pass to the external code. Naturally, that return procedure had better be in a locked segment or we could jump back to the Twilight Zone.

The return address can point to only one procedure in the application, but we’ll want to have many different callback options. The solution is to make that procedure (CallbackDispatcher) a big case statement with the request field of the parameter block as the case selector:

{3}

 procedure CallbackDispatcher (theXmPtr: xmPtr);
 { Don’t let this move or be purged! }
 begin
 case theXmPtr^.request of
 xreqNewXMWindow: 
 begin  { do this... }
 end;
 xreqCloseXMWindow: 
 begin  { do that... }
 end;
 xreqSysBeep: 
 begin  { do this... }
 end;
 otherwise
 { unknown callback request }
 end;
 end;

The values of theXmPtr^.request are constants agreed upon by the application and all external modules. In Experiment 3 these constants are:

{4}

 xreqNewXMWindow = 5001;
 xreqCloseXMWindow = 5002;
 xreqSysBeep = 5003;

The prefix ‘xreq’ stands for ‘external request’; there will be ‘areq’, or ‘application requests’, coming later.

GLUE ROUTINES

Making the use of callbacks convenient for the external module programmer is important. Remember that one reason for using external code is that you (or someone else) may want to add functionality long after the host application is finished and distributed. You shouldn’t have to rediscover how you typecast all the param fields; you just want a simple declaration that you can understand immediately, as if it came out of Inside Macintosh. Every callback has a short glue routine that takes care all this, like this one in Experiment 4:

{5}

 function NewXMWindow (theXmPtr: xmPtr; wBounds: rect; 
 wTitle: str255; wType: integer): WindowPtr;
 begin
 with theXmPtr^ do
 begin
 request := xreqNewXMWindow;
 param[1] := longint(wBounds.topLeft);
 param[2] := longint(wBounds.botRight);
 param[3] := longint(@wTitle);
 param[4] := longint(wType);
 DoCallback(theXmPtr, callbackAddr);
 NewXMWindow := WindowPtr(param[5]);
 if param[5] = 0 then
 result := xmFail
 else
 result := xmSuccess;
 end;
 end;

Within your module code you use NewXMWindow just as you would NewWindow. The glue routine sets up the parameter block, does the callback, and casts the results from the application to the appropriate type. All that matters is that the glue routine and CallbackDispatcher agree exactly on the order and typecasting of the parameters.

Note also how xmPtr^.result is used as an error flag, which most often will be assigned values for success or fail constants. You may also wish to assign it the value of a Toolbox-returned OSErr or ResErr, so that the application could (for example) specifically react to a low memory condition.

EXPERIMENT 4: HOST REQUESTS

We have enough now to implement single-task modules, like most HyperCard XCMD’s. However, a little more discipline and structure can make externals more useful and independent. Since the external can count on callback routines in the application, defined by a set of ‘xreq’ constants and glue routines, it’s only fair that the host application be able to call pre-defined routines in the external, defined by a set of ‘areq’ constants.

Here are the first four defined in Experiment 4:

{6}
 areqOpen = 7000;
 areqClose = 7001;
 areqDoEvent = 7002;
 areqGetInfo = 7003;

These might be part of a “required set” of requests that all externals must accept. You can establish the rule that the application will always call areqOpen when it first calls an external. This gives the external a chance to create its menus, windows, or internal data structures. When it’s closing time, the application must similarly call areqClose, so that the external can release memory, etc. As areqDoEvent suggests, an external should be able to accept normal Mac events and respond appropriately (e.g., by updating its windows). An external must also be able to tell the application something about itself via areqGetInfo, such as its name and some author or copyright information. Experiment 4 provides the structure for these calls but does not implement them all.

The other two request constants in Experiment 4 refer to unique routines that “do the work” :

{7}
 areqDrawMoire = 8001;  
 areqCalcFactorial = 8002;

This is a kludge! It helps to keep Experiment 4 simple, but it requires that the application know these dispatch constants at compile time, which prevents me from adding new, unanticipated externals later - the whole point of using external code. There are at least two solutions to this dilemma: either the application can call the external’s routines by event, such as after a specific menu item or button selection (from menus or buttons derived from the external’s resources), or the application can call the external’s specialized routines by name, perhaps as the result of a script language command. In either case, the application could either “broadcast” the request out to all externals until one accepted it (the way HyperCard passes messages along its hierarchy), or at launch time the application could query all externals and build a small database (of menu item names or script language commands) to help it look up event ownership later.

OVERWRITES AND MEMORY

The HyperCard XCMD parameter block has separate InArgs and OutArgs. I decided not to make this distinction but rather let all 8 parameters be used for data transfer in either direction. However, some discipline is required because the using a callback can overwrite information passed from the application. Consider how you might have your external respond to the areqOpen call at startup time:

As this figure suggests, your DoOpen routine might make three callbacks to set up a window, global variable, and menu, but finally you have to send the xmSuccess message back in response to the original areqOpen request. All three callbacks use the same block (only the app allocates parameter blocks, using NewPtrClear), and so they overwrite the parameters freely. The solution is simply to copy essential information from the parameter block into local variables immediately after information is received, and then put that information back into the block before returning control to the application.

Another lesson from HyperCard: prevent memory headaches by establishing the rule that externals must not dispose of memory that they did not allocate. If you violate this rule, then at least document clearly which callbacks return handles or pointers that the external must dispose itself. In these experiments I obey the rule for windows (the callback CloseXMWindow does nothing more than call DisposeWindow), but I break the rule for menus (the callback GetXMMenu returns a MenuHandle, but the external itself must call DisposeMenu when it closes). You decide where to compromise between clean design and efficiency.

Figure 1.

WHAT’S NEXT?

Experiments 1 to 4 are all small stand-alone programs with listings in this article. Experiments 5, 6, and 7 successively build toward a real event-handling Mac application with drop-in external code modules, but for brevity their code is just on the monthly disk. Here’s what they add.

In Experiment 5 the external code module is finally put into its own unit. The application is filled out to a minimal Mac application with menus and event loop. However, the external module, though separately compiled, must be inserted into the application with ResEdit (just like XCMDs must be inserted into stacks or HyperCard), and the calls to the module are still hard-wired. Though the external code can be separately compiled as a code resource, the listings also show how to include it within the host application during debugging.

In Experiment 6, the module is made responsive to menu and window events. This uses the simple “database” approach, so that when the app receives an event it can find out which external (if any) “owns” the event and should be passed the event for processing. New callbacks are added to support this:

{8}

 function GetXMMenu (theXmPtr: xmPtr; menuName: 
 str15): MenuHandle;
 function CountXMWindows (theXmPtr: xmPtr; 
 justMine: boolean): integer;
 function GetIndXMWindow (theXmPtr: xmPtr;
 i: integer; justMine: boolean; var owner: 
 OSType): WindowPtr;

The module name is shortened to an OSType to simplify and shrink the database.

Finally, in Experiment 7, external modules are truly separated from the application: they become separate files dropped into the application’s folder, which the application finds and loads at launch time. Also, Experiment 7 implements idle calls for externals, so that every external that requests idle time will be called once every pass through the main event loop. Figure 1 shows that the grand finale looks like a typical Mac demo circa 1985, except that nearly all the code and resources are contained in drop-in module files.

CONCLUSION

External modules can be used in many ways. Consider two extremes: you could write a large application for statistics and curve fitting and use very small modules to make it easy to add exotic functions later. Such a module might have no interface at all but just evaluate a mathematical function. Alternatively, like After Dark, the application (or CDEV and INIT) might be rather small and the modules contain most of the code, resources, user interface, and “personality” that the user identifies with the software.

You may want to use external modules to control application bloat, by letting the user drop in just the functionality needed. For in-house development teams, the most Mac-literate programmer might write the application code, then let others write externals, using the callbacks to handle most of the user interface and event details. Similarly, programmers can write externals in any language that can produce pure-code resources, as long as the glue routines are translated.

LISTINGS: EXPERIMENT 2
program ExperimentTwo;
 { Use a parameter block to exchange data }
 { with the called procedure. }
 const
 xmSuccess = 0;
 type
 xmPtr = ^xmBlock;
 xmBlock = record
 request: integer;
 result: integer;
 param: array[1..8] of longint;
 callbackAddr: ProcPtr;
 end;

 { ---------------- }

 procedure CallCodeRes (theXmPtr: xmPtr; addr: ProcPtr);
 inline
 $205F, $4E90;

 { ---------------- }

 procedure xmMain (theXmPtr: xmPtr);
 begin
 if theXmPtr <> nil then
 with theXmPtr^ do
 begin
 param[3] := param[1] + param[2];
 result := xmSuccess;
 end;
 end;

 { ============ main ============= }
 var
 myXmPtr: xmPtr;
begin
 myXmPtr := xmPtr(NewPtrClear(sizeOf(xmBlock)));
 if myXmPtr <> nil then
 with myXmPtr^ do
 begin
 param[1] := 2;
 param[2] := 3;
 param[3] := 0;
 CallCodeRes(myXmPtr, @xmMain);
 ShowText;
 writeLn(‘ answer = ‘, param[3]);
 end;
end.
LISTINGS: EXPERIMENT 3

program ExperimentThree;
 { Add the ability to make ‘callbacks’ to the host appl }

 { ======= common types and constants ======= }
 { These must be the same in the host app and }
 { external modules. }

 type
 xmPtr = ^xmBlock;
 xmBlock = record
 request: integer;
 result: integer;
 param: array[1..8] of longint;
 callbackAddr: ProcPtr;
 end;

 const
 xmSuccess = 0;
 xmFail = -1;
 xreqNewXMWindow = 5001;
 xreqCloseXMWindow = 5002;
 xreqSysBeep = 5003;

 { ==== procedures for the code module ==== }

 { ---- glue routines ---- }

 procedure DoCallback (theXmPtr: xmPtr; addr: ProcPtr);
 inline
 $205F, $4E90;

 { ---------------- }

 function NewXMWindow (theXmPtr: xmPtr; wBounds: rect;         
 wTitle: str255; wType: integer): WindowPtr;
 begin
 with theXmPtr^ do
 begin
 request := xreqNewXMWindow;
 param[1] := longint(wBounds.topLeft);
 param[2] := longint(wBounds.botRight);
 param[3] := longint(@wTitle);
 param[4] := longint(wType);
 DoCallback(theXmPtr, callbackAddr);
 NewXMWindow := WindowPtr(param[5]);
 if param[5] = 0 then
 result := xmFail
 else
 result := xmSuccess;
 end;
 end;

 { ---------------- }

procedure CloseXMWindow(theXmPtr: xmPtr; window: WindowPtr);
 begin
 with theXmPtr^ do
 begin
 request := xreqCloseXMWindow;
 param[1] := longint(window);
 DoCallback(theXmPtr, callbackAddr);
 end;
 end;

 { ---------------- }

 procedure DoBeep (theXmPtr: xmPtr; numBeeps: integer);
 begin
 with theXmPtr^ do
 begin
 request := xreqSysBeep;
 param[1] := longint(numBeeps);
 DoCallback(theXmPtr, callbackAddr);
 end;
 end;

 { --- the external module code that ‘does something’ --- }

 procedure xmMain (theXmPtr: xmPtr);
 { Get a window, draw some circles, }
 { wait a second, and close it.     }
 var
 tempRect: rect;
 tempStr: str255;
 tempLong: longint;
 theWindow: WindowPtr;
 i: integer;
 oldPort: GrafPtr;
 begin
 if theXmPtr <> nil then
 begin
 tempStr := ‘External Module Window’;
 SetRect(tempRect, 100, 100, 300, 300);

 { first callback: get a window from the host app }
 theWindow := NewXMWindow(theXmPtr, tempRect,
 tempStr, noGrowDocProc);
 if theXmPtr^.result = xmSuccess then
 begin
 GetPort(oldPort);
 SetPort(theWindow);
 SetRect(tempRect, 99, 99, 100, 100);
 for i := 1 to 100 do
 begin
 InsetRect(tempRect, -2, -2);
 FrameOval(tempRect);
 end;

 { second callback: make a noise }
 DoBeep(theXmPtr, 3);
 Delay(60, tempLong);

 { third callback: ask the app to close the window }
 CloseXMWindow(theXmPtr, theWindow);
 SetPort(oldPort);
 end;
 end;
 end;

{ === procedures in the host application === }

 procedure CallCodeRes (theXmPtr: xmPtr; addr: ProcPtr);
 inline
 $205F, $4E90;

 { ---------------- }

 procedure CallbackDispatcher (theXmPtr: xmPtr);
 { Don’t let this move or be purged! }
 var
 tempRect: rect;
 tempStr: str255;
 tempInt: integer;
 begin
 if theXmPtr <> nil then
 with theXmPtr^ do
 case request of

 xreqNewXMWindow: 
 begin
 tempRect.topLeft := point(param[1]);
 tempRect.botRight := point(param[2]);
 tempStr := StringPtr(param[3])^;
 tempInt := param[4];
 param[5] := longint(NewWindow(nil, tempRect,
 tempStr, true, tempInt, windowPtr(-1), 
 false, 0));
 end;

 xreqCloseXMWindow: 
 begin
 if param[1] <> 0 then
 DisposeWindow(windowPtr(param[1]));
 end;

 xreqSysBeep: 
 begin
 if not (param[1] in [1..20]) then
 param[1] := 1;
 for tempInt := 1 to param[1] do
 SysBeep(0);
 end;

 otherwise
 { unknown callback request }
 end;
 end;

 { ============ main ============= }

 var
 myXmPtr: xmPtr;
begin
 myXmPtr := xmPtr(NewPtrClear(sizeOf(xmBlock)));
 if myXmPtr <> nil then
 begin
 myXmPtr^.callbackAddr := @CallbackDispatcher;
 CallCodeRes(myXmPtr, @xmMain);
 DisposPtr(ptr(myXmPtr));
 end;
end.
LISTINGS: EXPERIMENT 4
program ExperimentFour;
 { Add ‘areq’ calls from the host app to the module. }
 { Only those procedures that differ from Experiment 3 are }
 { listed here.  The code disk has the complete listing.}
const
 xmSuccess = 0;
 xmFail = -1;
 xreqNewXMWindow = 5001;
 xreqCloseXMWindow = 5002;
 xreqSysBeep = 5003;

 { new in Experiment 4 }
 xmUnknownAppRequest = -2;

 areqOpen = 7000;{ required commands }
 areqClose = 7001;
 areqDoEvent = 7002;
 areqGetInfo = 7003;

 areqDrawMoire = 8001;    { module-specific }
 areqCalcFactorial = 8002;

 procedure xmMain (theXmPtr: xmPtr);
 { Respond to different messages from the host application. }
 { Some messages are required and common to all modules; }
 { some are unique to this module.     }

 { ---- required ----- }

 procedure OpenXModule;
 begin
 { One-time call.  Create any menus }
 { and custom data structures here. }
 end;

 { ----------- }

 procedure CloseXModule;
 begin
 { Release any memory and clean up. }
 end;

 { ----------- }

 procedure DoXmEvent;
 begin
 { Respond to Mac events }
 end;

 { ----------- }

 procedure GetXmInfo;
 { Return name and author info, }
 { like ‘!’ and ‘?’ for XCMDs   }
 var
 nameStr, authorStr: str255;
 begin
 nameStr := ‘Experiment Four Module’;
 authorStr := ‘Rob Spencer  1993’;
 theXmPtr^.param[1] := longint(NewString(nameStr));
 theXmPtr^.param[2] := longint(NewString(authorStr));
 end;

 { ----- unique ---- }

 procedure DrawMoire;
 { This was the entire external in Exp 3 }
 var
 tempRect: rect;
 tempStr: str255;
 tempLong: longint;
 theWindow: WindowPtr;
 i: integer;
 oldPort: GrafPtr;
 begin
 tempStr := ‘External Module Window’;
 SetRect(tempRect, 100, 100, 300, 300);
 theWindow := NewXMWindow(theXmPtr, tempRect, tempStr,
  noGrowDocProc);
 if theXmPtr^.result = xmSuccess then
 begin
 GetPort(oldPort);
 SetPort(theWindow);
 SetRect(tempRect, 99, 99, 100, 100);
 for i := 1 to 100 do
 begin
 InsetRect(tempRect, -2, -2);
 FrameOval(tempRect);
 end;
 DoBeep(theXmPtr, 3);
 Delay(60, tempLong);
 CloseXMWindow(theXmPtr, theWindow);
 SetPort(oldPort);
 end;
 end;

 { ----------- }

 procedure CalculateFactorial;
 { Calculate the factorial of param[1], }
 { put the result in param[2].          }
 var
 n: integer;
 factorial: longint;
 tempStr: str255;
 tempStrHandle: StringHandle;
 begin
 n := theXmPtr^.param[1];
 if (n < 0) or (n > 12) then
 begin
 { Error! return a readable message }
 { so the app may inform the user.  }
 theXmPtr^.result := xmFail;
 tempStr := ‘factorial input out-of-range’;
 tempStrHandle := NewString(tempStr);
 Hlock(handle(tempStrHandle));
 theXmPtr^.param[1] := 
 longint(handle(tempStrHandle));
 end
 else
 begin
 { Ok, do the calculation. }
 factorial := 1;
 while n > 1 do
 begin
 factorial := factorial * n;
 n := n - 1;
 end;
 theXmPtr^.param[2] := factorial;
 end;
 end;

 { ----- xmMain ----- }

 begin
 if theXmPtr <> nil then
 { Dispatch the app’s request }
 begin

 theXmPtr^.result := xmSuccess;
 case theXmPtr^.request of
 areqOpen: 
 OpenXModule;
 areqClose: 
 CloseXModule;
 areqDoEvent: 
 DoXmEvent;
 areqGetInfo: 
 GetXmInfo;
 areqDrawMoire: 
 DrawMoire;
 areqCalcFactorial: 
 CalculateFactorial;
 otherwise
 theXmPtr^.result := xmUnknownAppRequest;
 end;
 end;
 end;

 { ============ main ============= }

 var
 myXmPtr: xmPtr;
 tempStr: str255;
begin
 myXmPtr := xmPtr(NewPtrClear(sizeOf(xmBlock)));
 if myXmPtr <> nil then
 begin
 myXmPtr^.callbackAddr := @CallbackDispatcher;

 { draw a pattern }
 myXmPtr^.request := areqDrawMoire;
 CallCodeRes(myXmPtr, @xmMain);

 { get info about the external code }
 with myXmPtr^ do
 begin
 request := areqGetXmInfo;
 CallCodeRes(myXmPtr, @xmMain);
 ShowText;
 tempStr := StringHandle(param[1])^^;
 DisposHandle(handle(param[1]));
 writeLn(tempStr);
 tempStr := StringHandle(param[2])^^;
 DisposHandle(handle(param[2]));
 writeLn(tempStr);
 end;

 { calculate a factorial & check for errors }
 with myXmPtr^ do
 begin
 { Use Pascal lazy I/O for this demo. }
 ShowText;
 write(‘Enter a number : ‘);
 readLn(param[1]);
 request := areqCalcFactorial;
 CallCodeRes(myXmPtr, @xmMain);
 if result = xmSuccess then
 writeLn(param[1], ‘ ! =’, param[2])
 else
 begin
 tempStr := StringHandle(param[1])^^;
 DisposHandle(handle(param[1]));
 writeLn(tempStr);
 end;
 end;
 end;
 DisposPtr(ptr(myXmPtr));
end.

{ ---- end of listings ---- }

 

Community Search:
MacTech Search:

Software Updates via MacUpdate

Slack 2.6.2 - Collaborative communicatio...
Slack is a collaborative communication app that simplifies real-time messaging, archiving, and search for modern working teams. Version 2.6.2: Fixed Inexplicably, context menus and spell-check... Read more
Apple Final Cut Pro X 10.3.4 - Professio...
Apple Final Cut Pro X is a professional video editing solution.Completely redesigned from the ground up, Final Cut Pro adds extraordinary speed, quality, and flexibility to every part of the post-... Read more
Numi 3.15 - Menu-bar calculator supports...
Numi is a calculator that magically combines calculations with text, and allows you to freely share your computations. Numi combines text editor and calculator Support plain English. For example, '5... Read more
TunnelBear 3.0.14 - Subscription-based p...
TunnelBear is a subscription-based virtual private network (VPN) service and companion app, enabling you to browse the internet privately and securely. Features Browse privately - Secure your data... Read more
Apple iMovie 10.1.6 - Edit personal vide...
With an all-new design, Apple iMovie lets you enjoy your videos like never before. Browse your clips more easily, instantly share your favorite moments, and create beautiful HD movies and Hollywood-... Read more
Jamf Pro 9.99.0 - Powerful sysadmin/ente...
Jamf Pro (formerly Casper Suite) is the EMM tool that delights IT pros and the users they support by delivering on the promise of unified endpoint management for Apple devices. At Jamf, connecting... Read more
Adobe Lightroom 6.10.1 - Import, develop...
Adobe Lightroom is available as part of Adobe Creative Cloud for as little as $9.99/month bundled with Photoshop CC as part of the photography package. Lightroom 6 is also available for purchase as a... Read more
VueScan 9.5.78 - Scanner software with a...
VueScan is a scanning program that works with most high-quality flatbed and film scanners to produce scans that have excellent color fidelity and color balance. VueScan is easy to use, and has... Read more
TechTool Pro 9.5.1 - Hard drive and syst...
TechTool Pro has long been one of the foremost utilities for keeping your Mac running smoothly and efficiently. With the release of version 9, it has become more proficient than ever. TechTool... Read more
iPhoto Library Manager 4.2.7 - Manage mu...
iPhoto Library Manager allows you to organize your photos among multiple iPhoto libraries, rather than having to store all of your photos in one giant library. You can browse the photos in all your... Read more

Latest Forum Discussions

See All

Goat Simulator PAYDAY (Games)
Goat Simulator PAYDAY 1.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $4.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: ** IMPORTANT - SUPPORTED DEVICES **iPhone 4S, iPad 2, iPod Touch 5 or better Goat Simulator: Payday is the most... | Read more »
Zombie Gunship Survival Beginner's...
The much anticipated Zombie Gunship Survival is here. In this latest entry in the Zombie Gunship franchise, you're tasked with supporting ground troops and protecting your base from the zombie horde. There's a lot of rich base building fun, and... | Read more »
Mordheim: Warband Skirmish (Games)
Mordheim: Warband Skirmish 1.2.2 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $3.99, Version: 1.2.2 (iTunes) Description: Explore the ruins of the City of Mordheim, clash with other scavenging warbands and collect Wyrdstone -... | Read more »
Mordheim: Warband Skirmish brings tablet...
Legendary Games has just launched Mordheim: Warband Skirmish, a new turn-based action game for iOS and Android. | Read more »
Magikarp Jump splashes onto Android worl...
If you're tired ofPokémon GObut still want something to satisfy your mobilePokémon fix,Magikarp Jumpmay just do the trick. It's out now on Android devices the world over. While it looks like a simple arcade jumper, there's quite a bit more to it... | Read more »
Purrfectly charming open-world RPG Cat Q...
Cat Quest, an expansive open-world RPG from former Koei-Tecmo developers, got a new gameplay trailer today. The video showcases the combat and exploration features of this feline-themed RPG. Cat puns abound as you travel across a large map in a... | Read more »
Jaipur: A Card Game of Duels (Games)
Jaipur: A Card Game of Duels 1.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $1.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: ** WARNING: iPad 2, iPad Mini 1 & iPhone 4S are NOT compatible. ** *** Special Launch Price for a limited... | Read more »
Subdivision Infinity (Games)
Subdivision Infinity 1.03 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $2.99, Version: 1.03 (iTunes) Description: Launch sale! 40% Off! Subdivision Infinity is an immersive and pulse pounding sci-fi 3D space shooter. https://www.... | Read more »
Clash of Clans' gets a huge new upd...
Clash of Clans just got a massive new update, and that's not hyperbole. The update easily tacks on a whole new game's worth of content to the hit base building game. In the update, that mysterious boat on the edge of the map has been repaired and... | Read more »
Thimbleweed Park officially headed to iO...
Welp, it's official. Thimbleweed Park will be getting a mobile version. After lots of wondering and speculation, the developers confirmed it today. Thimbleweed Park will be available on both iOS and Android sometime in the near future. There's no... | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

Huawei Unveils New ‘Business-Styled’ MateBook...
Huawei has introduced a trio of new MateBook laptops, expanding its mobile portfolio and building on its success in delivering attractive and powerful high-end devices. The company claims the HUAWEI... Read more
Deal! Gold 12-inch 1.2GHz Retina MacBook for...
Amazon has the 2016 Gold 12″ 1.2GHz Retina MacBook (MLHF2LL/A) on sale for $350 off MSRP for a limited time. Shipping is free: - 12″ 1.2GHz Gold Retina MacBook: $1249.99 $350 off MSRP We expect this... Read more
13-inch 2.0GHz MacBook Pros on sale for $100...
B&H has the non-Touch Bar 13″ 2.0GHz MacBook Pros in stock today and on sale for $100 off MSRP. Shipping is free, and B&H charges NY & NJ sales tax only: - 13″ 2.0GHz MacBook Pro Space... Read more
15-inch 2.2GHz Retina MacBook Pro, Apple refu...
Apple has Certified Refurbished 2015 15″ 2.2GHz Retina MacBook Pros available for $1699. That’s $300 off MSRP, and it’s the lowest price available for a 15″ MacBook Pro. An Apple one-year warranty is... Read more
Apple refurbished 9-inch and 12-inch iPad Pro...
Apple has Certified Refurbished 9″ and 12″ Apple iPad Pros available for up to $160 off the cost of new iPads. An Apple one-year warranty is included with each model, and shipping is free: - 32GB 9″... Read more
Apple Certified Refurbished iMacs available f...
Apple has Certified Refurbished 2015 21″ & 27″ iMacs available for up to $350 off MSRP. Apple’s one-year warranty is standard, and shipping is free. The following models are available: - 21″ 3.... Read more
Sale! 15-inch 2.6GHz Silver Touch Bar MacBook...
DataVision has the 15″ 2.6GHz Silver Touch Bar MacBook Pro (MLW72LL/A) on sale for $2199 including free shipping. Their price is $200 off MSRP, and it’s the lowest price available for this model (... Read more
A Kaby Lake Processor Upgrade For The MacBook...
Now they tell me! Well, actually Apple hasn’t said anything official on the subject, but last week Bloomberg News’s Mark Gurman and Alex Webb cited unnamed “people familiar with the matter”... Read more
Kodak’s Camera-First Smartphone EKTRA Launche...
The Eastman Kodak Company and Bullitt Group have announced the availability of a U.S. GSM version of the KODAK EKTRA Smartphone. The U.S. launch coincides with a software update addressing requests... Read more
Apple Launches App Development Curriculum for...
Apple today launched a new app development curriculum designed for students who want to pursue careers in the fast-growing app economy. The curriculum is available as a free download today from Apple... Read more

Jobs Board

Best Buy *Apple* Computing Master - Best Bu...
**509110BR** **Job Title:** Best Buy Apple Computing Master **Location Number:** 000048-Topeka-Store **Job Description:** **What does a Best Buy Apple Computing Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions - Apple,...
Job Description: Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions - Apple,...
Job Description:SalesSpecialist - Retail Customer Service and SalesTransform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, Read more
*Apple* Systems Engineer - California Polyte...
Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo Apple Systems Engineer Department: ITS - Customer & Tech Support (134900) College/Division: Academic Affairs Salary Range: Position Read more
Best Buy *Apple* Computing Master - Best Bu...
**508718BR** **Job Title:** Best Buy Apple Computing Master **Location Number:** 001526-Odessa-Store **Job Description:** **What does a Best Buy Apple Computing Read more
All contents are Copyright 1984-2011 by Xplain Corporation. All rights reserved. Theme designed by Icreon.