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Hey You
Volume Number:5
Issue Number:5
Column Tag:Advanced Mac'ing

Related Info: Notification Mgr

The Notification Manager

By Steven Sheets, Contributing Editor, Haufman Estates, IL

Note: Source code files accompanying article are located on MacTech CD-ROM or source code disks.

Hey You: The Mac Notification Manager

More and more, code is being written for the Macintosh that runs in a multitasking environment. At first, an application only had to share space with Desk Accessories. Then came MultiFinder, and multiple applications started running at the same time. Along the way, Macintosh programmers started creating various low level routines to do tricks with the machine (INITs that load routines into system memory, vertical retrace routines, time manager ‘wakeup’ routines, redirection of normal traps, etc.). At any given time, half a dozen or more code segments may be running in addition to a single ‘normal’ application.

These code segments have to work in a very restrictive environment. Some are not allowed access to global data. Many can not make Toolbox calls that move or purge memory. Others can not even have control of the CPU for longer than a tick (60th second). Even a normal application cannot place an alert where the user can see it if it is running in the background under MultiFinder. How can these code segments inform the user of some event or action with these limitations?

Enter one of newest Toolbox managers from Apple; the Notification Manager. The Notification Manager allows the code to post a notification request that, in some method, notifies the user of something. A Notification Request can consist of an Alert Notification (displaying a text message), an Audible Notification (playing a ‘snd’ sound), an Icon Notification (displaying a small icon, or ‘SICN’, in the upper left corner on top of the Apple icon) or some combination.

Using the Notification Manager, a terminal program running in the background can inform the user when a download is complete. No matter what is running at the time, when the request is processed, the Notification Alert will appear on top of all windows. Using the Manager, an Appletalk Mail program could inform the user of new mail with a flashing mail box icon.

The Notification Manager handles the processing of all requests (playing the sound, clicking on the alert, flashing the icon, etc.) asynchronously. The code segment would use two new Toolbox traps to inform the manager of a request. Neither of these two calls process the request, they simply add or detach records from the Notification Manager list. Because of this, they neither move nor purge memory, and can be safely called at any time, even inside of a low level interrupt procedure.

The Notification Manager was implemented in the System Software 6.0. The new Toolbox traps will not function on systems prior to 6.0. Portions of the System Software 6.0 already uses the Notification Manager. By flashing a small Clock icon, The Alarm Clock use the manager to signal that the alarm has gone off. The Print Monitor also uses the Notification Manager to signal printing information.

The Notification Manager

The Notification Manager maintains a queue (list) of requests that need to be processed. Whenever SystemTask or WaitNextEvent is called, the Notification Manager checks the queue for an unprocessed request. First the Notification Request, if there is one, is processed, then the response routine, if there is one, is called. The response routine can be the default routine (simply removes the request record from the queue) or the code segment can define it’s own response routine to do whatever it wants.

The Notification Request is a standard Macintosh Queue record expanded for the Notification Manager. The record has the following format:

{1}

NMRec = record
 qLink: QElemPtr;
 qType: INTEGER;
 nmFlags: INTEGER;
 nmPrivate: LONGINT;
 nmReserved: INTEGER;
 nmMark: INTEGER;
 nmSIcon: Handle;
 nmSound: Handle;
 nmStr: StringPtr;
 nmResp: ProcPtr;
 nmRefCon: LONGINT;
end;

The qLink pointer points to the next request in the linked list and should not be changed by the code segment. Neither should the nmPrivate or nmReserved elements be changed by the code; the manager handles them. The qType (type of queue) of a Notification Queue is the value 8, the integer value of ORD(nmType). The qType element needs to be set to 8 before the request is added to the queue.

The nmStr pointer points to the text message that would be displayed by the Notification Manager in an alert. If the pointer is set to nil, no alert will be displayed. The nmSound is a handle to a sound record (ie. ‘snd ‘ resource). The Sound Manager will play it before the alert is displayed. If nmSound is set to -1, the “System Error” sound is used. If it is set to 0, no sounds are played. The nmSIcon is the handle to the small icon (32 bytes, 16 by 16 pixel bitmap) that the Notification Manager will flash in the upper left corner of the screen on top of the Apple icon. Usually this small icon is stored as a resource of type ‘SICN’. A nil value for nmSIcon signifies no flashing icon. The nmMark element indicates who generated the notification event. An application should set nmMark to 1. When under MultiFinder, a diamond mark will be placed in the Apple menu next to the application’s name. If the request was generated by a Desk Accessory, nmMark should be set to the refNum of the DA. This will place a diamond mark next to the DA’s name. All other types of code segments (Drivers, patches, etc.) should set this value to 0.

The nmResp is the pointer to the procedure called after the request is processed. If nmResp is set to 0, no procedure is called. If it is set to -1, a special response routine is called that removes that request from the queue. This response routine does not dispose of any memory (the string, the sound, the icon, or the request itself). If the code segment wants to define it’s own response routine, nmResp is set to the pointer of that routine. In most cases (main exception is Icon Alerts), the response procedure should remove the request from the queue immediately. The response procedure has the following format:

PROCEDURE MyResponse (nmReqPtr : QElemPtr) ;

The response routine will be called by the Notification Manager during a SystemTask or WaitNextEvent call. Thus it is safe to move or purge memory. It is also safe to do any I/O (file, resource, serial, Appletalk). If the routine is suppose to change some global variables of an application, it must first make sure that the A5 is correct. For example, when under MultiFinder, the notification may occur when some other application’s A5 is set. The nmRefCon may come in handy to store the value of A5. The nmRefCon element can be used by the code segment for what ever purpose the code segment wants. A handle to a data structure, a pointer to a Boolean flag, or the correct A5 value could be stored there.

Apple states that the response routine should not do “user interface” type of drawing. Instead the routine should set a flag so that the application knows when it should do the drawing. To change a Boolean flag, it is simpler to stuff a pointer to the flag into nmRefCon than it is to change A5 back and forth.

Using the Notification Manager

There are only two routines that exercise the Notification Manager, NMInstall and NMRemove. NMInstall is passed the pointer to the notification request that is to be installed into the queue. It returns noErr (0) if successful. NMRemove is passed a pointer to a notification request already installed in the queue. If it is successful in removing that request, it returns noErr also. Unless a request wants an Icon to be flashed for awhile, the NMRemove routine should be called after a notification request has been processed. Both calls are register based. The following are the Inline Glue routines needed to use the call from Pascal and the Assembler information:

{2}

FUNCTION NMInstall (nmReqPtr : QElemPtr) : OSErr;
 inline $205F, $A05E, $3E80;

_NMInstall ($A05E)
On entry: A0pointer to the NMRec
On exit:D0result code

FUNCTION NMRemove (nmReqPtr : QElemPtr) : OSErr;
 inline $205F, $A05F, $3E80;

__ NMRemove ( $A05F )
On entry: A0pointer to the NMRec
On exit:D0result code

The Sample Program: HeyYou

HeyYou uses the Notification Manager to show 3 different effects. The NotifStr routine demonstrates the simplest effect, displaying a text message to the user. The routine uses two global variables, a string to hold the text, and a NMRec to hold the notification request. The request nmResp is set to -1 so that the Notification Manager will automatically remove this request from the queue after it has been done. Since the data is stored in global variables, no other clean up has to be done.

The NotifSnd routine demonstrates a slightly more involved request. It plays a sound (‘snd ‘ resource) and displays a text message. No global variables are used in this example. Instead memory is allocated to hold the request and the test string. The nmResp is set to a pointer to the MySndResponse so that when the request is done, the MySndResponse routine can be called. MySndResponse can remove the request from the queue, release the sound from memory, dispose of the memory holding the string, and finally dispose of the memory holding the request itself.

The method used in NotifSnd works well for code segments that have no access to global memory space such as Desk Accessories, INITs, etc. This method also has the additional advantage of allowing more than one request to be added at the same time. This could not be done with NotifStr since each request shared the same global variables. As long as MySndResponse is locked in memory somewhere, the method used in NotifSnd will work.

The last example, NotifIcon, demonstrates the use of icons by the Notification Manager. It displays a text message, blinks a small icon in the upper left corner of the screen and marks HeyYou as the application that caused this request. Usually the code segment wants the icon to flash in the corner until the user has done something in response. For example, the Alarm Clock does not remove it’s icon until the alarm is turned off. To keep the Icon in use until the appropriate time, the notification request can not be removed from the queue or the flashing effect would be lost. Thus no response routine is specified. Instead the application removes the request (and flashing icon) when the application quits, when it resumes after a switch under MultiFinder, or when the user selects the “Remove Icon” menu item. In HeyYou, one example sets a timer going so that NotifIcon is processed 60 seconds after the menu item is selected. Since HeyYou and the timer work in the background under MultiFinder, this will demonstrate how the Notification Manager works when some other application is running. Notice the mark that appears next to the program name HeyYou in the Apple menu.

Beyond...

Here are some last ideas for Notification Manager routines/utilities that can be written:

1) An example that places a Notification Request in low System memory, and starts a Timer routine that will install the request sometime in the future. The response routine is set so that it removes the request and releases the memory used by everything (string, request, timer routine, response routine). With this routine, a “Smart” Alarm Clock would be easy to create.

2) An Appletalk socket completion routine that automatically adds a request whenever someone sends a packet to that computer. If this socket is loaded into low memory, it would create a simple pager utility.

3) A routine that would install an Icon Notification request, then set up a timer so that the request (and icon) would be automatically removed a few moments later.

Listing:  HeyYou.pas

{  HeyYou program for MacTutor by Steve Sheets}
{Demonstrates uses of the Notificaiton Manager.  Creates some simple 
String Notifications, some Sound }
{Notifications, some Small Icon Notifications (imediately and after a 
delay).}

program HeyYou;
{  Resource Constants.  }
 const
 SICNdiamond = 0;
 SICNheyyou = 500;
 SNDbeep = 1;
 SNDclick = 2;
 SNDbong = 3;
 SNDmonkey = 4;
 ALERTabout = 500;

{Notification Manager Queue Record.}
 type
 NMRec = record
 qLink: QElemPtr;
 qType: INTEGER;
 nmFlags: INTEGER;
 nmPrivate: LONGINT;
 nmReserved: INTEGER;
 nmMark: INTEGER;
 nmSIcon: Handle;
 nmSound: Handle;
 nmStr: StringPtr;
 nmResp: ProcPtr;
 nmRefCon: LONGINT;
 end;
 NMPtr = ^NMRec;

{Program Global Variables.  Menus, Notification Requests, Strings and 
Flags.  }
 var
 myM1, myM2, myM3: MenuHandle;
 StrRec, IconRec: NMRec;
 StrStr, IconStr: Str255;
 doneFlag, IconFlag: BOOLEAN;
 Timer: LONGINT;

{Notification Manager Glue rotines.}
{Install Notifiaction Request into Queue.    }
 function NMInstall (nmReqPtr: QElemPtr): OSErr;
 inline
 $205F, $A05E, $3E80;
{MOVE.L (SP)+,A0 }
{_NMInstall }
{MOVE.W D0,(SP)  }

{Remove Notifiaction Request into Queue.     }
 function NMRemove (nmReqPtr: QElemPtr): OSErr;
 inline
 $205F, $A05F, $3E80;
{MOVE.L (SP)+,A0 }
{_NMRemove}
{MOVE.W D0,(SP)  }

{Checks to see if this is System 6.0 or above}
 function CheckSystem: Boolean;
 var
 theWorld: SysEnvRec;
 begin
 if SysEnvirons(1, theWorld) = noErr then
 CheckSystem := (theWorld.systemVersion >= $0600)
 else
 CheckSystem := FALSE;
 end;

{Display About Info. }
 procedure DoAbout;
 var
 dummy: INTEGER;
 begin
 dummy := Alert(ALERTabout, nil);
 end;

{First Test of Notification Manager. }
{Displays a simple String.  The Notification Request is automatically
 removed after it is completed.  }
 procedure NotifStr (St: Str255);
 var
 E: OSerr;
 begin
 with StrRec do
 begin
 qType := 8;
{No Mark, Icons or Sounds.}
 nmMark := 0;
 nmSIcon := nil;
 nmSound := nil;
{This String.  }
 StrStr := St;
 nmStr := @StrStr;
{Automatically Removed when Completed. }
 nmResp := POINTER(-1);
 nmRefCon := 0;
 end;
 E := NMInstall(@StrRec);
 end;

{Call by Notification Manager after a Sound Notification has been completed. 
 Removes}
{the entry from Notification queue, releases SND resource if there is 
one, disposes of }
{string handle if there is one and disposes of the request record.
 }
 procedure MySndResponse (nmReqPtr: QElemPtr);
 var
 aPtr: NMPtr;
 E: OSErr;
 begin
 aPtr := NMPtr(nmReqPtr);
 E := NMRemove(nmReqPtr);
 if (aPtr^.nmSound <> nil) and (aPtr^.nmSound <> POINTER(-1)) then
 ReleaseResource(aPtr^.nmSound);
 if aPtr^.nmRefCon <> 0 then
 begin
 HUnLock(Handle(aPtr^.nmRefCon));
 DisposHandle(Handle(aPtr^.nmRefCon));
 end;
 DisposPtr(Ptr(nmReqPtr));
 end;

{Second Test of Notification Manager.}
{Displays a String and plays a sound.  Allocates memmory for the request 
record and the string.  }
{If Sound is -1, the System Beep is used.  Any other number,  indicates 
a SND resource, and}
{that resource is loaded in.  MySndResponse is setup so that it will 
be called after Notification is completed.}
 procedure NotifSnd (St: Str255; Sn: INTEGER);
 var
 E: OSerr;
 tempRec: NMPtr;
 StrHdl: StringHandle;
 begin
 tempRec := NMPtr(NewPtr(SIZEOF(NMRec)));
 with tempRec^ do
 begin
 qType := 8;
{No Marks or Icons.}
 nmMark := 0;
 nmSIcon := nil;
{System Beep or SND resource. }
 if (Sn = -1) then
 nmSound := POINTER(-1)
 else
 nmSound := GetResource(‘snd ‘, Sn);
{If String, allocate memmory for it. }
 if St = ‘’ then
 begin
 nmStr := nil;
 nmRefCon := 0;
 end
 else
 begin
 StrHdl := NewString(St);
 HLock(Handle(StrHdl));
 nmRefCon := ORD4(StrHdl);
 nmStr := StrHdl^;
 end;
{Call MySndResponse to remove resource when completed. }
 nmResp := @MySndResponse;
 end;
 E := NMInstall(QElemPtr(tempRec));
 end;

{Third Test of Notification Manager. }
{Displays a String, displays a Small Icon and Marks the Current Application.
 }
{This Notification is not removed until the User selects “Remove Icon”
 }
{fromt the Menu or the Application is Quit. }
 procedure NotifIcon (St: Str255; IC: INTEGER);
 var
 E: OSerr;
 begin
 if not IconFlag then
 begin
 IconFlag := TRUE;
 with IconRec do
 begin
 qType := 8;
{Current Application is Marked (in MultiFinder).}
 nmMark := 1;
{Small Icon is used. }
 nmSIcon := GetResource(‘SICN’, IC);
{No SND.}
 nmSound := nil;
{This String.  }
{Use String (if any).}
 if St = ‘’ then
 nmStr := nil
 else
 begin
 IconStr := St;
 nmStr := @IconStr;
 end;
{No Completion Routine. }
 nmResp := nil;
 nmRefCon := 0;
 end;
 E := NMInstall(@IconRec);
 end;
 end;

{If an small Icon is still flashing, Removes it and releases SND resource.
 }
 procedure RemoveNotifIcon;
 var
 E: OSerr;
 begin
 if IconFlag then
 begin
 IconFlag := FALSE;
 E := NMRemove(@IconRec);
 if IconRec.nmSIcon <> nil then
 ReleaseResource(IconRec.nmSIcon);
 end;
 end;

{Normal Mac Setup Procedure }
 procedure SetUp;
 var
 S: Str255;
 begin
 doneFlag := FALSE;
 IconFlag := FALSE;
 Timer := 0;
 S := ‘1’;
 S[1] := CHR(applemark);
 myM1 := NewMenu(101, S);
 AppendMenu(myM1, ‘NotifTest Source;(-’);
 AddResMenu(myM1, ‘DRVR’);
 InsertMenu(myM1, 0);
 myM2 := NewMenu(102, ‘File’);
 AppendMenu(myM2, ‘Quit’);
 InsertMenu(myM2, 0);
 myM3 := NewMenu(103, ‘Simple’);
 AppendMenu(myM3, ‘String Test #1;String Test #2;(-;Bong Sound Test;Click 
Sound Test;Bong and Click Sound Test’);
 AppendMenu(myM3, ‘Monkey Sound Alone Test - no alert;System Error Sound 
Test;(-;Diamond Icon Test’);
 AppendMenu(myM3, ‘HeyYou Icon Alone Test - no alert;Delayed Icon Test;Remove 
Icon’);
 InsertMenu(myM3, 0);
 DrawMenuBar;
 end;

{Normal Mac Menu Command Routine.  }
 procedure DoCommand (mResult: LONGINT);
 var
 theItem: INTEGER;
 theMenu: INTEGER;
 tempStr: Str255;
 tempInteger: INTEGER;
 tempLong: LONGINT;
 begin
 theItem := LoWord(mResult);
 theMenu := HiWord(mResult);
 case theMenu of
 101: 
 if theItem = 1 then
 DoAbout
 else
 begin
 GetItem(myM1, theItem, tempStr);
 tempInteger := OpenDeskAcc(tempStr);
 end;
 102: 
 if theItem = 1 then
 doneFlag := TRUE;
 103: 
 case theItem of
 1: 
 NotifStr(‘This is a String Test of the Notification Manager.’);
 2: 
 begin
 GetDateTime(tempLong);
 IUTimeString(tempLong, TRUE, tempStr);
 tempStr := CONCAT(‘This is another String Test of the Notification Manager. 
 The Time is ‘, tempStr);
 NotifStr(tempStr);
 end;

 4: 
 NotifSnd(‘This is a Sound Test of the Notification Manager using the 
Bong sound.’, SNDbong);
 5: 
 NotifSnd(‘This is a Sound Test of the Notification Manager using the 
Click sound.’, SNDclick);
 6: 
 begin
 NotifSnd(‘This is a Sound Test of the Notification Manager using the 
Bong sound.’, SNDbong);
 NotifSnd(‘This is a Sound Test of the Notification Manager using the 
Click sound.’, SNDclick);
 end;
 7: 
 NotifSnd(‘’, SNDmonkey);
 8: 
 NotifSnd(‘This is a Sound Test of the Notification Manager using the 
System Error sound.’, -1);

 10: 
 begin
 RemoveNotifIcon;
 NotifIcon(‘This is a Icon Test of the Notification Manager using the 
Diamond Icon.’, SICNdiamond);
 end;
 11: 
 begin
 RemoveNotifIcon;
 NotifIcon(‘’, SICNheyyou);
 end;
{Call NotifIcon after 60 seconds (3600 ticks).}
 12: 
 Timer := TickCount + 3600;
 13: 
 RemoveNotifIcon;
 otherwise
 end;
 otherwise
 end;
 HiliteMenu(0);
 end;

{Simple Mac Main Event Loop.  Check to see if it is time to display HeyYou 
Icon. }
{If Resuming under MultiFinder, Remove Icon (if any).}
 procedure MainLoop;
 const
 suspendResumeMessage = 1;
 var
 myEvent: EventRecord;
 whichWindow: WindowPtr;
 tempStr: Str255;
 tempLong: LONGINT;
 begin
 repeat
 if Timer <> 0 then
 if TickCount > Timer then
 begin
 RemoveNotifIcon;
 Timer := 0;
 GetDateTime(tempLong);
 IUTimeString(tempLong, TRUE, tempStr);
 NotifIcon(CONCAT(‘Hey You!  The Time is ‘, tempStr), SICNheyyou);
 end;

 if WaitNextEvent(everyEvent, myEvent, 0, nil) then
 case myEvent.what of
 mouseDown: 
 case FindWindow(myEvent.where, whichWindow) of
 inSysWindow: 
 SystemClick(myEvent, whichWindow);
 inMenuBar: 
 DoCommand(MenuSelect(myEvent.where));
 otherwise
 end;
 App4Evt: 
 if BitShift(myEvent.message, -24) = SuspendResumeMessage then
 if Odd(myEvent.message) then
 RemoveNotifIcon;
 otherwise
 end;
 until doneFlag;
 end;

{Deletes Menus and removes Icon Notification Request (if any). }

 procedure CloseDown;
 begin
 RemoveNotifIcon;
 DeleteMenu(101);
 DeleteMenu(102);
 DeleteMenu(103);
 DisposeMenu(myM1);
 DisposeMenu(myM2);
 DisposeMenu(myM3);
 end;

{Main Program  . }
begin
 InitGraf(@thePort);
 InitFonts;
 FlushEvents(everyEvent, 0);
 InitWindows;
 InitMenus;
 TEInit;
 InitDialogs(nil);
 InitCursor;
 DoAbout;
 if CheckSystem then
 begin
 SetUp;
 MainLoop;
 CloseDown;
 end;
end.
Listing:  HeyYou.r

/*----------------------------------------------------------

HeyYou.r-  Resources for HeyYou
Notification Manager Example Program for MacTutor by Steve Sheets

----------------------------------------------------------*/

#include “Types.r”

type ‘HEY!’ as ‘STR ‘;

resource ‘HEY!’ (0) {
 “Notification Manager Example for MacTutor by Steve Sheets”
};

resource ‘BNDL’ (128) {
 ‘HEY!’,
 0,
 { /* array TypeArray: 2 elements */
 /* [1] */
 ‘ICN#’,
 { /* array IDArray: 1 elements */
 /* [1] */
 0, 128
 },
 /* [2] */
 ‘FREF’,
 { /* array IDArray: 1 elements */
 /* [1] */
 0, 128
 }
 }
};

resource ‘FREF’ (128) {
 ‘APPL’,
 0,
 “”
};

resource ‘ICN#’ (128) {
 { /* array: 2 elements */
 /* [1] */
 $”FFFF FFFF 807F FFFF 807F FFFF 807F FFFF”
 $”807F FFFF 807F C0FF 887F 003F 887E 001F”
 $”887C 000F 8078 0007 8079 5D47 8071 5143"
 $”8071 D9C3 8071 5083 8071 5C83 8070 0003"
 $”8070 0003 8070 0003 8071 5D43 8071 5543"
 $”87F1 D543 81F0 9543 81F0 9DC7 81F0 0007"
 $”81F0 000F 81E0 001F 8F80 007F 81FF FFFF”
 $”81FF FFFF 81FF FFFF 81FF FFFF FFFF FFFF”,
 /* [2] */
 $”FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF”
 $”FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF”
 $”FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF”
 $”FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF”
 $”FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF”
 $”FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF”
 $”FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF”
 $”FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF”
 }
};

resource ‘SICN’ (500, purgeable) {
 { /* array: 1 elements */
 /* [1] */
 $”7FFC 8002 ABAA AA2A BB3A AA12 AB92 8002"
 $”ABAA AAAA BAAA 92AA 93BA 8002 7FFC”
 }
};

resource ‘ICON’ (500) {
 $”FFFF FFFF 807F FFFF 807F FFFF 807F FFFF”
 $”807F FFFF 807F C0FF 887F 003F 887E 001F”
 $”887C 000F 8078 0007 8079 5D47 8071 5143"
 $”8071 D9C3 8071 5083 8071 5C83 8070 0003"
 $”8070 0003 8070 0003 8071 5D43 8071 5543"
 $”87F1 D543 81F0 9543 81F0 9DC7 81F0 0007"
 $”81F0 000F 81E0 001F 8F80 007F 81FF FFFF”
 $”81FF FFFF 81FF FFFF 81FF FFFF FFFF FFFF”
};

data ‘SIZE’ (-1) {
 $”5800 0006 4000 0006 4000"
};

resource ‘ALRT’ (500) {
 {40, 76, 164, 436},
 500,
 { /* array: 4 elements */
 /* [1] */
 OK, visible, sound1,
 /* [2] */
 OK, visible, sound1,
 /* [3] */
 OK, visible, sound1,
 /* [4] */
 OK, visible, sound1
 }
};

resource ‘DITL’ (500) {
 { /* array DITLarray: 3 elements */
 /* [1] */
 {84, 150, 104, 210},
 Button {
 enabled,
 “Ok”
 },
 /* [2] */
 {20, 84, 74, 344},
 StaticText {
 disabled,
 “A Notification Manager example program f”
 “or MacTutor by Steve Sheets Requires Sys”
 “tem 6.0 or higher”
 },
 /* [3] */
 {10, 10, 74, 74},
 Icon {
 disabled,
 500
 }
 }
};

 
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Fire in the Hole Review By Rob Thomas on August 29th, 2014 Our Rating: :: WALK THE PLANKUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad Seafoam’s Fire in the Hole looks like a bright, 8-bit throwback, but there’s not enough booty to... | Read more »
Alien Creeps TD is Now Available Worldwi...
Alien Creeps TD is Now Available Worldwide Posted by Ellis Spice on August 29th, 2014 [ permalink ] Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad | Read more »
Dodo Master Review
Dodo Master Review By Jordan Minor on August 29th, 2014 Our Rating: :: NEST EGGiPad Only App - Designed for the iPad Dodo Master is tough but fair, and that’s what makes it a joy to play.   | Read more »
Motorsport Manager Review
Motorsport Manager Review By Lee Hamlet on August 29th, 2014 Our Rating: :: MARVELOUS MANAGEMENTUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad Despite its depth and sense of tactical freedom, Motorsport Manager is one of the most... | Read more »
Motorsport Manager – Beginner Tips, Tric...
The world of Motorsport management can be an unforgiving and merciless one, so to help with some of the stress that comes with running a successful race team, here are a few hints and tips to leave your opponents in the dust. | Read more »
CalPal Update Brings the App to 2.0, Add...
CalPal Update Brings the App to 2.0, Adds Lots of New Stuff Posted by Ellis Spice on August 29th, 2014 [ permalink ] | Read more »
Baseball Battle Review
Baseball Battle Review By Jennifer Allen on August 29th, 2014 Our Rating: :: SIMPLE HITTINGUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad Simple and cute, Baseball Battle is a fairly fun baseball game for those looking for something... | Read more »
Checkmark 2.1 Update Released, and it’s...
Checkmark 2.1 Update Released, and it’s on Sale for a Limited Time Posted by Jessica Fisher on August 29th, 2014 [ permalink ] | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

Labor Day Weekend MacBook Pro sale; 15-inch m...
B&H Photo has the new 2014 15″ Retina MacBook Pros on sale for up to $125 off MSRP. Shipping is free, and B&H charges NY sales tax only. They’ll also include free copies of Parallels Desktop... Read more
Labor Day Weekend iPad mini sale; $50 to $100...
Best Buy has the iPad mini with Retina Display (WiFi models) on sale for $50 off MSRP on their online store for Labor Day Weekend. Choose free shipping or free local store pick up. Price is for... Read more
13-inch 1.4GHz MacBook Air on sale for $899,...
Adorama has the new 2014 13″ 1.4GHz/128GB MacBook Air on sale for $899.99 including free shipping plus NY & NJ tax only. Their price is $100 off MSRP. Read more
It’s Official: Apple Issues Invitations To Se...
Apple has issued one of its characteristically cryptic press invitations for a special event to be held at the Flint Center for the Performing Arts in hometown Cupertino on Sept. 9, 2014 at 10:00 am... Read more
Tablet Shipments To See First On-year Decline...
TrendForce analyst Caroline Chen notes that when the iPad launched in 2010, it was an instant hit and spurred a tablet PC revolution, with tablets so popular that that notebook PC sales stagnated and... Read more
SOBERLINK Releases Apple iOS Compatible Handh...
Cypress, California based SOBERLINK, Inc., creator of the first handheld Breathalyzer designed to improve recovery outcomes, continues to show prominence in the mobile alcohol monitoring space with... Read more
New 21″ 1.4GHz iMac on sale again for $999, s...
Best Buy has the new 21″ 1.4GHz iMac on sale for $999.99 on their online store. Their price is $100 off MSRP. Choose free shipping or free local store pick up. Price is for online orders only, in-... Read more
Smartphone Outlook Remains Strong for 2014, U...
According to a new mobile phone forecast from the International Data Corporation (IDC) Worldwide Quarterly Mobile Phone Tracker, more than 1.25 billion smartphones will be shipped worldwide in 2014,... Read more
Save up to $60 with Apple refurbished iPod to...
The Apple Store has Apple Certified Refurbished 5th generation iPod touches available starting at $149. Apple’s one-year warranty is included with each model, and shipping is free. Many, but not all... Read more
12-Inch MacBook Air Coming in 4Q14 or 2015 –...
Digitimes’ Aaron Lee and Joseph Tsai report that according to Taiwan-based upstream supply chain insiders, Apple plans to launch a thinner MacBook model either at year end 2014 or in 2015, and that... Read more

Jobs Board

*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions (US) - A...
Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, you're also the Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions (US) - A...
Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, you're also the Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions (US) - A...
Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, you're also the Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions (US) - A...
Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, you're also the Read more
Senior Event Manager, *Apple* Retail Market...
…This senior level position is responsible for leading and imagining the Apple Retail Team's global event strategy. Delivering an overarching brand story; in-store, Read more
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