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Ext Code Modules
Volume Number:9
Issue Number:9
Column Tag:Pascal Workshop

External Code Modules
in Pascal

Put code and resources into external modules for expandable applications

By Rob Spencer, East Lyme, Connecticut

Note: Source code files accompanying article are located on MacTech CD-ROM or source code disks.

About the author

Rob Spencer is a biochemist at Pfizer Central Research, and when he’s not helping to develop new pharmaceuticals he’s an avid Mac enthusiast.

Code resources are everywhere. They’re in our operating system as drop-in Extensions. Our applications use them as familiar WDEFs, CDEFs, LDEFs, and MDEFs. We can write our own for extendible applications and development tools like HyperCard, Excel, 4th Dimension, ProGraph, Serius Developer, and LabView. We even see them in screen savers with zillions of drop-in modules. So how do these external chunks of code work, and how can you write your own application to make use of them? Here’s a set of seven successively more complex Pascal experiments that result in a simple structure to support powerful and flexible external code modules.

EXPERIMENT 1: ONE-WAY JUMPS

First comes the most important trick: how to call procedures by address, with parameter passing. I’ve seen this code snippet in many places, including the original HyperCard glue routines (as in Danny Goodman’s HyperCard Developer’s Guide, Bantam Books, 1988, appendix C), MacTutor (Jean de Combret, The Best of MacTutor, vol 5, pp. 246-260), and Symantec magazine (Spring and Autumn 1991 in the THINK Pascal section). All that’s needed is a small inline procedure with a parameter list that exactly matches (in number and type) the procedure we want to remote-call, plus a ProcPtr. The code for Experiment 1 demonstrates; it’s very short:

{1}

program ExperimentOne;

 { ---------------- }

 procedure CallCodeRes (paramA, paramB: integer; var paramC: integer; 
addr: ProcPtr);
 { Note that the param list must exactly  }
 { match that of the called procedure in  }
 { order and type, with the address added }
 { at the end. }
 inline
 $205F, { MOVE.L (A7)+,A0 }
 $4E90; { JSR (A0)        }

 { ---------------- }

 procedure xmMain (x, y: integer; var z: integer);
 { Accept input parameters and do something. }
 begin
 z := x + y;
 end;

 { ============ main ============= }
var
 a, b, c: integer;
begin
 a := 2;
 b := 3;
 c := 0;
 CallCodeRes(a, b, c, @xmMain);
 { Use THINK’s lazy I/O for this demo. }
 ShowText;
 writeLn(‘ a,b,c = ‘, a, b, c);
end.

When this program runs, the correspondence of parameter lists in the CallCodeRes and xmMain procedures makes the compiler set up the stack correctly before it goes to the inline code and makes the jump. We can pass parameters by value or address (var), and in the latter case get information back from the code module (i.e., 2 + 3 = 5). This is all in one little program here, but the descendants of xmMain (the prefix “xm” stands for “external module”) will reside in independently compiled code modules, while y will remain in the host application.

EXPERIMENT 2: ADD A PARAMETER BLOCK

This structure is very useful for debugging code resources inside the THINK environment (such as CDEFs, MDEFs, and WDEFs; see Jean de Combret’s article), but for our purposes it’s not enough. In Experiment 2 (see the Listings section) we pass only one parameter, but it’s a pointer to a parameter block:

{2}

 type
 xmPtr = ^xmBlock;
 xmBlock = record
 request: integer;
 result: integer;
 params: array[1..8] of longint;
 callbackAddr: ProcPtr;
 end;

This block is modeled after HyperCard’s XCMD parameter block. The param longints are used to pass information between the code module and the application, in either direction. These replace the explicit list of parameters in the procedures of Experiment 1. With type coercion these longints can be points, pointers, handles, etc. If you want to pass a string, cast one of these as a StringHandle or StringPtr. The other fields in the parameter block (request, result, callbackAddr) are there to support two-way communication to the module - which is what Experiments 3 and 4 are all about.

EXPERIMENT 3: ADD CALLBACKS

Experiments 1 and 2 satisfy the first reason why you might want to use external code modules: to have a way to send data out to a drop-in module and get answers back. However, external modules can be more useful if they have the ability to manage their own windows, menus, events, and script language commands, as well as specialized data. The difficulty is that there are many things in the application that a separately compiled code module can’t get access to, such as events and globals like window pointers and menu handles. We aren’t going to re-write and re-compile our application every time we write a new module (that’s the whole point), so we need a way for the application to know which modules are “out there” and what messages they know how to receive. All this means that really useful modules need two-way communication to the host application - not just by passing parameters, but by calling each other’s procedures. This is what callbacks allow.

Implementing callbacks takes another copy of the little inline routine to jump back to the application. All we have to do is include the return address (the app’s procedure to which we return) in the parameter block that we pass to the external code. Naturally, that return procedure had better be in a locked segment or we could jump back to the Twilight Zone.

The return address can point to only one procedure in the application, but we’ll want to have many different callback options. The solution is to make that procedure (CallbackDispatcher) a big case statement with the request field of the parameter block as the case selector:

{3}

 procedure CallbackDispatcher (theXmPtr: xmPtr);
 { Don’t let this move or be purged! }
 begin
 case theXmPtr^.request of
 xreqNewXMWindow: 
 begin  { do this... }
 end;
 xreqCloseXMWindow: 
 begin  { do that... }
 end;
 xreqSysBeep: 
 begin  { do this... }
 end;
 otherwise
 { unknown callback request }
 end;
 end;

The values of theXmPtr^.request are constants agreed upon by the application and all external modules. In Experiment 3 these constants are:

{4}

 xreqNewXMWindow = 5001;
 xreqCloseXMWindow = 5002;
 xreqSysBeep = 5003;

The prefix ‘xreq’ stands for ‘external request’; there will be ‘areq’, or ‘application requests’, coming later.

GLUE ROUTINES

Making the use of callbacks convenient for the external module programmer is important. Remember that one reason for using external code is that you (or someone else) may want to add functionality long after the host application is finished and distributed. You shouldn’t have to rediscover how you typecast all the param fields; you just want a simple declaration that you can understand immediately, as if it came out of Inside Macintosh. Every callback has a short glue routine that takes care all this, like this one in Experiment 4:

{5}

 function NewXMWindow (theXmPtr: xmPtr; wBounds: rect; 
 wTitle: str255; wType: integer): WindowPtr;
 begin
 with theXmPtr^ do
 begin
 request := xreqNewXMWindow;
 param[1] := longint(wBounds.topLeft);
 param[2] := longint(wBounds.botRight);
 param[3] := longint(@wTitle);
 param[4] := longint(wType);
 DoCallback(theXmPtr, callbackAddr);
 NewXMWindow := WindowPtr(param[5]);
 if param[5] = 0 then
 result := xmFail
 else
 result := xmSuccess;
 end;
 end;

Within your module code you use NewXMWindow just as you would NewWindow. The glue routine sets up the parameter block, does the callback, and casts the results from the application to the appropriate type. All that matters is that the glue routine and CallbackDispatcher agree exactly on the order and typecasting of the parameters.

Note also how xmPtr^.result is used as an error flag, which most often will be assigned values for success or fail constants. You may also wish to assign it the value of a Toolbox-returned OSErr or ResErr, so that the application could (for example) specifically react to a low memory condition.

EXPERIMENT 4: HOST REQUESTS

We have enough now to implement single-task modules, like most HyperCard XCMD’s. However, a little more discipline and structure can make externals more useful and independent. Since the external can count on callback routines in the application, defined by a set of ‘xreq’ constants and glue routines, it’s only fair that the host application be able to call pre-defined routines in the external, defined by a set of ‘areq’ constants.

Here are the first four defined in Experiment 4:

{6}
 areqOpen = 7000;
 areqClose = 7001;
 areqDoEvent = 7002;
 areqGetInfo = 7003;

These might be part of a “required set” of requests that all externals must accept. You can establish the rule that the application will always call areqOpen when it first calls an external. This gives the external a chance to create its menus, windows, or internal data structures. When it’s closing time, the application must similarly call areqClose, so that the external can release memory, etc. As areqDoEvent suggests, an external should be able to accept normal Mac events and respond appropriately (e.g., by updating its windows). An external must also be able to tell the application something about itself via areqGetInfo, such as its name and some author or copyright information. Experiment 4 provides the structure for these calls but does not implement them all.

The other two request constants in Experiment 4 refer to unique routines that “do the work” :

{7}
 areqDrawMoire = 8001;  
 areqCalcFactorial = 8002;

This is a kludge! It helps to keep Experiment 4 simple, but it requires that the application know these dispatch constants at compile time, which prevents me from adding new, unanticipated externals later - the whole point of using external code. There are at least two solutions to this dilemma: either the application can call the external’s routines by event, such as after a specific menu item or button selection (from menus or buttons derived from the external’s resources), or the application can call the external’s specialized routines by name, perhaps as the result of a script language command. In either case, the application could either “broadcast” the request out to all externals until one accepted it (the way HyperCard passes messages along its hierarchy), or at launch time the application could query all externals and build a small database (of menu item names or script language commands) to help it look up event ownership later.

OVERWRITES AND MEMORY

The HyperCard XCMD parameter block has separate InArgs and OutArgs. I decided not to make this distinction but rather let all 8 parameters be used for data transfer in either direction. However, some discipline is required because the using a callback can overwrite information passed from the application. Consider how you might have your external respond to the areqOpen call at startup time:

As this figure suggests, your DoOpen routine might make three callbacks to set up a window, global variable, and menu, but finally you have to send the xmSuccess message back in response to the original areqOpen request. All three callbacks use the same block (only the app allocates parameter blocks, using NewPtrClear), and so they overwrite the parameters freely. The solution is simply to copy essential information from the parameter block into local variables immediately after information is received, and then put that information back into the block before returning control to the application.

Another lesson from HyperCard: prevent memory headaches by establishing the rule that externals must not dispose of memory that they did not allocate. If you violate this rule, then at least document clearly which callbacks return handles or pointers that the external must dispose itself. In these experiments I obey the rule for windows (the callback CloseXMWindow does nothing more than call DisposeWindow), but I break the rule for menus (the callback GetXMMenu returns a MenuHandle, but the external itself must call DisposeMenu when it closes). You decide where to compromise between clean design and efficiency.

Figure 1.

WHAT’S NEXT?

Experiments 1 to 4 are all small stand-alone programs with listings in this article. Experiments 5, 6, and 7 successively build toward a real event-handling Mac application with drop-in external code modules, but for brevity their code is just on the monthly disk. Here’s what they add.

In Experiment 5 the external code module is finally put into its own unit. The application is filled out to a minimal Mac application with menus and event loop. However, the external module, though separately compiled, must be inserted into the application with ResEdit (just like XCMDs must be inserted into stacks or HyperCard), and the calls to the module are still hard-wired. Though the external code can be separately compiled as a code resource, the listings also show how to include it within the host application during debugging.

In Experiment 6, the module is made responsive to menu and window events. This uses the simple “database” approach, so that when the app receives an event it can find out which external (if any) “owns” the event and should be passed the event for processing. New callbacks are added to support this:

{8}

 function GetXMMenu (theXmPtr: xmPtr; menuName: 
 str15): MenuHandle;
 function CountXMWindows (theXmPtr: xmPtr; 
 justMine: boolean): integer;
 function GetIndXMWindow (theXmPtr: xmPtr;
 i: integer; justMine: boolean; var owner: 
 OSType): WindowPtr;

The module name is shortened to an OSType to simplify and shrink the database.

Finally, in Experiment 7, external modules are truly separated from the application: they become separate files dropped into the application’s folder, which the application finds and loads at launch time. Also, Experiment 7 implements idle calls for externals, so that every external that requests idle time will be called once every pass through the main event loop. Figure 1 shows that the grand finale looks like a typical Mac demo circa 1985, except that nearly all the code and resources are contained in drop-in module files.

CONCLUSION

External modules can be used in many ways. Consider two extremes: you could write a large application for statistics and curve fitting and use very small modules to make it easy to add exotic functions later. Such a module might have no interface at all but just evaluate a mathematical function. Alternatively, like After Dark, the application (or CDEV and INIT) might be rather small and the modules contain most of the code, resources, user interface, and “personality” that the user identifies with the software.

You may want to use external modules to control application bloat, by letting the user drop in just the functionality needed. For in-house development teams, the most Mac-literate programmer might write the application code, then let others write externals, using the callbacks to handle most of the user interface and event details. Similarly, programmers can write externals in any language that can produce pure-code resources, as long as the glue routines are translated.

LISTINGS: EXPERIMENT 2
program ExperimentTwo;
 { Use a parameter block to exchange data }
 { with the called procedure. }
 const
 xmSuccess = 0;
 type
 xmPtr = ^xmBlock;
 xmBlock = record
 request: integer;
 result: integer;
 param: array[1..8] of longint;
 callbackAddr: ProcPtr;
 end;

 { ---------------- }

 procedure CallCodeRes (theXmPtr: xmPtr; addr: ProcPtr);
 inline
 $205F, $4E90;

 { ---------------- }

 procedure xmMain (theXmPtr: xmPtr);
 begin
 if theXmPtr <> nil then
 with theXmPtr^ do
 begin
 param[3] := param[1] + param[2];
 result := xmSuccess;
 end;
 end;

 { ============ main ============= }
 var
 myXmPtr: xmPtr;
begin
 myXmPtr := xmPtr(NewPtrClear(sizeOf(xmBlock)));
 if myXmPtr <> nil then
 with myXmPtr^ do
 begin
 param[1] := 2;
 param[2] := 3;
 param[3] := 0;
 CallCodeRes(myXmPtr, @xmMain);
 ShowText;
 writeLn(‘ answer = ‘, param[3]);
 end;
end.
LISTINGS: EXPERIMENT 3

program ExperimentThree;
 { Add the ability to make ‘callbacks’ to the host appl }

 { ======= common types and constants ======= }
 { These must be the same in the host app and }
 { external modules. }

 type
 xmPtr = ^xmBlock;
 xmBlock = record
 request: integer;
 result: integer;
 param: array[1..8] of longint;
 callbackAddr: ProcPtr;
 end;

 const
 xmSuccess = 0;
 xmFail = -1;
 xreqNewXMWindow = 5001;
 xreqCloseXMWindow = 5002;
 xreqSysBeep = 5003;

 { ==== procedures for the code module ==== }

 { ---- glue routines ---- }

 procedure DoCallback (theXmPtr: xmPtr; addr: ProcPtr);
 inline
 $205F, $4E90;

 { ---------------- }

 function NewXMWindow (theXmPtr: xmPtr; wBounds: rect;         
 wTitle: str255; wType: integer): WindowPtr;
 begin
 with theXmPtr^ do
 begin
 request := xreqNewXMWindow;
 param[1] := longint(wBounds.topLeft);
 param[2] := longint(wBounds.botRight);
 param[3] := longint(@wTitle);
 param[4] := longint(wType);
 DoCallback(theXmPtr, callbackAddr);
 NewXMWindow := WindowPtr(param[5]);
 if param[5] = 0 then
 result := xmFail
 else
 result := xmSuccess;
 end;
 end;

 { ---------------- }

procedure CloseXMWindow(theXmPtr: xmPtr; window: WindowPtr);
 begin
 with theXmPtr^ do
 begin
 request := xreqCloseXMWindow;
 param[1] := longint(window);
 DoCallback(theXmPtr, callbackAddr);
 end;
 end;

 { ---------------- }

 procedure DoBeep (theXmPtr: xmPtr; numBeeps: integer);
 begin
 with theXmPtr^ do
 begin
 request := xreqSysBeep;
 param[1] := longint(numBeeps);
 DoCallback(theXmPtr, callbackAddr);
 end;
 end;

 { --- the external module code that ‘does something’ --- }

 procedure xmMain (theXmPtr: xmPtr);
 { Get a window, draw some circles, }
 { wait a second, and close it.     }
 var
 tempRect: rect;
 tempStr: str255;
 tempLong: longint;
 theWindow: WindowPtr;
 i: integer;
 oldPort: GrafPtr;
 begin
 if theXmPtr <> nil then
 begin
 tempStr := ‘External Module Window’;
 SetRect(tempRect, 100, 100, 300, 300);

 { first callback: get a window from the host app }
 theWindow := NewXMWindow(theXmPtr, tempRect,
 tempStr, noGrowDocProc);
 if theXmPtr^.result = xmSuccess then
 begin
 GetPort(oldPort);
 SetPort(theWindow);
 SetRect(tempRect, 99, 99, 100, 100);
 for i := 1 to 100 do
 begin
 InsetRect(tempRect, -2, -2);
 FrameOval(tempRect);
 end;

 { second callback: make a noise }
 DoBeep(theXmPtr, 3);
 Delay(60, tempLong);

 { third callback: ask the app to close the window }
 CloseXMWindow(theXmPtr, theWindow);
 SetPort(oldPort);
 end;
 end;
 end;

{ === procedures in the host application === }

 procedure CallCodeRes (theXmPtr: xmPtr; addr: ProcPtr);
 inline
 $205F, $4E90;

 { ---------------- }

 procedure CallbackDispatcher (theXmPtr: xmPtr);
 { Don’t let this move or be purged! }
 var
 tempRect: rect;
 tempStr: str255;
 tempInt: integer;
 begin
 if theXmPtr <> nil then
 with theXmPtr^ do
 case request of

 xreqNewXMWindow: 
 begin
 tempRect.topLeft := point(param[1]);
 tempRect.botRight := point(param[2]);
 tempStr := StringPtr(param[3])^;
 tempInt := param[4];
 param[5] := longint(NewWindow(nil, tempRect,
 tempStr, true, tempInt, windowPtr(-1), 
 false, 0));
 end;

 xreqCloseXMWindow: 
 begin
 if param[1] <> 0 then
 DisposeWindow(windowPtr(param[1]));
 end;

 xreqSysBeep: 
 begin
 if not (param[1] in [1..20]) then
 param[1] := 1;
 for tempInt := 1 to param[1] do
 SysBeep(0);
 end;

 otherwise
 { unknown callback request }
 end;
 end;

 { ============ main ============= }

 var
 myXmPtr: xmPtr;
begin
 myXmPtr := xmPtr(NewPtrClear(sizeOf(xmBlock)));
 if myXmPtr <> nil then
 begin
 myXmPtr^.callbackAddr := @CallbackDispatcher;
 CallCodeRes(myXmPtr, @xmMain);
 DisposPtr(ptr(myXmPtr));
 end;
end.
LISTINGS: EXPERIMENT 4
program ExperimentFour;
 { Add ‘areq’ calls from the host app to the module. }
 { Only those procedures that differ from Experiment 3 are }
 { listed here.  The code disk has the complete listing.}
const
 xmSuccess = 0;
 xmFail = -1;
 xreqNewXMWindow = 5001;
 xreqCloseXMWindow = 5002;
 xreqSysBeep = 5003;

 { new in Experiment 4 }
 xmUnknownAppRequest = -2;

 areqOpen = 7000;{ required commands }
 areqClose = 7001;
 areqDoEvent = 7002;
 areqGetInfo = 7003;

 areqDrawMoire = 8001;    { module-specific }
 areqCalcFactorial = 8002;

 procedure xmMain (theXmPtr: xmPtr);
 { Respond to different messages from the host application. }
 { Some messages are required and common to all modules; }
 { some are unique to this module.     }

 { ---- required ----- }

 procedure OpenXModule;
 begin
 { One-time call.  Create any menus }
 { and custom data structures here. }
 end;

 { ----------- }

 procedure CloseXModule;
 begin
 { Release any memory and clean up. }
 end;

 { ----------- }

 procedure DoXmEvent;
 begin
 { Respond to Mac events }
 end;

 { ----------- }

 procedure GetXmInfo;
 { Return name and author info, }
 { like ‘!’ and ‘?’ for XCMDs   }
 var
 nameStr, authorStr: str255;
 begin
 nameStr := ‘Experiment Four Module’;
 authorStr := ‘Rob Spencer  1993’;
 theXmPtr^.param[1] := longint(NewString(nameStr));
 theXmPtr^.param[2] := longint(NewString(authorStr));
 end;

 { ----- unique ---- }

 procedure DrawMoire;
 { This was the entire external in Exp 3 }
 var
 tempRect: rect;
 tempStr: str255;
 tempLong: longint;
 theWindow: WindowPtr;
 i: integer;
 oldPort: GrafPtr;
 begin
 tempStr := ‘External Module Window’;
 SetRect(tempRect, 100, 100, 300, 300);
 theWindow := NewXMWindow(theXmPtr, tempRect, tempStr,
  noGrowDocProc);
 if theXmPtr^.result = xmSuccess then
 begin
 GetPort(oldPort);
 SetPort(theWindow);
 SetRect(tempRect, 99, 99, 100, 100);
 for i := 1 to 100 do
 begin
 InsetRect(tempRect, -2, -2);
 FrameOval(tempRect);
 end;
 DoBeep(theXmPtr, 3);
 Delay(60, tempLong);
 CloseXMWindow(theXmPtr, theWindow);
 SetPort(oldPort);
 end;
 end;

 { ----------- }

 procedure CalculateFactorial;
 { Calculate the factorial of param[1], }
 { put the result in param[2].          }
 var
 n: integer;
 factorial: longint;
 tempStr: str255;
 tempStrHandle: StringHandle;
 begin
 n := theXmPtr^.param[1];
 if (n < 0) or (n > 12) then
 begin
 { Error! return a readable message }
 { so the app may inform the user.  }
 theXmPtr^.result := xmFail;
 tempStr := ‘factorial input out-of-range’;
 tempStrHandle := NewString(tempStr);
 Hlock(handle(tempStrHandle));
 theXmPtr^.param[1] := 
 longint(handle(tempStrHandle));
 end
 else
 begin
 { Ok, do the calculation. }
 factorial := 1;
 while n > 1 do
 begin
 factorial := factorial * n;
 n := n - 1;
 end;
 theXmPtr^.param[2] := factorial;
 end;
 end;

 { ----- xmMain ----- }

 begin
 if theXmPtr <> nil then
 { Dispatch the app’s request }
 begin

 theXmPtr^.result := xmSuccess;
 case theXmPtr^.request of
 areqOpen: 
 OpenXModule;
 areqClose: 
 CloseXModule;
 areqDoEvent: 
 DoXmEvent;
 areqGetInfo: 
 GetXmInfo;
 areqDrawMoire: 
 DrawMoire;
 areqCalcFactorial: 
 CalculateFactorial;
 otherwise
 theXmPtr^.result := xmUnknownAppRequest;
 end;
 end;
 end;

 { ============ main ============= }

 var
 myXmPtr: xmPtr;
 tempStr: str255;
begin
 myXmPtr := xmPtr(NewPtrClear(sizeOf(xmBlock)));
 if myXmPtr <> nil then
 begin
 myXmPtr^.callbackAddr := @CallbackDispatcher;

 { draw a pattern }
 myXmPtr^.request := areqDrawMoire;
 CallCodeRes(myXmPtr, @xmMain);

 { get info about the external code }
 with myXmPtr^ do
 begin
 request := areqGetXmInfo;
 CallCodeRes(myXmPtr, @xmMain);
 ShowText;
 tempStr := StringHandle(param[1])^^;
 DisposHandle(handle(param[1]));
 writeLn(tempStr);
 tempStr := StringHandle(param[2])^^;
 DisposHandle(handle(param[2]));
 writeLn(tempStr);
 end;

 { calculate a factorial & check for errors }
 with myXmPtr^ do
 begin
 { Use Pascal lazy I/O for this demo. }
 ShowText;
 write(‘Enter a number : ‘);
 readLn(param[1]);
 request := areqCalcFactorial;
 CallCodeRes(myXmPtr, @xmMain);
 if result = xmSuccess then
 writeLn(param[1], ‘ ! =’, param[2])
 else
 begin
 tempStr := StringHandle(param[1])^^;
 DisposHandle(handle(param[1]));
 writeLn(tempStr);
 end;
 end;
 end;
 DisposPtr(ptr(myXmPtr));
end.

{ ---- end of listings ---- }

 

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Warner Bros. Interactive Announces Mort...
Mortal Kombat X, by Warner Bros. and NetherRealm Studios, will be a a free-to-play fighting/card-battle Mortal Kombat game. The game promises card collecting, multiplayer team combat, classic characters such as Scorpion, Sub-Zero and Raiden, and the... | Read more »
GDC 2015 – Piloteer is Whitaker Trebella...
GDC 2015 – Piloteer is Whitaker Trebella’s Latest Project, and it’s Definitely Something DIfferent Posted by Rob Rich on March 3rd, 2015 [ permalink ] You know | Read more »
PangoLand Review
PangoLand Review By Amy Solomon on March 3rd, 2015 Our Rating: :: COME VISIT PANGO AND FRIENDSUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad PangoLand is an open-ended world full of familiar characters, bright colors and interactive... | Read more »
Knights of Pen & Paper is Leveling U...
With the roll of a die and a critical success, Paradox Interactive has announced Knights of Pen & Paper 2! You’ll be taking your place at the table once again in this sequel to Knights of Pen & Paper +1 Edition. The game will introduce the... | Read more »
GDC 2015 – Project Highrise is an Intere...
GDC 2015 – Project Highrise is an Interesting Idea from SomaSim Posted by Rob Rich on March 3rd, 2015 [ permalink ] You might know SomaSim best from their gold rush sim, 1849< | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

Mac Pros on sale for up to $279 off MSRP
Amazon has Mac Pros in stock and on sale for up to $279 off MSRP. Shipping is free: - 4-Core Mac Pro: $2725.87, $273 off MSRP (9%) - 6-Core Mac Pro: $3719.99, $279 off MSRP (7%) Read more
Sale! 13-inch Retina MacBook Pros for up to $...
B&H Photo has 13″ Retina MacBook Pros on sale for up to $205 off MSRP. Shipping is free, and B&H charges NY sales tax only: - 13″ 2.6GHz/128GB Retina MacBook Pro: $1219.99 save $80 - 13″ 2.... Read more
Another Tranche Of IBM MobileFirst For iOS Ap...
IBM has announced the next expansion phase for  its IBM MobileFirst for iOS portfolio, with a troika of new apps to address key priorities for the Banking and Financial Services, Airline and Retail... Read more
Sale! 15-inch Retina MacBook Pros for up to $...
B&H Photo has the new 2014 15″ Retina MacBook Pros on sale for up to $250 off MSRP for a limited time. Shipping is free, and B&H charges NY sales tax only: - 15″ 2.2GHz Retina MacBook Pro: $... Read more
WaterField Designs Introduces the Minimalist...
With Apple Pay gaining popularity, Android Pay coming in May 2015, and loyalty cards and receipts that can be accessed from smartphones, San Francisco’s WaterField Designs observes that it may be... Read more
Sale! 15-inch 2.2GHz Retina MacBook Pro for $...
 Best Buy has the 15″ 2.2GHz Retina MacBook Pro on sale for $1774.99 $1799.99, or $225 off MSRP. Choose free home shipping or free local store pickup (if available). Price valid for online orders... Read more
13-inch 2.5GHz MacBook Pro (refurbished) avai...
The Apple Store has Apple Certified Refurbished 13″ 2.5GHz MacBook Pros available for $170 off the cost of new models. Apple’s one-year warranty is standard, and shipping is free: - 13″ 2.5GHz... Read more
13-inch 2.5GHz MacBook Pro on sale for $100 o...
B&H Photo has the 13″ 2.5GHz MacBook Pro on sale for $999.99 including free shipping plus NY sales tax only. Their price is $100 off MSRP. Read more
27-inch 3.5GHz 5K iMac in stock today and on...
 B&H Photo has the 27″ 3.5GHz 5K iMac in stock today and on sale for $2299 including free shipping plus NY sales tax only. Their price is $200 off MSRP, and it’s the lowest price available for... Read more
Apple Launches Free Web-Based Pages and Other...
Apple’s new Web-only access to iWork productivity apps is a free level of iCloud service available to anyone, including people who don’t own or use Apple devices. The service includes access to Apple... Read more

Jobs Board

*Apple* Solutions Consultant - Retail Sales...
**Job Summary** As an Apple Solutions Consultant (ASC) you are the link between our customers and our products. Your role is to drive the Apple business in a retail Read more
*Apple* Pay Automation Engineer - iOS System...
**Job Summary** At Apple , great ideas have a way of becoming great products, services, and customer experiences very quickly. Bring passion and dedication to your job Read more
Sr. Technical Services Consultant, *Apple*...
**Job Summary** Apple Professional Services (APS) has an opening for a senior technical position that contributes to Apple 's efforts for strategic and transactional Read more
Event Director, *Apple* Retail Marketing -...
…This senior level position is responsible for leading and imagining the Apple Retail Team's global engagement strategy and team. Delivering an overarching brand Read more
*Apple* Pay - Site Reliability Engineer - Ap...
**Job Summary** Imagine what you could do here. At Apple , great ideas have a way of becoming great products, services, and customer experiences very quickly. Bring Read more
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