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Animate PICS
Volume Number:7
Issue Number:3
Column Tag:Developer Forum

Related Info: Picture Utilities

Animating PICS

By Steven Sheets, Herdon, VA

Note: Source code files accompanying article are located on MacTech CD-ROM or source code disks.

Animating PICS

In the spring of 1988, at the Apple Developer Conference, a standard was agreed upon by several animation and graphic developers that would allow each developer to import and export simple animation sequences. (An animation sequence is a group of pictures that when shown sequentially create an animated image). Since that time, most animation developers have either implemented this standard in their programs, or have promised to have it implemented in the near future. The name of this standard is PICS.

While obviously animation packages need to know how to manipulate PICS files, any Macintosh program can use these files, and display the animated images. The file format is extremely simple and the code needed to animate the images is easy to write and understand.

The main advantage in using PICS files is that while most Macintosh developers know how to animate a bit or pixel map across the screen, they are usually lousy artists. The images they create are often extremely crude, and fail to have a ‘finished’ look. This is especially true if the programmer has to create the bit or pixel map by hand and enter the image in as hex data. Instead of these amateurish attempts, a developer can now create (or have his friend the graphic artist create for him) a professional looking animation sequence using professional animation packages and tools. Once the sequence is completed, the programmer can then import the created PICS data into his program, and animate it himself.

This article will cover how to animate PICS files. First the file format will be described. Then a sample program will be given that displays PICS files. The program will include PICSUnit, a unit that reads, disposes and draws PICS data structures.

PICS File Format

The file type for a PICS file is ‘PICS’. The file creator should be set to the creator type of whatever animation package exported the data. It is recommended that the following icon be used:

The hex data for this icon is given in the example program (even though the example does not create PICS files).

The PICS file itself consists of one or more resources. The file’s data fork is not used by the PICS format. PICS file format is an open ended format in that a developer (or group of developers) can add or use as much information as he wishes. Only one resource is required, although that would make a very short animation sequence. If another application duplicates a PICS file, all resources should be copied. A resource that is not used by one animation package might be used by another.

The single required resource is a picture (resource type ‘PICT’, id number 128). This picture is the initial setting of the animation sequence. All animation will be done inside the rectangle defined by this picture’s picFrame rectangle. Normally a picture’s picFrame is set so that top and left are 0 (zero), while the bottom and right are the height and width of the picture. But be careful! This is not always the case; the top left can be any value. Whatever the top left is, the following drawing is done in that coordinate system.

Once the first frame is defined, each new frame of animation is defined in a new PICT resource. The resource ID of this new frame is sequentially in order after the preceding frame. Thus if the PICS file contains 10 frames, there would be 10 PICT resource in the file, number 128 through 137.

The PICT resource for all the frames after the first one need not be an entire image. The picFrame of the PICT resource defines exactly how the frame is displayed. In all cases, the picFrame of the new PICT should never be larger, or outside, than the picFrame of the first PICT.

First, the picture handle can contain an empty picFrame (usually coordinate 0,0,0,0, but really any coordinates where right is less than or equal to left or bottom is less than or equal to top). In this case, no new animation is displayed for this frame. Such a frame is often used to pause the animation.

Second, a frame can contain an image the exact size, and coordinates of the first PICT. In this case, the entire image is drawn using the same coordinates and rectangle as the first PICT.

Finally, a frame can have only the changes from the previous frame. In that case, the picFrame of the PICT resource would be smaller than the size of the entire image. The picture should only be drawn in the rectange given in the picFrame (again using the coordinate system of the first PICT). The PICT for such a frame is often called a delta picture (PICT containing the difference). The advantage of this type of frame is memory size. If an animation image is large, but the difference from one frame to another is smaller, a series of delta pictures is much smaller in byte size than the same number of pictures of the entire image.

In addition to the animation frame, there was one other optional resource. A resource of type ‘INFO’ and id 128 provides additional information about the animation sequence. The following is the resource Pascal data structure. Remember that, like the file format, this structure may be expanded in the future with additional fields. The resource handle may be longer than this structure:

{1}

TYPE  TPICSInfoRec = RECORD
 BWColor: INTEGER; {0 = Black & White, 1 = Color}
 Depth: INTEGER; {1,2,4,8,16 pixel depth}
 Speed: INTEGER; {1..200 frames per sec}
 {  else negative seconds per frame}
 Version: INTEGER; {0 currently}
 Creator: ResType; {original creator signature}
 Largest: LongInt; {if non-zero, largest picture size}
 END;
 TPICSInfoPtr = ^TPICSInfoRec;
 TPICSInfoHdl = ^TPICSInfoPtr;

The first field of the structure (BWColor) tells if the animation sequence is in black & white or color. If the sequence is in color, the next field (depth) defines the depth (in pixels) of the image (or in other words, the numbers of colors 1, 4, 16, 256, or more). The next field (Depth) defines the speed that the animation images are displayed on the screen. If the number is 1 to 200, then that number is the number of frames per second. Remember, due to the flicker rate of most Mac screens (around 60 frames of sec) animation of more than 60 frames per sec is impossible. If the Speed number is negative, than the absolute value of Speed is the number of seconds between frames. The Version field defines the version of the file format (currently 0), while the Creator field shows the creator of the data (regardless of what the file type creator was set to). The last field, Largest, gives the size of the largest frame (PICT resource) in bytes. This is an optional field, and may contain the value zero.

The PICS format does have its deficiencies. The format could have been expanded to allow better use of memory. For example, the pictures should have been able to be used in more than one frame. Many times, animation sequences return to the same image over and over again. The PICS format requires each frame to have it’s own picture, even if that image is used in more than one spot. Also, the drawing of the delta frames could have used an X & Y position value. This would have allowed the same picture to be animated across the screen. The PICS format requires multiple pictures even if the image is the same but in a different position.

There are a couple more items that could have been added to the format. The amount of time between two given frames should have been variable. Finally, a color table could have been provided for color animation sequences, that would give the optimal colors for the sequence.

Example Program

The example program demonstrates how code can use PICSUnit, a Pascal unit that manipulates PICS. PICSUnit consists of 3 calls; ReadPICS (which reads a PICS file into memory and creates a PICS data structure), DisposPICS (which disposes of a PICS data structure in memory), and DrawPICS (which animates the PICS data structure in the current grafport at a given X & Y position). Notice that a PICS data structure in memory is a complex handle (ie. handle that contains other handles in it). Be sure to use the DisposPICS call, or a program will start to use up memory with unreferenced handles.

The DrawPICS routine is also passed two flags to indicate how many times to draw the animation (once or continuous) and also whether or not the animation should stop if the user presses a key or the mouse. Be careful! If the call is set for continuous animation without stopping when the user prompts, the program will go into a endless loop of animation (very pretty, but not a very good user interface).

What Next?

Obviously the example program could be improved. The PICSUnit could be rewritten for performance, at the cost of more memory. Drawing with a PICT handle can be a time consuming action; flickering can also occur. If offscreen grafports (and color grafports) were used, the images could be drawn there. Then when it is time for a new frame to be animated, Copybits could be used to move the image onto the screen. For that matter, multiple offscreen grafports could be created for each frame (assuming enough memory), thus speeding up the animation and eliminating flickers.

The example program that uses the PICSUnit is not the end-all utility it could be. A Public Domain PICS Editor would be very useful (any one interested?). Such an Editor would show each frame of animation, and allow the user to step through the frames any way they wished.

Other PICS utilities could be useful. Perhaps a program that takes a PICS file that consists of PICTs all the same size (regardless of how much of the image changes), and calculates exactly the portion of the image that changes from one frame to another. It would then output a PICS file consisting of these delta PICTs. Such a utility would greatly reduce the size of a PICS file.

As always, any comment or ideas or suggestions are always appreciated.

Listing:  PICSUnit.p

{}
{PICS Unit- Steve Sheets}
{}
{This Unit provides the Interface to the PICS data structure}
{as well as the procedures to create, dispose and draw the}
{PICS information.}

unit PICSUnit;

interface
 const
 kPICStype = 'PICS'; {File type of PICS}
 kINFOtype = 'INFO';   
 {Resource type of PICS information resource}

{Interface for the optional information handle and the PICS handle which 
contains 1 or more Pictures and the information handle. Notice that the 
PICS handle is a variable length handle based on the number of frames.}
 type
 TPICSInfoRec = record
 BWColor: INTEGER; {0 = Black & White, 1 = Color}
 Depth: INTEGER; {1,2,4,8,16 pixel depth}
 Speed: INTEGER; {1..200 frames per sec, else negative seconds per frame}
 Version: INTEGER; {0 currently}
 Creator: ResType; {original creator signature}
 Largest: LongInt; {if non-zero, largest picture size}
 end;
 TPICSInfoPtr = ^TPICSInfoRec;
 TPICSInfoHdl = ^TPICSInfoPtr;

 TPICSRec = record
 NumFrames, DimH, DimV: INTEGER;
 PICSInfoHdl: TPICSInfoHdl;
 Frame: array[1..1] of PicHandle;
 end;
 TPICSPtr = ^TPICSRec;
 TPICSHdl = ^TPICSPtr;


{Given a file name and volume reference number,  try to read the PICS 
file at that location.  If successful, return noErr in the function and 
the information in thePICS parameter.  If there was a problem, return 
the error number in the function, and thePICS is set to NIL.}

 function ReadPICS (theFileName: Str255;
 theVRefNum: INTEGER;
 var thePICS: TPICSHdl): OSErr;

{Given thePICS data, dispos of all the handles and data structures.}

 procedure DisposePICS (thePICS: TPICSHdl);

{Given thePICS data, and an V & H position to draw at, draw the animation. 
 The Loopflag tells the procedure to either loop the animation continously 
(TRUE), or only draw once time (FALSE). The ScanKeyFlag tells the procedure 
if it should look to see if someone has pressed a key during animation. 
 If so, the procedure is stopped at that point.  Notice that it is dangerous 
to have Loopflag set TRUE and ScanKeyFlag set FALSE (infinite loop time).}

 procedure DrawPICS (thePICS: TPICSHdl;
 HPos, VPos: INTEGER;
 LoopFlag, ScanKeyFlag: BOOLEAN);

implementation

{Simple utility function, given number of frames, size of the TPICSRec 
record in bytes.}

 function PICSsize (theNumFrames: INTEGER): INTEGER;
 begin
 PICSsize := (theNumFrames * 4) + 10;
 end;

 function ReadPICS (theFileName: Str255;
 theVRefNum: INTEGER;
 var thePICS: TPICSHdl): OSErr;
 var
 tempE: OSErr;
 tempResNum: INTEGER;
 tempSize: INTEGER;
 tempPICS: TPICSHdl;
 tempPicture: PicHandle;
 tempFlag: BOOLEAN;
 begin
 thePICS := nil;
 tempPICS := nil;
 tempPicture := nil;

 tempResNum := OpenRFPerm(theFileName, theVRefNum, 0);
 if tempResNum = -1 then
 tempE := ResError
 else
 begin
 tempPicture := PicHandle(Get1Resource('PICT', 128));
 if tempPicture = nil then
 tempE := ResError
 else
 begin
 HNoPurge(Handle(tempPicture));
 DetachResource(Handle(tempPicture));

 tempSize := 100;
 tempPICS := TPICSHdl(NewHandle(PICSsize(tempSize)));
 if tempPICS = nil then
 tempE := MemError
 else
 begin
 with tempPICS^^ do
 begin
 NumFrames := 1;
 with tempPicture^^.picFrame do
 begin
 DimH := Right - Left;
 DimV := Bottom - Top;
 end;
 PICSInfoHdl := nil;
 Frame[1] := tempPicture;
 end;
 tempPicture := nil;

 tempPICS^^.PICSInfoHdl := 
 TPICSInfoHdl(Get1Resource(kINFOtype, 128));
 if tempPICS^^.PICSInfoHdl <> nil then
 begin
 HNoPurge(Handle(tempPICS^^.PICSInfoHdl));
 DetachResource(Handle(tempPICS^^.PICSInfoHdl));
 end;

 tempFlag := FALSE;
 repeat
 tempPicture := PicHandle(Get1Resource('PICT', 128 +
 tempPICS^^.NumFrames));
 if tempPicture = nil then
 begin
 tempE := ResError;
 if (tempE = resNotFound) or (tempE = noErr) then
 begin
 tempE := noErr;
 SetHandleSize(Handle(tempPICS),
 PICSsize(tempPICS^^.NumFrames));
 thePICS := tempPICS;
 tempPICS := nil;
 end;
 tempFlag := TRUE;
 end
 else
 begin
 HNoPurge(Handle(tempPicture));
 DetachResource(Handle(tempPicture));
 if tempPICS^^.NumFrames = tempSize then
 begin
 tempSize := tempSize + 100;
 SetHandleSize(Handle(tempPICS),
 PICSsize(tempSize));
 tempE := ResError;
 end;
 if tempE = noErr then
 begin
 tempPICS^^.NumFrames := tempPICS^^.NumFrames
 + 1;
 tempPICS^^.Frame[tempPICS^^.NumFrames] :=
 tempPicture;
 tempPicture := nil;
 end
 else
 tempFlag := TRUE;
 end;
 until tempFlag;
 end;

 end;
 CloseResFile(tempResNum);
 end;

 if tempPICS <> nil then
 DisposePICS(tempPICS);
 if tempPicture <> nil then
 DisposHandle(Handle(tempPicture));

 ReadPICS := tempE;
 end;

 procedure DisposePICS (thePICS: TPICSHdl);
 var
 tempNum: INTEGER;
 begin
 if thePICS <> nil then
 begin
 if thePICS^^.PICSInfoHdl <> nil then
 DisposHandle(Handle(thePICS^^.PICSInfoHdl));
 for tempNum := 1 to thePICS^^.NumFrames do
 DisposHandle(Handle(thePICS^^.Frame[tempNum]));
 DisposHandle(Handle(thePICS));
 end;
 end;

 procedure DrawPICS (thePICS: TPICSHdl;
 HPos, VPos: INTEGER;
 LoopFlag, ScanKeyFlag: BOOLEAN);
 var
 tempRect: Rect;
 tempTicks: LongInt;
 tempDone: BOOLEAN;
 tempCount: INTEGER;

{Wait tempTicks number of ticks, stopping at any time if mouse or key 
is pressed.}

 procedure WaitFrame;
 var
 tempLong: LongInt;
 tempEvent: EventRecord;
 begin
 tempLong := tickCount + tempTicks;
 while (tempLong > tickCount) and (not tempDone) do
 begin
 SystemTask;
 tempDone := GetNextEvent(mDownMask + keyDownMask + autoKeyMask, tempEvent);
 end;
 end;

 begin
 if thePICS <> nil then
 if thePICS^^.NumFrames > 0 then
 if thePICS^^.Frame[1] <> nil then
 begin
 tempDone := FALSE;
 if thePICS^^.PICSInfoHdl <> nil then
 begin
 tempTicks := thePICS^^.PICSInfoHdl^^.Speed;
 if tempTicks <= 0 then
 tempTicks := -60 * tempTicks
 else
 tempTicks := 60 div tempTicks;
 end
 else
 tempTicks := 6;

 repeat
 tempCount := 0;
 repeat
 tempCount := tempCount + 1;

 if thePICS^^.Frame[tempCount] <> nil then
 if not 
 EmptyRect(thePICS^^.Frame[tempCount]^^.PicFrame)
 then
 begin
 tempRect := thePICS^^.Frame[tempCount]^^.PicFrame;
 OffSetRect(tempRect, HPos, VPos);
 DrawPicture(thePICS^^.Frame[tempCount], tempRect);
 end;
 WaitFrame;

 until tempDone or (tempCount >= thePICS^^.NumFrames);
 until tempDone or (not LoopFlag);
 end;
 end;
end.
Listing:  PICSPlayer.p

{PICS Player-  Steve Sheets}
{}
{This Progam displays a PICS animation sequence.  It loads PICS files, 
animates the file once or animates it in a continous loop.  Either animation 
can be canceled by pressing any key.  The program uses alerts to prompt 
the user for actions.  The actual animation is drawn in a window the 
size of the screen.}

program PICSplayer;
 uses
 PICSUnit;
 const
 kLoadQuit = 500;
 kPICSinfo = 501;
 kError = 502;
 kColorProblem = 503;
 var
 gDone, gColorFlag: BOOLEAN;
 gName: Str255;
 gNum: INTEGER;
 gPICS: TPICSHdl;
 gWindow: WindowPtr;

 procedure SetUp;
 const
 ROM85Loc = $28E;
 TwoHighMask = $C000;
 type
 WordPtr = ^INTEGER;
 var
 tempWordPtr: WordPtr;
 begin
 tempWordPtr := POINTER(ROM85Loc);
 gColorFlag := (BitAnd(tempWordPtr^, TwoHighMask) = 0);
 gDone := FALSE;
 gName := '';
 gPICS := nil;
 if gColorFlag then
 gWindow := NewCWindow(nil, Screenbits.Bounds, '',
 TRUE, dBoxProc, POINTER(-1), FALSE, 0)
 else
 gWindow := NewWindow(nil, Screenbits.Bounds, '',
 TRUE, dBoxProc, POINTER(-1), FALSE, 0);
 if gWindow <> nil then
 begin
 SetPort(gWindow);
 EraseRect(screenbits.bounds);
 end;
 SetCursor(Arrow);
 end;

 procedure ShutDown;
 begin
 if gPICS <> nil then
 begin
 DisposePICS(gPICS);
 gPICS := nil;
 end;
 if gWindow <> nil then
 begin
 DisposeWindow(gWindow);
 gWindow := nil;
 end;
 end;

 procedure PlayPICS (Loop: BOOLEAN);
 var
 tempH, tempV: INTEGER;
 begin
 if gPICS <> nil then
 begin
 SelectWindow(gWindow);
 SetPort(gWindow);

 EraseRect(screenbits.bounds);
 with screenbits.bounds, gPICS^^ do
 begin
 tempH := (right - left - DimH) div 2;
 tempV := (bottom - top - DimV) div 2;
 if tempH < 0 then
 tempH := 0;
 if tempV < 0 then
 tempV := 0;
 end;

 HideCursor;
 DrawPICS(gPICS, tempH, tempV, Loop, TRUE);
 ShowCursor;

 EraseRect(screenbits.bounds);
 end;
 end;

 procedure LoadPICS;
 var
 tempList: SFTypeList;
 tempPt: Point;
 tempE: OSErr;
 tempStr: Str255;
 tempNum: INTEGER;
 tempReply: SFReply;
 begin
 if gPICS <> nil then
 begin
 DisposePICS(gPICS);
 gPICS := nil;
 end;

 tempPt.v := 40;
 tempPt.h := 40;
 tempList[0] := kPICStype;
 SFGetFile(tempPt, '', nil, 1, tempList, nil, tempReply);
 if tempReply.good then
 begin
 gName := tempReply.fname;
 tempE := ReadPICS(gName, tempReply.vRefNum, gPICS);
 if tempE <> noErr then
 begin
 case tempE of
 memFullErr: 
 tempStr := 'Memmory full error.  The file you are reading is to large';
 fnfErr: 
 tempStr := 'File not found error';
 resNotFound: 
 tempStr := 'A required resource was not found in the file';
 otherwise
 begin
 NumToString(tempE, tempStr);
 tempStr := CONCAT('Error Number: ', tempStr);
 end
 end;
 ParamText(gName, tempStr, '', '');
 tempNum := Alert(kError, nil);
 end
 else if (not gColorFlag) and (gPICS <> nil) then
 if (gPICS^^.PICSInfoHdl <> nil) then
 if (gPICS^^.PICSInfoHdl^^.BWColor = 1) then
 begin
 ParamText(gName, '', '', '');
 tempNum := Alert(kColorProblem, nil);
 end;
 end;
 end;

 procedure DoInformationAlert;
 var
 tempStr: Str255;
 begin
 NumToString(gPICS^^.NumFrames, tempStr);
 ParamText(gName, tempStr, '', '');
 gNum := Alert(kPICSinfo, nil);
 end;

begin
 SetUp;

 if gWindow <> nil then
 repeat
 if gPICS = nil then
 gNum := Alert(kLoadQuit, nil)
 else
 DoInformationAlert;

 case gNum of
 1: 
 PlayPICS(FALSE);
 2: 
 LoadPICS;
 3: 
 gDone := TRUE;
 4: 
 PlayPICS(TRUE);
 otherwise
 end;
 until gDone;

 ShutDown;
end.
Listing:  PICSPlayer.r

/*----------------------------------------------------------
#
#PICS Animator Resource Source
#
#Steve Sheets
#
----------------------------------------------------------*/

#include "Types.r"

#include "SysTypes.r"

type 'PcPl' as 'STR ';

resource 'PcPl' (0) {
 "PICS Player 1.0, © Steve Sheets." };

resource 'vers' (1) {
 0x1, 0x0, 0x0, -0x80, verUs, "1.0", "1.0, © 1990 Steve Sheets." };

resource 'vers' (2) {
 0x1, 0x0, 0x0, -0x80, verUs, "1.0", "PICS Player 1.0" };

resource 'BNDL' (128) {
 'PcPl', 0,
 { 'ICN#', { 0, 128, 1, 129 },
 'FREF', { 0, 128, 1, 129 } } };

resource 'ICN#' (128) {
 { $"FFE0 0000 8030 0000 8010 0000 9FFC 0000"
 $"9006 0000 9002 0000 93FF 8000 9200 C000"
 $"9200 4000 927F F000 9240 1800 9240 1400"
 $"9248 3F00 9248 4080 9248 8040 9249 3020"
 $"924B C810 F24E 7F8F 1242 3007 1241 0007"
 $"1E40 8007 0242 6007 0245 1FE7 03C8 811F"
 $"005F C107 0040 0100 007F FF",

 $"FFE0 0000 FFF0 0000 FFF0 0000 FFFC 0000"
 $"FFFE 0000 FFFE 0000 FFFF 8000 FFFF C000"
 $"FFFF C000 FFFF F000 FFFF F800 FFFF FC00"
 $"FFFF FF00 FFFF FF80 FFFF FFC0 FFFF FFE0"
 $"FFFF FFF0 FFFF FFFF 1FFF FFFF 1FFF FFFF"
 $"1FFF FFFF 03FF FFFF 03FF FFFF 03FF FF1F"
 $"007F FF07 007F FF00 007F FF"  } };

resource 'ICN#' (129) {
 { $"FFE0 0000 8030 0000 8010 0000 9FFC 0000"
 $"9006 0000 9002 0000 93FF 8000 9200 C000"
 $"9200 4000 927F F000 9240 1800 9240 1400"
 $"924F 9E00 9248 8200 9248 8200 9248 C200"
 $"9249 2200 F24E 1200 1242 1200 1241 2200"
 $"1E40 C200 0242 0200 0245 0200 03C8 8200"
 $"005F C200 0040 0200 007F FE",

 $"FFE0 0000 FFF0 0000 FFF0 0000 FFFC 0000"
 $"FFFE 0000 FFFE 0000 FFFF 8000 FFFF C000"
 $"FFFF C000 FFFF F000 FFFF F800 FFFF FC00"
 $"FFFF FE00 FFFF FE00 FFFF FE00 FFFF FE00"
 $"FFFF FE00 FFFF FE00 1FFF FE00 1FFF FE00"
 $"1FFF FE00 03FF FE00 03FF FE00 03FF FE00"
 $"007F FE00 007F FE00 007F FE"  } };

resource 'FREF' (128) { 'APPL', 0, "" };

resource 'FREF' (129) { 'PICS', 1, "" };

resource 'ALRT' (500) {
 {40, 31, 170, 481}, 500,
 { Cancel, visible, sound1,
 Cancel, visible, sound1,
 Cancel, visible, sound1,
 Cancel, visible, sound1  } };

resource 'ALRT' (501) {
 {40, 31, 170, 481}, 501,
 { OK, visible, sound1,
 OK, visible, sound1,
 OK, visible, sound1,
 OK, visible, sound1 }  };

resource 'ALRT' (502) {
 {40, 56, 160, 456}, 502,
 { OK, visible, sound1,
 OK, visible, sound1,
 OK, visible, sound1,
 OK, visible, sound1 }  };

resource 'ALRT' (503) {
 {40, 56, 190, 456}, 503,
 { OK, visible, sound1,
 OK, visible, sound1,
 OK, visible, sound1,
 OK, visible, sound1 }  };

resource 'DITL' (500) {
 { {10, 125, 30, 325}, StaticText { disabled,
 "PICS Player 1.0 - Steve Sheets" },
 {100, 80, 120, 180}, Button { enabled, "Load PICS" },
 {100, 260, 120, 360}, Button { enabled, "Quit" },
 {40, 10, 90, 440}, StaticText { disabled,
 "This is an example program that demonstrates how to animate "
 "PICS files.  This program was written for MacTutor magazine." } } };

resource 'DITL' (501) {
 { {100, 10, 120, 110}, Button { enabled, "Play Once" },
 {100, 230, 120, 330}, Button { enabled, "Read PICS" },
 {100, 340, 120, 440}, Button { enabled, "Quit" },
 {100, 120, 119, 220}, Button { enabled, "Play Loop" },
 {35, 10, 90, 440}, StaticText { disabled,
 "Name: ^0\n"
 "Number of Frames ^1\n"
 "Select the amount of animation, load PICS or exit the program." },
 {10, 125, 30, 325}, StaticText { disabled, 
 "PICS Player 1.0 - Steve Sheets" } } };

resource 'DITL' (502) {
 { {80, 170, 100, 230}, Button { enabled, "OK" },
 {20, 20, 60, 380}, StaticText { disabled,
 "There was a problem while reading the file \"^0\".  ^1."     }
 } };

resource 'DITL' (503) {
 { {110, 170, 130, 230}, Button { enabled, "OK"},
 {20, 20, 86, 380}, StaticText { disabled,
 "You are running on a Black & White Macintosh, and the PICS file "
 "you selected contains color information.  There may be a problem "
 "when drawing using Quickdraw.  Proceed with caution."  }     }
 };

 

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Choice Provisions is Set to Launch Destr...
Choice Provisions is Set to Launch Destructamundo on iOS This Month Posted by Tre Lawrence on January 23rd, 2015 [ permalink ] Choice Provisions – home stable to | Read more »
King of Thieves – An Interview With Zept...
Ahead of the release of ZeptoLab’s King of Thieves, we were able to ask ZeptoLab’s co-founder, Semyon Voinov, a few questions about the inspiration behind the game and what that means for the Cut the Rope franchise. | Read more »
Handle Review
Handle Review By Jennifer Allen on January 23rd, 2015 Our Rating: :: SPEEDY ORGANIZINGUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad Handle is a very convenient way of juggling your emails, To Do list, and Calendar all through one... | Read more »
The New Disney Inquizitive App Offers a...
The New Disney Inquizitive App Offers a Place for Fans to Take Disney Quizzes Posted by Tre Lawrence on January 23rd, 2015 [ permalink ] | Read more »
Hands-On With Cut the Rope Developer Zep...
Marking quite a departure from ZeptoLab’s past successes, namely the Cut The Rope series, King of Thieves is shaping up to be quite promising. Due for release in February, we were lucky enough to have some time with a preview build to see exactly... | Read more »
Fast Fishing Review
Fast Fishing Review By Jennifer Allen on January 23rd, 2015 Our Rating: :: LIVES UP TO ITS NAMEUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad Fishing is far from relaxing in Fast Fishing, but it is fun.   | Read more »
The LEGO Movie Video Game is Available N...
The LEGO Movie Video Game is Available Now for iOS Posted by Ellis Spice on January 23rd, 2015 [ permalink ] Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad | Read more »
Satellina Review
Satellina Review By Jennifer Allen on January 23rd, 2015 Our Rating: :: TWITCHY BUT TACTICALUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad Satellina requires quick thinking and twitchy fingers, and it’s pretty fun.   | Read more »
Tail Drift, the Crazy 360 Degree Flyer,...
Tail Drift, the Crazy 360 Degree Flyer, Has Gone Free-to-Play in a New Update Posted by Jessica Fisher on January 22nd, 2015 [ permalink ] | Read more »
PureSkate 2 Review
PureSkate 2 Review By Tre Lawrence on January 22nd, 2015 Our Rating: :: ALMOST ALL AIRUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad PureSkate 2 lets one’s fingers do the skateboarding.   | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

College Student Deals are back, additional $5...
Take an additional $50 off all MacBooks and iMacs at Best Buy Online with their College Students Deals Savings, valid through April 11, 2015. Anyone with a valid .EDU email address can take advantage... Read more
iPhone 6 and 6 Plus GIve Apple Half Of US Mob...
Chicago-based Consumer Intelligence Research Partners, LLC (CIRP) have released analysis of the results of its research on mobile phone manufacturers for the calendar quarter that ended December 31,... Read more
Save $100 on MacBook Airs with 256GB of stora...
B&H Photo has 256GB MacBook Airs on sale for $100 off MSRP. Shipping is free, and B&H charges NY sales tax only: - 11″ 1.4GHz/256GB MacBook Air: $999 $100 off MSRP - 13″ 1.4GHz/256GB MacBook... Read more
21-inch 2.7GHz iMac on sale for $1179, save $...
B&H Photo has the 21″ 2.7GHz iMac on sale for $1179 including free shipping plus NY sales tax only. Their price is $120 off MSRP, and it’s the lowest price available for this model from any... Read more
iPhone Usage Rates by State Correlate With Ed...
Chitika Insights notes that despite iPhones being the largest source of smartphone Internet traffic in North America, their latest study finds a relatively high degree of variation of iPhone usage... Read more
ProGearX Extendable Pole “Pov/Selfie Stick” M...
There’s something inescapably narcissistic about the concept of selfies as they’ve developed as a smartphone-driven social (particularly social media) phenomenon that rubs me the wrong way. However,... Read more
iPad Air 2 on sale for up to $100 off MSRP, 2...
 Best Buy has iPad Air 2s on sale for up to $100 off MSRP on their online store for the next two days. Choose free shipping or free local store pickup (if available). Sale prices available for online... Read more
Roundup of Apple refurbished MacBook Pros and...
The Apple Store has Apple Certified Refurbished 2014 MacBook Pros and MacBook Airs available for up to $400 off the cost of new models. An Apple one-year warranty is included with each model, and... Read more
Sale! 13-inch 2.8GHz Retina MacBook Pro for $...
 B&H Photo has the 13″ 2.8GHz Retina MacBook Pro on sale for $1599 including free shipping plus NY sales tax only. Their price is $200 off MSRP, and it’s the lowest price available for this model... Read more
Next OS X/iOS Version Upgrades Should Concent...
On stage at Apple’s World Wide Developers’ Conference in June 2009, Bertrand Serlet, the company’s Senior Vice President of Software Engineering at the time, announced that the forthcoming OS X... Read more

Jobs Board

Business Development Manager - *Apple* Pay...
**Job Summary** Apple Pay is seeking an experienced business development manager to support the identification, recruitment, negotiation and ongoing management of Read more
*Apple* Solutions Consultant (ASC)- Retail S...
**Job Summary** The ASC is an Apple employee who serves as an Apple brand ambassador and influencer in a Reseller's store. The ASC's role is to grow Apple Read more
*Apple* Solutions Consultant - Retail Sales...
**Job Summary** As an Apple Solutions Consultant (ASC) you are the link between our customers and our products. Your role is to drive the Apple business in a retail Read more
*Apple* Lead Operator, GSOC - Apple (United...
**Job Summary** Apple is seeking an exceptional, customer service oriented and experienced persons to fulfill the role of Apple Lead Operator (ALO) as part of the Read more
Order Support Supervisor- *Apple* Online Sto...
**Job Summary** The Apple Online Store (AOS) Order Administration team is looking for an Order Support Supervisor to manage and lead a team of Specialists through the Read more
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