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Printing Windows
Volume Number:6
Issue Number:5
Column Tag:C Workshop

Related Info: Quickdraw TextEdit Picture Utilities

Printing Windows and Dialogs

By Kirk Chase, Anaheim, CA

Note: Source code files accompanying article are located on MacTech CD-ROM or source code disks.

Printing Windows

Not so long ago, I was working on a small, in-house project. I got it running, debugged it, and then showed it to a co-worker for that ever-refreshing pat on the back for a job well done. Well, the co-worker looked at it and played around with it for a moment. Then he looked up to me and said, “I can’t print it out!”

The project did not have the ability to print out its contents. It was small enough that I thought that nobody would ever be on it long enough to care about a hard copy print out. In fact, the only reason I had put a “save” and “open” procedure was because I had a small, single data structure that was easy to write out and read in. I figured printing was not really needed since the job was small and the window contents contained some items that were not made for printing (scroll bars, buttons, lists, and so on).

After talking myself into finding a way to print it out, I went back to the keyboard to try and find an easy, generic way, to print out the window. My first attempt was this:

1. Open up a picture.

2. Call the update procedure for my window, thereby recording the drawing commands.

3. Close the picture.

4. When it came time to print, I would draw the picture in the print port in a rectangle that was positioned where I wanted it to be.

This had all the elements of being simple. A quick “cut and paste” brought the print loop in. A few more lines of code, and I was printing out the picture just fine. It worked great, at least on windows that were not very complex. Another approach was needed for more complex windows.

Another Approach

Looking at my update procedure, I saw many simple drawing commands, a line here, a rectangle there, some text, and so on. So I said, why not just skip the picture and call the drawing routines directly when needed. Cut, cut, paste, paste. And all was well until I printed it out. Oh, most of it came out. I took a closer look at those items that did not show up on the printed page. There were no controls, no scrolling list, and no edit text field. A quick look at the offending structures all yielded a simple conclusion: they were all tied to the grafport that was my window. It was a battle between the window and the printer port. When it came time to draw those structures, they could not be coaxed into changing sides for just a moment. Well, no bucket of sand and metal was going to tell me what I could and could not print.

It was clear that I needed to put in a flag so that I could branch off to a different update routine when printing. Then I got to work on the structures: the TextEdit record, the list, and the controls.

The TextEdit record was fairly simple. I just changed the port temporarily to the print port. The code looked like this:

/* 1 */

if (theTE != NIL)
 if (!forPrinting)
 TEUpdate(&tempRect,theTE); /* normal updating */
 else {
 OldPort = (**theTE).inPort; /* change port in TE */
 GetPort(&aPort);
 (**theTE).inPort = aPort;
 TEUpdate(&tempRect,theTE); /* normal updating */
 (**theTE).inPort = OldPort; /* restore port in TE */
 }

Simple and sweet.

In Control

The control routines were a touch more difficult. I started out with my own version of DrawControls(). It looked like this:

/* 2 */

/* Draw or Print Controls */
 if (!forPrinting)
 DrawControls(MyWindow);
 else
 PrintControls(((WindowPeek) MyWindow)->controlList);

and the PrintControls() looked like this:

/* 3 */

PrintControls(theControl)
ControlHandle theControl;
{ /* PrintControls() */
ProcPtr controlRoutine;
long dummy;
int varCode;

while (theControl != NULL) { /* control loop */
 varCode = GetCVariant(theControl);
 
 HLock((Handle) (**theControl).contrlDefProc);
 controlRoutine =(ProcPtr) *((**theControl).contrlDefProc);
 dummy = CallPascalL(varCode, theControl, 0, 0L, controlRoutine); /* 
Call CDEF to Draw */
 HUnlock((Handle) (**theControl).contrlDefProc);
 
 theControl = (**theControl).nextControl;
 } /* control loop */
} /* PrintControls() */

What this bit of code does is this. It loops through the control list. It gets the control’s variant and CDEF proc. It then calls the control proc with the message to draw the control.

This worked like a dream except for the controls the that were inactive. In there place was a gray box. The problem was simple. When controls go inactive, for the most part, they just paint a gray rectangle over their control with the pen mode set to exclusive-or. This little trick “dims” the control. Unfortunately, the LaserWriter does not support this mode of drawing. Hence the gray box is the only thing that is seen (overdrawing the control). The only solution I could think of was to temporarily activate the control and then set it back when finished drawing. Something like this:

/* 4 */

PrintControls(theControl)
ControlHandle theControl;
{ /* PrintControls() */
ProcPtr controlRoutine;
long dummy;
int varCode, hilite;

while (theControl != NULL) { /* control loop */
 varCode = GetCVariant(theControl);
 hilite = (**theControl).contrlHilite;
 
 HiliteControl(theControl, 0); /* LW does not support XOR */
 HLock((Handle) (**theControl).contrlDefProc);
 controlRoutine =(ProcPtr) *((**theControl).contrlDefProc);
 dummy = CallPascalL(varCode, theControl, 0, 0L, controlRoutine); /* 
Call CDEF to Draw */
 HUnlock((Handle) (**theControl).contrlDefProc);
 HiliteControl(theControl, hilite);
 
 theControl = (**theControl).nextControl;
 } /* control loop */
} /* PrintControls() */

This worked out well, and I was happy again. In addition to this, it would work on all controls, not just the standard ones.

Next on the List

The next step was the printing of the list. This turned out to be the hardest. My first step was to try and fake out the list into thinking that it belonged to the printer port. No such luck. I then tried calling the LDEF like with the controls, still no luck. At last resort, I wrote a routine for just text lists. The call in my window update procedure looks like:

/* 5 */

if (List_I_AList != NIL)
 if (!forPrinting)
 LUpdate(MyWindow->visRgn,List_I_AList);
 else 
 PrintList(List_I_AList); /* call print list */

And PrintList() is as follows:

/* 6 */

PrintList(theList)
ListHandle theList;
{ /* PrintList() */
Cell lCell;
Rect lRect, dstRect;
int lDataOffset, lDataLen;
char dataPtr[255];

if (theList == NULL) return;
lCell.h =  0;
lCell.v = 0;
LDoDraw(TRUE, theList);
do { /* loop through cells */
 LFind(&lDataOffset, &lDataLen, lCell, theList);
 LGetCell(&dataPtr, &lDataLen, lCell, theList);
 
 LRect(&lRect, lCell, theList);
 if (SectRect(&((**theList).rView), &lRect, &dstRect))
 if (EqualRect(&lRect, &dstRect)) { /* Draw it */
 TextBox(&dataPtr, lDataLen, &lRect, teJustLeft);
 }
 } while (LNextCell(TRUE, TRUE, &lCell, theList)); /* loop through cells 
*/
} /* PrintList() */

What this procedure does is to loop through all the cells checking if the cell is visible. If it is, it extracts the text and prints it out using TextBox() (Not very efficient).

PrintWindow()

PrintWindow() is fairly simple. You need only offset the origin of the print port by the proper amount, set the printing flag, and call your update routine. In your update routine, you should make sure not to set the port to your window (do this before the call) and then check the printing flag to use the proper update routines for TE records, lists, and controls. PrintWindow() could stand for a few improvements.

1. Thumb controls are still not drawn.

2. A routine that handled any LDEF not just the standard text LDEF.

3. Scrolling the text in a TE record to the proper place.

4. Hilighting list and text selections.

Printing Dialogs

Dialogs turned out to be a bit more difficult. Granted, dialogs are not printed very often, but it is nice to be able to do so when the occasion requires. Drawing is a two step process. First you print the items in the dialog item list, and then you call any update routines you use (like bolding the default button) just as you did for printing the window. In my print loop, I call all the various drawing routines, passing it the port I wish to print, and let the various routines decide if this is their window/dialog or not.

The Dialog Item List

The dialog item list is found in the dialog structure as shown in figure 1.

Figure 1. The Dialog Structure

Figure 2. The Item List Structure

The item list is a more complicated structure. I found the item list at a single indirection rather than a double indirection (items in the dialog record is a pointer instead of a handle) Refer to figure 2 while I explain the item list structure.

The first item is a 2 byte number that is the number of items in the item list minus 1 (for 7 items, the number would be 6). Next comes the items.

Each item has a 4 byte placeholder for a handle to the object or a procedure pointer. The next 8 bytes are the display rectangle (Top, Left, Bottom, Right order). The next byte is the item type. The types are as follows:

0 User item (userItem)

4 Control item (ctrlItem)

add the following constants for the exact control

0 for a button (btnCtrl)

1 for a checkbox (chkCtrl)

2 for a radio button (radCtrl)

3 for a resource defined control (resCtrl)

8 Static text item (statText)

16 Editable text item (editText)

32 Icon (iconItem)

64 Picture (picItem)

In addition to this, for any disabled item, you add 128 (itemDisable).

Following the item type byte is a length byte of the data that is to follow. Then it is followed by that many bytes of data. If the number of bytes is odd, then an extra byte is added to pad the item to an even byte boundary. The length byte still contains the actual data length.

The data and the placeholder vary by the item type. A user item has 0 bytes of data and the placeholder is interpreted as a procedure pointer to the drawing routine. A picture or icon has the resource ID of the item in the data bytes and the placeholder holds the handle to the picture or icon. Static and edit text hold the default text in their data bytes; the placeholder holds a handle to the actual text. All controls, except for the resource defined control have their control titles in the data bytes; for a resource control, it has the resource ID number; the placeholder holds the control handle for all control types.

Printing the Dialog

My routine for printing the dialog is as follows:

/* 7 */

PrintDialog(d, s0, s1, s2, s3)
DialogPeek d;
Str255 s0, s1, s2, s3;
{ /* PrintDialog() */
ditlheader *dh;
Ptr p;
int itemCount, i, theItem, datalen;
int ResID, theType;
Handle hItem;
char text[256];
Rect tempRect, box;

p = (Ptr) *(*d).items;
itemCount = *((int *) p); /* get number of dialog items */

p = p + 2;
for (i=0; i<= itemCount; i++) { /* Item Loop */
 dh = (ditlheader *) p;
 
 /* get type */
 theItem = dh->itemType;
 if (theItem < 0)
 theItem = theItem * -1;
 if (theItem >= 128)
 theItem -= 128;
 
 /* get length of data */
 datalen = dh->dataLength;
 if ((datalen % 2) != 0)
 datalen += 1;
 
 switch (theItem) { /* ItemType Switch */
 case ctrlItem + btnCtrl: /* Standard Button */
 case ctrlItem + chkCtrl: /* Checkbox */
 case ctrlItem + radCtrl: /* Radio Button */
 case ctrlItem + resCtrl: /* Resource Control */
 PrintControls((ControlHandle) dh->HorP); /* Draw controls */
 break;
 
 case editText:
 case statText:
 GetDItem((DialogPtr) d, i + 1, &theType, &hItem, &box);
 GetIText(hItem, (Str255 *) text);
 PtoCstr(text);
 
 /* make substitution of ParamText */
 PtoCstr((char *) s0);
 PtoCstr((char *) s1);
 PtoCstr((char *) s2);
 PtoCstr((char *) s3);
 while(StrReplace(text, “^0”, (char *) s0));
 while(StrReplace(text, “^1”, (char *) s1));
 while(StrReplace(text, “^2”, (char *) s2));
 while(StrReplace(text, “^3”, (char *) s3));
 CtoPstr((char *) s0);
 CtoPstr((char *) s1);
 CtoPstr((char *) s2);
 CtoPstr((char *) s3);
 
 TextBox(text, strlen(text), &(dh->displayRect), teJustLeft); /* draw 
text */
 if (theItem == editText) { /* draw edit text box */
 tempRect = dh->displayRect;
 FrameRect(&tempRect);
 } 
 break;
 
 case iconItem:
 PlotIcon(&(dh->displayRect), (Handle) dh->HorP); /* draw icon */
 break;
 
 case picItem:
 DrawPicture((PicHandle) dh->HorP, &(dh->displayRect)); /* draw picture 
*/
 break;
 
 case userItem:
 CallPascal((WindowPtr) ThePrintPort, i+ 1, (ProcPtr) dh->HorP); /* draw 
user item */
 break;
 
 default:
 break;
 } /* ItemType Switch */
 p = p + sizeof(ditlheader) + datalen;
 } /* Item Loop */
} /* PrintDialog() */

The first step in the routine is to figure out how many items there are in the item list. Then it loops through the item getting the associated data and moving the pointer if needed so that it can get the next dialog item.

It then switches on the item type (accounting for any disabled items in the process). For controls, it just sends the placeholder as a control handle to my PrintControls() that I wrote for printing a window. For icons and pictures, it interprets the placeholder as an icon or picture handle and calls the toolbox routines for printing these items. For user items, it calls the procedure pointer found in the placeholder.

Editable and static text took just a little more coding. After calling GetDItem() and GetIText() to get the actual text, I call a substitution routine to remove the parameter text characters (“^0”, “^1”, “^2”, “^3”) with the strings passed to PrintDialog(). The substitution routine makes the first possible substitution then returns 1 if a substitution was made and 0 if no substitutions were made. Putting the call in a while loop removes all occurrences. After this, it just calls TextBox() again to draw the text, and, if the item was an edit text item, it frames the box.

Conclusion

All in all, printing dialogs and windows are not too hard with a little work on the drawing procedures and an routine to go through a dialog’s item list. In my listing, I reference "Messenger.h" which was in last month's MacTutor. These routines are not made for printing out more than the contents of the window or dialog that you can see. It is not made for text editors or drawing applications. But if the window just needs a quick print with minimal set up, PrintWindow() and PrintDialog() are for you.

Listing:  PrintWD.c

/*******************
PrintWD.c
*******************/

/**********************
Include files
***********************/
#include “String.h”
#include “Messenger.h”
#include “PrintTraps.h”

/**********************
Structures
***********************/
typedef struct ditlheader {
 long HorP;
 Rect displayRect;
 char itemType;
 char dataLength;
 } ditlheader, *ditlheaderPtr, **ditlheaderHdl;

/**********************
Globals
***********************/
THPrint ThePrintRec; /* Printing Stuff */
TPPrPortThePrintPort;
TPrStatus PrintStatus;
Rect  PageRect;
char  forPrinting;

/*************************************************/
/*********** Printing Routines *******************/
/*************************************************/

/***************************/
/* PrintControls() handles printing of standard buttons */
PrintControls(theControl)
ControlHandle theControl;
{ /* PrintControls() */
ProcPtr controlRoutine;
long dummy;
int varCode, hilite;

while (theControl != NULL) { /* control loop */
 varCode = GetCVariant(theControl);
 hilite = (**theControl).contrlHilite;
 
 HiliteControl(theControl, 0); /* LW does not support XOR */
 HLock((Handle) (**theControl).contrlDefProc);
 controlRoutine =(ProcPtr) *((**theControl).contrlDefProc);
 dummy = CallPascalL(varCode, theControl, 0, 0L, controlRoutine); /* 
Call CDEF to Draw */
 HUnlock((Handle) (**theControl).contrlDefProc);
 HiliteControl(theControl, hilite);
 
 theControl = (**theControl).nextControl;
 } /* control loop */
} /* PrintControls() */

/***************************/
/* PrintList() handles printing of standard list */
PrintList(theList)
ListHandle theList;
{ /* PrintList() */
Cell lCell;
Rect lRect, dstRect;
int lDataOffset, lDataLen;
char dataPtr[255];

if (theList == NULL) return;
lCell.h =  0;
lCell.v = 0;
LDoDraw(TRUE, theList);
do { /* loop through cells */
 LFind(&lDataOffset, &lDataLen, lCell, theList);
 LGetCell(&dataPtr, &lDataLen, lCell, theList);
 LRect(&lRect, lCell, theList);
 if (SectRect(&((**theList).rView), &lRect, &dstRect))
 if (EqualRect(&lRect, &dstRect)) { /* Draw it */
 TextBox(&dataPtr, lDataLen, &lRect, teJustLeft);
 }
 } while (LNextCell(TRUE, TRUE, &lCell, theList)); /* loop through cells 
*/
} /* PrintList() */

/***************************/
/* StrReplace() substitutes the first occurrence of t with r in s.  It 
returns TRUE if there was a substitution*/
int StrReplace(s, t, r)
char *s, *t, *r;
{ /* StrReplace() */
char temp[256], *p;

strcpy(temp, s);
p = strstr(temp, t); /* find first occurrence */
if (*p == ‘\0’) return (0); /* no occurence */

*p = ‘\0’; /* delete t */
p = p + strlen(t); /* go to second half of string */

strcpy(s, temp); /* get first part */
strcat(s, r); /* put in replacement */
strcat(s, p); /* put in second half */

return (1);
} /* StrReplace() */

/***************************/
/* PrintDialog() 
prints dialog substituting sX for ParamText */     
PrintDialog(d, s0, s1, s2, s3)
DialogPeek d;
Str255 s0, s1, s2, s3;
{ /* PrintDialog() */
ditlheader *dh;
Ptr p;
int itemCount, i, theItem, datalen;
int ResID, theType;
Handle hItem;
char text[256];
Rect tempRect, box;

p = (Ptr) *(*d).items;
itemCount = *((int *) p); /* get number of dialog items */

p = p + 2;
for (i=0; i<= itemCount; i++) { /* Item Loop */
 dh = (ditlheader *) p;
 
 /* get type */
 theItem = dh->itemType;
 if (theItem < 0)
 theItem = theItem * -1;
 if (theItem >= 128)
 theItem -= 128;
 
 /* get length of data */
 datalen = dh->dataLength;
 if ((datalen % 2) != 0)
 datalen += 1;
 
 switch (theItem) { /* ItemType Switch */
 case ctrlItem + btnCtrl: /* Standard Button */
 case ctrlItem + chkCtrl: /* Checkbox */
 case ctrlItem + radCtrl: /* Radio Button */
 case ctrlItem + resCtrl: /* Resource Control */
 PrintControls((ControlHandle) dh->HorP); /* Draw controls */
 break;
 
 case editText:
 case statText:
 GetDItem((DialogPtr) d, i + 1, &theType, &hItem, &box);
 GetIText(hItem, (Str255 *) text);
 PtoCstr(text);
 
 /* make substitution of ParamText */
 PtoCstr((char *) s0);
 PtoCstr((char *) s1);
 PtoCstr((char *) s2);
 PtoCstr((char *) s3);
 while(StrReplace(text, “^0”, (char *) s0));
 while(StrReplace(text, “^1”, (char *) s1));
 while(StrReplace(text, “^2”, (char *) s2));
 while(StrReplace(text, “^3”, (char *) s3));
 CtoPstr((char *) s0);
 CtoPstr((char *) s1);
 CtoPstr((char *) s2);
 CtoPstr((char *) s3);
 
 TextBox(text, strlen(text), &(dh->displayRect), teJustLeft); /* draw 
text */
 if (theItem == editText) { /* draw edit text box */
 tempRect = dh->displayRect;
 FrameRect(&tempRect);
 } 
 break;
 
 case iconItem:
 PlotIcon(&(dh->displayRect), (Handle) dh->HorP); /* draw icon */
 break;
 
 case picItem:
 DrawPicture((PicHandle) dh->HorP, &(dh->displayRect)); /* draw picture 
*/
 break;
 
 case userItem:
 CallPascal((WindowPtr) ThePrintPort, i+ 1, (ProcPtr) dh->HorP); /* draw 
user item */
 break;
 
 default:
 break;
 } /* ItemType Switch */
 p = p + sizeof(ditlheader) + datalen;
 } /* Item Loop */
} /* PrintDialog() */

/***************************/
/* InitPrint() initializes print variables */
InitPrint()
{
ThePrintRec = NUL;
PrOpen();
ThePrintRec = (THPrint) NewHandle(sizeof(TPrint));
PrintDefault(ThePrintRec);
PageRect = (*ThePrintRec)->prInfo.rPage;
PrClose();
forPrinting = FALSE;
PrSetError(noErr);
} /* end InitPrint() */

/***************************/
/* doPageSetUp() handles page setup dialog */
doPageSetUp()
{
char  confirmed;
WindowPtr SavePort;
OSErr theError;

InitCursor();
GetPort(&SavePort);
PrOpen();
confirmed = PrValidate(ThePrintRec);
confirmed = PrStlDialog(ThePrintRec);
PrClose();
theError = PrError();
SetPort(SavePort);
if (confirmed) {
 PageRect = (*ThePrintRec)->prInfo.rPage;
 }
} /* end doPageSetUp() */

/***************************/
/* PrintWindow() handles printing */
PrintWindow(theWindow)
WindowPtr theWindow;
{
char  DoIt; /* flag to do printing */
TPrStatus PrintStatus; /* print variables */
TPPrPortmyPrPort;
WindowPtr savePort;
intcopies, i, j, firstPage, lastPage, oldiPlayer;
char  dummy;
Rect  tempRect, pictRect, nameRect, windowRect;
OSErr theError;
GrafPtr aPort;
Point oldOrigin;

GetPort(&savePort); /* initialize printing */
InitCursor();
PrOpen();

if (PrError() == noErr){ /* do print dialog */
 DoIt = PrValidate(ThePrintRec);
 DoIt = PrJobDialog(ThePrintRec);
 dummy = (int) AnOSError(PrError(), “\pProblem with Print Dialog”, “\p”);
 
 if (DoIt && !dummy) { /* Print Document */
 tempRect = theWindow->portRect;
 /* SetCursor(*watch); */
 InsetRect(&tempRect, -4, -4);
 pictRect = tempRect; /* set print variables up */
 PositionRect(&pictRect, &PageRect, CENTER, THIRD);
 
 ThePrintPort = PrOpenDoc(ThePrintRec, NUL, NUL);
 theError = PrError();
 if (!AnOSError(theError, “\pProblem with Printer”, “\p”)) { /* good 
port */
 /* get copies and page range */
 copies = (*ThePrintRec)->prJob.iCopies;
 firstPage = (*ThePrintRec)->prJob.iFstPage;
 lastPage = (*ThePrintRec)->prJob.iLstPage;

 if ((*ThePrintRec)->prJob.bJDocLoop == bSpoolLoop) /* check for spooling 
*/
 copies = 1;
 
 /* check bad page range */
 if (firstPage > lastPage) {
 InitCursor();
 dummy = Message(M_OK, noIcon, “\pBad page range”, “\p”, “\p”, “\p”);
 }
 else { /* good page range */
 for (i=0; i<copies; i++) { /* valid picture */
 PrOpenPage(ThePrintPort, NUL); /* print page */
 theError = PrError();
 if (!AnOSError(theError, “\pProblem with page”, “\p”)) {
 FrameRect(&pictRect);
 GetPort(&aPort);
 oldOrigin = topLeft(aPort->portRect);
 SetOrigin(oldOrigin.h - pictRect.left, oldOrigin.v - pictRect.top);
 forPrinting = TRUE;
 
 UpDate_MyWindow(theWindow);
 UpDate_AboutDialog(theWindow);
 UpDate_TestDialog(theWindow);
 
 forPrinting = FALSE;
 SetOrigin(oldOrigin.h, oldOrigin.v);
 
 }
 PrClosePage(ThePrintPort);
 } /*  end valid picture */
 }
 } /* end else good port */
 PrCloseDoc(ThePrintPort);
 if (((*ThePrintRec)->prJob.bJDocLoop == bSpoolLoop) && (PrError() == 
noErr))
 PrPicFile(ThePrintRec, NUL, NUL, NUL, &PrintStatus); 
 /* print spool file, if any */
 
 } /* end of print document */
 } /* no error on PrOpen() */

PrClose();
SetPort(savePort);
InvalRect(&tempRect);
InitCursor();
} /* end doPrint() */
 

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Realpolitiks Mobile 1.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $5.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: PLEASE NOTE: The game might not work properly on discontinued 1GB of RAM devices (iPhone 5s, iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus, iPad... | Read more »
Layton’s Mystery Journey (Games)
Layton’s Mystery Journey 1.0.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $15.99, Version: 1.0.0 (iTunes) Description: THE MUCH-LOVED LAYTON SERIES IS BACK WITH A 10TH ANNIVERSARY INSTALLMENT! Developed by LEVEL-5, LAYTON’S... | Read more »
Full Throttle Remastered (Games)
Full Throttle Remastered 1.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $4.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: Originally released by LucasArts in 1995, Full Throttle is a classic graphic adventure game from industry legend Tim... | Read more »
Stunning shooter Morphite gets a new tra...
Morphite is officially landing on iOS in September. The game looks like the space shooter we've been needing on mobile, and we're going to see if it fits the bill quite shortly. The game's a collaborative effort between Blowfish Studios, We're Five... | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

Clearance 2016 13-inch MacBook Airs, Apple re...
Apple has Certified Refurbished 2016 13″ MacBook Airs available starting at $809. An Apple one-year warranty is included with each MacBook, and shipping is free: – 13″ 1.6GHz/8GB/128GB MacBook Air: $... Read more
PHOOZY World’s First Thermal Capsules to Summ...
Summer days spent soaking up the sun can be tough on smartphones, causing higher battery consumption and overheating. To solve this problem, eXclaim IP, LLC has introduced the PHOOZY Thermal Capsule... Read more
2018 Honda Ridgeline with Android Auto and Ap...
The 2018 Honda Ridgeline is arriving in dealerships nationwide with a Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (MSRP1) starting at $29,630. The 2017 Honda Ridgeline was named North American Truck of the... Read more
comScore Ranks Top 15 U.S. Smartphone Apps fo...
comScore, Inc. recently released data from comScore Mobile Metrix, reporting the top smartphone apps in the U.S. by audience reach for June 2017. * “Apple Music,” as it appears in comScore’s monthly... Read more
13-inch 3.1GHz MacBook Pros on sale for $100...
B&H Photo has the new 2017 13″ 3.1GHz Space Gray MacBook Pros in stock today and on sale for $100 off MSRP including free shipping. B&H charges sales tax in NY and NJ only: – 13″ 3.1GHz/256GB... Read more
Apple refurbished Mac minis available startin...
Apple has Certified Refurbished Mac minis available starting at $419. Apple’s one-year warranty is included with each mini, and shipping is free: – 1.4GHz Mac mini: $419 $80 off MSRP – 2.6GHz Mac... Read more
Apple’s 2017 Back to School Promotion: Free B...
Purchase a new Mac using Apple’s Education discount, and take up to $300 off MSRP. All teachers, students, and staff of any educational institution qualify for the discount. Shipping is free. As part... Read more
Clearance 2016 13-inch MacBook Pros available...
B&H Photo has clearance 2016 13″ MacBook Pros in stock today for up to $220 off original MSRP. Shipping is free, and B&H charges NY & NJ sales tax only: – 13″ 2.9GHz/512GB Touch Bar... Read more
Apple Move Away from White Label Event Apps C...
DoubleDutch, Inc., a global provider of Live Engagement Marketing (LEM) solutions, has made a statement in the light of a game-changing announcement from Apple at this year’s WWDC conference.... Read more
70 Year Old Artist Creates Art Tools for the...
New Hampshire-based developer Pirate’s Moon has announced MyArtTools 1.1.3, the update to their precision drawing app, designed by artist Richard Hoeper exclusively for use with the 12.9-inch iPad... Read more

Jobs Board

*Apple* Solutions Consultant (ASC) - Poole -...
Job Summary The people here at Apple don't just create products - they create the kind of wonder that's revolutionised entire industries. It's the diversity of those Read more
SW Engineer *Apple* TV - Apple Inc. (United...
Changing the world is all in a day's work at Apple . If you love innovation, here's your chance to make a career of it. You'll work hard. But the job comes with more Read more
Frameworks Engineering Manager, *Apple* Wat...
Frameworks Engineering Manager, Apple Watch Job Number: 41632321 Santa Clara Valley, California, United States Posted: Jun. 15, 2017 Weekly Hours: 40.00 Job Summary Read more
Product Manager - *Apple* Pay on the *Appl...
Job Summary Apple is looking for a talented product manager to drive the expansion of Apple Pay on the Apple Online Store. This position includes a unique Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions - Apple...
SalesSpecialist - Retail Customer Service and SalesTransform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, you're also the Read more
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