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PStrings in C
Volume Number:3
Issue Number:11
Column Tag:Programmer's Workshop

Pascal String Library for C

By Troy Clark, PO Box 2647, Carefree, AZ 85377

Breaking away from C strings and the Stdio Library

Many Mac C programmers use C style strings in order to remain compatible with the Stdio library which provides several commonly needed functions. Unfortunately, C strings are incompatible with virtually all the ROM routines that take strings as arguments. I will point out the draw backs to the most common solution to this compatibility problem and then discuss how to eliminate it altogether.

In this process, I will show you how to create libraries of code in such a way as to allow LightspeedC to link only the code that was actually used, as well as give you examples of how to use Apple’s SANE, Str2Dec and Dec2Str libraries. I will also demonstrate how to write functions in C that take a variable number of arguments. More importantly, I have provided the source for a complete Pascal String Library.

Need for a Pascal String Library

The easiest way around the string compatibility problem is to use the MacTraps routines CtoPstr() and PtoCstr() to convert back and fourth between C and Pascal strings at run time. However, using these extra function calls will increase the size of your code and may hinder your application’s overall performance since it takes time to do the conversions. Including the Stdio library adds approxiamtely 16K to your application alone. Couple this fact with the string conversion overhead neccessary to stay on speaking terms with the ROM, and you’ve got a real mess!

You could eliminate the problem altogether by using Pascal strings, exclusively. This implies having to write your own code as a functional replacement for the Stdio library. How dependent are you on the Stdio? Since getchar() and printf() are next to useless in the Mac environment, there are really only two areas of concern--file and Pascal string handling.

Reading the File Manager chapter of Inside Macintosh will get your wheels rolling in the file handling department. It is very easy to create, delete, open, close, read and write files using the ROM routines. If you need examples of how to use the routines and you can’t find them anywhere else, you can always dig through the Stdio’s source code. Yes--even the Stdio uses the ROM! Implementing a high quality Pascal String Library is not as easy, so I have taken this burden off your shoulders by providing one for you.

Writing the functions to draw, copy, concatenate and search Pascal strings was fairly straight forward. It is important to remember that type ‘char’ is actually a signed quantity and that character values greater than 127 will be considered negative. I got around this “feature” by declaring all Pascal string arguments as ‘unsigned char *’ (i.e. a pointer to an unsigned char). The signed quantity issue was particiliarly important for the PStrFind functions which take ‘char’s as arguments. Since all K&R standard C compilers convert ‘char’s to ‘int’s before passing them to a function, I declared the argument as type ‘int’ within the function definition and then manually stripped the sign extension off via: int_var &= 0xFF;

Fig. 1 Demo shows how to use the string library

Immediate char values such as ‘•’ DO NOT get sign extended! During a few moments of carelessness, you could easily write a function that works correctly with ‘immediate’ character arguments, but FAILS when tested with ‘char’ type arguments! Note that sign extension of type ‘char’ (i.e. or any other signed type) occurs BEFORE a cast takes affect, so casting type ‘char’ to type ‘unsigned int’ for example will not solve the problem.

(In hopes of reducing redundant expressions, I will henceforth substitute “standard type” in place of “type int, long, float, short double and double”)

Writing the functions to: 1) create a Pascal string representation of any standard type of number. 2) set the value of any standard type of number to the value represented in a Pascal string--was far more challenging. Rather than writing seperate functions for each type of number, I wrote two functions capable of operating on any standard type. This was made possible by using the SANE, Dec2Str and Str2Dec libraries!

SANE Contributions

There are two structures defined in the sane.h file which you need to be aware of in order to understand these libraries. Decimal structures are used to store decimal string representations of numeric values in up to 20 digits of precision. DecForm structures are used to specify the number of significant digits and whether you want a FLOATDECIMAL (i.e. scientific notation) or FIXEDDECIMAL (i.e. decimal) representation of a value.

SANE provides procedures to set a Decimal structure equal to the value of any standard type of number, as well as procedures to set the value of any standard type of number equal to a Decimal record. The Dec2Str library provides a procedure to create a Pascal string representation of a value in a Decimal structure according to the settings of a DecForm structure. The Str2Dec library provides a procedure to set a Decimal structure to the value represented in a Pascal string. These procedures are documented in the Apple Numerics Manual. I used them to create the PStr2Num() and Num2PStr() functions listed below--notice how little code was required!

Functions with Variable Arguments

LightspeedC generates code that uses a calling convention designed to allow programmers to write functions accepting a variable number of arguments:

;  High memory
;  Callers Code looks like this
 MOVE  . . ., -(SP)     ;  last argument
 . . .
 MOVE  . . ., -(SP)     ;  first argument
 JSR    function
 ADD   #. . ., -(SP)    ;  total size of arguments

;  Functions’s code looks like this
 LINK   A6, #. . .      ;  (optional)
 . . . 
 MOVE  . . ., D0        ;  result
 UNLK  A6               ;  (optional)
; Low memory

The first argument passed to a function is always in the same location relative to the stack pointer (register A7) regardless of how many additional arguments are supplied. Thus, all the arguments can be found by adding positive offsets to the address of the first which is usually an integer specifying how many arguments are to follow. The responsiblity of removing the arguments from the stack lies with the party that knows how many arguments were actualy passed--the caller. The PStrCat() and ShowVars() listed below are examples of functions written to accept a variable number of arguments. In LightspeedC, the maximum number of arguments is 31.

Fooling LS C into using Strip-able Code Libraries

LightspeedC’s linker considers libraries built with ‘Build Library...’ command as ATOMIC code units. If any code is used then the ALL the code gets linked! If a library is itself a project, however, then all the source files and libraries with in it are individually eligible for removal. This is the key to creating ‘strip-able’ code libraries in LightSpeed C! All you have to do is: 1) create a seperate source file for each function 2) create a new project and add all the files 3) compile the files. You can now consider this project a ‘libary’ and include it in any other project you want.

String Library Demo Shows How to Use It!

I have also provide the source for an application that DEMO’s the Pascal String Library. It’s basically an online tutorial that explains the ‘how to’s and ‘results of’ using each function in the library.

You can find stuff like this only in MacTutor! I would like to thank David Smith for allowing me to share this information with you. Until next time...

/*    File: PStrLib.h           */

#ifndef _PStrLib_
 #define_PStrLib_
 #ifndef _WindowMgr_
 #include <WindowMgr.h>
 #endif
 #ifndef _FontMgr_
 #include <FontMgr.h>
 #endif
 #ifndef _saneh_
 #include <sane.h>
 #endif
 extern char _char[];
 #defineBOOL1
 #defineCDBLFFEXT
 #defineCSHORTDBLFFDBL
 #defineCFLOAT   FFSGL
 #defineCINTFFINT
 #defineCLONG    FFLNG
 #defineCCOMP    FFCOMP
 #definePSTR2
 #defineDEC FIXEDDECIMAL
 #defineSCI FLOATDECIMAL
 #defineALL 255
 #defineNIL 0L
 #defineCEN (-1)
 #defineNL1 (-1)
 #defineNL2 (-2)
 #defineCUR (-3)
 #defineplain    ‘’
 #define  _alpha 1
 #define  _digit 2
 #define  _hex   4
 #define  _octal 8
 #define_ascii   16
 #define_cntrl   32
 #define  _punct 64
 #define  _space 128
/* 
The c character passed to the macros below should be’declared as’ or 
‘cast to’ type ‘Byte’ or ‘unsigned char’. Type char gets sign extended 
to an integer. Thus, when c > 127 the _char[] subscript becomes negative! 
 Note that immediate chars such as ‘•’ do not get sign extended so they’re 
okay.
*/
#define IsAlphaNum(c) (_char[(c)+1]&(_alpha|_digit))
 #defineIsAlpha(c) (_char[(c)+1]&_alpha)
 #defineIsAscii(c) (_char[(c)+1]&_ascii)
 #defineIsCntrl(c) (_char[(c)+1]&_cntrl)
#define IsCSym(c) ((_char[(c)+1]&(_alpha|_digit))||(c)==’_’)
#define IsCSymF(c) ((_char[(c)+1]&_alpha)||(c)==’_’)
 #define  IsDigit(c) (_char[(c)+1]&_digit)
 #defineIsGraph(c) ((c)>=’!’&&(c)<=’~’)
 #defineIsOctDigit(c)(_char[(c)+1]&_octal)
 #defineIsPrint(c) ((c)>=32&&(c)<=255)
 #defineIsPunct(c) (_char[(c)+1]&_punct)
 #defineIsSpace(c) (_char[(c)+1]&_space)
 #defineIsHexDigit(c)(_char[(c)+1]&_hex)
#endif
/*    FILE:  macros_char.c
 Contains _char[] used by macros in PStrLib.h */
#include“PStrLib.h”

char _char[257] =
{/* char masks allow for efficient macros */
 0, _cntrl|_ascii, _cntrl|_ascii, _cntrl|_ascii,
 _cntrl|_ascii|_space, _cntrl|_ascii, _cntrl|_ascii,
 _cntrl|_ascii, _cntrl|_ascii, _cntrl|_ascii,
 _cntrl|_ascii|_space, _cntrl|_ascii|_space,
 _cntrl|_ascii|_space, _cntrl|_ascii|_space,
 _cntrl|_ascii|_space, _cntrl|_ascii, _cntrl|_ascii,
 _cntrl|_ascii, _cntrl|_ascii, _cntrl|_ascii,
 _cntrl|_ascii, _cntrl|_ascii, _cntrl|_ascii,
 _cntrl|_ascii, _cntrl|_ascii, _cntrl|_ascii,
 _cntrl|_ascii, _cntrl|_ascii, _cntrl|_ascii,
 _cntrl|_ascii, _cntrl|_ascii, _cntrl|_ascii,
 _cntrl|_ascii, _space|_ascii, _ascii|_punct,
 _ascii|_punct, _ascii|_punct, _ascii|_punct,
 _ascii|_punct, _ascii|_punct, _ascii|_punct,
 _ascii|_punct, _ascii|_punct, _ascii|_punct,
 _ascii|_punct, _ascii|_punct, _ascii|_punct,
 _ascii|_punct, _ascii|_punct, _digit|_hex|_octal|_ascii,
 _digit|_hex|_octal|_ascii, _digit|_hex|_octal|_ascii,
 _digit|_hex|_octal|_ascii, _digit|_hex|_octal|_ascii,
 _digit|_hex|_octal|_ascii, _digit|_hex|_octal|_ascii,
 _digit|_hex|_octal|_ascii, _digit|_hex|_ascii,
 _digit|_hex|_ascii, _ascii|_punct, _ascii|_punct,
 _ascii|_punct, _ascii|_punct, _ascii|_punct,
 _ascii|_punct, _ascii|_punct, _alpha|_hex|_ascii,
 _alpha|_hex|_ascii, _alpha|_hex|_ascii,
 _alpha|_hex|_ascii, _alpha|_hex|_ascii,
 _alpha|_hex|_ascii, _alpha|_ascii, _alpha|_ascii,
 _alpha|_ascii, _alpha|_ascii, _alpha|_ascii,
 _alpha|_ascii, _alpha|_ascii, _alpha|_ascii,
 _alpha|_ascii, _alpha|_ascii, _alpha|_ascii,
 _alpha|_ascii, _alpha|_ascii, _alpha|_ascii,
 _alpha|_ascii, _alpha|_ascii, _alpha|_ascii,
 _alpha|_ascii, _alpha|_ascii, _alpha|_ascii,
 _ascii|_punct, _ascii|_punct, _ascii|_punct,
 _ascii|_punct, _ascii|_punct, _ascii|_punct,
 _alpha|_ascii|_hex, _alpha|_ascii|_hex,
 _alpha|_ascii|_hex, _alpha|_ascii|_hex,
 _alpha|_ascii|_hex, _alpha|_ascii|_hex,
 _alpha|_ascii, _alpha|_ascii, _alpha|_ascii,
 _alpha|_ascii, _alpha|_ascii, _alpha|_ascii,
 _alpha|_ascii, _alpha|_ascii, _alpha|_ascii,
 _alpha|_ascii, _alpha|_ascii, _alpha|_ascii,
 _alpha|_ascii, _alpha|_ascii, _alpha|_ascii,
 _alpha|_ascii, _alpha|_ascii, _alpha|_ascii,
 _alpha|_ascii, _alpha|_ascii, _ascii|_punct,
 _ascii|_punct, _ascii|_punct, _ascii|_punct,
 _cntrl|_ascii,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,
 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,
 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,
 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,
 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,
 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0
};
/*    FILE:   Num2PStr.c    
 Creates a pascal string rep of a given type of 
 number, returning TRUE if it fails to do so. */
#include“PStrLib.h”

Num2PStr(type, numPtr, pStr, format, places)
inttype;/* type of var pointed at by numPtr */
void  *numPtr; /* size of *numPtr depends on type */
register char  *pStr;/* points to a PASCAL string */           
int   format;  /* specifies Dec or Sci notation */
intplaces;/* # digits to right of Dec point */
{
 auto   Decimal  _Decimal_;
 auto   DecForm  _DecForm_;
 register int    n = 1;
 
/* 
NOTE: When Dec2Str() fails, it sets pStr == ‘?’. The most common cause 
of failure is trying to convert a large number to DEC string format using 
a large places value. The do-while loop below catches such failures and 
fixes them by changing the format to SCI which virtually never fails 
(See the Apple Numerics Manual for more details).  
*/ 
 do {
 _DecForm_.style = n > 0 ? format : FLOATDECIMAL;
 _DecForm_.digits = format == FLOATDECIMAL ? places + 1 : places;
   fp68k(&_DecForm_, numPtr, &_Decimal_, type + FOB2D);
   Dec2Str(_DecForm_, &_Decimal_, pStr);
 } while (pStr[1] == ‘?’ && --n >= 0);
Kreturn(pStr[1] == ‘?’); /* Ret TRUE if Dec2Str() FAILED */
}
/*    FILE:   PStr2Num.c
 Sets value of a given type of number based on a pascal string representation, 
returning TRUE if it fails to do so. */
#include“PStrLib.h”

PStr2Num(pStr, type, numPtr)
char  *pStr;/* points to a PASCAL string */        
inttype;/* type of variable n points at */
void  *numPtr; /* generic pointer */
{
 auto Decimal  _decimal_;
 auto int valid, index = 1; 
 /* start-scan pos. of pStr */
 
 Str2Dec(pStr, &index, &_decimal_, &valid);
 fp68k(&_decimal_, numPtr, type + FOD2B);
 return(!valid); /*returns TRUE if failed */
}
/*    FILE:   PStrCat.c
 Concatenates 2-30 Pascal strings. */
#include“PStrLib.h”

PStrCat(count, dst)  
register intcount; /* # of strings (including dst) */
unsigned char  *dst; /* destination pascal string */
{
 register unsigned char *dstPtr, *srcPtr;
 register unsigned char **argList = &dst;
 register int     argLen, totLen;
 
 if ((totLen = *dst) < 255) {
 if (count > 30)
 count = 30;/* max. # of string args 30 */
 dstPtr = dst + totLen; 
 /* dstPtr = 1 past end of dst */
 while (--count > 0 && totLen < 255) {
 srcPtr = *++argList;
 argLen = srcPtr[0];
 if (totLen + argLen > 255)
 argLen = 255 - totLen;
 /* max totLen = 255 */
 totLen += argLen; 
 while (--argLen >= 0)  /* add arg’s char to dst */
 *++dstPtr = *++srcPtr;   
 }
 dst[0] = totLen;/* sets length of dst */
 }
}
/*    FILE:   PStrCmp.c
 Compares src to dst returning <0 less than, =0 equal, >0 greater */
#include“PStrLib.h”

PStrCmp(src, dst)
register unsigned char  *src, *dst; /* Pascal strings */
{
 register int    slen = *src, dlen = *dst;
 register int    mlen = *src <= *dst ? *src : *dst;
 
 while (--mlen >= 0 && *++src == *++dst);
 return(((slen != dlen && *src == *dst) ? slen - dlen : *src - *dst));
}
/*    FILE:   PStrCopy.c
 Copys count char from pos of src to dst. */
#include“PStrLib.h”

PStrCopy(src, pos, count, dst)
register unsigned char  *src, *dst; /* Pascal strings */
register intpos, count;
{
 register int    max;
 
 --pos;
 if (count > (max = *src - pos))   
 count = max;
 src += pos;
 *dst = count;
 while (--count >= 0) *++dst = *++src;
}
/*    FILE:   PStrDel.c
 Deletes count chars from pos of dst. */
#include“PStrLib.h”

PStrDel(s, pos, count)
register unsigned char  *s; /* Pascal string */
register intpos, count;
{
 register unsigned char *t;
 register int    shift;
 
 if (*s) {
 if (--pos + count > *s)
 count = *s - pos;
 shift = *s - pos;
 *s -= count;
 s += pos;
 t = s + count;
 while (--shift >= 0)
 *++s = *++t;
 }
}
/*    FILE:  PStrDraw.c
 Draws 1 to 10 Pascal strings at specified locations in the current GrafPort. 
 It Offers auto-centering and New-Line modes. If h == 0 then it uses 
the last (current) h position. If v == 0 then it uses the last (current) 
v position. If x < 0 then s is centered inside the portRect.  If y < 
0 then it offsets -y number of lines from current v pos. Otherwise, h 
and v represent the desired x and y coordinates. */
#include“PStrLib.h”

PStrDraw(count, s, h, v)
intcount; /* number of { s, h, v} sets to follow */
char  *s; /* a pascal string to draw */
inth;   /* horizontal position */
intv;   /* vertical position */
{
 register char *argPtr = (char *)&count;
 register char *sp;
 register Rect *rp = &thePort->portRect;
 register int    x, y, lineHeight = 1.5 * thePort->txSize;
 static int old_x = 0, old_y = 0;
 
 while (--count >= 0) {
 sp = *(char **)(argPtr += 2);
 x = *(int *)(argPtr += 4);
 y = *(int *)(argPtr += 2);
 if (x >= 0)
 old_x = x;
 else if (x != CUR)/* Auto-Center Mode? */
   old_x = (rp->right - rp->left - StringWidth(sp)) / 2;
 if (y >= 0)
 old_y = y;
 else if (y != CUR)/* New-Line Mode? */
 old_y += -y * lineHeight;
 MoveTo(old_x, old_y);
 DrawString(sp);
 old_x += StringWidth(sp);
 }
}
/*    FILE:   PStrFind.c
 Finds first occurance of p in t. */
#include“PStrLib.h”

PStrFind(p, t, pos)  
unsigned char  *p, *t;  /* Pascal strings */
register intpos; /* char pos to start search  */
{/* range of pos: 1 to 255 */
 register unsigned char *tp = t + pos, *pp = p, *ppe=p + *p;
 register long tpe = (long)(t + *t); /*trick ptr!*/
 
 while (++pp <= ppe && tp <= (unsigned char *)tpe) {
 while (*pp != *tp) {
 tp = t + ++pos; /* tp to next pos in text */
 pp = p + 1;/* sp to start of pattern */
 }
 ++tp;  /* compare next char for match */
 }
 return(pp > ppe ? pos : 0);
 /* 0 if Not Found, else char position in t */
}
/*    FILE:   PStrFindFC.c
 Finds first occurance of c in s. */
#include“PStrLib.h”

PStrFindFC(s, c) 
register unsigned char  *s; /* Pascal string */
register intc;   /* char to find */
{
 register int    n = *s;
 register unsigned char *sp = s;
 
 c &= 0xFF; 
 /* strip sign ext. in case caller was type char */
 while (*++sp != c && --n >= 0);
 return(n >= 0 ? sp - s : 0);
}/* Result: 0 if Not Found, else char position */
/*    FILE:   PStrFindFNS.c
 Finds first occurance in s NOT in set. */
#include“PStrLib.h”

PStrFindFNS(s, set)  
unsigned char  *s, *set;  /* Pascal strings */
{
 register int    i = *s, n;
 register unsigned char *setp, *sp = s;
 
 while (--i >= 0) {
 ++sp;
 setp = set;
 n = *setp;
 while (--n >= 0 && *++setp != *sp);
 if (n < 0) return(sp - s);
 }
 return(0);
}/* Result: 0 if Not Found, else char position */
/*    FILE:   PStrFindFS.c
 Finds first occurance in both s and set. */
#include“PStrLib.h”

PStrFindFS(s, set)
unsigned char  *s, *set;  /* Pascal strings */
{
 register int    i = *s, n;
 register unsigned char *setp, *sp = s;
 
 while (--i >= 0) {
 ++sp;
 setp = set;
 n = *setp;
 while (--n >= 0 && *++setp != *sp);
 if (n >= 0) return(sp - s);
 }
 return(0);
}/* Result: 0 if Not Found, else char position */
/*    FILE:   PStrFindLC.c
 Finds last occurance of c in s. */
#include“PStrLib.h”

PStrFindLC(s, c) 
register unsigned char  *s; /* Pascal string */
register intc;   /* char to find */
{
 register int    n = *s;
 register unsigned char   *sp = s + n + 1;
 
 c &= 0xFF; 
 /* strips sign ext. in case caller was ‘char’ */
 while (*--sp != c && --n >= 0);
 return(sp - s);
}/* Result: 0 if Not Found, else char position */
/*    FILE:   PStrFindLS.c
 Finds last occurance in both s and set. */
#include“PStrLib.h”

PStrFindLS(s, set)
unsigned char  *s, *set;  /* Pascal strings */
{
 register int    i = *s, n;
 register unsigned char *setp, *sp = s + i;

 while (--i >= 0) {
 setp = set;
 n = *setp;
 while (--n >= 0 && *++setp != *sp);
 if (n >= 0) return(sp - s);
 --sp;
 }
 return(0);
}/* Result: 0 if Not Found, else char position */
/*    FILE:   PStrFixLen.c
 Sets length of pascal string s to len by either chopping extra chars 
off or by padding out with c characters. */
#include“PStrLib.h”

PStrFixLen(s, len, c)
registerunsigned char*s;  /* pascal string */
register  int    len;/* max length is 255 */
registerint c;   /* pad character */
{
 register unsigned char *sp = s + *s;
 register int    n;
 
 if (*s < (len &= 0xFF)) {
 n = len - *s;
 while (--n >= 0)  *++sp = c;
 }
 *s = len;
}
/*    FILE:   PStrIns.c
 Inserts src at pos of dst. */
#include“PStrLib.h”

PStrIns(src, dst, pos)
unsigned char    *src;  /* Pascal string */
register unsigned char  *dst; /* Pascal string */
register intpos;
{
 register unsigned char *s, *d;
 register int    len, shift;
 
 if (--pos + *src < 256) {
 len = *src;
 *dst += len;
 shift = *dst - pos;
 s = dst + *dst;
 d = ++s + len;
 while (--shift >= 0)
 *--d = *--s;
 }
 else {
 len = 255 - pos;
 *dst = 255;
 }
 s = dst + pos;
 while (--len >= 0)
 *++s = *++src;
}
/*    FILE:   PStrRep.c
 Replaces count chars from pos of dst with src. */
#include“PStrLib.h”

PStrRep(dst, pos, len, src) 
register char  *dst, *src;/* pascal strings */
register intpos, len;
{
 PStrDel(dst, pos, len);
 PStrIns(src, dst, pos);
}
/*    FILE:  SetFont.c
 Sets the txFont, txSize, txFace fields of the current GrafPort. */
#include“PStrLib.h”

SetFont(font, size, face)
intfont, size;
Style face;
{
 TextFont(font);
 TextSize(size);
 TextFace(face);
}
/*    FILE:   ShowVars.c 
 Displays up to 10 sets of variable labels and values.  */
#include“PStrLib.h”

ShowVars(count, varLabel, varType, varPtr)   
intcount; /* # of {varLabel,varType,varPtr} sets */
char  *varLabel; /* string label for variable */
intvarType; /* type of variable*/
char  *varPtr;   /* pointer to variable */
{
auto  char**lh = &varLabel; /* Ptr 1st varLabel */
auto  int *tp = &varType; /* Ptr to 1st varType */
auto  char**vh = &varPtr; /* Ptr to 1st varPtr */
auto  char*sp;
auto  Str255s;
auto  RectwRect;
auto  WindowPtr  wp, savedPort;
auto  int y = 5;
 
 if (count > 0) {
 if (count > 10)
 count = 10;/* max number of arg. sets */
 GetPort(&savedPort);
 wRect.top = 45;
 wRect.left = 72;
 wRect.bottom = count * 20 + wRect.top + 45;
 wRect.right = 440;
 wp = NewWindow(NIL, &wRect, NIL, TRUE, dBoxProc, -1L, FALSE, NIL);
 SetPort(wp);
 while (--count >= 0) {
 if (*tp == PSTR)
 sp = *vh;
 else if (*tp == BOOL)
 sp = **(Boolean **)vh ? “\pTRUE” : “\pFALSE”;
 else {
 sp = (char *)s;
 Num2PStr(*tp, *vh, sp, DEC, (*tp >= CINT ? 0 : 6));
 }
 MoveTo(30, y += 20);
 if (*lh && **lh){ /* Length varLabel > 0? */
 DrawString(*lh);
 DrawString(“\p = “);
 }
 DrawString(sp);
 /*  
 Incr. Ptr’s 10 bytes each pass so they’ll
 point to the next set of arg.s on the stack.
 */

 lh = (char **)((char *)lh + 10);
 tp += 5;
 vh = (char **)((char *)vh + 10);
 }
 MoveTo(30, wRect.bottom - wRect.top - 10);
 DrawString(“\pClick Mouse Button to Continue...”);
 while (!Button());/* Wait for a mouse down event */
 DisposeWindow(wp);
 SetPort(savedPort);
 }
}
 

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Apple Final Cut Pro X is a professional video editing solution.Completely redesigned from the ground up, Final Cut Pro adds extraordinary speed, quality, and flexibility to every part of the post-... Read more
Logic Pro X 10.3.1 - Music creation and...
Logic Pro X is the most advanced version of Logic ever. Sophisticated new tools for professional songwriting, editing, and mixing are built around a modern interface that's designed to get creative... Read more
Paragraphs 1.1.4 - Writing tool just for...
Paragraphs is an app just for writers. It was built for one thing and one thing only: writing. It gives you everything you need to create brilliant prose and does away with the rest. Features... Read more
VueScan 9.5.70 - Scanner software with a...
VueScan is a scanning program that works with most high-quality flatbed and film scanners to produce scans that have excellent color fidelity and color balance. VueScan is easy to use, and has... Read more
TextSoap 8.3.2 - Automate tedious text d...
TextSoap can automatically remove unwanted characters, fix up messed up carriage returns, and do pretty much anything else that we can think of to text. Save time and effort. Be more productive. Stop... Read more
ForkLift 3.0 - Powerful file manager: FT...
ForkLift is a powerful file manager and ferociously fast FTP client clothed in a clean and versatile UI that offers the combination of absolute simplicity and raw power expected from a well-executed... Read more
Amazon Chime 4.0.5528 - Amazon-based com...
Amazon Chime is a communications service that transforms online meetings with a secure, easy-to-use application that you can trust. Amazon Chime works seamlessly across your devices so that you can... Read more
Sparkle 2.1.0 - $79.99
Sparkle will change your mind if you thought building websites wasn't for you. Sparkle is the intuitive site builder that lets you create sites for your online portfolio, team or band pages, or... Read more

Blasty Bubs is a colorful Pinball and Br...
QuickByte Games has another arcade treat in the works -- this time it's a mishmash of brick breaking and Pinball mechanics. It's called Blasty Bubs, and it's a top down brickbreaker that has you slinging balls around a board. [Read more] | Read more »
Corsola and Heracross are the new region...
Generation 2 finally launched in Pokémon GO, unleashing a brand new batch of Pokémon into the wild. Even before the update went live people were speculating on how to catch elusive Pokémon like the legendary "dogs", Unknown, and whether or not... | Read more »
The Warlock of Firetop Mountain (Games)
The Warlock of Firetop Mountain 1.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $4.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: An epic adventure through a mysterious mountain filled with monsters, magic and mayhem! “...it looks downright... | Read more »
Fantasy MMORPG MU Origin’s receives a hu...
Developer Webzen are looking to take their highly popular fantasy battler MU Origin to the next level this month, with its most ambitious overhaul yet. The latest update introduces the long sought after Server Arena, new treasure dungeons, and much... | Read more »
RPG Djinn Caster (Games)
RPG Djinn Caster 1.0.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $4.99, Version: 1.0.0 (iTunes) Description: SPECIAL PRICE 38% OFF(USD 7.99 -> USD 4.99)!!!A Fantasy Action RPG of far foreign lands! Summon the Djinns and rise to... | Read more »
Alto's Odyssey gets its first trail...
There's finally video evidence of Alto's Odyssey, the follow up to the 2015 App Store hit, Alto's Adventure. It looks just as soothing and atmospheric as Alto's last outing, but this time players will be journeying to the desert. Whereas Alto's... | Read more »
Last week on Pocket Gamer
What’s going on in the wider world of portable gaming? Each week we ask that question of our sister website Pocket Gamer. The PG team covers iOS gaming, just like 148Apps, but it also strays into the world of Android games and handheld consoles... | Read more »
Pokémon GO Generation 2 evolution guide
At long last, Niantic Labs finally unleashed the Generation 2 Pokémon into the wild. Pokémon GO trainers are scrambling to grab up this new set of 80 Pokémon. There are some special new tricks required to catch all of these new beasties, though.... | Read more »
The best new games we played this week
It feels as though the New Year got off to a creaking start as far as mobile games go, but that's changed over the past few weeks. The last few days alone have seen the debut of a number of wonderful games, so we thought we'd take the time to... | Read more »
Recruit more scallywags and discover new...
Get ready to show off your sea legs all over again in Oceans & Empires’ new grand update, which aims to make the act of rising to the role of seven seas ruler even more fresh and appealing, thanks to a richness of new content on both iOS and... | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

Apple restocks refurbished 2015 and 2016 13-i...
Apple has Certified Refurbished 2015 and 2016 13″ MacBook Airs available starting at $759. An Apple one-year warranty is included with each MacBook, and shipping is free: - 2016 13″ 1.6GHz/8GB/128GB... Read more
13-inch 2.5GHz MacBook Pro (Apple refurbished...
Apple has Certified Refurbished 13″ 2.5GHz MacBook Pros (MD101LL/A) available for $829, or $270 off original MSRP. Apple’s one-year warranty is standard, and shipping is free: - 13″ 2.5GHz MacBook... Read more
QuickerTek Announces 5TB Apple AC AirPort Tim...
QuickerTek Inc. has announced their new 5TB hard drive upgrade for Apple’s AC AirPort Time Capsule. By customer request, this upgrade also features six external antennas and offers the highest... Read more
Apple Certified Refurbished iMacs available f...
Apple has Certified Refurbished 2015 21″ & 27″ iMacs available for up to $350 off MSRP. Apple’s one-year warranty is standard, and shipping is free. The following models are available: - 21″ 3.... Read more
Apple offering Certified Refurbished Series 1...
Apple is now offering Certified Refurbished Series 1 and Series 2 Apple Watches for 14-16% off MSRP, starting at $229. An Apple one-year warranty is included with each watch. Shipping is free: Series... Read more
1.4GHz Mac mini on sale for $449, save $50
B&H Photo has the 1.4GHz Mac mini on sale for $50 off MSRP including free shipping plus NY sales tax only: - 1.4GHz Mac mini: $449 $50 off MSRP Read more
12-inch Retina MacBooks on sale for $200-$250...
Newegg has the 12″ 1.2GHz Space Gray Retina MacBook (sku MLH82LL/A) on sale for $1349.99 including free shipping. Their price is $250 off MSRP, and it’s the lowest price available for this model.... Read more
13-inch 2.0GHz Space Gray MacBook Pro on sale...
Adorama has the non-Touch Bar 13″ 2.0GHz Space Gray MacBook Pro in stock today for $100 off MSRP. Shipping is free, and Adorama charges NY & NJ sales tax only: - 13″ 2.0GHz MacBook Pro Space Gray... Read more
13-inch Touch Bar MacBook Pros on sale for $1...
B&H Photo has select 2016 Apple 13″ Touch Bar MacBook Pros in stock today and up to $100 off MSRP. Shipping is free, and B&H charges NY sales tax only: - 13″ 2.9GHz/512GB Touch Bar MacBook... Read more
KSI-1802R SX Disinfect-able Keyboard With Wav...
KSI has unveiled a new, innovative medical keyboard, the KSI-1802R SX, at HIMSS 2017, running February 19-22 in Orlando, Florida. KSI-1802R SX is the only keyboard that combines dual factor... Read more

Jobs Board

*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions - Apple,...
Job Description: Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, Read more
Manager *Apple* Systems Administration - Pu...
Req ID 3315BR Position Title Manager, Apple Systems Administration Job Description The Manager of Apple Systems Administration oversees the administration and Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions - Apple,...
Job Description: Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, Read more
Manager *Apple* Systems Administration - Pu...
Req ID 3315BR Position Title Manager, Apple Systems Administration Job Description The Manager of Apple Systems Administration oversees the administration and Read more
*Apple* Technician - nfrastructure (United S...
Let’s Work Together Apple Technician This position is based in Portland, ME Life at nfrastructure At nfrastructure, we understand that our success results from our Read more
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