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Compiler Compare
Volume Number:5
Issue Number:8
Column Tag:Jörg's Folder

Compiler Comparison

By Jörg Langowski, MacTutor Editorial Board

Note: Source code files accompanying article are located on MacTech CD-ROM or source code disks.

Code optimization

You will have noticed the change in the column’s title: a recent reader survey has shown that Forth and Basic are the two languages that our readers would most like to see less of in MacTutor. That’s a shame, but we’re responsive (at least we try)

So, from now on my monthly column will have a wider scope. As you might have seen, I have very often used Forth as a vehicle to explain general concepts of Macintosh programming. Since many subscribers don’t seem to be happy with Forth - in fact, people often have asked about things that had been explained in a Forth column, but they just hadn’t read. The column about the Notification Manager in V5#6 is a good example: at the bottom of page 42, one of the ‘ideas to be written’ was explained as: “ An example that places a Notification Manager request in low System memory, and starts a Timer routine ”; this is just the example that was in the Forth Forum that covered the Notification Manager. Anyway, I’ll try to use other vehicles to convey the message from now on. Such as assembly, or maybe even C. Mach2 Forth still is a very good assembly-language development system because of its interactivity. Of course, you cannot create complicated macros, or structures, and have to resort to Forth code for those purposes. I’ll still inform you about interesting things I come across on the Forth scene, but this won’t be an exclusive Forth column anymore. Emphasis will be on two things: basic system-level things such as drivers, trap patches, INITs, network, new managers as they come up; and - on the other side of the spectrum - object-oriented programming in C++.

Apple will ‘Real Soon Now’ release a C++ under MPW, and we’ll hopefully have a pre-release by the time you read this. C++ is a very interesting language, much more than a simple extension of C; reading Stroustrup’s book I got this feeling of ‘yes, that’s how one should have done it in the first place’ that I had 15 years ago when all I knew was Algol 60, and came across the description of Algol 68. Sadly enough, Algol 68 never really caught on; hopefully, C++ will. The C++ column will start with the next issue; including program examples if we get the pre-release soon enough, just ‘dry swimming’ if not.

This month, we’ll talk once more about one of my favorite subjects, number crunching, speed (or the lack of it), and intelligence in compilers (or the lack of it).

A matrix multiplication routine

Since I am doing more and more everyday computation (mostly Fortran) on the MacII, I’m obviously interested in a good optimizing compiler. Now, a standard trick that every decent compiler should have in its repertoire is the elimination of constant expressions from loops, or assignment of array elements that are not dependent on the loop index to intermediate variables.

Imagine my surprise when I found out that (in Language Systems Fortran 1.2.1) I could speed up a loop that looked like this:

 do k=1,n3
 do i=1,n1
 c(i,k) = 0x0
 do j=1,n2
 c(i,k) = c(i,k)+a(i,j)*b(j,k)
 end do
 end do
 end do

by simply writing:

 do k=1,n3
 do i=1,n1
 sum = 0x0
 do j=1,n2
 sum = sum+a(i,j)*b(j,k)
 end do
 c(i,k) = sum
 end do
 end do

Now, in undergraduate programming classes, years ago, we were actually taught to look for constant arithmetical or index expressions in loops and put them outside if possible. Today, almost everybody assumes that the compiler is smart enough to take care of that; incorrectly, as you see. To see how good the compilers available under MPW can do, I wrote a Fortran program (listing 1) that calls several versions of this matrix multiplication loop, written in Fortran (Lang. Sys. 1.2.1), Pascal (Apple 3.0 beta), and C (Apple 3.0 beta). Surprise: none of the compilers was good enough to move the indexing outside of the loop. The following table gives the results (Mac IIx):

Pascal, hand-optimized: 2.7667 seconds

C, register variables, hand-opt.: 3.4667 seconds

Pascal: 4.0333 seconds

Fortran, const. dimensions, opt=3: 4.5000 seconds

Fortran, hand-optimized, opt=3: 4.6500 seconds

C: 4.7167 seconds

Fortran, opt=3: 6.5167 seconds

Fortran, opt=0: 6.6167 seconds

A difference of more than a factor of 2 between the slowest Fortran and the fastest Pascal code. Apple Pascal lived up to its good reputation here, but even that could be improved a lot by eliminating the constant index expression.

Surprised, I ran the Fortran benchmark on a Microvax II, and found that even there some speed could be gained by ‘hand-optimizing’ the code:

Fortran, plain: 3.6333 seconds

Fortran, hand-opt.: 3.2833 seconds

Fortran, const. dimensions: 3.1000 seconds

However, the difference between the machine-optimized and the hand-optimized version is not quite as big as for the MPW languages (15% for the VAX vs. 27-30% for MPW). If you compile the VAX code without optimization, you get a bigger difference (23%):

Fortran, plain: 6.2500 seconds

Fortran, hand-opt.: 4.8833 seconds

Fortran, const. dimensions: 4.8000 seconds

Therefore, take-home lesson one: don’t take compiler optimizations for granted.

The machine code behind it

Benchmarks have been run on lots of different machines, using lots of different compilers. I was interested in how the code generated by the MPW compilers actually differed. A job for Nosy, and the results are shown in the last listing. I’ve only printed the innermost loops. Don’t be overwhelmed by the pile of assembly code, just note some important details.

First, for the loop optimization examples discussed here, there seems to be no tradeoff between code length and speed. On the contrary, the fastest code is also the shortest. On the other hand, there are some obvious pieces of code which are clearly redundant. The most blatant example is the Fortran-generated code at the end of the listing, where an index expression is recalculated that was actually in register A1 all the time! 14 extra lines of machine code on each pass through the loop will add up to quite some extra time lost. Another point is that Language System obviously has no great trust in the quality of the 68000/20/30, otherwise how can one explain that they repeat the EXT.L D2 instruction each time it occurs? To make sure it works at least once?

Language Systems Fortran makes other funny assumptions about the machine, for instance it seems to think there are only two floating point registers in the 68881, FP0 and FP7. I have looked at some code which had great potential for optimization by using enough FP registers. Language Systems is, however, known for its responsiveness towards customers, so I hope we won’t have to wait too long until a well-optimized Fortran shows up.

Both Pascal and C like juggling floating point registers. Why generate (like Apple’s C):

FMOVE   FP7,FP1
FADD    FP0,FP1
FMOVE   FP1,FP7

when a simple FADD FP0,FP7 would suffice? Eliminates two floating point instructions per loop. Pascal does

   FADD    FP7,FP0
   FMOVE   FP0,FP7

when a simple inversion of the operands

   FADD FP0,FP7

would give the same result. One floating point instruction per loop eliminated. The timing difference between the Pascal and C routines is partly because of the one extra floating point instruction.

Last remark: I haven’t seen the Absoft MPW 3.0 Fortran yet. If anyone from Absoft is reading this, I’d like an evaluation copy to run the same analysis (since you claim in your ads you have such a great optimizer). If I get enough other languages collected together, we’ll have a follow-up on this article.

Next month

The MacHack is over (thanks, Aimée, Carol, and all the others, for organizing such a good meeting), and I’ll tell you some of my impressions in the next column. Otherwise, we’ll start with an introduction to C++; I hope the compiler will arrive here in time.

Listing 1: Matrix multiplication benchmark

!!S Main
 program matrix
c
c Main program in Language Systems Fortran
c
c Some line breaks in the Fortran program are due to 
c editing.
c
 implicit none
 
 integer i,j,ticks1,ticks2
 extended a(50,50), b(50,50), c(50,50)
 extended time1,time2
 
 integer ticks
 
 type *,’Matrix multiplication benchmark’
 type *,’------------------------------’
 type *
 type *,’This program compares the number crunching power’
 type *,’of some of the popular MPW compilers.’
 type *,’Written under MPW 3.0 by J. Langowski / MacTutor 1989'
 type *
 type *,’Setting up 50x50 matrices...’

 ticks1 = ticks()
 
 do i=1,50
 do j=1,50
 a(i,j) = (i-1) + j-1
 b(j,i) = a(i,j)
 end do
 end do
 
 ticks2 = ticks()
 time1 = (ticks2-ticks1)/60.
 type *
 write (6,’(f8.4,’’ seconds for setting up matrices’’)’) time1
 
 ticks1 = ticks()
 call mat_mult_for3(c,50,a,50,b,50,50,50,50)
 
 ticks2 = ticks()
 time1 = (ticks2-ticks1)/60.
 type *
 write (6,’(f8.4,’’ seconds for multiplying matrices’’,
     *  ‘’ using FORTRAN routine, opt=3'’)’) time1
 type *,’c(25,25) = ‘,c(25,25)
 
 ticks1 = ticks()
 call mat_mult_for(c,50,a,50,b,50,50,50,50)
 
 ticks2 = ticks()
 time1 = (ticks2-ticks1)/60.
 type *
 write (6,’(f8.4,’’ seconds for multiplying matrices’’,
     *  ‘’ using FORTRAN routine, opt=0'’)’) time1
 type *,’c(25,25) = ‘,c(25,25)

 ticks1 = ticks()
 call mat_mult_for1(c,50,a,50,b,50,50,50,50)
 
 ticks2 = ticks()
 time1 = (ticks2-ticks1)/60.
 type *
 write (6,’(f8.4,’’ seconds for multiplying matrices’’,
     *  ‘’ using FORTRAN routine, hand-optimized’’)’) time1
 type *,’c(25,25) = ‘,c(25,25)
 
 ticks1 = ticks()
 call mat_mult_for0(c,50,a,50,b,50,50,50,50)
 
 ticks2 = ticks()
 time1 = (ticks2-ticks1)/60.
 type *
 write (6,’(f8.4,’’ seconds for multiplying matrices’’,
     *  ‘’ using FORTRAN routine, constant dimensions’’)’) time1
 type *,’c(25,25) = ‘,c(25,25)
 
 ticks1 = ticks()
 call mat_mul_pas(c,%val(50),a,%val(50),b,%val(50),%val(50),%val(50),%val(50))
 
 ticks2 = ticks()
 time1 = (ticks2-ticks1)/60.
 type *
 write (6,’(f8.4,’’ seconds for multiplying matrices’’,
     *  ‘’ using PASCAL routine’’)’) time1
 type *,’c(25,25) = ‘,c(25,25)
 
 ticks1 = ticks()
 call mat_mul_pas_opt(c,%val(50),a,%val(50),b,%val(50),%val(50),%val(50),%val(50))
 
 ticks2 = ticks()
 time1 = (ticks2-ticks1)/60.
 type *
 write (6,’(f8.4,’’ seconds for multiplying matrices’’,
     *  ‘’ using PASCAL routine, hand-optimized’’)’) time1
 type *,’c(25,25) = ‘,c(25,25)
 
 ticks1 = ticks()
 call mat_mul_c(c,%val(50),a,%val(50),b,%val(50),%val(50),%val(50),%val(50))
 
 ticks2 = ticks()
 time1 = (ticks2-ticks1)/60.
 type *
 write (6,’(f8.4,’’ seconds for multiplying matrices’’,
     *  ‘’ using C routine’’)’) time1
 type *,’c(25,25) = ‘,c(25,25)
 
 ticks1 = ticks()
 call mat_mul_c_opt(c,%val(50),a,%val(50),b,%val(50),%val(50),%val(50),%val(50))
 
 ticks2 = ticks()
 time1 = (ticks2-ticks1)/60.
 type *
 write (6,’(f8.4,’’ seconds for multiplying matrices’’,
     *  ‘’ using C routine, hand-optimized’’)’) time1
 type *,’c(25,25) = ‘,c(25,25)
 
 end

!!S Main
 subroutine mat_mult_for3(c,nc,a,na,b,nb,n1,n2,n3)
c sets c=a.b
c na,nb,nc are first dimensions
c n1 n2 n3 are problem dimensions
c c is n1xn3
c a    n1 n2
c b    n2 n3
 implicit none
 
 integer na,nb,nc,n1,n2,n3
 integer*2 i,j,k
 extended c(nc,n3),a(na,n2),b(nb,n3)
 
 do k=1,n3
 do i=1,n1
 c(i,k) = 0x0
 do j=1,n2
 c(i,k) = c(i,k)+a(i,j)*b(j,k)
 end do
 end do
 end do
 return
 end

!!S Main
 subroutine mat_mult_for1(c,nc,a,na,b,nb,n1,n2,n3)
c
csame as before, invariant matrix element eliminated from loop
c
 implicit none
 
 integer na,nb,nc,n1,n2,n3
 integer*2 i,j,k
 extended c(nc,n3),a(na,n2),b(nb,n3)
 extended sum 
 
 do k=1,n3
 do i=1,n1
 sum = 0x0
 do j=1,n2
 sum = sum+a(i,j)*b(j,k)
 end do
 c(i,k) = sum
 end do
 end do
 return
 end

!!S Main
 subroutine mat_mult_for0(c,nc,a,na,b,nb,n1,n2,n3)
c
csame as before, with constant dimensions
c
 implicit none
 
 integer na,nb,nc,n1,n2,n3
 integer*2 i,j,k
 extended c(50,50),a(50,50),b(50,50)
 extended sum 
 
 do k=1,n3
 do i=1,n1
 sum = 0x0
 do j=1,n2
 sum = sum+a(i,j)*b(j,k)
 end do
 c(i,k) = sum
 end do
 end do
 return
 end

!!S Main
 integer function ticks
 ticks = long(362)
 return
 end
Listing 2 : non-optimized Fortran routine           
!!S Main
 subroutine mat_mult_for(c,nc,a,na,b,nb,n1,n2,n3)
c
cduplicate of mat_mul_for3 for compiling without optimization
c
 implicit none
 
 integer na,nb,nc,n1,n2,n3
 integer*2 i,j,k
 extended c(nc,n3),a(na,n2),b(nb,n3)
 
 do k=1,n3
 do i=1,n1
 c(i,k) = 0x0
 do j=1,n2
 c(i,k) = c(i,k)+a(i,j)*b(j,k)
 end do
 end do
 end do
 return
 end
Listing 3 : Pascal routine

{$S Main}
{$R-}
unit matmul;

interface

type matrix = array [1..50,1..50] of extended;

procedure mat_mul_pas
 (var c : matrix; nc : longint;
  var a : matrix; na : longint;
  var b : matrix; nb : longint;
  n1,n2,n3:longint);

procedure mat_mul_pas_opt
 (var c : matrix; nc : longint;
  var a : matrix; na : longint;
  var b : matrix; nb : longint;
  n1,n2,n3:longint);

implementation

procedure mat_mul_pas;
var
 i,j,k:integer;
begin
 for k:=1 to n3 do
 for i:=1 to n1 do
 begin
 c[i,k] := 0;
 for j:=1 to n2 do
 c[i,k] := c[i,k]+a[i,j]*b[j,k];
 end;
end;

procedure mat_mul_pas_opt;
var
 i,j,k:integer; sum:extended;
begin
 for k:=1 to n3 do
 for i:=1 to n1 do
 begin
 sum := 0;
 for j:=1 to n2 do
 sum := sum+a[i,j]*b[j,k];
 c[i,k] := sum;
 end;
end;

end.
Listing 4 : C routine

pascal void mat_mul_c 
 (extended c[50][], long nc,
  extended a[50][], long na,
  extended b[50][], long nb,
  long n1, long n2, long n3)

{
 int i,j,k;
 
 for ( k=1 ; k <= n3; k++ )
 for ( i=1 ; i <= n1 ; i++ )
 {
 c[i][k] = 0.0;
 for ( j=1 ; j <= n2 ; j++ )
 c[i][k] = c[i][k]+a[i][j]*b[j][k];
 }
}

pascal void mat_mul_c_opt
 (extended c[50][], long nc,
  extended a[50][], long na,
  extended b[50][], long nb,
  long n1, long n2, long n3)

{
 register int i,j,k;
 register extended sum;
 
 for ( k=1 ; k <= n3; k++ )
 for ( i=1 ; i <= n1 ; i++ )
 {
 sum = 0.0;
 for ( j=1 ; j <= n2 ; j++ )
 sum = sum+a[i][j]*b[j][k];
 c[i][k] = sum;
 }
}
Listing 5 : inner loops compared, Nosy-disassembled

pascal, optimized
lan_3 MOVEA.L  param2(A6),A0
 MOVE D6,D0
 MULS #$258,D0
 MOVE D5,D1
 MULS #12,D1
 ADD  D1,D0
 MOVEA.Lparam3(A6),A1
 MOVE D5,D1
 MULS #$258,D1
 MOVE D7,D2
 MULS #12,D2
 ADD  D2,D1
 LEA  -$264(A0),A0
 FMOVE.X0(A0,D0.W),FP0
 LEA  -$264(A1),A0
 FMUL.X 0(A0,D1.W),FP0
 FADD FP7,FP0  ; could use
 FMOVE  FP0,FP7  ; FADD FP0,FP7 here
 ADDQ #1,D5
 BVS.S  lan_5
lan_4 CMP.W van_1(A6),D5
 BLE  lan_3

c, optimized
lar_1 MOVE.LD7,D0
 MOVE.L D0,D1
 MULU #12,D0
 SWAP D1
 MULU #12,D1
 SWAP D1
 CLR  D1
 ADD.L  D1,D0
 ADD.L  D6,D0
 MOVE.L D5,D1
 MOVE.L D1,D2
 MULU #12,D1
 SWAP D2
 MULU #12,D2
 SWAP D2
 CLR  D2
 ADD.L  D2,D1
 ADD.L  D7,D1
 FMOVE.X  0(A3,D0.L),FP0
 FMUL.X 0(A4,D1.L),FP0
 FMOVE  FP7,FP1
 FADD FP0,FP1
 FMOVE  FP1,FP7
 ADDQ.L #1,D7
lar_2 CMP.L D7,D4
 BGE  lar_1

pascal, plain
lam_3 MOVEA.L  param2(A6),A0
 MOVE D6,D0
 MULS #$258,D0
 MOVE D5,D1
 MULS #12,D1
 ADD  D1,D0
 MOVEA.L  param3(A6),A1
 MOVE D5,D1
 MULS #$258,D1
 MOVE D7,D2
 MULS #12,D2
 ADD  D2,D1
 LEA  -$264(A0),A0
 FMOVE.X 0(A0,D0.W),FP0
 LEA  -$264(A1),A0
 FMUL.X 0(A0,D1.W),FP0
 MOVE D6,D0
 MULS #$258,D0
 MOVE D7,D1
 MULS #12,D1
 ADD  D1,D0
 LEA  -$264(A4),A0
 FADD.X 0(A0,D0.W),FP0
 MOVE D6,D0
 MULS #$258,D0
 MOVE D7,D1
 MULS #12,D1
 ADD  D1,D0
 LEA  -$264(A4),A0
 FMOVE.X FP0,0(A0,D0.W)
 ADDQ #1,D5
 BVS.S  lam_5
lam_4 CMP.W vam_1(A6),D5
 BLE  lam_3

c, plain
lao_3 MOVE.LD5,D0
 MOVE.L D0,D1
 MULU #12,D0
 SWAP D1
 MULU #12,D1
 SWAP D1
 CLR  D1
 ADD.L  D1,D0
 ADD.L  D6,D0
 MOVE.L D7,D1
 MOVE.L D1,D2
 MULU #12,D1
 SWAP D2
 MULU #12,D2
 SWAP D2
 CLR  D2
 ADD.L  D2,D1
 ADD.L  D6,D1
 MOVEA.L  param3(A6),A0
 MOVE.L D5,D2
 MOVE.L D2,D3
 MULU #12,D2
 SWAP D3
 MULU #12,D3
 SWAP D3
 CLR  D3
 ADD.L  D3,D2
 ADD.L  D7,D2
 FMOVE.X  0(A4,D1.L),FP0
 FMUL.X 0(A0,D2.L),FP0
 FADD.X 0(A3,D0.L),FP0
 MOVE.L D5,D0
 MOVE.L D0,D1
 MULU #12,D0
 SWAP D1
 MULU #12,D1
 SWAP D1
 CLR  D1
 ADD.L  D1,D0
 ADD.L  D6,D0
 FMOVE.X FP0,0(A3,D0.L)
 ADDQ.L #1,D7
lao_4 CMP.L D7,D4
 BGE  lao_3

Fortran, optimized
lah_3 MOVE-172(A6),D2
 EXT.L  D2
 EXT.L  D2
 SUB.L  -142(A6),D2
 MULS.L #12,D2 
 MOVE.L D2,D0
 MOVE -170(A6),D2
 EXT.L  D2
 EXT.L  D2
 SUB.L  -130(A6),D2
 MULS.L -134(A6),D2 
 ADD.L  D0,D2
 MOVEA.L  32(A6),A0
 ADDA.L D2,A0
 FMOVE.X  (A0),FP7
 MOVE -170(A6),D2
 EXT.L  D2
 EXT.L  D2
 SUB.L  -118(A6),D2
 MULS.L #12,D2 
 MOVE.L D2,D1
 MOVE -168(A6),D2
 EXT.L  D2
 EXT.L  D2
 SUB.L  -106(A6),D2
 MULS.L -110(A6),D2 
 ADD.L  D1,D2
 MOVEA.L  24(A6),A1
 ADDA.L D2,A1
 FMUL.X (A1),FP7
 FADD.X -94(A6),FP7
 FMOVE.X  FP7,-94(A6)
 ADDQ #1,-170(A6)
 SUBQ.L #1,D5
 BGT  lah_3

Fortran, plain
lae_3 MOVE-164(A6),D2
 EXT.L  D2
 EXT.L  D2
 SUB.L  -134(A6),D2
 MULS.L #12,D2 
 MOVE.L D2,D0
 MOVE -162(A6),D2
 EXT.L  D2
 EXT.L  D2
 SUB.L  -122(A6),D2
 MULS.L -126(A6),D2 
 ADD.L  D0,D2
 MOVEA.L  32(A6),A0
 ADDA.L D2,A0
 FMOVE.X  (A0),FP7 ; get a(i,k)
 MOVE -162(A6),D2
 EXT.L  D2
 EXT.L  D2
 SUB.L  -110(A6),D2
 MULS.L #12,D2 
 MOVE.L D2,D1
 MOVE -160(A6),D2
 EXT.L  D2
 EXT.L  D2
 SUB.L  -98(A6),D2
 MULS.L -102(A6),D2 
 ADD.L  D1,D2
 MOVEA.L  24(A6),A1
 ADDA.L D2,A1
 FMUL.X (A1),FP7 ; multiply by b(i,k)
 MOVE -164(A6),D2
 EXT.L  D2
 EXT.L  D2
 SUB.L  -158(A6),D2
 MULS.L #12,D2 
 MOVE.L D2,D1
 MOVE -160(A6),D2
 EXT.L  D2
 EXT.L  D2
 SUB.L  -146(A6),D2
 MULS.L -150(A6),D2 
 ADD.L  D1,D2
 MOVEA.L  40(A6),A1
 ADDA.L D2,A1
 FADD.X (A1),FP7 ; add c(i,k)
 MOVE -164(A6),D2; this
 EXT.L  D2; whole
 EXT.L  D2; stuff
 SUB.L  -158(A6),D2; is
 MULS.L #12,D2  ;
 MOVE.L D2,D1  ; R
 MOVE -160(A6),D2; E
 EXT.L  D2; D
 EXT.L  D2; U
 SUB.L  -146(A6),D2; N
 MULS.L -150(A6),D2; D
 ADD.L  D1,D2  ; A
 MOVEA.L  40(A6),A1; N
 ADDA.L D2,A1  ; T !!!!
 FMOVE.X  FP7,(A1) ; put back c(i,k)
 ADDQ #1,-162(A6)
 SUBQ.L #1,D5
 BGT  lae_3

 

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DiskCatalogMaker is a simple disk management tool which catalogs disks. Simple, light-weight, and fast Finder-like intuitive look and feel Super-fast search algorithm Can compress catalog data for... Read more
Live Home 3D Pro 3.1.2 - $69.99
Live Home 3D Pro, a successor of Live Interior 3D, is the powerful yet intuitive home design software that lets you build the house of your dreams right on your Mac. It has every feature of Live Home... Read more
Deeper 2.2.1 - Enable hidden features in...
Deeper is a personalization utility for macOS which allows you to enable and disable the hidden functions of the Finder, Dock, QuickTime, Safari, iTunes, login window, Spotlight, and many of Apple's... Read more
Pinegrow 3.04 - Mockup and design webpag...
Pinegrow (was Pinegrow Web Designer) is desktop app that lets you mockup and design webpages faster with multi-page editing, CSS and LESS styling, and smart components for Bootstrap, Foundation,... Read more

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The best deals on the App Store this wee...
There are quite a few truly superb games on sale on the App Store this week. If you haven't played some of these, many of which are true classics, now's the time to jump on the bandwagon. Here are the deals you need to know about. [Read more] | Read more »
Realpolitiks Mobile (Games)
Realpolitiks Mobile 1.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $5.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: PLEASE NOTE: The game might not work properly on discontinued 1GB of RAM devices (iPhone 5s, iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus, iPad... | Read more »
Layton’s Mystery Journey (Games)
Layton’s Mystery Journey 1.0.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $15.99, Version: 1.0.0 (iTunes) Description: THE MUCH-LOVED LAYTON SERIES IS BACK WITH A 10TH ANNIVERSARY INSTALLMENT! Developed by LEVEL-5, LAYTON’S... | Read more »
Full Throttle Remastered (Games)
Full Throttle Remastered 1.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $4.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: Originally released by LucasArts in 1995, Full Throttle is a classic graphic adventure game from industry legend Tim... | Read more »
Stunning shooter Morphite gets a new tra...
Morphite is officially landing on iOS in September. The game looks like the space shooter we've been needing on mobile, and we're going to see if it fits the bill quite shortly. The game's a collaborative effort between Blowfish Studios, We're Five... | Read more »
Layton's Mystery Journey arrives to...
As you might recall, Layton's Mystery Journey is headed to iOS and Android -- tomorrow! To celebrate the impending launch, Level-5's released a new trailer, complete with an adorable hamster. [Read more] | Read more »
Sidewords (Games)
Sidewords 1.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $2.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: Grab a cup of coffee and relax with Sidewords. Sidewords is part logic puzzle, part word game, all original. No timers. No... | Read more »
Noodlecake Games' 'Leap On!...
Noodlecake Games is always good for some light-hearted arcade fun, and its latest project, Leap On! could carry on that tradition. It's a bit like high stakes tetherball in a way. Your job is to guide a cute little blob around a series of floating... | Read more »
RuneScape goes mobile later this year
Yes, RuneScape still exists. In fact, it's coming to iOS and Android in just a few short months. Jagex, creators of the hit fantasy MMORPG of yesteryear, is releasing RuneScape Mobile and Old School RuneScape for mobile devices, complete with... | Read more »
Crash of Cars wants you to capture the c...
Crash of Cars is going full on medieval in its latest update, introducing castles and all manner of new cars and skins fresh from the Dark Ages. The update introduces a new castle-themed map (complete with catapults) and a gladiator-style battle... | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

13″ 2.3GHz/128GB Space Gray MacBook Pro on sa...
MacMall has the 13″ 2.3GHz/128GB Space Gray MacBook Pro (MPXQ2LL/A) on sale for $1219 including free shipping. Their price is $80 off MSRP. Read more
Clearance 2016 12-inch Retina MacBooks, Apple...
Apple recently dropped prices on Certified Refurbished 2016 12″ Retina MacBooks, with models now available starting at $1019. Apple will include a standard one-year warranty with each MacBook, and... Read more
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FotoJet Designer, is a simple but powerful new graphic design apps available on both Mac and Windows. With FotoJet Designer’s 900+ templates, thousands of resources, and powerful editing tools you... Read more
Logo Maker Shop iOS App Lets Businesses Get C...
A newly released app is designed to help business owners to get creative with their branding by designing their own logos. With more than 1,000 editable templates, Logo Maker Shop 1.0 provides the... Read more
Sale! New 15-inch MacBook Pros for up to $150...
Amazon has the new 2017 15″ MacBook Pros on sale for up to $150 off MSRP including free shipping: – 15″ 2.8GHz MacBook Pro Space Gray: $2249 $150 off MSRP – 15″ 2.89Hz MacBook Pro Space Gray: $2779 $... Read more
DEVONthink To Go 2.1.7 For iOS Brings Usabili...
DEVONtechnologies has updated DEVONthink To Go, the iOS companion to DEVONthink for Mac, with enhancements and bug fixes. Version 2.1.7 adds an option to clear the Global Inbox and makes the grid... Read more
15-inch 2.2GHz Retina MacBook Pro, Apple refu...
Apple has Certified Refurbished 2015 15″ 2.2GHz Retina MacBook Pros available for $1699. That’s $300 off MSRP, and it’s the lowest price available for a 15″ MacBook Pro. An Apple one-year warranty is... Read more
13-inch 2.3GHz Silver MacBook Pro on sale for...
B&H Photo has the new 2017 13″ 2.3GHz/256GB Silver MacBook Pro (MPXU2LL/A) on sale for $1399 including free shipping plus NY & NJ sales tax only. Their price is $100 off MSRP. Read more
Apple Tackles Distracted Driving With iOS 11...
One of the most important new features coming in iOS 11 is Do Not Disturb while driving, intended to help drivers stay more focused on the road. With Do Not Disturb while driving, your iPhone can... Read more
iMazing Mini for Mac: Free Automatic and Priv...
Geneva, Switzerland-based indie developer DigiDNA has released iMazing Mini, their free macOS utility designed to automatically back up iOS devices over any local Wi-Fi network. The app offers users... Read more

Jobs Board

Frameworks Engineering Manager, *Apple* Wat...
Frameworks Engineering Manager, Apple Watch Job Number: 41632321 Santa Clara Valley, California, United States Posted: Jun. 15, 2017 Weekly Hours: 40.00 Job Summary Read more
Product Manager - *Apple* Pay on the *Appl...
Job Summary Apple is looking for a talented product manager to drive the expansion of Apple Pay on the Apple Online Store. This position includes a unique Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions - Apple...
SalesSpecialist - Retail Customer Service and SalesTransform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, you're also the Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions - Apple...
SalesSpecialist - Retail Customer Service and SalesTransform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, you're also the Read more
Senior Payments Architect - *Apple* Pay - A...
Changing the world is all in a day's work at Apple . If you love innovation, here's your chance to make a career of it. You'll work hard. But the job comes with more Read more
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