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FORTRAN to Mach2
Volume Number:5
Issue Number:3
Column Tag:Forth Forum

Porting FORTRAN to Mach 2

By Jörg Langowski, MacTutor Editorial Board

“Mach2 and FORTRAN”

Regular readers of this column will have noticed that for my work on machines other than the Mac, I often use Fortran. Also, you’ll have remarked that I’ve complained a lot about the complications that arise when one wants to do even the simplest matrix operations in Forth; keeping track of three loop levels for array indexing just goes beyond the capabilities of the average human. There is just no elegant way to deal with multi-dimensional arrays in Forth so far (please: if you object to that, do send me your implementation, and I’ll promise to print it!).

Now, there exist a lot of ready-written Fortran subroutines that do matrix inversion, solution of linear equations, diagonalization, least-squares fitting and more complicated things. Many of those routines exist in the source libraries of mainframe computers at universities and research institutions, and often they are even in the public domain. Also, although most scientific software is still written in Fortran, there is a wealth of good implementations available in Pascal and C. Alas, not so much luck with Forth. There are specific math packages for some Forth implementations, not yet for Mach2 to my knowledge; but wouldn’t it be nice to have some generic way of including external subroutines to Mach2 programs, be they written in Fortran, Pascal, C, or assembler?

This column describes a utility that does exactly what we want: given an external routine in a resource file, with the entry point at the start of the code, it will read the resource and compile it into the Mach2 code. All we have to know is the number of parameters that the routine expects. This utility also serves me as an excuse to speak about the (excellent) MPW Fortran implementation by Language Systems, which I received some months ago.

The external code resource linker

Lets assume we have a Pascal routine that expects three parameters on the stack. For clarity, all parameter are supposed to be longints. On entry to the routine, the stack looks like in Fig.1.

Fig.1: param. setup for Pascal procedure call

We have already seen many examples how to write Mach2 routines that look like Pascal procedures to the Mac, for instance MDEFs or dialog filter procedures. This time we are going to do the opposite, calling a procedure from Mach2 that is written in Pascal or conforms to the Pascal parameter passing standard. Language Systems Fortran subroutines use that standard, so we’ll be able to call our Fortran routines that way.

Before we jump to the entry point of the external routine, we have to setup the A7 stack as shown in Fig. 1. The ‘external procedure linker’ automatically creates the glue code for moving the parameters from the Forth to the A7 stack and pushing the correct return address on the stack.

The principle of the method is as follows: If you want to link the external procedure ‘myProc’ into Forth code being compiled, you first open a resource file that contains a PROC resource with the name of your routine ‘myProc’:

\1

“ myResFile” call OpenResFile 
\ you may store the refno returned by OpenResFile 
\ somewhere, so that you can easily close the file later

and then you write:

: my.definition
 ( does some stuff )

 par1 par2 par3 [ ExtProc 3 myProc ]

 ( does some more stuff )
;

This code sequence will tell the external procedure linker to setup the A7 stack for 3 longint parameters and the return address, then copy the code found in the resource PROC name ‘myProc’ into the Mach2 code space. The return address references the code that starts after the loaded code; this reference is automatically resolved.

The program (Listing 1) also provides support for functions which return a longint result; such function must reside in FUNC resources in the resource file and are compiled by writing

 [ ExtFunc #pars myFunc ]

The only difference is that one longint zero is pushed to the A7 stack before pushing the parameters.

Fortran parameter passing

LS Fortran allows to pass parameters by value when calling other routines (see below), but the subroutines themselves expect all parameters to be passed by reference. Therefore the stack setup is very simple; only 32-bit addresses are passed. When we call Fortran routines from Mach2, we must therefore always put the addresses, not the values of variables on the stack.

Read listing 1 for the Mach2 source of the external linker. At the beginning you’ll also find a definition for a different sort of do loop, ?do next, which allows a loop to be skipped altogether when the initial value of the loop index is greater that the index limit. We need that definition for creating the code that takes the parameters off the Forth stack and pushes them on the A7 stack.

Language Systems’ Fortran for MPW

Let’s now digress a little and look at LS Fortran in more detail. The compiler is an MPW tool; by typing

fortran filename [options]

one creates an object file that can be linked with the Fortran libraries, all the existing MPW libraries or Pascal or C procedures. A typical mainframe Fortran program contains I/O statements for keyboard input and terminal output. The code generated from such a program will have support for a standard ‘glass teletype’ I/O window. And, most surprising: when your program stops, the glass teletype stays on the screen and becomes a TextEdit window; the program output can be reviewed, edited, and saved to a file. All the support code for standard I/O, text editing and file saving is automatically loaded with the Fortran code when any reference is made to the Fortran I/O library (such as a WRITE (unit,format) iolist statement).

I was very impressed by this Fortran implementation by the way it supports standard I/O in a way almost transparent to the Macintosh programmer. Of course you don’t need this support for a ‘real’ Macintosh program, and it takes about 50K of code; just use only the toolbox for I/O, no Fortran I/O statements, and the code won’t be linked in.

Arrays larger than 32K are supported; any time a routine uses a local variable space of more than 16K, a heap object will be allocated for the local variables whose size is only limited by the memory of the Macintosh. Common blocks, too, are stored in the heap. Initialization and disposal of the heap objects is automatically done at the beginning and the end of the program.

Large array and Common support, too, will link large segments of code from the run time library, notably the error handler which uses the glass teletype output window; therefore, in a ‘pure Macintosh’ program, you can’t use big arrays by simply defining them in your subroutine. However, since LS Fortran also supports structures, pointers and handles, there is a very easy way to circumvent this restriction. The example is given in listing 2, subroutine bigarray. We define an array as a structure with one field, an indexed integer*4:

 structure /array/
 integer*4 f(1)
 end structure

and reference this structure through a handle. Pointer and handle definitions are given in an include file that comes with the Fortran system. For our example, they look like the following:

 structure /Parray/
 pointer /array/ P
 end structure
 
 structure /Harray/
 pointer /Parray/ H
 end structure

 record /Harray/ myarray

After going through this setup, we can reference our indexed data field f through double indirection:

myarray.h^.p^.f(i)

will return the value of the i-th element of the array. Multi-dimensional arrays can be set up in an analogous way. The only thing that remains is to make the array handle reference some legal memory space. This is done through a toolbox call, e.g.

 j = newHandle(%val(arraysize*4))
 if (j.ne.0) then 
 myarray.h = j
 end if

This code sequence also gives you an idea how Macintosh toolbox routines are called; their names are made known to the compiler by including the line

!!M Inlines.f

at the beginning of the source file; Inlines.f is a file that contains inline toolbox routine definitions. [The Fortran system contains an MPW tool for updating that file in case new toolbox routines are released. Very nice.] The toolbox routine is called using call when it is defined as a Pascal procedure and like a Fortran function if it is defined as a function in Inside Mac.

Note that you have to indicate explicitly when a parameter has to be passed by value, as in NewHandle(%val(handlesize)), the default being call by reference. Not including %val in toolbox calls has got me confused several times - be careful to check your calls thoroughly.

LS MPW Fortran supports 68020 and 68881 code generation; I have run no extensive benchmarks, but it makes my MacII run at about 40-50% the speed of a Microvax II for typical programs. This should improve by at least a factor of two if Language Systems gets their act together and include a reasonable optimizer in their compiler. The version 1.0 that I have will accept the -opt=n compiler directive on the command line, but the code generated looks the same no matter what optimization level is used and it is certainly less than optimal, with lots of unnecessary transfers back and forth between local variables and registers. In fact, I was rolling on the floor laughing when I saw the first assembly listing. I called LS after I found out, thinking I was too stupid to activate the optimizer, but they admitted that selecting the optimizer has no effect in version 1.0 and that it should change with the next version. They should at least say something about that in the manual. Still I think it is a very good Fortran implementation; some of my Vax programs required some work on minor syntax differences, but in general the transport was easy. A working program can be easily made to run in the background on the Mac by strategic placement of some calls to WaitNextEvent; all of a sudden the MacII becomes a serious competitor for a mini-mainframe. The optimizer will - hopefully - come.

Listing 2 contains several example subroutines that we shall later call from Mach2. They range from simple extended-to-real floating point conversions to a Gauss-Jordan algorithm for the solution of a system of linear equations. Please look at the code for more details; we don’t have enough space to describe it all here.

The !!S compiler directive indicates the segment name into which the code will be placed, the same as the resource name later used by ExtProc. Listing 3 contains an MPW script for generating a resource file with the PROC resources, and for building a Fortran application that tests the Gauss-Jordan and matrix multiplication routines by solving a system of linear equations.

The end of the Forth example (listing 1) contains words which call the external Fortran routines. You see a definition of single-to-extended floating point conversions, a routine that computes the distance between two points in 3-d space, a program that creates a large array on the heap, uses it and disposes the heap object, and finally the linear equation testing program, analogous to the Fortran application. These latter two programs are included as applications on the source code disk; also included is the ‘machsub’ file with the PROC resources, in case you want to test this code from Mach2 but don’t have the Fortran compiler. The PROC resources have been compiled with the 68020 and 68881 options off, so they should work on any Mac.

The approach described here should work equally well with external routines written in other languages, and notably it should be easy to add dynamic run time linking support. One simply would have to reserve memory and load the PROC resource in as it is needed. You are welcome to experiment and share your experiences in this column.

Till next month.

Listing 1: Mach2 external code resource linker 

\ external code resource linker
\ to be used for linking in external subroutines
\ syntax
\ : <forth word>
\[ ExtProc 3 mySub ] ( gets resource PROC “mySub”& links it )
\       ( 3 parameters required )
\[ ExtFunc 3 myFnc ] ( gets resource FUNC “myFnc” & links it)
\     ( 3 parameters required, placeholder for function result )
\ ;
\
\ The external procedure loader follows Pascal calling 
\ conventions, i.e.,
\ it will put one longint/parameter and return address on top 
\ of the A7 stack. Return is made to the code directly 
\ following the loaded 
\ external procedure, just as you would expect.
\
\ © 1989 J. Langowski / MacTutor

only forth also mac also assembler

 \ taken with permission from Mach2 roundtable on GEnie - JL
 \
 \ An example of writing new looping structure,  ?DO ... NEXT.
 \ Acts like a DO ... LOOP except that the test for loop 
 \ completion is done before the loop body is executed, thus
 \ if the ?DO “limit” is less than or equal to starting “index”
 \ loop body will be skipped (remember that a DO ... LOOP will
 \ always execute loop body at least once, even if the starting
 \ index equals the limit).  Waymen @ PASC  

 ASCII ?DO_  CONSTANT ?DOMark

 : ?DO  ( limit index -- ) \ compile time  ( -- )
     STATE @
     IF
         $26C526C6 ,    ( MOVE.L  D5,(A3)+
                          MOVE.L  D6,(A3)+ )
         $2C1E2A1E ,    ( MOVE.L  (A6)+,D6
                          MOVE.L  (A6)+,D5 )
         $6000 W,       ( BRA )
      HERE  >R  0 W, \ space for forward branch offset 
         ?DOMark >R     \ compiler flag
     ELSE
         -1  ABORT” Compile only!”
     THEN ; IMMEDIATE

 : NEXT  ( -- )
 \ compile time ( -- )
     STATE @ IF
  R> ?DOMark = IF
             $5286 W,       ( ADDQ.L #1,D6)
             HERE R@  -  R@ W!  \ patch forward branch left by ?DO
             $BA86 W,       ( CMP.L  D6,D5 )
             R>  HERE  -   \ backward branch offset for BGT
             $6E00  W, W,   ( BGT )  
             $2C232A23 ,    ( MOVE.L  -(A3),D6
                              MOVE.L  -(A3),D5 )
         ELSE
             -1 ABORT” Unpaired ?DO”
         THEN
     ELSE
         -1 ABORT” Compile only!”
     THEN ; IMMEDIATE

\ ------------------------------------------
\ external procedure linker code starts here
\ ------------------------------------------

$20 constant bl
variable subrfile 

: pushA6 $2F1E w, ;
: push0 $2F3C w, 0 , ;
: popA6 $2D1F w, ;
: pushret $41FA0000 , \ LEA 0(PC),A0
 $2F08 w, \ MOVE.L A0,-(A7)
 here 4-\ address of PC reference
;

: ExtProc { | procHdl retAddr -- }
 bl word number? IF ( # params OK )
 0 ?DO pushA6 NEXT
 pushret
 ascii PROC bl word call GetNamedResource
 ?dup IF -> procHdl
 procHdl @ here procHdl call SizeRsrc 
 dup allot ( procPtr here size )
 cmove \ move code into Forth object space
 here over - swap w! \ resolve LEA reference
 ELSE abort” ExtProc - can’t find routine”
 THEN
 ELSE abort” ExtProc - parameter number syntax error”
 THEN
;

: ExtFunc { | procHdl retAddr -- }
 bl word number? IF ( # params OK )
 push0 \ space for function result
 0 ?DO pushA6 NEXT
 pushret
 ascii FUNC bl word call GetNamedResource
 ?dup IF -> procHdl
 procHdl @ here procHdl call SizeRsrc 
 dup allot ( procPtr here size )
 cmove \ move code into Forth object space
 here over - swap w! \ resolve LEA reference
 popA6
 ELSE abort” ExtProc - can’t find routine”
 THEN
 ELSE abort” ExtProc - parameter number syntax error”
 THEN
;

\ --------------------------------------------------
\ define some calls to external (Fortran) procedures
\ --------------------------------------------------

“ machsub” call openresfile subrfile !

: x2r [ extproc 2 x2r ] ;
: r2x [ extproc 2 r2x ] ;

: distance ( p q r | -- )
 [ extproc 3 distance ]
;
variable myarrayH
variable myarraysize

: makearray ( arrayhandle arraysize -- )
 [ extproc 2 makearray ]
;
: gaussj ( a n np b m mp ierr -- )
 [ extproc 7 gaussj ]
;
: matmul ( a b c n np m mp l lp -- )
 [ extproc 9 matmul ]
;
subrfile @ call closeresfile

\ --------------------------------------------------
\ end of external definitions; testing routines
\ --------------------------------------------------

also sane fp
fvariable x 20 vallot
fvariable y 20 vallot
fvariable dist 

: f>s { | [ 6 lallot ] x s -- }
 ^ x f! \ store from FP stack into local variable
 ^ x ^ s x2r
 s
;
: s>f { s | [ 6 lallot ] x -- }
 ^ s ^ x r2x
 ^ x f@ \ push local variable to FP stack 
;
: setup.x.y
 1.5 x f!  2.5 x 10 + f!  3.5 x 20 + f!
 3.5 y f! -1.0 y 10 + f!  0.0 y 20 + f!
;

: compute.distance
 x y dist distance
 cr .” The distance between points x and y is “
 dist f@ f. .” units” cr
;

: test.array
 cr .” Setting up 10000 element array...” cr
 10000 myarraySize !
 myarrayH myarraySize makearray
 .” Testing setup: “ cr
 10000 0 DO
 .” array(“ i . .” ) = “ myarrayH @ @ i 4* + @ . cr
 1000 +loop
 myarrayH @ call disposhandle drop
;

5 constant maxdim 

variable n variable n1 
variable m variable m1 
variable ierr 

variable a maxdim dup * 4* 4- vallot ( np*np real array )
variable b maxdim 4* 4- vallot ( np el. real vector )
variable c maxdim dup * 4* 4- vallot ( np*np real array )
variable d maxdim 4* 4- vallot ( np el. real vector )

: setup.vars 
 maxdim n1 ! 1 m1 ! ;

: read.str ( -- addr )
 pad 1+ 80 expect span @ pad c! pad ;

: num.inp.err
 .” numeric input error, reenter - “
;
: num.lim.err
 .” number outside limits, reenter - “
;
: read.int 
 begin read.str cr number? not while drop 
 num.inp.err
 repeat
;
: read.real
 begin read.str cr fnumber? not while fdrop 
 num.inp.err
 repeat
;
: read.int.limit { lo hi -- }
 begin
 read.int dup lo > over hi < and
 not while drop
 num.lim.err
 repeat
;
: read.real.limit ( flo fhi -- )
 begin
 fover fover
 read.real
 fswap fover f> fswap fover f< and
 not while fdrop
 num.lim.err
 repeat
 fswap fdrop fswap fdrop
;
: dumpAB { dim | -- }
 dim 0 do
 cr dim 0 do  
 i 5 * j + 4* a + @ s>f f.
 loop
 i 4* b + @ s>f f. 
 loop
;
 
: dumpC { dim | -- }
 dim 0 do
 cr dim 0 do  
 i 5 * j + 4* c + @ s>f f.
 loop
 loop
;

: gausstest { | dim -- } 
 cr
 setup.vars
 .” Enter problem dimension (min=1,max=10) : “ 
 0 n1 @ read.int.limit -> dim
 dim 0 do
 cr .” Enter row # “ i . .”  - “
 dim 0 do read.real f>s 
 i 5 * j + 4* a + ! \ store in array a
 loop
 read.real f>s i 4* b + ! \ store right-hand side
 loop
 a c 400 cmove \ copy a to c

 cr .” Calling GAUSSJ...”
 dim n ! 1 m !
 a n n1 b m m1 ierr gaussj
 cr .” After GAUSSJ. Components of A,B:”
 dim dumpAB
 cr .” Checking solution. Old A:” dim dumpC

 c b d n n1 n n1 m m1 matmul
 cr .” Old B: “
 dim 0 do
 i 4* d + @ s>f f.
 loop
 cr     
;

NEW.WINDOW lineq
“ Linear Equations” lineq TITLE
50 50 300 450 lineq BOUNDS
Document Visible NoCloseBox GrowBox lineq ITEMS

600 5000 terminal gauss

: go.gauss activate fp 7 fixed gausstest
 begin ?terminal until
 bye
;

: start
 lineq add
 lineq gauss build
 lineq dup call selectwindow call setport
 gauss go.gauss
; 
Listing 2: Fortran subroutines to be called from Mach2

!!S x2r 
 subroutine x2r(r,x)
 extended x
 real*4 r
 
 r = snglq(x)
 
 return
 end

!!S r2x 
 subroutine r2x(x,r)
 extended x
 real*4 r
 
 x = qext(r)
 
 return
 end

!!S Distance
 subroutine distance (r,y,x)
 implicit none
 extended x(3),y(3),r,x1,x2,x3
 
 x1 = x(1)-y(1)
 x2 = x(2)-y(2)
 x3 = x(3)-y(3)
 
 r = sqrt(x1*x1 + x2*x2 + x3*x3)
 
 return
 end

!!M Inlines.f
!!S makearray
 subroutine makearray (arraysize, myarray)
 implicit none

 integer*4 arraysize
 include ‘::fincludes:memtypes.f’
 
 structure /array/
 integer*4 f(1)
 end structure
 
 structure /Parray/
 pointer /array/ P
 end structure
 
 structure /Harray/
 pointer /Parray/ H
 end structure

 record /Harray/ myarray

 integer i,j
c
csets up new array of length arraysize
cand initializes it.
creturns -1 in arraysize 
cwhen the handle couldn’t be created.
c
 j = newHandle(%val(arraysize*4))
 if (j.ne.0) then
 myarray.h = j
 
 do i=1,arraysize
 myarray.h^.p^.f(i) = i
 end do
 
 else
 arraysize = -1
 end if
 
 return
 end

!!S matmul
 subroutine matmul (lp,l,mp,m,np,n,c,b,a)
c
cgenerates the matrix product c = a*b.
ca is an input matrix of dimensions m*n, stored in 
can array of physical dimensions mp*np.
cb is an input matrix of dimensions n*l, stored in 
can array of physical dimensions np*lp.
cc is the product matrix of dimensions m*l, stored in 
can array of physical dimensions mp*lp.
c
cJ. Langowski 1989
c
 implicit none
 integer*4 np,n,mp,m,lp,l
 real*4 a(mp,np),b(np,lp),c(mp,lp)
 
 real*4 sum
 integer*4 i,j,k
 
 do i=1,l
 do j=1,m
 sum=0.
 do k=1,n
 sum = sum + a(j,k)*b(k,i)
 end do
 c(j,i) = sum
 end do
 end do
 
 return
 end

!!S gaussj
 subroutine gaussj (ierr,mp,m,b,np,n,a)
c
c  linear equation solution by Gauss-Jordan elimination.
cA is an input matrix of N*N elements, stored in an array
cof physical dimensions NP*NP. B is an input matrix of 
cN*M containing the M right hand side vectors, stored 
cin an array of physical dimensions NP*MP. On output, A
cis replaced by its matrix inverse, and B is replaced by
cthe corresponding set of solution vectors.
c
cfrom: Press/Flannery/Teukolsky/Vetterling, 
cNumerical Recipes,  Cambridge University Press, 
cCambridge, UK 1986.
c
cJL \ added IERR for return of error status:
cIERR=0 no error
cIERR=-1singular matrix
c parameters are in inverse order wrt original 
cdefinition so that Mach2 can push them on the stack 
cin the original order.
c
 integer nmax
 parameter (nmax=50)
 
 integer*4 n,np,m,mp
 real*4 a(np,np),b(np,mp)
 
 integer*4 ipiv(nmax),indxr(nmax),indxc(nmax)
 integer*4 i,j,k,l,ll,irow,icol
 real*4 big,dum,pivinv
 
 do i=1,n
 ipiv(i) = 0
 end do
 do i=1,n
 big=0.
 do j=1,n
 if (ipiv(j) .ne. 1) then
 do k=1,n
 if (ipiv(k).eq.0) then
 if(abs(a(j,k)) .ge. big) then
 big = abs(a(j,k))
 irow=j
 icol=k
 end if
 else if (ipiv(k).gt.1) then
 ierr=-1
 return
 end if
 end do
 end if
 end do
 ipiv(icol)=ipiv(icol)+1
 
 if(irow.ne.icol) then
 do l=1,n
 dum=a(irow,l)
 a(irow,l)=a(icol,l)
 a(icol,l) = dum
 end do
 do l=1,m
 dum=b(irow,l)
 b(irow,l)=b(icol,l)
 b(icol,l)=dum
 end do
 end if
 
 indxr(i) = irow
 indxc(i) = icol
 if (a(icol,icol).eq.0.) then
 ierr=-1
 return
 end if
 pivinv=1./a(icol,icol)
 a(icol,icol)=1.
 
 do l=1,n
 a(icol,l)=a(icol,l)*pivinv
 end do
 do l=1,m
 b(icol,l)=b(icol,l)*pivinv
 end do
 do ll=1,n
 if (ll.ne.icol) then
 dum=a(ll,icol)
 a(ll,icol)=0.
 do l=1,n
 a(ll,l)=a(ll,l)-a(icol,l)*dum
 end do
 do l=1,m
 b(ll,l)=b(ll,l)-b(icol,l)*dum
 end do
 end if
 end do
 end do
 
 do l=n,1,-1
 if(indxr(l).ne.indxc(l)) then
 do k=1,n
 dum=a(k,indxr(l))
 a(k,indxr(l))=a(k,indxc(l))
 a(k,indxc(l))=dum
 end do
 end if
 end do
 
 ierr=0
 return
 end
 
 program gausstest
c
cmain program to test GAUSSJ and MATMUL
csubroutines
c
 implicit none
 integer*4 i,ierr,j,n,np
 real*4 a(10,10), b(10), c(10,10), d(10), sum
 
 np = 10
1write (6,*) ‘Enter problem dimension (max=10):’
 read (6,*) n
 if (n.ge.np .or. n.eq.0) goto 1
 do i=1,n
 write (6,*) ‘Enter row #’,i,’:’
 read (6,*) (a(i,j),j=1,n),b(i)
 do j=1,n
 c(i,j) = a(i,j)
 end do
 end do
 write (6,*) ‘Calling GAUSSJ...’
 call gaussj(ierr,1,1,b,np,n,a)
 write (6,*) ‘After GAUSSJ. Components of A, B:’
 do i=1,n
 write (6,*) (a(i,j),j=1,n),b(i)
 end do
 write (6,*) ‘Checking solution: original b(i):’
 do i=1,n
 sum = 0.
 do j=1,n
 sum = sum + c(i,j)*b(j)
 end do
 write (6,*) sum
 end do 
 call matmul (1,1,np,n,np,n,d,b,c)
 write (6,*) (d(i),i=1,n)
 goto 1
 end
Listing 3: MPW script to generate ‘machsub’ file and Fortran test application

fortran myarray.f
fortran distance.f
fortran x2r.f
fortran r2x.f
fortran matmul.f
fortran gaussj.f
fortran gausstest.f

link -b -w myarray.f.o -m MAKEARRAY 
 -t FTNp 
 “{FLibraries}FORTRANLib.o” 
 “{Libraries}Runtime.o” 
 “{Libraries}Interface.o” 
 -rt PROC=128 -o “machsub” -l >> machsub.map
link -b -w distance.f.o -m DISTANCE 
 -rt PROC=129 -o “machsub” -l >> machsub.map
link -b -w x2r.f.o -m X2R 
 -rt PROC=130 -o “machsub” -l >> machsub.map
link -b -w r2x.f.o -m R2X 
 -rt PROC=131 -o “machsub” -l >> machsub.map
link -b -w gaussj.f.o -m GAUSSJ 
 -sg gaussj=f_RunTime 
 “{FLibraries}FORTRANLib.o” 
 “{FLibraries}IntrinsicLib.o” 
 “{FLibraries}FSANELib.o” 
 “{Libraries}Runtime.o” 
 “{Libraries}Interface.o” 
 -rt PROC=132 -o “machsub” -l >> machsub.map
link -b -w matmul.f.o -m MATMUL 
 -sg matmul=f_RunTime 
 “{FLibraries}FORTRANLib.o” 
 “{Libraries}Runtime.o” 
 “{Libraries}Interface.o” 
 -rt PROC=133 -o “machsub” -l >> machsub.map
link -b -w gausstest.f.o gaussj.f.o matmul.f.o 
 “{FLibraries}FORTRANLib.o” 
 “{FLibraries}IntrinsicLib.o” 
 “{FLibraries}FSANELib.o” 
 “{Libraries}Runtime.o” 
 “{Libraries}Interface.o” 
 -o “gausstest” -l > gausstest.map
gausstest

 
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Software Updates via MacUpdate

VueScan 9.4.41 - Scanner software with a...
VueScan is a scanning program that works with most high-quality flatbed and film scanners to produce scans that have excellent color fidelity and color balance. VueScan is easy to use, and has... Read more
Cloud 3.0.0 - File sharing from your men...
Cloud is simple file sharing for the Mac. Drag a file from your Mac to the CloudApp icon in the menubar and we take care of the rest. A link to the file will automatically be copied to your clipboard... Read more
LibreOffice 4.3.1.2 - Free Open Source o...
LibreOffice is an office suite (word processor, spreadsheet, presentations, drawing tool) compatible with other major office suites. The Document Foundation is coordinating development and... Read more
SlingPlayer Plugin 3.3.20.505 - Browser...
SlingPlayer is the screen interface software that works hand-in-hand with the hardware inside the Slingbox to make your TV viewing experience just like that at home. It features an array of... Read more
Get Lyrical 3.8 - Auto-magically adds ly...
Get Lyrical auto-magically add lyrics to songs in iTunes. You can choose either a selection of tracks, or the current track. Or turn on "Active Tagging" to get lyrics for songs as you play them.... Read more
Viber 4.2.2 - Send messages and make cal...
Viber lets you send free messages and make free calls to other Viber users, on any device and network, in any country! Viber syncs your contacts, messages and call history with your mobile device,... Read more
Cocktail 7.6 - General maintenance and o...
Cocktail is a general purpose utility for OS X that lets you clean, repair and optimize your Mac. It is a powerful digital toolset that helps hundreds of thousands of Mac users around the world get... Read more
LaunchBar 6.1 - Powerful file/URL/email...
LaunchBar is an award-winning productivity utility that offers an amazingly intuitive and efficient way to search and access any kind of information stored on your computer or on the Web. It provides... Read more
Maya 2015 - Professional 3D modeling and...
Maya is an award-winning software and powerful, integrated 3D modeling, animation, visual effects, and rendering solution. Because Maya is based on an open architecture, all your work can be scripted... Read more
BBEdit 10.5.12 - Powerful text and HTML...
BBEdit is the leading professional HTML and text editor for the Mac. Specifically crafted in response to the needs of Web authors and software developers, this award-winning product provides a... Read more

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This Week at 148Apps: August 25-29, 2014
Shiny Happy App Reviews   | Read more »
Qube Kingdom – Tips, Tricks, Strategies,...
Qube Kingdom is a tower defense game from DeNA. You rally your troops – magicians, archers, knights, barbarians, and others – and fight against an evil menace looking to dominate your kingdom of tiny squares. Planning a war isn’t easy, so here are a... | Read more »
Qube Kingdom Review
Qube Kingdom Review By Nadia Oxford on August 29th, 2014 Our Rating: :: KIND OF A SQUARE KINGDOMUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad Qube Kingdom has cute visuals, but it’s a pretty basic tower defense game at heart.   | Read more »
Fire in the Hole Review
Fire in the Hole Review By Rob Thomas on August 29th, 2014 Our Rating: :: WALK THE PLANKUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad Seafoam’s Fire in the Hole looks like a bright, 8-bit throwback, but there’s not enough booty to... | Read more »
Alien Creeps TD is Now Available Worldwi...
Alien Creeps TD is Now Available Worldwide Posted by Ellis Spice on August 29th, 2014 [ permalink ] Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad | Read more »
Dodo Master Review
Dodo Master Review By Jordan Minor on August 29th, 2014 Our Rating: :: NEST EGGiPad Only App - Designed for the iPad Dodo Master is tough but fair, and that’s what makes it a joy to play.   | Read more »
Motorsport Manager Review
Motorsport Manager Review By Lee Hamlet on August 29th, 2014 Our Rating: :: MARVELOUS MANAGEMENTUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad Despite its depth and sense of tactical freedom, Motorsport Manager is one of the most... | Read more »
Motorsport Manager – Beginner Tips, Tric...
The world of Motorsport management can be an unforgiving and merciless one, so to help with some of the stress that comes with running a successful race team, here are a few hints and tips to leave your opponents in the dust. | Read more »
CalPal Update Brings the App to 2.0, Add...
CalPal Update Brings the App to 2.0, Adds Lots of New Stuff Posted by Ellis Spice on August 29th, 2014 [ permalink ] | Read more »
Baseball Battle Review
Baseball Battle Review By Jennifer Allen on August 29th, 2014 Our Rating: :: SIMPLE HITTINGUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad Simple and cute, Baseball Battle is a fairly fun baseball game for those looking for something... | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

Labor Day Weekend MacBook Pro sale; 15-inch m...
B&H Photo has the new 2014 15″ Retina MacBook Pros on sale for up to $125 off MSRP. Shipping is free, and B&H charges NY sales tax only. They’ll also include free copies of Parallels Desktop... Read more
Labor Day Weekend iPad mini sale; $50 to $100...
Best Buy has the iPad mini with Retina Display (WiFi models) on sale for $50 off MSRP on their online store for Labor Day Weekend. Choose free shipping or free local store pick up. Price is for... Read more
13-inch 1.4GHz MacBook Air on sale for $899,...
Adorama has the new 2014 13″ 1.4GHz/128GB MacBook Air on sale for $899.99 including free shipping plus NY & NJ tax only. Their price is $100 off MSRP. Read more
It’s Official: Apple Issues Invitations To Se...
Apple has issued one of its characteristically cryptic press invitations for a special event to be held at the Flint Center for the Performing Arts in hometown Cupertino on Sept. 9, 2014 at 10:00 am... Read more
Tablet Shipments To See First On-year Decline...
TrendForce analyst Caroline Chen notes that when the iPad launched in 2010, it was an instant hit and spurred a tablet PC revolution, with tablets so popular that that notebook PC sales stagnated and... Read more
SOBERLINK Releases Apple iOS Compatible Handh...
Cypress, California based SOBERLINK, Inc., creator of the first handheld Breathalyzer designed to improve recovery outcomes, continues to show prominence in the mobile alcohol monitoring space with... Read more
New 21″ 1.4GHz iMac on sale again for $999, s...
Best Buy has the new 21″ 1.4GHz iMac on sale for $999.99 on their online store. Their price is $100 off MSRP. Choose free shipping or free local store pick up. Price is for online orders only, in-... Read more
Smartphone Outlook Remains Strong for 2014, U...
According to a new mobile phone forecast from the International Data Corporation (IDC) Worldwide Quarterly Mobile Phone Tracker, more than 1.25 billion smartphones will be shipped worldwide in 2014,... Read more
Save up to $60 with Apple refurbished iPod to...
The Apple Store has Apple Certified Refurbished 5th generation iPod touches available starting at $149. Apple’s one-year warranty is included with each model, and shipping is free. Many, but not all... Read more
12-Inch MacBook Air Coming in 4Q14 or 2015 –...
Digitimes’ Aaron Lee and Joseph Tsai report that according to Taiwan-based upstream supply chain insiders, Apple plans to launch a thinner MacBook model either at year end 2014 or in 2015, and that... Read more

Jobs Board

*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions (US) - A...
Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, you're also the Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions (US) - A...
Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, you're also the Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions (US) - A...
Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, you're also the Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions (US) - A...
Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, you're also the Read more
Senior Event Manager, *Apple* Retail Market...
…This senior level position is responsible for leading and imagining the Apple Retail Team's global event strategy. Delivering an overarching brand story; in-store, Read more
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