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ZBasic TextEdit
Volume Number:3
Issue Number:11
Column Tag:Basic School

TextEdit Records from ZBasic

By Dave Kelly, MacTutor Editorial Board

How NOT to Do TextEdit

In past months I promised you some more on text editing. I really intended to give you a text processor written completely in ZBasic. Well, this article is dedicated to the time that it took to find out what not to do if you plan on creating a full blown text processor. This column may not be all that was promised, but it should provide some help to those of you that don’t know what to do with text edit routines.

Basic or Toolbox?

We have talked about text editing in some of the past issues (see June, 1987 and August, 1987). I’ll try to pick up where we left off wherever that might be. There are two varieties of Basic programming. The soft approach uses only the enhanced Basic language provided by the language developer. These high level routines are short cuts that should save you time and increase your chances of getting your program to work quickly and efficiently. The other approach is the ROM calls approach. Effectively, the ROM approach is what C and Pascal programmers have to do every time they write a program unless they have some preprogrammed “libraries” to set up scroll bars, windows, text edit fields etc. for you. (Maybe that’s the best approach). Ideally speaking, I think we want the best of both worlds. We want to be able to set up the basic functions with high level routines, but be able to have the capability (power) to call low level (ROM) routines when the capabilities of the high level routines are not sufficient.

Basic Flunks Text Editing

Why am I telling you all this? Well, I tell you this so you can be warned in advance of the limitations of thinking that the enhanced BASIC routines will always be good enough to do the job. Text Editing is one of these cases. The present capabilities of ALL Basic languages enhanced Basic commands are not enough to do text editing without relying on calls to the ROM routines. I am referring to the use of the EDIT FIELD statements in either MS Basic or ZBasic. In MS Basic you are limited to 8 types of edit fields with no way to access the Text Edit record or to scroll the text in the edit field. The ScrollText Library call will allow you to do some limited scrolling, however, does not provide a way to cut and paste easily. (see The Complete MacTutor, Vol. 2, pg. 345 for examples of scrolling with MS Basic.) Since there has been no word from Microsoft in about a year (and no updates of MS Basic), Microsoft Basic is pretty much out of the running at the present time.

Text editing in ZBasic is much more useful. ZBasic has 4 types of Edit Fields (the text is always selected when default text is used). The best addition is the TEHANDLE function. TEHANDLE gives you the capability to get to the Edit Field’s text record. It sounds simple, but there are some other limitations that I might classify as bugs. Yes, I’ve found a bug, but don’t misunderstand me. ZBasic is a very sound product these days. The problems have resulted in my spending a lot of time searching out the best way not to do text editing.

TEHandle Function in ZBasic

First I will try to explain the usefulness of the TEHANDLE function. The example in the ZBasic manual, pg. E-141 demonstrates TEHANDLE, but the example is more useful for what it does than it is as an example of how to use TEHANDLE. In fact, the functions defined in the example can be cut and pasted into your own program to allow you to pass EDIT FIELD strings longer than 255 characters (ZBasic’s limit). I recommend that you use these routines if you have a need to handle long strings. The definition of how TEHANDLE works is conspicuously missing. The top of the page says the format is just TEHANDLE with no parameters. In fact, TEHANDLE by itself gives a syntax error. A close look at the functions defined in the example show that the format should be: TEHANDLE (field ) where field is the field number. Here is what is confusing: The definition in the manual says that TEHANDLE “Returns the handle to the current EDIT FIELD ” and that the purpose is to be able to handle fields larger than 255 characters. Well, I guess they didn’t think that anyone would want to do more than that.

The problem I have encountered is that TEHANDLE only works if the value of field is 1. That is, it only works for the first EDIT FIELD of a window. For instance, if you change the EDIT FIELD number of the example on page E-141 to 2 and adjust all the function calls such that they will also refer to field 2, the example program will gracefully bomb. Zedcor tells me they think there is a problem with some changes that were made with system version 4.1 and ZBasic 4.0. ZBasic 4.01 should soon be out. [Where have we heard that before? -Ed]

For me, the importance of getting at the text edit record is to be able to add power to my program to control where the text is located, where it is viewed, what part of the text is selected, and even change fonts and size information (among other things). A text edit record is created for each EDIT FIELD you create. The record, shown on pg. E-183 of the ZBasic manual, is stored in the heap with other resources. It turns out however that it was not intended that the user have this kind of capability with ZBasic EDIT FIELDS. For example, if you have several EDIT FIELDS on your screen, you will have trouble changing fonts or font sizes in one field (by poking the font id into the edit record) without affecting the other fields or even the printing on the screen. It appears that the built-in automatic EDIT FIELD update routines won’t let the text font or style change after it has been created. Another disappointment is that the EDIT FIELD automatic routines reset the text to the beginning of the window so that text scrolling is impossible (or very cumbersome). The bottom line is that the ROM routines will need to be used in full to really have control over what the EDIT FIELD does.

Complications Set In

This leads us to another problem. If you use the TENEW function (ROM) to create the Text Edit Field the ZBasic DIALOG statement will not know how to tell the Dialog Event routine that a text edit event has occurred. Then how do you process the events? Well, how about GETNEXTEVENT ? (discussed in Sept. 1987 MacTutor). Hmm but if I’ve got to go to all that trouble why not just use Pascal and not have all the limitations that Basic leaves us with. Not only that but the Pascal routines have been used hundreds of times before and there are a lot of examples available. Doesn’t sound too promising for BASIC. I think that is why so many serious developers only use Basic occasionally for easy, short, quick routines. Take a look at the Mousehole Basic Only board and compare it with the Pascal or C board and you’ll see what I mean. In the August 1987 APDA catalog there is a graph on page 11 showing the results of a survey done in 1985. The results are that 30% prefer C, 28% prefer Pascal, 20% prefer assembler, 6% prefer Basic, 4% Forth, 4% Modula-2, 4% LISP, 4% Other. These results were before TML and Lightspeed Pascal became popular so there might be some changes to the high end of the scale. (See figure 1)

Fig. 1 1985 APDA Survey of Preferred Languages

So what do we do about it? Sit back and wait for Zedcor to improve their product. In this case, the limitations are created only because Zedcor has not provided access to all routines via the high level enhanced BASIC routines. Fortunately, they did provide the ROM routine capability to do the job. The problem is that it will be just as much work to write a ROM program in BASIC as it would be in PASCAL. Zedcor still has the finest Basic available and they have thus far provided excellent support of the language. I realize that some of you have been upset that you have been the guinea pigs while the bugs were worked on. For those of you that have lost hope, you can be assured that ZBasic is now a solid product.

The program I’ve provided here is the results of my attempts to take the EDIT FIELD to its maximum capability. I refer to it as a tour of the Edit Field because it gives you an overview of Edit Fields and Text Edit Records. The program is set up in a similar manner to the TEHANDLE example in the ZBasic manual pg. E-141 except that I have added the capability to view the entire text edit record and attempt to change the values of the edit record. If you type in the byte offset of the edit record (found on E-183) you can see which of the parameters of the record can be changed and which ones change back when the EDIT FIELD is updated. Figure 2 shows the text edit record and is displayed as a menu function by the program. Figure 3 shows the program in action. A text edit window is put up, with the text edit fields displayed below. The program is supposed to work correctly on a large screen (Mac II), but the default window size comes up and obscures some of the field information.

Fig. 2 The Text Edit Record

Fig. 3 Our Demo Program in Action

Program Details

First a window is opened to full screen size (same as your monitor). By calling GETWMGRPORT as Dave Smith suggested I’ve modified the routine from what was in the Sept. 1987 MacTutor. Three EDIT FIELDS are opened. The first is the main text edit field the other two are for convenience in entering data to change the text edit record.

The SCROLL BUTTON statement was intended to be used, but has not been implemented. It appears that since the canned EDIT FIELD seems to reset itself to the first line of the text, TESCROLL cannot be used with EDIT FIELDs. You would have to create your own TE field with ROM calls.

Generally speaking, the “MenuEvent” and “DialogEvent” routines don’t change a whole lot from program to program. Since the EDIT FIELD is a canned function (preprogrammed, automatic function), it is not necessary to call any ROM routines to handle the basic functions of the EDIT FIELD. ZBasic handles calls like TEIDLE for you. The user defined function teWordPeek% helps to shorten the typing involved in the text edit record list.

There is a problem that I discovered in my early version of the program before I removed the growbox from the window. It seems that if you resize the window, the text that was printed with PRINT @(x,y) does not print at x,y when the point x,y is outside the visible range of the window. The same can be said for the LOCATE statement. The solution would be to use the DRAWSTRING ROM call to draw the text at a specific location.

The buttonevent routine is supposed to handle the reading of the byte to be changed and the new value. The problem here was that the TEHANDLE function would not work for a 2nd or 3rd EDIT FIELD.

As you can see, there is still a bit of work to be done here, if possible. From what I can tell here, I recommend that ROM calls be used for any major text editing. This will have to be followed up on in future issues of MacTutor.


{1}
‘Edit Field Tour
‘A software explanation of the Text Edit Record
‘WARNING: Some portions of this program do not
‘function properly.  USE AT YOUR OWN RISK!
‘the ZBasic way.
‘©MacTutor, 1987
‘By Dave Kelly

WINDOW OFF
COORDINATE WINDOW
DEF MOUSE =-1
DIM DestRect%(3)
CALL GETWMGRPORT(WMgrPort&)
‘Figure out the size of monitor used
PortRecttop=PEEK WORD(WMgrPort&+8)
PortRectleft=PEEK WORD(WMgrPort&+10)
PortRectbottom=PEEK WORD(WMgrPort&+12)
PortRectright=PEEK WORD(WMgrPort&+14)
WINDOW 1,”TEdit Tour”,(PortRectleft+4,PortRecttop+42)-         
 (PortRectright-6,PortRectbottom-6),5
TEXT ,,,0
EDIT FIELD 1,defaulttext$,(4,4)-(WINDOW(2)-16,                 
 WINDOW(3)/2), 2
SCROLL BUTTON 1,0,0,10,10,(WINDOW(2)-16,3)-                    (WINDOW(2),WINDOW(3)/2+1),0
CALL MOVETO(4,(WINDOW(3)/2)+22)
CALL DRAWSTRING(“Change Byte:”)
EDIT FIELD 2,,(90,(WINDOW(3)/2)+13)-(105,                      (WINDOW(3)/2)+25)
EFHndl2&=TEHANDLE(2)
CALL MOVETO(111,(WINDOW(3)/2)+22)
CALL DRAWSTRING(“TO”)
EDIT FIELD 3,,(140,(WINDOW(3)/2)+13)-(155,                     (WINDOW(3)/2)+25)
EFHndl3&=TEHANDLE(3)
BUTTON 3,1,”Enter”,(170,(WINDOW(3)/2)+11)-(240,                (WINDOW(3)/2)+27)
APPLE MENU “TEdit Tour”
MENU 1,0,1,”File”
MENU 1,1,1,”View Text Edit Record”
MENU 1,2,0,”-”
MENU 1,3,1,”Quit/Q”
EDIT MENU 2
DEF FN teWordPeek%(n)=PEEK WORD(PEEK LONG(TEHANDLE(1))+n)
DEF FN teLongPeek&(n)=PEEK LONG(PEEK LONG(TEHANDLE(1))+n)
EDIT FIELD 1:CurrentField=1
ON DIALOG GOSUB “DialogEvent”
ON MENU GOSUB “MenuEvent”
FLUSHEVENTS
MENU ON:DIALOG ON
“Loop”
GOSUB “Info”
GOTO “Loop”
MENU OFF:DIALOG OFF
“DialogEvent”
D=DIALOG(0)
SELECT D
 CASE 1
 GOSUB “ButtonEvent” 
 CASE 2
 ‘EditEvent
 CurrentField=DIALOG(2)
 CASE 3
 ‘Inactive Window
 CASE 4
 ‘Closebox
 IF DIALOG(4)=1 THEN END
 CASE 5
 GOSUB “Refresh”
 CASE 6
 ‘ Return Key
 CurrentField=DIALOG(6)
 IF CurrentField<>1 THEN GOSUB “ButtonEvent”
 CASE 7
 ‘ Tab Key
 CurrentField=DIALOG(7)
 LONG IF CurrentField<>3
 EDIT FIELD CurrentField+1
 CurrentField=CurrentField+1
 XELSE
 EDIT FIELD 1
 CurrentField=1
 END IF
 CASE 8
 ‘ Zoomin not used
 CASE 9
 ‘ Zoomout not used
 CASE 10
 ‘ Shift tab
 CurrentField=DIALOG(10)
 LONG IF CurrentField<>1
 EDIT FIELD CurrentField-1
 CurrentField=CurrentField-1
 XELSE
 EDIT FIELD 3
 CurrentField=3
 END IF
 CASE 11
 ‘ Clear key
 CurrentField=DIALOG(11)
 CASE 12
 ‘ Left Arrow
 CurrentField=DIALOG(12)
 CASE 13
 ‘ Right Arrow
 CurrentField=DIALOG(13)
 CASE 14
 ‘ Up Arrow
 CurrentField=DIALOG(14)
 CASE 15
 ‘ Down Arrow
 CurrentField=DIALOG(15)
 CASE 16
 ‘ Keypress
END SELECT
RETURN
“MenuEvent”
MenuNumber=MENU(0)
MenuItem=MENU(1)
MENU
SELECT MenuNumber
 CASE 255
 GOSUB “appleID”
 CASE 1
 GOSUB “fileID”
 CASE 2
 ‘ Edit Menu
END SELECT
RETURN
“appleID”
IF CurrentField<>1 THEN EDIT FIELD 1:CurrentField=1
WINDOW 2,””,(PortRectleft+10,PortRecttop+30)-                  (PortRectright-12, 
PortRectbottom-12),-2
TEXT 4,9,0,0
MOUSE ON
PRINT “Byte”;SPC(5);”TEHANDLE = “;TEHANDLE(1)
PRINT “ 0  DestRect”,FN teWordPeek%(0),FN teWordPeek%(2),      
 FN teWordPeek%(4), FN teWordPeek%(6)
PRINT “ 8  ViewRect”,FN teWordPeek%(8),FN teWordPeek%(10), FN  
 teWordPeek%(12), FN teWordPeek%(14)
PRINT “16  SelRect”,FN teWordPeek%(16),FN teWordPeek%(18), FN  
 teWordPeek%(20),FN teWordPeek%(22)
PRINT “24  LineHeight”,FN teWordPeek%(24)
PRINT “26  FontAscent”,FN teWordPeek%(26)
PRINT “28  SelPoint”,FN teWordPeek%(28),FN                     teWordPeek%(30)
PRINT “32  SelStart”,FN teWordPeek%(32),,”Byte”

PRINT “34  SelEnd”,FN teWordPeek%(34),,”68  recallines”,FN     
 teWordPeek%(68)
PRINT “36  Active”,FN teWordPeek%(36),,”70  ClickStuff”,FN     
 teWordPeek%(70)
PRINT “38  WordBreak”,FN teLongPeek&(38),,”72  CrOnly”,FN      
 teWordPeek%(72)
PRINT “42  ClickLoop”,FN teLongPeek&(42),,”74  txFont”,FN      
 teWordPeek%(74)
PRINT “46  ClickTime”,FN teLongPeek&(46),,”76  txFace”,FN      
 teWordPeek%(76)
PRINT “50  ClickLoc”,FN teWordPeek%(50),,”78  txMode”,FN       
 teWordPeek%(78)
PRINT “52  Carettime”,FN teLongPeek&(52),,”80  txSize”,FN      
 teWordPeek%(80)
PRINT “56  CaretState”,FN teWordPeek%(56),,”82  GrafPtr”,FN    
 teLongPeek&(82)
PRINT “58  Just”,FN teWordPeek%(58),,”86  HighHook”,FN         teLongPeek&(86)
PRINT “60  teLength”,FN teWordPeek%(60),,”90  caretHook”,FN    
 teLongPeek&(88)
PRINT “62  hText”,FN teLongPeek&(62),,”94  nLines”,FN          teWordPeek%(94)
PRINT “66  RecalBack”,FN teWordPeek%(66),,”96  LineStarts”,    
 FN teWordPeek%(96)
PRINT
TEXT 2,18
PRINT SPC(15);”©MacTutor, 1987
TEXT 2,12
PRINT SPC(30);”By Dave Kelly”
PRINT SPC(27);”ZBasic Version 4.0"
MOUSE ON
DO
 mous=MOUSE(0)
 outsiderect=(MOUSE(1)<0 OR MOUSE(1)>WINDOW(2) OR              
 MOUSE(2)<0 OR MOUSE(2)>WINDOW(3))
UNTIL mous<>0 AND NOT (outsiderect)
MOUSE OFF
WINDOW CLOSE 2
TEXT 4,9,0,0
GOSUB “Refresh”
RETURN
“fileID”
SELECT MenuItem
 CASE 1
 GOSUB “appleID”
 CASE 3
 END
END SELECT
RETURN
“Info”
LONG IF CurrentField=1 AND WINDOW(0)=1
 TEXT 4,9,0,0
 PRINT @(0,17);”destRect:”,FN teWordPeek(0),FN                 
 teWordPeek(2), FN teWordPeek(4),FN teWordPeek(6)
 PRINT @(0,18);”viewRect:”,FN teWordPeek(8),FN                 
 teWordPeek(10), FN teWordPeek(12),FN teWordPeek(14)
 PRINT @(0,19);”selPoint:”,FN teWordPeek(28),FN 
 teWordPeek(30),
 PRINT @(0,20);”selStart:”,FN teWordPeek(32),”selEnd:”,FN      
 teWordPeek(34)
 PRINT @(0,22);”teLength:”,FN teWordPeek(60),”nLines:”;FN      
 teWordPeek(94),”hText”, PEEK LONG(FN teLongPeek&(62))
 PRINT @(0,23);”txFont:”,FN teWordPeek(74),                    “txFace:”; 
FN teWordPeek(76), “txSize:”,FN 
 teWordPeek(80)
END IF
RETURN
“Refresh”
CALL TEXTFONT(4)
CALL TEXTSIZE(9)
CALL MOVETO(4,(WINDOW(3)/2)+22)
CALL DRAWSTRING(“Change Byte:”)
CALL MOVETO(111,(WINDOW(3)/2)+22)
CALL DRAWSTRING(“TO”)
RETURN
“ButtonEvent”
 Byte$=EDIT$(2):NewByte$=EDIT$(3)
 FOR i= 1 TO LEN(Byte$)
IF MID$(Byte$,i,1)<“0” OR MID$(Byte$,i,1)>”9"THEN Byte$=””
 NEXT i
 FOR i=1 TO LEN(NewByte$)
 IF MID$(NewByte$,i,1)<“0” OR MID$(NewByte$,i,1)>”9"THEN NewByte$=””
 NEXT i
 IF Byte$=”” OR NewByte$=”” THEN B
 Byte&=VAL(Byte$):NewByte&=VAL(NewByte$)
‘Delete current text  (BOMBS see discussion in MacTutor, Nov. 87)
 ‘ CALL TESETSELECT(0,1000,EFHndl3&)
 ‘ CALL TEDELETE(EFHndl2&)
 ‘ CALL TESETSELECT(0,1000,EFHndl3&)
 ‘ CALL TEDELETE(EFHndl3&)
 EDIT FIELD 1:CurrentField=1
 POKE WORD PEEK LONG(TEHANDLE(1))+Byte&,NewByte&
 CALL SETRECT(DestRect%(0),FN teWordPeek(0),FN                 teWordPeek(2),FN 
teWordPeek(4),FN teWordPeek(6))
 CALL TEUPDATE(DestRect%(0),TEHANDLE(1))
RETURN

BASIC QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

Q. How can I determine the size of screen being used and draw my windows accordingly?

A. Use the following lines of code (or similar)

{2}
 CALL GETWMGRPORT(WMgrPort&)
 PortRecttop=PEEK WORD(WMgrPort&+8)
 PortRectleft=PEEK WORD(WMgrPort&+10)
 PortRectbottom=PEEK WORD(WMgrPort&+12)
 PortRectright=PEEK WORD(WMgrPort&+14)
 WINDOW 1,”TEdit Tour”, (PortRectleft+4, PortRecttop+42)-      
 (PortRectright-6, PortRectbottom-6), 5

Q. I’ve created a resource to be owned by my application, but I’m not quite sure how to go PEEKing and POKEing around with it. Could you explain? The resource is:

{3}
 PASS.Rsrc
 TYPE PASS=GNRL
 ,1
 .I
 255
 .I
 61
 .P
 DON’T PANIC!

After compiling the resource the following program will open the resource file, move each resource to memory, PEEK and PRINT the contents, then change the resource by switching the integers and reversing the order of the string and rewriting the resource as the file closes. To use the resource with your application see my column in the Aug. 1987 MacTutor.

{4}
‘ Find out what application is named
ResName$=FILES$(1,””,,vol%)
IF ResName$=”” THEN END
‘Open application resource file
Refnum=FN OPENRESFILE(ResName$)
Errnum=FN RESERROR
LONG IF Errnum<>0
BEEP:PRINT”ERROR# “;Errnum
PRINT “Problem with Resource File!”
FOR i=1 TO 1000:NEXT i:END
END IF
CALL LOADRESOURCE(Refnum):’Load Resource into memory
Rhndl&=FN GETRESOURCE(CVI(“PASS”),1)
ResPtr&=USR3(Rhndl&):’Lock the handle and return a pointer
firstint=PEEK WORD(ResPtr&):’ get the first integer
secondint=PEEK WORD(ResPtr&+2):’get the second integer
FOR i=1 TO PEEK(ResPtr&+4)
 string$=string$+CHR$(PEEK(ResPtr&+4+i))
NEXT i
PRINT firstint,secondint,string$
POKE WORD(ResPtr&),secondint:’save second into 1st integer
POKE WORD(ResPtr&+2),firstint:’ save first into 2nd integer
POKE(ResPtr&+4),LEN(string$)
FOR i=LEN(string$) TO 1 STEP -1
 Newstring$=Newstring$+MID$(string$,i,1)
NEXT i
FOR  i=1 TO LEN(Newstring$)
 POKE(ResPtr&+4+i),(ASC(MID$(Newstring$,i,1)))
NEXT i
CALL CHANGEDRESOURCE(Rhndl&)
ResPtr&=USR7(Rhndl&):’ Unlock the resource handle
CALL CLOSERESFILE(Refnum)
END

Thanks to Chas Stricklin of Shreveport, LA for asking the above questions. I’m sure there are other people out there that have some of the same questions.

 
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B&H Photo has dropped prices on 2013 15″ Retina MacBook Pros by $250 off original MSRP. Shipping is free, and B&H charges NY sales tax only: - 15″ 2.3GHz Retina MacBook Pro: $2249, $250 off... Read more
More iPad Upgrade Musings – The ‘Book Mystiqu...
Much discussed recently, what with Apple reporting iPad sales shrinkage over two consecutive quarters, is that it had apparently been widely assumed that tablet users would follow a two-year hardware... Read more

Jobs Board

*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions (US) - A...
Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, you're also the Read more
Sr. Product Leader, *Apple* Store Apps - Ap...
**Job Summary** Imagine what you could do here. At Apple , great ideas have a way of becoming great products, services, and customer experiences very quickly. Bring Read more
Sr Software Lead Engineer, *Apple* Online S...
Sr Software Lead Engineer, Apple Online Store Publishing Systems Keywords: Company: Apple Job Code: E3PCAK8MgYYkw Location (City or ZIP): Santa Clara Status: Full Read more
Sr Software Lead Engineer, *Apple* Online S...
Sr Software Lead Engineer, Apple Online Store Publishing Systems Keywords: Company: Apple Job Code: E3PCAK8MgYYkw Location (City or ZIP): Santa Clara Status: Full Read more
*Apple* Solutions Consultant (ASC) - Apple (...
**Job Summary** The ASC is an Apple employee who serves as an Apple brand ambassador and influencer in a Reseller's store. The ASC's role is to grow Apple Read more
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