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Smart Docs
Volume Number:4
Issue Number:2
Column Tag:C Workshop

Smart Documents

By Joel McNamara, Watercourse Software, Bellevue, WA

Forked Tongue Programming: Data Forks, Resource Juggling, and Stand Alone Documents

Most developers are quick to realize that a Macintosh file, whether application or not, could easily be an advertisement for Double Mint Gum. Yes, it’s two, two, two files in one. As “Inside Macintosh” is quick to point out, “Every file has a resource fork and a data fork (either of which may be empty). The resource fork of an application contains not only the resources used by the application but also the application code itself. The data fork of an application can contain anything an application wants to store there.” Big deal. Even most novices know that when an application creates a document, it places the data into the data fork of a file. Pretty basic stuff, even a bit dull and boring for most MacTutor readers.

But let’s step beyond the obvious for a moment, and concentrate on the quote “can contain anything an application wants to store there.” If we can put anything in there, how about data that only the application could access. No reading in other files, but just operating on the information found within its data fork. Think of it as a stand alone document. Perhaps a word processor that generates a file when double clicked will run itself. Or a chart program that makes files you could modem to a business associate without him needing the creator application. Something a little like “Glue,” where you have the ability to view an application’s output without needing the application. Runtime versions of data bases incorporate these features. Even Microsoft is rumored to be considering a version of “Excel” that will create stand alone spreadsheets.

Pretty neat stuff, but probably too tricky for the average programmer, right? Wrong. The secret lies within effectively using the resource and data forks.

Stand Alone Document Theory

The reasons for developing such stand alone documents are quite obvious; the ability to disseminate information without the need of a “mother” application to access it; being able to address larger audiences with your output since not everyone needs the creator; not needing sophisticated knowledge of an application to use the information found in a document. All of these points and more make it worthwhile to consider incorporating the ability to generate stand alone documents in your applications.

In thinking about such a project, there are several things to consider. The first is the functionality you want the document to have. More than likely you’re not going to want the stand alone file to do everything the original application does. Therefore, you’ll need to include some secondary code that will simply display, scroll, print, or do whatever.

But where does one put the code and resources actually needed to run the document? If there is one set of CODE resources that run the main application and another set that will run the stand alone document, won’t they conflict and cause problems? Two theories can be used in developing stand alone document generators. The first espouses putting all the required resources into a template file. The generator then simply copies the template, gives the copied file a new name, and inserts the desired information into the data fork. This is the technique used in the stand alone text generator “Take A Letter.” The second method is cleaner, eliminating the need for template files. The generator program actually contains the code needed to run a stand alone document, although it may masquerade as another resource. The generator creates a new file, copies in the resources, renames them, fills the data fork, and sets the file’s attributes to be an application.

Stand Alone Document Practice

Enough theory, and on to the practice. What will be demonstrated is how to construct a stand alone document generator that works with MacPaint format documents. Three sources are included here. The first (PaintDisplay.c) is code for a program that loads a Paint file stored in its data fork and then shows the upper left hard corner of the bit mapped image. The second listing (PostCard.c) is for an application called PostCard that builds a stand alone Paint document. (The code from PaintDisplay will be inserted into this document generator.) And finally, PostCard.r is the RMaker file. Although the sources are in Lightspeed C, the techniques should be general enough to apply to a different variation of C or even another language. (Lightspeed info: Both projects (PaintDisplay proj and PostCard proj) should include MacTraps plus their own respective source files and be set to build applications. PostCard’s creator type should be ‘PCRD’.)

The first step is to compile PaintDisplay.c. This source contains a standard algorithm for displaying an image from a MacPaint format file. It initializes everything, opens up its data fork, grabs bytes, puts up a window, displays the left corner of the Paint document, and waits for a mouse click to quit. All in one breath. Don’t try to run it quite yet though. If you do, it will be looking in its own data fork for something that isn’t there yet, and your curiosity will be rewarded with a bomb.

The only real item in the code that needs discussing, is how one goes about accessing the data fork. To quote from the source:

if (GetVol(&thisVolume,&vRef) != noErr)
 ErrorRoutine(FALSE,0);
GetAppParms(&thisProgram,&temp,&thisHandle);
if (FSOpen(thisProgram,vRef,&srcFile) != noErr)
 ErrorRoutine(TRUE,srcFile);

The first step is to determine what volume the application is on with a GetVol() call. Next, use GetAppParms() to return the name of the current application. Now pass the application’s name and the volume reference number to FSOpen(). It will oblige by opening up your application’s data fork.

Resource Rascality

Once you’ve compiled PaintDisplay, the next task is to use RMaker on the PostCard.r file. This file contains the resources for the menus, dialogs, bundles, icons, etc. for the PostCard application. It also has the necessary resources to be used in creating the stand alone document.

An often overlooked feature of RMaker is the ability to copy specific resources from one file to another during the compile stage. By using the “.R” command you could load, let’s say, a font from an existing file into the resource file you’re currently compiling. The format is:

Type FONT = GNRL* the new resource type (FONT)
,8 * the new resource ID
.R * the RMaker directive
Fonts FONT 12  * the file “Fonts” and the resource
 * (FONT 12) to copy into the new resource

RMaker is pretty lax as to letting you get away with things in certain areas. This feature proves beneficial when building program generating applications. As mentioned before, the biggest problem in writing an application that builds another, is where to stick the code that will be spawned off. Obviously you can’t have a program with two CODE 0 resources, at least without the potential for serious problems.

The solution is to build a new resource type of your choosing, and then through RMaker, stuff the CODE into it. For example:

Type FAKE = GNRL * creates a resource type called FAKE...
,0 * with an ID of 0 
.R * tells RMaker to load in something
SuperEdit CODE 0 * else, i.e., the jump table from
 * a file called “SuperEdit”

This is what’s happening in PostCard.r. The previously compiled code from PaintDisplay is being read in, and then assigned a new type and identification. The CODE resource is still the same, but it’s gone into hiding by changing its name. It’s as easy as that. When the resource file is compiled, you’ll have your CODE just sitting there, ready to use, but disguised as something else that won’t conflict with the the program that will be using it to create another application.

Taking a peek with ResEdit at the results. FAKE and DUMY are really code resources, but with their new identities, don’t conflict with code resources found in the application that will use them.

Two words of advice on using RMaker in such a fashion. The first is, RMaker frowns on using a source file with a space in its name. Therefore, “My File” will cause you problems but “MyFile” will not. The second caveat is to be aware of path names. If all of your formats look all right, but RMaker still is complaining, odds are you have an improperly laid out path. Double check it.

You’ll notice in the PostCard.r file, more than just CODE resources are being changed. Remember, all compilers are not created equal. Some will generate just two code segments (for under 32k of code, of course): 0 - the jump table, and 1 - the actual code . Others, Lightspeed C for example, will generate more than two code segments and a variety of other resource types where data is stored. That’s what all the CRELs, DATAs, ZEROs, etc. are all about. When you are transferring and converting code resources, be sure you get everything your particular compiler needs for the application to run. At first put everything in, but after a while try some experimenting. At times you’ll find you don’t need all of the data and support resources.

Resource Moving Without ResEdit

The last step in the process is to compile PostCard.c. The compiled resources from PostCard proj.Rsrc are copied in, and the application is ready to run.

From the Macintosh’s perspective, here’s what happens when the user selects “Make a PostCard...” from the menu:

The SFPut() routine is called to select a name and location for the new file. CreateResFile() is used to create the named file. Finder attributes are then set, and the resource fork of the new file is opened.

Now the fun stuff. The code determines what the resource reference number of the current application is (in this case PostCard). It then makes use of a programmer defined function called ResTransfer().

ResTransfer(sourceRes, sourceID, destRes, destID)
ResType sourceRes, destRes;
intsourceID, destID; 
{
Handle  codeHandle;
 codeHandle = NewHandle(0);
 codeHandle = GetResource(sourceRes,sourceID);
 UseResFile(resRef);
 DetachResource(codeHandle);
 AddResource(codeHandle, destRes, destID, “\p”);
 if (ResError() != noErr) {
   DoMessage(“\pSorry, couldn’t copy the required resource.”);
 myError = 1;
 }
}

ResTransfer() is passed the resource type and ID of the resource to be copied, along with what type of resource and what ID number you want the copy to appear as. GetResource() is used to get a handle to the resource to be copied. UseResFile() is then called with the resource reference file number of the application that will be created. This tells the resource manager to only deal with the resource fork of the new stand alone document.

As per “Inside Macintosh,” the resource to be copied is detached, and then added to the new application with AddResource(). AddResource() is passed the handle to the resource, along with information concerning type and identification. If for some reason it can’t be added, an error handling routine is alerted.

ResTransfer() is called repeatedly for all of the resources needed to be placed in the stand alone document. At first BNDL, FREF, ICN#, etc. are moved in, giving the application its own unique type and icon. Next the FAKE and DUMY resources are copied and then converted back to their original types and IDs.

Once all the resources have been moved and/or changed, UpdateResFile() is used to tell the resource manager the new file needs updating, effectively adding and writing all of the resources. The stand alone document’s resource fork is then closed, and UseResFile() is called to revert the current resource fork back to PostCard.

With the resources in place, SFGet() is called to select the Paint format file to be read in. Its data fork is read and then written to the stand alone document’s data fork. With no errors reported, the stand alone document has now been created and is ready to run!

Final Thoughts

Needless to say, PostCard ain’t very fancy. If one was to do it right, scrolling, desk accessory support, more error handling, perhaps even printing and the ability to save a full MacPaint format document out of it should be included in the PaintDisplay code. Did I just hear the basis for a shareware product?

Also keep in mind that PostCard just demonstrates the idea of stand alone documents. Although application generators like it are useful, stand alone documents would really be best created by say a “WriteNow” or “SuperPaint.” Ideally, the entire process would be incorporated as a function in an actual, full blown program where the user would simply select a menu item to create the stand alone file.

One potential argument to the idea of stand alone documents is more code overhead in the original program. However, with a little thought and planning this can easily be avoided by segmenting the program so the main application and the one to be generated would share some common code. Even if an extra 15 or 20k went into the final product, users would likely justify the size increase because of the benefits.

As you can see, creating stand alone documents isn’t that difficult. The problems with data and resources can easily be overcome, with the end result being things like self running documentation, double clickable desktop presentations, or stand alone spreadsheets. Hopefully in the near future we’ll be seeing more of stand alone documents. But for now, why don’t you give your own a try.

/* 
 * PostCard, version 1.0, Lightspeed C
 * demonstrates using data forks and resource tricks
 * Copyright 1987 by Joel McNamara - All Rights Reserved
 * for MacTutor Magazine
 * initial coding - October 12, 1987
 */
#include“MacTypes.h”
#include“QuickDraw.h”
#include“WindowMgr.h”
#include“EventMgr.h”
#include“MenuMgr.h”
#include“FileMgr.h”
#include“MemoryMgr.h”
#include“ResourceMgr.h”
#include“StdFilePkg.h”
#include“OSUtil.h”
#include“DialogMgr.h”

/* defines... */
#define MessageDLOG255
#define AboutDLOG256
#define HelpDLOG 257
#define AppleMENU1
#define About    1
#define FileMENU 255
#define Quit1
#define CommandMENU256
#define MakeCard 1
#define Help3

/* globals... */
Boolean done;
char    theString[256];
MenuHandleAppleMenuHndl, FileMenuHndl, CommandMenuHndl;
EventRecord theEvent;
DialogPtr theDialog;
int     resRef,dummy,myError;

/* main */
main()
{
 Initialize();
 do{
 MainLoop();
 }while(!done);
} 
/* as always... */
Initialize()
{
 InitGraf(&thePort);
 InitFonts();
 InitWindows();
 InitMenus();
 TEInit();
 InitDialogs(0);
 InitCursor();
 FlushEvents(everyEvent, 0);
 SetUpMenus();
 done = FALSE;
 myError = 0;
}

/* make the menus */
SetUpMenus()
{
 AppleMenuHndl = GetMenu(AppleMENU);
 AddResMenu(AppleMenuHndl, ‘DRVR’);
 InsertMenu(AppleMenuHndl, 0);
 FileMenuHndl = GetMenu(FileMENU);
 InsertMenu(FileMenuHndl, 0);
 CommandMenuHndl = GetMenu(CommandMENU);
 InsertMenu(CommandMenuHndl, 0);
 DrawMenuBar();
}
/* generic dialog displayer */
DoDialog(theDLOG)
inttheDLOG;
{
 theDialog = GetNewDialog(theDLOG, 0, -1);
 DoButton(theDialog);
 ModalDialog(0, &dummy);
 DisposDialog(theDialog);
}
/* message display routine */
DoMessage(theMessage)
Str255  theMessage;
{
 theDialog = GetNewDialog(MessageDLOG, 0, -1);
 ParamText(theMessage, “\p”, “\p”, “\p”);
 DoButton(theDialog);
 ModalDialog(0, &dummy);
 DisposDialog(theDialog); 
}
/* loop until we’re done */
MainLoop()
{
 SystemTask();
 if (GetNextEvent(everyEvent,&theEvent)) {
 switch (theEvent.what) {
 case mouseDown:
 DoMouseDown();  
 break;
 default:
 break;
 }
 }
}
/* if we have a mouse down */
DoMouseDown()
{
WindowPtr whichWindow;
intthePart;
 thePart = FindWindow(theEvent.where,&whichWindow);
 switch(thePart) {
 case inMenuBar:
 DoMenu();
 break;
 case inSysWindow:
 SystemClick(&theEvent, whichWindow);
 break;
 default:
 break;
 }
}

/* if a menu hit then... */
DoMenu()
{
long menuChoice;
 menuChoice = MenuSelect(theEvent.where);
 DoMenuItem(menuChoice);
}
/* which menu was selected? */
DoMenuItem(menuChoice)
long menuChoice;
{
int theMenu,theItem;
 if (menuChoice != 0 ) {
 theItem = menuChoice;
 theMenu = (menuChoice >> 16);
 switch (theMenu) {
 case AppleMENU:
 DoDA(theItem);
 break; 
 case FileMENU:
 done = TRUE;
 break;
 case CommandMENU:
 DoCommands(theItem);
 default:
 break;
 }
 HiliteMenu(0);
 }
}
/* the apple menu was hit */
DoDA(theItem)
int theItem;
{
int accNumber;
 if (theItem == About)
 DoDialog(AboutDLOG);
 else{
 GetItem(AppleMenuHndl,theItem,theString);
 accNumber = OpenDeskAcc(theString);
 }
}
/* the commands menu was hit */
DoCommands(theItem)
int theItem;
{
 switch(theItem) {
 case MakeCard:
 ConvertFile();
 break;
 case Help:
 DoDialog(HelpDLOG);
 break;
 default:
 break;
 }
}
/* make a postcard */
ConvertFile()
{
char*   buffer;
long    theEOF;
intcurrentResRef,refNum,destRef;
Handle  codeHandle;

Point   myPoint;
SFReply paintReply, myReply;
SFTypeListmyTypes;
FInfo   myFInfo;
OSErr   myErr;   
 myTypes[0] = ‘PNTG’;
 myPoint.h = 90;
 myPoint.v = 90;

 /* first we create the application */ 
 DoMessage(“\pFirst name the PostCard you want to create.”);
 SFPutFile(myPoint, “\pEnter PostCard name:”, “\pMy PostCard”, 0,
 &myReply);
 if (myReply.good)
 {
 SetVol(0, myReply.vRefNum);
 CreateResFile(myReply.fName);
 /* make it what we want... */
 myFInfo.fdType = ‘APPL’;
 myFInfo.fdCreator = ‘PDIS’;
 myFInfo.fdFlags = fHasBundle;
 myFInfo.fdLocation.h = 0;
 myFInfo.fdLocation.v = 0;
 SetFInfo(myReply.fName, myReply.vRefNum, &myFInfo);
 /* open its resource fork */
 resRef = OpenResFile(myReply.fName);
 if (resRef != -1)
 {
 /* get PostCard’s resource ref number and then
 start moving the resources */
 currentResRef = CurResFile();
 /* first the obvious ones */
 ResTransfer(‘BNDL’,129, ‘BNDL’,128);
 ResTransfer(‘PDIS’,0,’PDIS’,0);
 ResTransfer(‘FREF’,128,’FREF’,128);
 ResTransfer(‘ICN#’,129,’ICN#’,128);
 /* now grab the FAKEs and make them CODE */
 ResTransfer(‘FAKE’,0,’CODE’,0);
 ResTransfer(‘FAKE’,1,’CODE’,1);
 ResTransfer(‘FAKE’,2,’CODE’,2);
 /* finally get the DUMYs and convert them */
 ResTransfer(‘DUMY’,0,’CREL’,2);
 ResTransfer(‘DUMY’,1,’DATA’,0);
 ResTransfer(‘DUMY’,2,’DREL’,0);
 ResTransfer(‘DUMY’,3,’STRS’,0);
 ResTransfer(‘DUMY’,4,’ZERO’,0);

 /* update the new application, close it, make PostCard
 the current open resource fork */
 UpdateResFile(resRef);
 CloseResFile(resRef);
 UseResFile(currentResRef);
 
 /* see if we have any errors - open the application */
 if ( (FSOpen(myReply.fName, myReply.vRefNum, &destRef) != noErr) || 
(myError == 1) ) {
 DoMessage(“\pSorry a resource error prevented the PostCard from being 
created.”); 
 FSDelete(myReply.fName,myReply.vRefNum);
 myError = 0;    
 }
 else
 { 
 /* here we select the paint file we want to convert */
 DoMessage(“\pNow select the Paint file you want to display.”);
 SFGetFile(myPoint, “\p”, 0, 1, myTypes, 0, &paintReply);
 if (paintReply.good)
 { 
 /* open, read, and write into the document */
if (FSOpen(paintReply.fName, paintReply.vRefNum, &refNum) == noErr)
 {
 if ( GetEOF(refNum, &theEOF) != noErr)
 myError = 1;
 buffer = NewPtr(theEOF);
 if ( FSRead(refNum, &theEOF, buffer) != noErr)
 myError = 1;
 if ( FSWrite(destRef, &theEOF, buffer) != noErr)
 myError = 1;
 myErr = FSClose(refNum);
 myErr = FSClose(destRef);
 if (myError != 1)
 DoMessage(“\pYour PostCard has been created!”);
 } 
 }
 else
 {
 /* get rid of file we’ve created */
 FSDelete(myReply.fName,myReply.vRefNum);    
 }
 }
 
 }
 else
 myError = 1;
 
 if (myError == 1) {
 /* opps, problems - blitz the file */
 DoMessage(“\pSorry an error prevented the PostCard from being created.”); 

 FSDelete(myReply.fName,myReply.vRefNum);
 }
 }
}

/* grab a resource and rename it routine */
ResTransfer(sourceRes, sourceID, destRes, destID)
ResType sourceRes, destRes;
intsourceID, destID; 
{
Handle  codeHandle;
 codeHandle = NewHandle(0);
 
 /* get the source resource */
 codeHandle = GetResource(sourceRes,sourceID);
 /* set the current res file to the stand alone document */
 UseResFile(resRef);
 /* detach the source resource... */
 DetachResource(codeHandle);
 /* and add it to the document */
 AddResource(codeHandle, destRes, destID, “\p”);
 if (ResError() != noErr) {
 DoMessage(“\pSorry, couldn’t copy the required resource.”);
 myError = 1;
 }
}


/* fancy button for the modals */
DoButton(myDialog)
DialogPtr myDialog;
{
short   myType;
Handle  myHandle;
Rect    myBox;
GrafPtr dummyPort;

 GetPort(&dummyPort);
 SetPort(myDialog);
 GetDItem( myDialog, 1, &myType, &myHandle, &myBox );
 InsetRect(&myBox, -4, -4);
 PenSize(3, 3);
 FrameRoundRect(&myBox, 16, 16);
 PenNormal();
 SetPort(dummyPort);
}


/*
 * PaintDisplay.c
 *
 * This program supplies the code needed for the PostCard application
 * to generate a stand alone Paint file.
 *
 * copyright 1987, Joel McNamara - All Rights Reserved
 * for MacTutor Magazine
 *
 * initial coding - October 12, 1987
 *
 */
  
#include<MacTypes.h>
#include<QuickDraw.h>
#include<WindowMgr.h>
#include<EventMgr.h>
#include<MemoryMgr.h>
#include<SegmentLdr.h>

/* setup the world, display the image, and wait for a click */
main()
{
 InitGraf(&thePort);
 InitFonts();
 InitWindows();
 InitMenus();
 TEInit();
 InitDialogs(0L);
 InitCursor();
 FlushEvents(everyEvent,0);
 displayPaint();
 while (!Button());
}

/* the guts of the paint display program */
displayPaint()
{
char    *srcPtr, *dstPtr, *saveDstPtr, *skipPtr;
intsrcFile, scanLine, vRef, temp;
long    srcSize, paintSize;
Str255  thisProgram;
StringPtr thisVolume;
GrafPortaPort;
BitMap  theBitMap;
Rect    myRect;
WindowPtr myWind;
Handle  thisHandle;

 /* we’ll be sloppy with the nonrelocatable pointers and let them all 
get cleaned up upon exiting */
    
 /* the first 512 header bytes to skip */
 srcSize = 512;  
 skipPtr = NewPtr(512);
 if (srcPtr == 0L)
        ErrorRoutine(FALSE,0);
     /* the biggest it can be */  
 srcPtr = NewPtr(51840);
 if (srcPtr == 0L)
        ErrorRoutine(FALSE,0);
 /* see who and where we are... */
 if (GetVol(&thisVolume,&vRef) != noErr)
 ErrorRoutine(FALSE,0);
 GetAppParms(&thisProgram,&temp,&thisHandle);
    /* then open our data fork and read past the header */
    if (FSOpen(thisProgram,vRef,&srcFile) != noErr)
 ErrorRoutine(TRUE,srcFile);
 if (FSRead(srcFile,&srcSize,skipPtr) != noErr)
        ErrorRoutine(TRUE,srcFile);
 /* see how big we really are... */
 if (GetEOF(srcFile,&paintSize) != noErr)
        ErrorRoutine(TRUE,srcFile);
 paintSize -= 512;
 /* now read the rest of the bytes and close */
 if (FSRead(srcFile,&paintSize,srcPtr) != noErr)
        ErrorRoutine(TRUE,srcFile);  
 if (FSClose(srcFile) != noErr)
        ErrorRoutine(TRUE,srcFile);
 /* get a destination pointer... */
 dstPtr = NewPtr(51840);
 if (dstPtr == 0L)
        ErrorRoutine(FALSE,0); 
 saveDstPtr = dstPtr;
 scanLine = 1; 
 /* and start unpacking the compressed Paint data */
 for (scanLine = 1; scanLine <= 720; scanLine++)
 UnpackBits(&srcPtr,&dstPtr,72);
 /* make a window */      
 SetRect(&myRect,12,35,500,325);
   myWind = NewWindow(0L,&myRect,”\p”,TRUE,1,-1L,FALSE,99);

 /* configure our bitmap */
 theBitMap.baseAddr = saveDstPtr;
 theBitMap.rowBytes = 72;  
 theBitMap.bounds.top = 0;
 theBitMap.bounds.left = 0;
 theBitMap.bounds.bottom = 72 * 8;
 theBitMap.bounds.right = 720;
 /* and copy the Paint bits into our window */  
 CopyBits(&theBitMap, &myWind->portBits, &myWind->portRect, &myWind->portRect, 
srcCopy, 0L);    
}


/* simple no frills, beep and quit */
ErrorRoutine( closeFile, fileNum )
Boolean closeFile;
intfileNum; 
{
 SysBeep(5);
 if (closeFile)
 FSClose(fileNum); 
 ExitToShell();
}

* resource file for PostCard.c
* by Joel McNamara
* for MacTutor Magazine
* October 12, 1987

Development:MacTutor:PostCard proj.Rsrc
* you’ll probably want to change the pathname

* the bundles, first for PostCard then PaintDisplay
Type BNDL
,128
PCRD 0
ICN#
0 128
FREF
0 128

* this BNDL will be renumbered by the application
,129
PDIS 0
ICN#
0 128
FREF
0 128

* we’ll use the same FREF for both
Type FREF
,128
APPL 0

* PostCard file type
Type PCRD = STR 
,0
PostCard Version 1.0 - 12 Oct 87

* PaintDISplay file type
Type PDIS = STR 
,0
PaintDisplay Version 1.0 - 12 Oct 87

* der menu
Type MENU
,1
\14
About PostCard...
(-

,255
File
Quit

,256
Commands
Make a PostCard...
(-
Help...

* the dialog items
Type DITL
,255 (4)
2

button
48 272 66 349
OK

staticText Disabled
6 11 43 350
^0

,256 (4)
5
button
171 86 190 178
OK

staticText Disabled
2 86 20 177
PostCard 1.0

staticText Disabled
24 13 87 263
PostCard creates an application and then places a Paint file into the 
data fork, thus creating a stand alone viewer.

staticText Disabled
124 24 158 241
Copyright 1987, Joel McNamara\0D         All Rights Reserved

staticText Disabled
100 50 118 208
for MacTutor Magazine

,257 (4)
4
button
166 295 184 406
OK

staticText Disabled
3 4 38 423
PostCard takes a MacPaint document and turns it into a stand alone application 
that displays the upper left corner.

staticText Disabled
42 4 91 423
When the Paint document is selected a new file is created with CODE resources 
(FAKE and DUMY - stored within the PostCard application) copied and renamed 
into the new file.


staticText Disabled
95 4 161 423
These resources drive the new application by reading its own data fork 
(copied in from the Paint file) and then displaying the bit mapped image.


* the dialogs
Type DLOG
,255 (4)
message
60 68 136 438
Visible NoGoAway
1
0
255

,256 (4)
about
52 122 252 394
Visible NoGoAway
1
0
256

,257 (4)
help
46 48 242 474
Visible NoGoAway
1
0
257


* here’s the trickery - we create new resources of type FAKE, and read
* the CODE resources from PaintDisplay into them.
Type FAKE = GNRL
,0
.R
Development:MacTutor:PaintDisplay CODE 0
* you’ll need to specify a different pathname above

,1
.R
Development:MacTutor:PaintDisplay CODE 1
* you’ll need to specify a different pathname above

,2
.R
Development:MacTutor:PaintDisplay CODE 2
* you’ll need to specify a different pathname above


* now get the rest of the resources we need (as required by Lightspeed 
C) -
* creating dummy resources named DUMY.
Type DUMY = GNRL
,0
.R
Development:MacTutor:PaintDisplay CREL 2
* you’ll need to specify a different pathname above

,1
.R
Development:MacTutor:PaintDisplay DATA 0
* you’ll need to specify a different pathname above

,2
.R
Development:MacTutor:PaintDisplay DREL 0
* you’ll need to specify a different pathname above

,3
.R
Development:MacTutor:PaintDisplay STRS 0
* you’ll need to specify a different pathname above

,4
.R
Development:MacTutor:PaintDisplay ZERO 0
* you’ll need to specify a different pathname above

* now the application icon
Type ICN# = GNRL
,128
.H
00000000
00000000 
1FFFF800
20003C00 
20007C00
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Lens Blur 1.3.0 - True out-of-focus boke...
Let Lens Blur transform your existing photo into true SLR-quality out-of-focus bokeh effect! Everyone needs a gorgeous personalized background for a social profile, blog, Web/UI design, presentation... Read more
VMware Fusion 6.0.3 - Run Windows apps a...
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Tweetbot 1.5.1 - Popular iOS twitter cli...
Tweetbot is a full-featured OS X Twitter client with a lot of personality. Whether it's the meticulously-crafted interface, sounds and animation, or features like multiple timelines and column views... Read more
Mac DVDRipper Pro 4.1.7 - Copy, backup,...
Mac DVDRipper Pro is the DVD backup solution that lets you protect your DVDs from scratches, save your batteries by reading your movies from your hard disk, manage your collection with just a few... Read more
PDFpenPro 6.2 - Advanced PDF toolkit for...
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PDFpen allows users to easily edit PDF's. Add text, images and signatures. Fill out PDF forms. Merge or split PDF documents. Reorder and delete pages. Even correct text and edit graphics! Features... Read more
Monolingual 1.5.9 - Remove unwanted OS X...
Monolingual is a program for removing unnecesary language resources from OS X, in order to reclaim several hundred megabytes of disk space. It requires a 64-bit capable Intel-based Mac and at least... Read more
Maya 2015 - Professional 3D modeling and...
Maya is an award-winning software and powerful, integrated 3D modeling, animation, visual effects, and rendering solution. Because Maya is based on an open architecture, all your work can be scripted... Read more
Starcraft II: Wings of Liberty 1.1.1.180...
Download the patch by launching the Starcraft II game and downloading it through the Battle.net connection within the app. Starcraft II: Wings of Liberty is a strategy game played in real-time. You... Read more
Sibelius 7.5.0 - Music notation solution...
Sibelius is the world's best-selling music notation software for Mac. It is as intuitive to use as a pen, yet so powerful that it does most things in less than the blink of an eye. The demo includes... Read more

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Hearthstone: Heroes of Warcraft Review
Hearthstone: Heroes of Warcraft Review By Rob Thomas on April 21st, 2014 Our Rating: :: PERFECTLY (WAR)CRAFTEDiPad Only App - Designed for the iPad This World of Warcraft CCG spin-off is easy to pick up, almost impossible to put... | Read more »
Hearthstone: Tips and Tricks for Becomin...
Hearthstone: Heroes of Warcraft is a deceptive game because it can be so easy to get into, but doing well winds up being a bit of a challenge. Well, for those just jumping into the game with its iPad release, here are a few general tips on how to... | Read more »
Puzzle Breaker Review
Puzzle Breaker Review By Jordan Minor on April 21st, 2014 Our Rating: :: PUZZLES AND DRAGONSUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad Puzzle Breaker combines simple match-3 gameplay with a surprisingly strong RPG feel.   | Read more »
Createrria Gets an Update that Adds Lead...
Createrria Gets an Update that Adds Leaderboards, Parental Controls, and More Posted by Tre Lawrence on April 21st, 2014 [ permalink ] | Read more »
The Amazing Spider-Man 2 Review
The Amazing Spider-Man 2 Review By Lee Hamlet on April 21st, 2014 Our Rating: :: SPIDER-SENSE TINGLING. IN A GOOD WAYUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad With great power comes… Ah who cares? I just want to swing!   | Read more »
This Week at 148Apps: April 14-18, 2014
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Have a Special Dead Trigger 2 Easter Bas...
Have a Special Dead Trigger 2 Easter Basket Full of Goodies, Courtesy of Madfinger Games Posted by Rob Rich on April 18th, 2014 [ permalink ] Dead Trigger 2 | Read more »
Almost All of Playdek’s Library is on Sa...
Almost All of Playdek’s Library is on Sale Right Now, and You Should Check it Out Posted by Rob Rich on April 18th, 2014 [ permalink ] Playdek has released quite a few great iOS ports of board and card games over the years, and now most of them... | Read more »
Zynga Launches Brand New Farmville Exper...
Zynga Launches Brand New Farmville Experience with Farmville 2: Country Escape Posted by Tre Lawrence on April 18th, 2014 [ permalink ] | Read more »
David. Review
David. Review By Cata Modorcea on April 18th, 2014 Our Rating: :: MINIMALISTIC IN A DIFFERENT WAYUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad David is a minimalistic game wrapped inside of a soothing atmosphere in which the hero... | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

Updated Price Trackers
We’ve updated our Mac Price Trackers with the latest information on prices, bundles, and availability on systems from Apple’s authorized internet/catalog resellers: - 15″ MacBook Pros - 13″ MacBook... Read more
Apple refurbished MacBook Airs available for...
The Apple Store has Apple Certified Refurbished 2013 MacBook Airs available for up to $200 off the cost of new models. An Apple one-year warranty is included with each MacBook, and shipping is free... Read more
Android Leads in Operating System Share Andro...
Consumer Intelligence Research Partners, LLC (CIRP) has released its latest results of its research on mobile phone operating systems for the calendar quarter that ended March 31, 2014. This analysis... Read more
Pelican Products, Inc. Introduces New Lineup...
Pelican Products, Inc., the global leader in the design and manufacture of high-performance protective cases, today announced the launch of a new line of rugged phone cases for both the Apple iPhone... Read more
SaveDrives – Car Dashboard Video Camera &...
Drivers who want to help reduce potential damage to their health and finances in the event of an accident can download the innovative new no-cost app SaveDrives – Car Dashboard Video Camera &... Read more
Deal Alert! 13-inch MacBook Pro on sale for $...
Best Buy has the 13″ 2.5GHz MacBook Pro on sale for $999.99 on their online store. Choose free shipping or free instant local store pickup (if available). Their price is $200 off MSRP. Price is valid... Read more
Free HopTo 2.2 Helps Enhance Your Productivit...
The HopTo app helps you do more on your iPad by providing more and easier adaccess to files and documents. Version 2.2 adds Egnyte and HopTo’s Mac OSX File Connector. If you already have the hopTo... Read more
National Distracted Driving Awareness Month:...
As the country recognizes National Distracted Driving Awareness Month, Sprint is reminding wireless consumers to focus on driving while behind the wheel, to not text or email while driving, and to... Read more
13-inch 2.4GHz Retina MacBook Pro available f...
Abt has the 13″ 2.4GHz 128GB Retina MacBook Pro available for $1229 including free shipping. Their price is $70 off MSRP. Read more
iMacs on sale for up to $160 off MSRP this we...
Best Buy has iMacs on sale for up to $160 off MSRP for a limited time. Choose free home shipping or free instant local store pickup (if available). Prices are valid for online orders only, in-store... Read more

Jobs Board

*Apple* Solutions Consultant (ASC) - Apple (...
**Job Summary** The ASC is an Apple employee who serves as an Apple brand ambassador and influencer in a Reseller's store. The ASC's role is to grow Apple Read more
Position Opening at *Apple* - Apple (United...
…customers purchase our products, you're the one who helps them get more out of their new Apple technology. Your day in the Apple Store is filled with a range of Read more
*Apple* Solutions Consultant (ASC) - Apple (...
**Job Summary** The ASC is an Apple employee who serves as an Apple brand ambassador and influencer in a Reseller's store. The ASC's role is to grow Apple Read more
*Apple* Inc. Research Data Specialist - Appl...
…of Worldwide Market Research & Intelligence. The team is responsible for conducting Apple branded consumer market research. It is also responsible for analyzing data Read more
*Apple* Automotive Parts Department position...
Apple Automotive is one of the fastest growing dealer…and it shows. Consider making the switch to the Apple Automotive Group today! At Apple Automotive, we Read more
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