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MacDraw Files
Volume Number:3
Issue Number:10
Column Tag:Programmer's Forum

MacDraw PICT Files from Basic

By Bob Andris, Lockheed Corp.

Why “Draw” a ‘PICT’ File?

This article should really have been titled “ ‘PICT’ing in ZBasic™ “, but that didn’t sound quite as clear. The ‘PICT’ file format is rapidly becoming the standard for transferring High Quality graphics between programs, and not just graphics programs. To name just a few, MacDraw™, MacDraft™, Cricket Draw™, and SuperPaint™ all will both read and write ‘PICT’ files. However, layout programs like PageMaker™ will also read ‘PICT’ files in directly with its “Place” command. In addition to all of the above a word processor like Word™ 3.0 will pass ‘PICT’ information back and forth through the clipboard and retain the individuality of each ‘PICT’ element. Why all of this compatibility? The answer to that one is simply called the “LaserWriter™”!

The LaserWriter with its PostScript™ language treats all ‘PICT’ elements as separate objects, not bit maps, and prints (or better yet, “draws”) them vectorially. That’s why a diagonal line has nice sharp edges, and not the “jaggies” that go with the individual pixels of a bit map. This even holds true for text! As the quest for higher and higher quality proliferates, the ‘PICT’ format will become even more prevalent. The ‘PICT’ format is also inherently faster than most because it is the format that ‘QuickDraw’ in the ROM is using to begin with!

All of the graphics programs mentioned previously also have their own proprietary file format, including MacDraw. Getting into those formats is not the purpose of this article. It is “ ‘PICT’ing “ that we’ll be covering in detail. And, as you will see, “draw”ing a ‘PICT’ file in ZBasic is even easier than “paint”ing a ‘PNTG’ file in ZBasic as I covered in a previous article.

What’s in the ‘PICT’ure?

First of all, there are several good references on the ‘PICT’ file format and ‘QuickDraw’ing a picture, so I’ll give them to you now.

MacDraw’s PICT File Format and Comments, Macintosh Technical Note #27, by Ginger Jernigan, Aug. 20, 1986.

QuickDraw’s Internal Picture Definition, Macintosh Technical Note #21, by Ginger Jernigan, June 20, 1986.

Optimizing for the LaserWriter--Picture Comments, Macintosh Technical Notes #91, by Ginger Jernigan, Mar. 2, 1987.

Inside Macintosh™ Volume I, chapter 6, QuickDraw, in particular Pictures and Polygons starting on p 158.

As Inside Mac says on page 158, “A picture in QuickDraw is a transcript of calls to routines that draw something--anything--in a bit image.”. Whoa ! ! ! What happened to all this elements, objects, and vector stuff this idiot was just talking about? Well, the bit image they’re talking about on page 158 is the screen. The things that get stored in the files and also sent to the LaserWriter are those calls friends, not a bit image!

Since pictures are all of varying size, i.e., length, as we could have guessed a Picture is really just a variable length record. The record always starts with the following two fixed-length fields:

picSize:INTEGER; {size of record in bytes}
picFrame: Rect;  {picture frame}

Immediately following the two fixed-length fields are the ‘QuickDraw’ calls to generate the picture. It is important to point out that the size (picSize) includes the first two fixed-length fields themselves. If we were to write out this picture record to a file we’d have what we need, right? Wrong! All of the programs mentioned previously would spit-up something terrible. So, what’s missing? Well, it’s a header of some kind . . . that’s what makes a picture record into a ‘PICT’ file. So let’s get into that now.

The MacDraw ‘PICT’ file format

Referring you to tech note #21, MacDraw gives you the option to use two file formats. They are DRWG and PICT. The DRWG format is the internal one that only MacDraw understands. The PICT format is the one we’ll look at in MacDraw. Rather than just drone on and on, it’s time for an example. I went into MacDraw, itself, drew a simple five-sided ‘closed’ polygon, saved it as a ‘PICT’ file and then went into Fedit+™ to take a look at it with tech note #27 in hand. Figure 1 shows the polygon as you normally see it in MacDraw.

Fig. 1 A draw figure created from Basic!

As we can see, there’s not much to it. Just an ordinary polygon. The total file size, as stored by MacDraw, is just 570 bytes. That’s good, since the actual ‘PICT’ure part of it is only 58 bytes long. A quick mental calculation tells us the header is our old friend, 512-bytes, long! Same length as the ‘Paint’ file headers were. Now let’s view what you find in Fedit+ and take a close look at the header.

Fig. 2 ‘Fedit+’ View of the “MacDraw”ed Polygon File

Figure 2 is the “ Fedit+ ”ed look at both sectors of the MacDraw ‘PICT’ file called “Polygon”. The breaks in the sector views are where they become all zero from then on. The numbers in the left halves are the hex representation of the code and to the right is the ASCII representation. Here’s what we find in the header (refer to tech note #27):

MacDraw PICT File Header

4452  5747fType  ‘DRWG’ in ASCII for
 MacDraw 1.7 & 1.9
 4D44 hdrID ‘MD’ in ASCII 
 0006 version  file format version
0003 to prRec  120 byte print record
 0000   (ends with position 000079)

0000  0000xOrigindrawing origin
0000  0000yOrigindrawing origin
0048  0000xScale screen res (=72 dots/inch)
0048  0000yScale screen res (=72 dots/inch)
0000 to atrState state of drwg attributes
 0000   (ends with position 0000CD)

 0001 lCntno. of top-level objects
 0001 lTottotal no. of all objects
0000  0066lSiz total size of list
000A  0000top  box of all objects (= 10)
0055  0000left box of all objects (= 85)
0046  0000bottom box of all objects (= 70)
00E1  0000right  box of all objects (=225)
0007 to filler 282 unused bytes
 0000   (ends with position 0001FF)

Creating this header for each different file would be quite time consuming and also subject to error. Fortunately we’re in luck! Tech note #27 says “If MacDraw opens a PICT file and finds that it has a different hdrID than MacDraw expects, or that the first block is zeroed, it ignores the header and uses its own default document settings.”. So all we will have to do to create a “MacDraw” ‘PICT’ file in ZBasic is to start it out with 512 bytes of zero (0)! The second part of Figure 2 is the data for the actual QuickDraw ‘PICT’ure of the polygon. Let’s get into that now.

Pic comments are Helpful

MacDraw makes extensive use of picture comments [CALL PICCOMMENT( . . . ) in ZBasic] to gain more functions than are available with the standard QuickDraw calls. They are also used to guide the LaserWriter in “drawing” a complex set of figures and text. A good example is using piccomments to tie arrowheads and lines together in order to make the combination a single entity, the arrowhead-line. There are two types of piccomments available, the so-called ‘shortComment’ and its companion the ‘longComment’. The long one allows you to specify a variable-length data record to be executed, while the ‘shortComment’ has simply one operation, like “picPlyClo”, which means we’re drawing a “closed” polygon. The only ones we‘ll be needing here are the short comments. They are characterized by a one (1) byte ‘opcode’, which is ‘A0’, followed by a two (2) byte ‘kind’ which describes the action desired.

The first item in the QuickDraw picture is always 2 bytes of record size, which includes the 2 bytes themselves. Then comes the picture frame, of type ‘Rectangle’, which means 8 bytes (4 words or integers) of rectangle description. This is followed with the picture definition. What we do now is look at the first byte, the ‘opcode’ (operation code), which tells us what is going to be described and then the descriptions will follow. Then we look for the next ‘opcode’ and the process keeps repeating until the picture is finished. Now we can take a look at that “PICT’ure data in the second half of Figure 2:

Quickdraw Picture Format

003A  picSize  size of entire picture, in bytes
 (   58 decimal, in this case)
0000  picToploc of top of entire picture
 (    0 decimal, in this case)
0000  picLeft  loc of left of entire picture
 (    0 decimal, in this case)
02D0  picBottom  loc of bottom of entire picture
 (720 decimal, in this case)
0240  picRight loc of right of entire picture
 (576 decimal, in this case)

 11opcode for ‘picVersion’(1 byte )
 01version number for this picture

 A0opcode for ‘shortComment’(2 bytes)
0082    kind for ‘picDwgBegin’
 (begin a MacDraw pict)

 A0opcode for ‘shortComment’(2 bytes)
00A0    kind for ‘PolyBegin’
 (begin a special polygon)

 A0opcode for ‘shortComment’(2 bytes)
00A5    kind for ‘picPlyClo’
 (the poly’n is to be closed)

 01opcode for ‘clipRgn’(10 bytes, or more)
000A  rgnSize  size of entire region(10 bytes)
0000  top top of ‘clipping’ rgn       (    0 dec)
0000  leftleft of ‘clipping’ rgn       (    0 dec)
02D0  bottombottom of ‘clipping’ rgn (720 dec)
0240  right right of ‘clipping’ rgn     (576 dec)

 22opcode for ‘short line’ (st.v,st.h,dh,dv)
000A  start.v  vert start pt for line  (10 dec)
0055  start.h  horiz start pt for line(85 dec)
 00dh horz line length        (  0 dec)
 23dv vert line length         (35 dec)

 23opcode for ‘short line from’(dh,dv)
 63dh horiz line length(99 dec)
 19dv vert line length  (25 dec)

 23opcode for ‘short line from’(dh,dv)
 29dh horiz line length(41 dec)
 C4dv vert line length  (196-256=-60 *)

 23opcode for ‘short line from’(dh,dv)
 A6dh horiz line length(166-256=-90 *)
 19dv vert line length  (25 dec)

 23opcode for ‘short line from’(dh,dv)
 CEdh horiz line length(206-256=-50 *)
 E7dv vert line length  (231-256=-25 *)

 A0opcode for ‘shortComment’(2 bytes)
00A1    kind for ‘PolyEnd’
 (end a special polygon)

 A0opcode for ‘shortComment’
 (2 bytes to follow)
0083    kind for ‘picDwgEnd’
 (end a MacDraw pict)

 FFopcode for ‘EndofPicture’
 (nothing to follow)

 * dh & dv are both (-128 . . . +127), so if
 number is greater than +127 decimal,
 subtract 256 from it to get true neg. no’s.

Now let’s take a break from all of this and get into some programming.

The “MacDraw/ZBasic” Polygon Program

The first ZBasic program at the end of this article is called “MacDrawPoly.BAS”. It is the shortest and simplest of the three, and was written to try a couple of different approaches to creating the same figure. We begin by defining the ‘opcodes’ for the ‘short’ piccomments we’ll be needing, and then we define the picture rectangle and CALL SETRECT( . . . ) to initialize it. After this, we ‘open’ the picture and get a ‘handle’ to it (PicHand&); and then ‘begin’ the picture with a piccomment. I should point out here that the ‘picDwgBeg’ and its converse ‘picDwgEnd’ are really not necessary, but they do make the QuickDraw description of the picture much more efficient.

The first file created uses piccomments to tell it a ‘polygon’ is coming, that the polygon is of the ‘closed’ type, and that the polygon description is completed. The second file use the more standard QuickDraw calls to open, close, frame, and ‘kill’ the polygon. Now we open a file and give it a type of ‘PICT’ and creator of ‘MDRW’ (for MacDraw). As discussed previously, the first thing we do is write-out a 512 byte header of zeroes. Then we get the ‘pointer’ to the picture data from the ‘handle’ we got at the beginning of the program.

As you can see from the coding, PicLength%=PEEK WORD(PicPtr&+0), the length of the entire picture record is contained in the first 2 bytes (one word or integer) of the record itself. We need this to know how much data to write-out to the files. The ‘monkeying’ around you see to get the number of words (integers) from this length-of-record is merely to insure we’ll include the ‘FF’ (EndofPicture) at the end of the record. I’ll point out that with this method, sometimes you’ll get an extra byte after the ‘FF’, before the file is actually closed (50-50 chance). This won’t hurt anything, because “MacDraw”, and all the rest, know that ‘FF’ means it’s all done drawing your picture! Figure 3 compares the ‘polygons’ as done by “MacDraw” itself, and as done by the ZBasic program.

Fig. 3 Comparison of the Polygons

Compare the Actual Polygon File Data

As we can see, all three polygons in Figure 3 sure look the same. But the proof of the pudding is to use Fedit+ again and take a look at the actual data. Figure 4 does this for “MacDraw.poly1”, the first of our ZBasic files.

Well, the first thing we notice is the 512 byte header of zeroes. And since “MacDraw” read it in, we know that part of the approach works. In comparing Figure 2 to Figure 4, we find that our ZBasic polygon’s ‘PICT’ data is also 58 bytes long - so far so good. As a matter of fact, the match is perfect except for the “bottom” and “right” of the ‘clip’ rectangle. These numbers are $0117(279 dec) and $01E7(487 dec) which happens to be the ‘vis’ and also the ‘clip’ regions of ZBasic’s default window! We could change the clipping region in our program to get them to match perfectly - but as we will see later, the only thing affected is what is visible on the screen when the picture is being generated. “MacDraw” and all the rest ignore this when they read in a “default-header” file and reset the ‘clip’ region as necessary. As a matter of fact, it changes constantly with how much reduction or expansion you are using at the time. The ‘PICT’ data for “MacDraw.poly2” was 65 bytes long and was constructed slightly differently. Figure 5 shows us those differences.

Fig. 4 ZBasic’s ‘PICT’ Polygon File

The first thing we notice is that the ‘PolyBegin’, ‘PolyEnd’, and ‘picPlyClo’ piccomments are missing, just as we coded the program. However there is a new ‘opcode’ at position 00021A; it is ‘$70’ which is the opcode for ‘framePoly’. Our ZBasic CALL FRAMEPOLY( . . . ) produced this for us. This opcode is followed by ‘polySize’, ‘polyBBox’, and ‘polyPoints’ which are the size of the polygon record, the bounding box, or rectangle, and the array of points, respectively. The method used in “poly1” is more efficient than that used in “poly2”, but for just a few points per polygon the payoff is not that great. Now let’s get on to something with a little more visual appeal.

Fig. 5 ZBasic Version of a ‘Conventional’ Polygon

Fill and Pen Patterns

The second program at the end of this article, “MacDrawPat.BAS”, will look like Figure 6 when you run it “interactively” in ZBasic. Referring to the listing you’ll see a CALL SHOWPEN, which allows us to see what is going on while running. As mentioned in Inside Mac and the ZBasic manual, when we ‘open’ a ‘PICT’ure QuickDraw makes the pen ‘invisible’. Conversely, when we ‘close’ it, the pen gets turned back on. So if you want to watch, do a ‘showpen’ after opening the picture. Just be sure to ‘hidepen’ before you hit the ‘closepicture’.

This program gets us into patterns in QuickDraw. A pattern is simply an 8 by 8 array of pixels, or data, which can be used for ‘filling’, ‘painting’, and for ‘drawing’ by the pen. If you remember back when we did ‘Paint’ing in ZBasic, we simply did PEN ,,,,32 and got the thirty-secondth pen pattern to use. Well we can do the same thing with our “MacDraw” ‘PICT’ files. But, BE CAREFUL! MacDraw does NOT use the same patterns as the ‘Paint’ programs. It has its own patterns, while the ‘Paint’ programs use a set that resides in the System File. If you use a pattern that MacDraw does not have it will do one of three things:

(1) default to black

(2) default to white

(3) spit-up all over itself

So, we will have to get the exactly correct patterns to use. There are three ways to do this that I know of. First, there is a [Not in ROM] procedure on p 473 of Inside Mac, Vol. I, called ‘GetIndPattern’ which would do it. But that procedure is not yet implemented in ZBasic. Second, by using ZBasic’s FN GETRESOURCE( . . . ) and a little manipulation you could probably get the patterns. The third way is to look at the patterns, convert them to hex-strings, and use CALL STUFFHEX( . . . ) to put them into a real pattern record. The third way is shown pictorially in Figure 7. First fire-up “ResEdit”, open up MacDraw, and find the resource ‘PAT#’. That’s where the 36 ‘fill’ patterns reside. The first one is ‘None’, the second is ‘white’, the third is ‘black’, etc. Watch that first one (None)! I haven’t found a pattern for ‘None’ yet, so I just don’t do a ‘fill’ if the desired pattern is ‘None’.

Fig. 6 ZBasic Run of “MacDrawPat.BAS”

In order to save you the work of converting 36 patterns, they are all listed as ‘DATA’ statements at the end of the program. There are a couple of other points of interest in “MacDrawPat.BAS”. First is the sequence of the graphics calls. Referring to the listing you will notice that they appear in the following order:

(1) draw the single-weight line

(2) draw the ‘brick’ filled rectangle

(3) draw the ‘diamond’ filled oval

(4) draw the double-weight line

(5) draw the ‘inverted-V’ filled round-rectangle

Now looking back at Figure 6, you see that’s how they are stacked on the screen. This is the same effect that the “Bring to Front” and “Send to Back” commands under the “Arrange” menu in “MacDraw” will produce. You can use this to your advantage.

Fig. 7 ‘FillPattern’ Conversion

‘Fill’ and ‘Paint’ are NOT the Same

The second item of interest, is that ‘filling’ and ‘painting’ are not the same action in QuickDraw. If you CALL FILLRECT( . . . ) and then follow it with CALL FRAMERECT( . . . ) you get a ‘filled’ rectangle that has the pattern and the frame “GROUPED” as MacDraw does with its ‘Fill’ menu. The top half of the file “MacDraw.demo” is generated this way. However, if you CALL PAINTRECT( . . . ) and then follow it with CALL FRAMERECT( . . . ) you get a ‘painted’ rectangle that is “NOT GROUPED”. In other words, the ‘paint’ can “spill” out of the frame. I took the file “MacDraw.demo” into MacDraw to demonstrate this, as shown in Figure 8.

As you can see, the bottom three figures have their ‘paint’ selected and then dragged out of the frames. You can get this same effect in “MacDraw”, itself, by drawing your shape, ‘filling’ it with your selected pattern, and then changing its frame line to 0-weight (the ‘dashed’ line under the ‘Lines’ menu). The only reason to do it this way in our program is that ‘paint’ing avoids the ‘stuffhex’ call to set up the pattern and get a pointer to it.

The “MacDrawFiles.BAS” Program

The last program of the three is the largest and incorporates all of the features of “MacDraw” itself. It won’t let you work interactively, like ‘selecting’ lines and moving them around. I’ll let that to MacDraw and the others. But it will give you the tools to create a MacDraw compatible file inside of your ZBasic program and get the full benefit of:

(1) any selected font family

(2) all 8 “MacDraw” font sizes

(3) all 6 “MacDraw” font styles & combinations

(4) all 36 “MacDraw” fill/pen patterns

(5) all 5 “MacDraw” line weights

(6) all 3 “MacDraw” arrowhead lines

(7) all 9 “MacDraw” tools along the ‘left pallete’, i.e.,:

a. text

b. orthogonal lines

c. diagonal lines

d. rectangles

e. rounded-corner rectangles

f. ovals

g. arcs

h. freehand

i. polygons

Fig. 8 Effects of ‘Painting’

Figure 9 shows two different parts of the “MacDraw.text” file. The upper half has several different fonts, all in 12 pt Bold. It also contains the 6 basic font styles and a combination of Bold-through-Shadow.

The lower half uses Helvetica, in Bold, to illustrate all 8 “MacDraw” font sizes. Although you can invoke any font size in your ZBasic program, MacDraw only allows these eight sizes. If you give it a size it doesn’t have, say 16 pt, it will “default” to 12 pt. The moral of the story is . . . if you are going to bring your drawing into MacDraw, itself, use these sizes only - even if you ‘fudged’ it (“Tiny 9” is an example).

The upper left portion of Figure 10 shows most of the 36 ‘fill’ patterns and the upper right shows a portion of the 36 ‘pen’ patterns. ‘Scrolling’ around in MacDraw will give you a better look at all of them. The center portion of the upper half of Figure 10 contains the different line weights and the start of the ‘arrowhead’ lines. Some more of these ‘arrowhead’ lines are shown down the center of the lower half of the figure. The geometric shapes are along the left and right sides of the lower half.

Having mentioned ‘scrolling’ you should also be aware that if you extend your ‘work of art’ past the boundaries you set up for your ‘picRect’ the info is still there. Just go down to the bottom of the “Layout” menu in MacDraw to the “Drawing Size” item and select a few more pages to look at. You’ll then be able to scroll around and see the ‘missing’ portions.

Fig. 9 ‘text’ Output of “MacDrawFiles.BAS”

Items of Special Interest

If you look at the listing of “MacDrawFiles.BAS” there are several things of special interest you should note. First of all, as mentioned earlier, don’t even bother to call ‘fillrect’, ‘filloval’, etc., if you want ‘None’ for the fill. Even though it is in the fill data, it’s just there for completeness of the data set. Second, the 0 pen size does produce ‘invisible’ lines, but you’ll never find them. QuickDraw does not bother to save ‘invisible’ lines. You can verify this by going directly into MacDraw, drawing a line, making it invisible, and saving the drawing in the ‘PICT’ format. Quit out of it, load the drawing, and “Select All” under the “Edit” menu. Nothing. Note, the MacDraw proprietary format, however, will save those invisible lines!

Fig. 10 ‘graphics’ Output of “MacDrawFiles.BAS”

The third thing to take a look at is the ovalWidth and ovalHeight for the rounded-corner rectangles. They are both shown as 20 pixels in size. I’ve tried several different size and aspect-ratio rounded-corner rectangles in MacDraw, itself, and they always come back 20-by-20 if you leave it’s default settings alone. You can go under the ‘Edit’ menu and change the corners to any one of 6 different settings. Our fourth item of interest is the so-called freehand tool. MacDraw uses the ‘polygon’ to describe freehand drawing . . . but not exactly. It really is a polygon, but I don’t know what algorithm MacDraw uses to decide when to add a new point to the polygon. When you ‘draw’ freehand in your programs, you’ll probably use a lot more points than MacDraw ever would.

The last item is arrowheads! These were the toughest of all to nail down. Finally, I created a special subroutine called, naturally, “ArrowHeads”. Just feed it the x & y coordinates of both end points of the line (xahl1%, yahl1%, xahl2%, & yahl2%) and the type of arrowhead desired (ArrwPt%=1 for end-pt 1, 2 for 2, & 3 for both) and it will figure out the angles and adjust the line length for the proper match with the arrowhead(s). Study the subroutine coding (it’s heavily commented) and it will become clear what it has to do.

ZBasic configuration

Since ZBasic can be “configured” to just about any range of variables imagined, I’ve elected to include the configuration that was used for running the programs in Figure 11. All three will run with version 3.03 or higher.

Fig. 11 ZBasic 3.03 Configuration

The MacDrawPoly Program
REM
REM  (MacDrawPoly.BAS)
REM
REM  CREATES A ‘MACDRAW(PICT)’ CLOSED-POLYGON 
REM
 WINDOW OFF
 COORDINATE WINDOW
REM
REM  DEFINE ‘SHORT’ PICCOMMENTS
REM
 NIL&=0
 noData%=0
 picDwgBeg%=130
 picDwgEnd%=131
 PolyBegin%=160
 PolyEnd%=161
 picPlyClo%=165
REM
REM  DEFINE PICTURE RECTANGLE (A FULL-SIZE ‘DRAW’ PAGE)
REM
 picRect=0.
 picTop%=0
 picLeft%=0
 picBottom%=720
 picRight%=576
REM
REM  ‘INITIALIZE’ PICTURE
REM
 CALL SETRECT(picRect,picLeft%,picTop%,picRight%,picBottom%)
REM
REM  CREATE THE ‘MACDRAW’ POLYGONS
REM
 FOR File%=1 TO 2
 PicHand&=FN OPENPICTURE(picRect)
REM
REM  ‘BEGIN’ A ‘MACDRAW’ PICTURE
REM
 CALL PICCOMMENT(picDwgBeg%,noData%,NIL&)
 IF File%=2 THEN “poly2”
REM
REM  *  CREATE ‘MACDRAW-TYPE’ CLOSED-POLYGON * 
REM
“poly1”
 CALL PICCOMMENT(PolyBegin%,noData%,NIL&)
 CALL PICCOMMENT(picPlyClo%,noData%,NIL&)
 CALL MOVETO(85,10)
 CALL LINETO(85,45)
 CALL LINETO(184,70)
 CALL LINETO(225,10)
 CALL LINETO(135,35)
 CALL LINETO(85,10)
 CALL PICCOMMENT(PolyEnd%,noData%,NIL&)
 GOTO “EndPicture”
REM
REM  * * * CREATE CONVENTIONAL CLOSED-POLYGON * * *
REM
“poly2”
 PolyHandle&=FN OPENPOLY
 CALL MOVETO(85,10)
 CALL LINETO(85,45)
 CALL LINETO(184,70)
 CALL LINETO(225,10)
 CALL LINETO(135,35)
 CALL LINETO(85,10)
 CALL CLOSEPOLY
 CALL FRAMEPOLY(PolyHandle&)
 CALL KILLPOLY(PolyHandle&)
REM
REM  ‘END’ A ‘MACDRAW’ PICTURE
REM
“EndPicture”
 CALL PICCOMMENT(picDwgEnd%,noData%,NIL&)
REM
REM  CREATE THE ‘MACDRAW’ PICT FILE
REM
 DEF OPEN “PICTMDRW”
 IF File%=1 THEN OPEN “O”,#1,”MacDraw.poly1"
 IF File%=2 THEN OPEN “O”,#1,”MacDraw.poly2"
REM
REM  WRITE-OUT A 512 BYTE (256 WORDS OR INTEGERS) HEADER OF ZEROES
REM
 A%=0
 FOR I%=1 TO 256
 WRITE #1,A%
 NEXT I%
REM
REM  CLOSE THE PICTURE & WRITE-OUT THE ‘PICT’ DATA
REM
 CALL CLOSEPICTURE
 PicPtr&=PEEK LONG(PicHand&)
 PicLength%=PEEK WORD(PicPtr&+0)
 NumWords%=PicLength%/2
 doubleNumWords%=2*NumWords%
 IF doubleNumWords%<PicLength% THEN NumWords%=NumWords%+1
 FOR I%=1 TO NumWords%
 J%=2*(I%-1)
 A%=PEEK WORD(PicPtr&+J%)
 WRITE #1,A%
 NEXT I%
 CALL KILLPICTURE(PicHand&)
 CLOSE #1
 NEXT File%
 END
The MacDrawPat Program
REM
REM  (MacDrawPat.BAS)
REM
REM  CREATES A ‘MACDRAW(PICT)’ GRAPHICS-DEMO FILE
REM
 WINDOW OFF
 COORDINATE WINDOW
REM
REM  DEFINE ‘SHORT’ PICCOMMENTS
REM
 NIL&=0
 noData%=0
 picDwgBeg%=130
 picDwgEnd%=131
REM
REM  READ-IN ALL 36 ‘MACDRAW’ FILL/PEN PATTERNS AS HEX STRINGS
REM
 DIM MacDrawPat$(36)
 FOR I%=1 TO 36
 READ patID%,MacDrawPat$(I%)
 NEXT I%
REM
REM  DEFINE PICTURE RECTANGLE (A FULL-SIZE ‘MACDRAW’ PAGE)
REM
 picRect=0.
 picTop%=0
 picLeft%=0
 picBottom%=720
 picRight%=576
REM
REM  ‘INITIALIZE’ QUICKDRAW RECTANGLE
REM
 DIM qdRect,qdTop%,qdLeft%,qdBottom%,qdRight%
REM
REM  ‘INITIALIZE’ QUICKDRAW ‘FILL’ PATTERN
REM
 DIM fillPat,row12%,row34%,row56%,row78%
 fillPatPtr&=VARPTR(fillPat)
REM
REM  ‘INITIALIZE’ PICTURE
REM
 CALL SETRECT(picRect,picLeft%,picTop%,picRight%,picBottom%)
REM
REM  * * * CREATE A GRAPHICS-DEMO FILE * * *
REM
 PicHand&=FN OPENPICTURE(picRect)
REM
REM  ‘BEGIN’ A ‘MACDRAW’ PICTURE
REM
 CALL PICCOMMENT(picDwgBeg%,noData%,NIL&)
REM
REM  TURN ON THE ‘PEN’ SO WE CAN SEE WHAT’S HAPPENING
REM
 CALL SHOWPEN
REM
REM  DRAW A ‘SINGLE-WEIGHT’ LINE
REM
 CALL MOVETO(25,25)
 CALL LINETO(325,125)
REM
REM  CREATE A ‘FILLRECT’ - NOTE: FILL & FRAME ARE ‘GROUPED’
REM
 qdTop%=25
 qdLeft%=50
 qdBottom%=125
 qdRight%=100
 CALL SETRECT(qdRect,qdLeft%,qdTop%,qdRight%,qdBottom%)
 CALL STUFFHEX(fillPatPtr&,MacDrawPat$(11))
 CALL FILLRECT(qdRect,fillPat)
 CALL FRAMERECT(qdRect)
REM
REM  CREATE A ‘FILLOVAL’ - NOTE: FILL & FRAME ARE ‘GROUPED’
REM
 qdTop%=25
 qdLeft%=250
 qdBottom%=125
 qdRight%=300
 CALL SETRECT(qdRect,qdLeft%,qdTop%,qdRight%,qdBottom%)
 CALL STUFFHEX(fillPatPtr&,MacDrawPat$(34))
 CALL FILLOVAL(qdRect,fillPat)
 CALL FRAMEOVAL(qdRect)
REM
REM  DRAW A ‘DOUBLE-WEIGHT’ LINE
REM
 PEN 2,2,,,
 CALL MOVETO(25,125)
 CALL LINETO(325,25)
 CALL PENNORMAL
REM
REM  CREATE A ‘FILLROUNDRECT’ - NOTE: FILL & FRAME ARE ‘GROUPED’
REM
 qdTop%=25
 qdLeft%=150
 qdBottom%=125
 qdRight%=200
 CALL SETRECT(qdRect,qdLeft%,qdTop%,qdRight%,qdBottom%)
 ovalWidth%=10
 ovalHeight%=10
 CALL STUFFHEX(fillPatPtr&,MacDrawPat$(30))
 CALL FILLROUNDRECT(qdRect,ovalWidth%,ovalHeight%,fillPat)
 CALL FRAMEROUNDRECT(qdRect,ovalWidth%,ovalHeight%)
REM
REM  DRAW A ‘SINGLE-WEIGHT’ LINE
REM
 CALL MOVETO(25,150)
 CALL LINETO(325,250)
REM
REM  CREATE A ‘PAINTRECT’ - NOTE: PAINT & FRAME ARE NOT! ‘GROUPED’
REM
 qdTop%=150
 qdLeft%=50
 qdBottom%=250
 qdRight%=100
 CALL SETRECT(qdRect,qdLeft%,qdTop%,qdRight%,qdBottom%)
 PEN ,,,,11
 CALL PAINTRECT(qdRect)
 CALL PENNORMAL
 CALL FRAMERECT(qdRect)
REM
REM  CREATE A ‘PAINTOVAL’ - NOTE: PAINT & FRAME ARE NOT! ‘GROUPED’
REM
 qdTop%=150
 qdLeft%=250
 qdBottom%=250
 qdRight%=300
 CALL SETRECT(qdRect,qdLeft%,qdTop%,qdRight%,qdBottom%)
 PEN 2,2,,,37
 CALL PAINTOVAL(qdRect)
 CALL PENNORMAL
 CALL FRAMEOVAL(qdRect)
REM
REM  DRAW A ‘DOUBLE-WEIGHT’ LINE
REM
 PEN 2,2,,,
 CALL MOVETO(25,250)
 CALL LINETO(325,150)
 CALL PENNORMAL
REM
REM  CREATE A ‘PAINTROUNDRECT’ - NOTE: PAINT & FRAME ARE NOT! ‘GROUPED’
REM
 qdTop%=150
 qdLeft%=150
 qdBottom%=250
 qdRight%=200
 CALL SETRECT(qdRect,qdLeft%,qdTop%,qdRight%,qdBottom%)
 ovalWidth%=10
 ovalHeight%=10
 PEN ,,,,32
 CALL PAINTROUNDRECT(qdRect,ovalWidth%,ovalHeight%)
 CALL PENNORMAL
 CALL FRAMEROUNDRECT(qdRect,ovalWidth%,ovalHeight%)
REM
REM  RESET THE ‘PEN’, DUE TO THE ‘SHOWPEN’ CALL
REM
 CALL HIDEPEN
REM
REM  ‘END’ A ‘MACDRAW’ PICTURE
REM
“EndPicture”
 CALL PICCOMMENT(picDwgEnd%,noData%,NIL&)
REM
REM  CREATE THE ‘MACDRAW’ PICT FILE
REM
 DEF OPEN “PICTMDRW”
 OPEN “O”,#1,”MacDraw.demo”
REM
REM  WRITE-OUT A 512 BYTE (256 WORDS OR INTEGERS) HEADER OF ZEROES
REM
 A%=0
 FOR I%=1 TO 256
 WRITE #1,A%
 NEXT I%
REM
REM  CLOSE THE PICTURE & WRITE-OUT THE ‘PICT’ DATA
REM
 CALL CLOSEPICTURE
 PicPtr&=PEEK LONG(PicHand&)
 PicLength%=PEEK WORD(PicPtr&+0)
 NumWords%=PicLength%/2
 doubleNumWords%=2*NumWords%
 IF doubleNumWords%<PicLength% THEN NumWords%=NumWords%+1
 FOR I%=1 TO NumWords%
 J%=2*(I%-1)
 A%=PEEK WORD(PicPtr&+J%)
 WRITE #1,A%
 NEXT I%
 CALL KILLPICTURE(PicHand&)
REM
REM * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
*
REM
REM  DATA FOR ALL 36 ‘MACDRAW’ FILL/PEN PATTERNS AS HEX STRINGS
REM
 DATA  1,”0000000000000000"
 DATA  2,”0000000000000000"
 DATA  3,”FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF”
 DATA  4,”77DD77DD77DD77DD”
 DATA  5,”AA55AA55AA55AA55"
 DATA  6,”8822882288228822"
 DATA  7,”8800220088002200"
 DATA  8,”8000080080000800"
 DATA  9,”8000000008000000"
 DATA 10,”8080413E080814E3"
 DATA 11,”FF808080FF080808"
 DATA 12,”8142241881422418"
 DATA 13,”8040201008040201"
 DATA 14,”E070381C0E0783C1"
 DATA 15,”77BBDDEE77BBDDEE”
 DATA 16,”8844221188442211"
 DATA 17,”99CC663399CC6633"
 DATA 18,”2040800008040200"
 DATA 19,”FF00FF00FF00FF00"
 DATA 20,”FF000000FF000000"
 DATA 21,”CC00000033000000"
 DATA 22,”F0F0F0F00F0F0F0F”
 DATA 23,”FF888888FF888888"
 DATA 24,”AA44AA11AA44AA11"
 DATA 25,”0102040810204080"
 DATA 26,”83070E1C3870E0C1"
 DATA 27,”EEDDBB77EEDDBB77"
 DATA 28,”1122448811224488"
 DATA 29,”3366CC993366CC99"
 DATA 30,”40A00000040A0000"
 DATA 31,”AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA”
 DATA 32,”8888888888888888"
 DATA 33,”0101101001011010"
 DATA 34,”0008142A552A1408"
 DATA 35,”FF80808080808080"
 DATA 36,”8244281028448201"
 END
The MacDrawFiles Program
REM
REM  (MacDrawFiles.BAS)
REM
REM  CREATES A ‘MACDRAW(PICT)’ TEXT-FILE & GRAPHICS-FILE
REM
REM  REFER TO Macintosh Technical Note #27: MacDraw’s PICT File
REM  Format and Comments, August 20, 1986 BY Ginger Jernigan;
REM  #21: QuickDraw’s Internal Picture Definition, June 20, 1986
REM  BY Ginger Jernigan; AND #91: Optimizing for the LaserWriter
REM  --Picture Comments, March 2, 1987 BY Ginger Jernigan 
REM
REM  DISABLE ZBASIC’S DEFAULT WINDOW
REM
 WINDOW OFF
REM
REM  SET THE COORDINATE SYSTEM TO WINDOW ‘PIXEL’ COORDINATES
REM
 COORDINATE WINDOW
REM
REM  ESTABLISH A ‘STATUS’ WINDOW
REM
 WINDOW #1,”MacDrawFiles.BAS”,(4,41)-(506,337),261
 CALL MOVETO(144,50)
 PRINT “Now creating the ‘MacDraw’ files . . .”
REM
REM  DEFINE ‘SHORT’ PICCOMMENTS
REM
 NIL&=0
 noData%=0
 picDwgBeg%=130
 picDwgEnd%=131
 PolyBegin%=160
 PolyEnd%=161
 picPlyClo%=165
REM
REM  READ-IN SELECTED FONT FAMILIES
REM
 DIM fontNo%(13),fontName$(13)
 FOR I%=1 TO 13
 READ fontNo%(I%),fontName$(I%)
 NEXT I%
REM
REM  READ-IN ALL 8 ‘MACDRAW’ FONT SIZES
REM
 DIM fontSize%(8)
 FOR I%=1 TO 8
 READ fontSize%(I%)
 NEXT I%
REM
REM  READ-IN ALL 6 ‘MACDRAW’ FONT STYLES
REM
 DIM fontStyle%(6),fontStyle$(6)
 FOR I%=1 TO 6
 READ fontStyle%(I%),fontStyle$(I%)
 NEXT I%
REM
REM  READ-IN ALL 36 ‘MACDRAW’ FILL/PEN PATTERNS AS HEX STRINGS
REM
 DIM MacDrawPat$(36)
 FOR I%=1 TO 36
 READ patID%,MacDrawPat$(I%)
 NEXT I%
REM
REM  READ-IN ALL 5 ‘MACDRAW’ LINE WEIGHTS
REM
 DIM penWidth%(5),penHeight%(5)
 FOR I%=1 TO 5
 READ penWidth%(I%),penHeight%(I%)
 NEXT I%
REM
REM  DEFINE PICTURE RECTANGLE (A FULL-SIZE ‘MACDRAW’ PAGE)
REM
 picRect=0.
 picTop%=0
 picLeft%=0
 picBottom%=720
 picRight%=576
REM
REM  ‘INITIALIZE’ QUICKDRAW RECTANGLE
REM
 DIM qdRect,qdTop%,qdLeft%,qdBottom%,qdRight%
REM
REM  ‘INITIALIZE’ QUICKDRAW ‘FILL’ PATTERN
REM
 DIM fillPat,row12%,row34%,row56%,row78%
 fillPatPtr&=VARPTR(fillPat)
REM
REM  ‘INITIALIZE’ PICTURE
REM
 CALL SETRECT(picRect,picLeft%,picTop%,picRight%,picBottom%)
REM
REM  CREATE A ‘MACDRAW’ TEXT-DEMO FILE & A GRAPHICS-DEMO FILE
REM
 FOR File%=1 TO 2
 PicHand&=FN OPENPICTURE(picRect)
REM
REM  ‘BEGIN’ A ‘MACDRAW’ PICTURE
REM
 CALL PICCOMMENT(picDwgBeg%,noData%,NIL&)
REM
REM  CHECK FOR TEXT(File%=1) OR GRAPHICS(File%=2)
REM
 IF File%=2 THEN “graphics”
REM
REM  . . . CREATE TEXT FILE . . .
REM
“text”
REM
REM  * * ‘SAMPLE’ FONT FAMILIES (USE 12 PT BOLD) * *
REM
 x%=10
 FOR I%=1 TO 13
 y%=25*(I%+1)
 CALL MOVETO(x%,y%)
 TEXT fontNo%(I%),fontSize%(3),fontStyle%(2),1
 CALL DRAWSTRING(fontName$(I%))
 CALL DRAWSTRING(“ 12 pt Bold”)
 NEXT I%
REM
REM  * * ‘SAMPLE’ FONT STYLES (USE ‘HELVETICA’ 12 PT) * *
REM
 x%=180
 FOR I%=1 TO 6
 y%=25*(I%+1)
 CALL MOVETO(x%,y%)
 TEXT fontNo%(4),fontSize%(3),fontStyle%(I%),1
 CALL DRAWSTRING(fontName$(4))
 CALL DRAWSTRING(“ 12 pt “)
 CALL DRAWSTRING(fontStyle$(I%))
 NEXT I%
 y%=y%+25
 CALL MOVETO(x%,y%)
 Style%=0
 Style$=””
 FOR I%=2 TO 6
 Style%=Style%+fontStyle%(I%)
 Style$=Style$+fontStyle$(I%)+” “
 NEXT I%
 TEXT fontNo%(4),fontSize%(3),Style%,1
 CALL DRAWSTRING(fontName$(4))
 CALL DRAWSTRING(“ 12 pt “)
 CALL DRAWSTRING(Style$)
REM
REM  * * ‘SAMPLE’ FONT SIZES (USE ‘HELVETICA’ BOLD) * *
REM
 x%=10
 yold%=391
 FOR I%=1 TO 8
 y%=yold%+fontSize%(I%)
 yold%=y%
 CALL MOVETO(x%,y%)
 TEXT fontNo%(4),fontSize%(I%),fontStyle%(2),1
 CALL DRAWSTRING(fontName$(4))
 CALL DRAWSTRING(“”)
 Size$=STR$(fontSize%(I%))
 CALL DRAWSTRING(Size$)
 CALL DRAWSTRING(“ pt Bold”)
 NEXT I%
 GOTO “EndPicture”
REM
REM  . . . CREATE GRAPHICS FILE . . .
REM
“graphics”
REM
REM  * * ‘SAMPLE’ ALL 36 ‘MACDRAW’ FILL PATTERNS * *
REM  NOTE: FILL & FRAME ARE ‘GROUPED’ AUTOMATICALLY
REM
 FOR I%=1 TO 3
 qdBottom%=20
 FOR J%=1 TO 12
 K%=(I%-1)*12+J%
 qdTop%=qdBottom%+5
 qdLeft%=10+(I%-1)*30
 qdBottom%=qdTop%+25
 qdRight%=qdLeft%+25
 CALL SETRECT(qdRect,qdLeft%,qdTop%,qdRight%,qdBottom%)
 CALL STUFFHEX(fillPatPtr&,MacDrawPat$(K%))
 IF K%>1 CALL FILLRECT(qdRect,fillPat)
 CALL FRAMERECT(qdRect)
 NEXT J%
 NEXT I%
REM
REM  * * ‘SAMPLE’ ALL 5 ‘MACDRAW’ LINE WEIGHTS * *
REM
 TEXT fontNo%(4),fontSize%(1),fontStyle%(2),1
 x%=150
 FOR I%=1 TO 5
 y%=10+30*I%
 CALL MOVETO(x%,y%)
 Width$=STR$(penWidth%(I%))
 Height$=STR$(penHeight%(I%))
 Note$=”  Line Width,Height = “+Width$+”,”+Height$
 CALL DRAWSTRING(Note$)
 CALL MOVE(10,-penHeight%(I%))
 CALL PENSIZE(penWidth%(I%),penHeight%(I%))
 CALL LINE(41-penWidth%(I%),0)
 CALL PENNORMAL
 NEXT I%
REM
REM  * * ‘SAMPLE’ ALL 3 ‘MACDRAW’ ARROWHEADS * *
REM
REM  USE HORIZ LINES
REM
 dx%=50
 dy%=0
 x%=90
REM
REM  USE RIGHT(I%=1), LEFT(I%=2), & BOTH(I%=3) ARROWHEADS
REM
 FOR I%=1 TO 3
 x%=x%+65
REM
REM  USE ALL 5 LINE WEIGHTS
REM
 FOR J%=1 TO 5
 y%=150+30*J%
 CALL PENSIZE(penWidth%(J%),penHeight%(J%))
 xahl1%=x%
 yahl1%=y%
 xahl2%=x%+dx%
 yahl2%=y%+dy%
REM
REM  ADJUST LENGTHS FOR PENSIZE
REM
 IF I%=1 THEN xahl2%=xahl2%+1-penWidth%(J%)
 IF I%=2 THEN xahl1%=xahl1%+1
 ArrwPt%=I%
 GOSUB “ArrowHeads”
 NEXT J%
 NEXT I%
REM
REM  USE VERT LINES
REM
 dx%=0
 dy%=50
 y%=270
REM
REM  USE RIGHT(I%=1), LEFT(I%=2), & BOTH(I%=3) ARROWHEADS
REM
 FOR I%=1 TO 3
 y%=y%+65
REM
REM  USE ALL 5 LINE WEIGHTS
REM
 FOR J%=1 TO 5
 x%=140+30*J%
 CALL PENSIZE(penWidth%(J%),penHeight%(J%))
 xahl1%=x%
 yahl1%=y%
 xahl2%=x%+dx%
 yahl2%=y%+dy%
REM
REM  ADJUST LENGTHS FOR PENSIZE
REM
 IF I%<>2 THEN yahl1%=yahl1%-1
 IF I%=1 THEN yahl2%=yahl2%-penHeight%(J%)
 ArrwPt%=I%
 GOSUB “ArrowHeads”
 NEXT J%
 NEXT I%
REM
REM  USE 45 DEG. LINES
REM
 dx%=INT(50./SQR(2.))
 dy%=INT(50./SQR(2.))
 y%=490
REM
REM  USE RIGHT(I%=1), LEFT(I%=2), & BOTH(I%=3) ARROWHEADS
REM
 FOR I%=1 TO 3
 y%=y%+50
REM
REM  USE ALL 5 LINE WEIGHTS
REM
 FOR J%=1 TO 5
 x%=125+30*J%
 CALL PENSIZE(penWidth%(J%),penHeight%(J%))
 xahl1%=x%
 yahl1%=y%
 xahl2%=x%+dx%
 yahl2%=y%+dy%
REM
REM  ADJUST LENGTHS FOR PENSIZE
REM
 IF I%=1 THEN “df1”
 IF I%=2 THEN “df2”
 GOTO “df3”
“df1” xahl2%=xahl2%-1-INT(penWidth%(J%)/SQR(2.))
 yahl2%=yahl2%-1-INT(penHeight%(J%)/SQR(2.))
 IF J%<5 THEN “df3”
 xahl2%=xahl2%+1
 yahl2%=yahl2%+1
 GOTO “df3”
“df2” xahl1%=xahl1%+1+INT(penWidth%(J%)/SQR(2.))
 yahl1%=yahl1%+1+INT(penHeight%(J%)/SQR(2.))
 IF J%<3 THEN “df3”
 xahl1%=xahl1%-1
 yahl1%=yahl1%-1
 IF J%<5 THEN “df3”
 xahl1%=xahl1%-1
 yahl1%=yahl1%-1
“df3” ArrwPt%=I%
 GOSUB “ArrowHeads”
 NEXT J%
 NEXT I%
 CALL PENNORMAL
REM
REM  * * ‘SAMPLE’ ALL 36 ‘MACDRAW’ PEN PATTERNS * *
REM
 CALL PENSIZE(penWidth%(5),penHeight%(5))
 FOR I%=1 TO 3
 y%=5
 FOR J%=1 TO 12
 K%=(I%-1)*12+J%
 x%=385+(I%-1)*50
 y%=y%+30
 CALL MOVETO(x%,y%)
 CALL STUFFHEX(fillPatPtr&,MacDrawPat$(K%))
 CALL PENPAT(fillPat)
 CALL LINE(40,0)
 NEXT J%
 NEXT I%
 CALL PENNORMAL
REM
REM  * * ‘SAMPLE’ ALL 8 GRAPHICS ‘TOOLS’ * *
REM
 CALL PENSIZE(penWidth%(3),penHeight%(3))
REM
REM  USE ORTHOGONAL LINES
REM
 CALL MOVETO(10,420)
 CALL LINETO(50,420)
 CALL MOVETO(80,400)
 CALL LINETO(80,440)
 CALL MOVETO(110,400)
 CALL LINETO(150,440)
REM
REM  USE UNCONSTRAINED LINES
REM
 CALL MOVETO(10,450)
 CALL LINETO(75,490)
 CALL MOVETO(85,490)
 CALL LINETO(150,450)
REM
REM  USE RECTANGLES
REM
 qdTop%=510
 qdLeft%=10
 qdBottom%=qdTop%+40
 qdRight%=qdLeft%+40
 CALL SETRECT(qdRect,qdLeft%,qdTop%,qdRight%,qdBottom%)
 CALL FRAMERECT(qdRect)
 qdTop%=520
 qdLeft%=60
 qdBottom%=qdTop%+20
 qdRight%=qdLeft%+60
 CALL SETRECT(qdRect,qdLeft%,qdTop%,qdRight%,qdBottom%)
 CALL FRAMERECT(qdRect)
 qdTop%=500
 qdLeft%=130
 qdBottom%=qdTop%+60
 qdRight%=qdLeft%+20
 CALL SETRECT(qdRect,qdLeft%,qdTop%,qdRight%,qdBottom%)
 CALL FRAMERECT(qdRect)
REM
REM  USE ROUNDED-CORNER RECTANGLES
REM
 ovalWidth%=20
 ovalHeight%=20
 qdTop%=580
 qdLeft%=10
 qdBottom%=qdTop%+40
 qdRight%=qdLeft%+40
 CALL SETRECT(qdRect,qdLeft%,qdTop%,qdRight%,qdBottom%)
 CALL FRAMEROUNDRECT(qdRect,ovalWidth%,ovalHeight%)
 qdTop%=590
 qdLeft%=60
 qdBottom%=qdTop%+20
 qdRight%=qdLeft%+60
 CALL SETRECT(qdRect,qdLeft%,qdTop%,qdRight%,qdBottom%)
 CALL FRAMEROUNDRECT(qdRect,ovalWidth%,ovalHeight%)
 qdTop%=570
 qdLeft%=130
 qdBottom%=qdTop%+60
 qdRight%=qdLeft%+20
 CALL SETRECT(qdRect,qdLeft%,qdTop%,qdRight%,qdBottom%)
 CALL FRAMEROUNDRECT(qdRect,ovalWidth%,ovalHeight%)
REM
REM  USE OVALS
REM
 qdTop%=650
 qdLeft%=10
 qdBottom%=qdTop%+40
 qdRight%=qdLeft%+40
 CALL SETRECT(qdRect,qdLeft%,qdTop%,qdRight%,qdBottom%)
 CALL FRAMEOVAL(qdRect)
 qdTop%=660
 qdLeft%=60
 qdBottom%=qdTop%+20
 qdRight%=qdLeft%+60
 CALL SETRECT(qdRect,qdLeft%,qdTop%,qdRight%,qdBottom%)
 CALL FRAMEOVAL(qdRect)
 qdTop%=640
 qdLeft%=130
 qdBottom%=qdTop%+60
 qdRight%=qdLeft%+20
 CALL SETRECT(qdRect,qdLeft%,qdTop%,qdRight%,qdBottom%)
 CALL FRAMEOVAL(qdRect)
REM
REM  USE ARCS
REM
 startAngle%=225
 arcAngle%=150
 qdTop%=410
 qdLeft%=385
 qdBottom%=qdTop%+40
 qdRight%=qdLeft%+40
 CALL SETRECT(qdRect,qdLeft%,qdTop%,qdRight%,qdBottom%)
 CALL FRAMEARC(qdRect,startAngle%,arcAngle%)
 qdTop%=420
 qdLeft%=435
 qdBottom%=qdTop%+20
 qdRight%=qdLeft%+60
 CALL SETRECT(qdRect,qdLeft%,qdTop%,qdRight%,qdBottom%)
 CALL FRAMEARC(qdRect,startAngle%,arcAngle%)
 qdTop%=400
 qdLeft%=505
 qdBottom%=qdTop%+60
 qdRight%=qdLeft%+20
 CALL SETRECT(qdRect,qdLeft%,qdTop%,qdRight%,qdBottom%)
 CALL FRAMEARC(qdRect,startAngle%,arcAngle%)
REM
REM  USE THE ‘FREEHAND’ TOOL (‘MACDRAW’ USES A POLYGON)
REM
 PolyHandle&=FN OPENPOLY
 PI=4.*ATN(1.)
 PIO20=PI/20.
 THETA=0.
 R=50.*COS(2.*THETA)
 X%=455+INT(R*COS(THETA))
 Y%=510+INT(R*SIN(THETA))
 CALL MOVETO(X%,Y%)
 FOR I%=1 TO 20
 THETA=I%*PIO20
 R=50.*COS(2.*THETA)
 X%=455+INT(R*COS(THETA))
 Y%=510+INT(R*SIN(THETA))
 CALL LINETO(X%,Y%)
 NEXT I%
 CALL CLOSEPOLY
 CALL FRAMEPOLY(PolyHandle&)
 CALL KILLPOLY(PolyHandle&)
REM
REM  USE A POLYGON
REM
 PolyHandle&=FN OPENPOLY
 CALL MOVETO(385,540)
 CALL LINETO(385,575)
 CALL LINETO(485,600)
 CALL LINETO(525,540)
 CALL LINETO(435,565)
 CALL CLOSEPOLY
 CALL FRAMEPOLY(PolyHandle&)
 CALL KILLPOLY(PolyHandle&)
REM
REM  USE A ‘FORCED-CLOSE’ POLYGON
REM  NOTE: THE ‘PICCOMMENTS’ WILL FORCE CLOSURE
REM
 CALL PICCOMMENT(PolyBegin%,noData%,NIL&)
 CALL PICCOMMENT(picPlyClo%,noData%,NIL&)
 CALL MOVETO(385,610)
 CALL LINETO(385,645)
 CALL LINETO(485,670)
 CALL LINETO(525,610)
 CALL LINETO(435,635)
 CALL LINETO(385,610)
 CALL PICCOMMENT(PolyEnd%,noData%,NIL&)
 CALL PENNORMAL
REM
REM  ‘END’ A ‘MACDRAW’ PICTURE
REM
“EndPicture”
 CALL PICCOMMENT(picDwgEnd%,noData%,NIL&)
REM
REM  CREATE THE ‘MACDRAW’ PICT FILE
REM
 CURSOR=4
 DEF OPEN “PICTMDRW”
 IF File%=1 THEN OPEN “O”,#1,”MacDraw.text”
 IF File%=2 THEN OPEN “O”,#1,”MacDraw.graphics”
REM
REM  WRITE-OUT A 512 BYTE (256 WORDS OR INTEGERS) HEADER OF ZEROES
REM
 A%=0
 FOR I%=1 TO 256
 WRITE #1,A%
 NEXT I%
REM
REM  CLOSE THE PICTURE & WRITE-OUT THE ‘PICT’ DATA
REM
 CALL CLOSEPICTURE
 PicPtr&=PEEK LONG(PicHand&)
 PicLength%=PEEK WORD(PicPtr&+0)
 NumWords%=PicLength%/2
 doubleNumWords%=2*NumWords%
 IF doubleNumWords%<PicLength% THEN NumWords%=NumWords%+1
 FOR I%=1 TO NumWords%
 J%=2*(I%-1)
 A%=PEEK WORD(PicPtr&+J%)
 WRITE #1,A%
 NEXT I%
 CALL KILLPICTURE(PicHand&)
 CLOSE #1
 CURSOR=0
 NEXT File%
 GOTO “Exit”
REM
REM * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
*
 “ArrowHeads”
REM
REM  SUBROUTINE TO CONSTRUCT A ‘MACDRAW’ ARROWHEAD(S) LINE
REM
REM  DEFINE ARROWHEAD PARAMETERS
REM
 DIM ArrwRect,ArrwRT%,ArrwRL%,ArrwRB%,ArrwRR%
 NIL&=0
 noData%=0
 picArrwR%=170
 picArrwL%=171
 picArrwB%=172
 picArrwEnd%=173
 arcAngle%=48
REM
REM  GET PEN SIZE & ARROWHEAD RECTANGLE SIZE
REM
 DIM pnLocV%,pnLocH%,pnSizeV%,pnSizeH%,pnMode%
 DIM pnPat12%,pnPat34%,pnPat56%,pnPat78%
 CALL GETPENSTATE(pnLocV%)
 IF pnSizeV%=0 THEN RETURN
 IF pnSizeV%=1 THEN ArrwWH%=20
 IF pnSizeV%=2 THEN ArrwWH%=30
 IF pnSizeV%=4 THEN ArrwWH%=40
 IF pnSizeV%=6 THEN ArrwWH%=50
REM
REM  DETERMINE LINE PROPERTIES
REM
 dxahl=xahl2%-xahl1%
 dyahl=yahl2%-yahl1%
 lineLength=SQR(dxahl*dxahl+dyahl*dyahl)
 xcorr%=INT((dyahl/lineLength)*pnSizeV%/2)
 ycorr%=INT(ABS(dxahl/lineLength)*pnSizeV%/2)
 IF xahl1%=xahl2% THEN “ah1”
 tanAnglw=dyahl/dxahl
 Angle=57.2957795*ATN(tanAngle)
 IF xahl1%>xahl2% THEN Angle=Angle+180.
 lineAngle%=INT(Angle)+90
 GOTO “ah3”
“ah1” IF yahl1%>yahl2% THEN “ah2”
 lineAngle%=90+90
 GOTO “ah3”
“ah2” lineAngle%=-90+90
REM
REM  DETERMINE WHICH ARROWHEAD(S) TO DRAW
REM  (ArrwPt%=1 FOR PT 1, 2 FOR 2, 3 FOR BOTH)
REM
“ah3” short=(ArrwWH%/2)/lineLength
 IF ArrwPt%=2 THEN “ah4”
REM
REM  ARROWHEAD AT PT 1
REM
 bothFlag%=1
 xahlc%=xahl1%
 yahlc%=yahl1%
 xahl1%=xahlc%+INT(short*dxahl)
 yahl1%=yahlc%+INT(short*dyahl)
 startAngle%=lineAngle%-arcAngle%/2
 IF xahl1%>xahl2% THEN “ah6”
 IF xahl1%<xahl2% THEN “ah5”
 IF yahl1%>yahl2% THEN “ah6”
 GOTO “ah5”
REM
REM  ARROWHEAD AT PT 2
REM
“ah4” bothFlag%=2
 xahlc%=xahl2%
 yahlc%=yahl2%
 xahl2%=xahlc%-INT(short*dxahl)
 yahl2%=yahlc%-INT(short*dyahl)
 startAngle%=lineAngle%+180-arcAngle%/2
 IF startAngle%>360 THEN startAngle%=startAngle%-360
 IF xahl1%<xahl2% THEN “ah6”
 IF xahl1%>xahl2% THEN “ah5”
 IF yahl1%<yahl2% THEN “ah6”
“ah5” picArrw%=picArrwL%
 IF ArrwPt%=3 THEN picArrw%=picArrwB%
 GOTO “ah7”
“ah6” picArrw%=picArrwR%
 IF ArrwPt%=3 THEN picArrw%=picArrwB%
REM
REM  ‘QUICKDRAW’ THE ARROWHEAD(S) WITH ‘PAINTARC’ &
REM  USE PICCOMMENTS TO ‘TIE’ IT(THEM) TO THE LINE
REM
“ah7” ArrwRT%=yahlc%-ArrwWH%/2
 ArrwRB%=ArrwRT%+ArrwWH%
 ArrwRL%=xahlc%-ArrwWH%/2
 ArrwRR%=ArrwRL%+ArrwWH%
 CALL SETRECT(ArrwRect,ArrwRL%,ArrwRT%,ArrwRR%,ArrwRB%)
 IF ArrwPt%<3 THEN “ah8”
 IF bothFlag%<2 THEN “ah8”
 GOTO “ah9”
“ah8” CALL PICCOMMENT(picArrw%,noData%,NIL&)
“ah9” CALL PAINTARC(ArrwRect,startAngle%,arcAngle%)
 IF ArrwPt%<3 THEN “ah10”
 IF bothFlag%<2 THEN “ah4”
“ah10”  xahl1%=xahl1%-xcorr%
 yahl1%=yahl1%-ycorr%
 xahl2%=xahl2%-xcorr%
 yahl2%=yahl2%-ycorr%
 CALL MOVETO(xahl1%,yahl1%)
 CALL LINETO(xahl2%,yahl2%)
 CALL PICCOMMENT(picArrwEnd%,noData%,NIL&)
 RETURN
REM
REM * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
*
REM
REM  DATA FOR SELECTED FONT FAMILIES
REM
 DATA   0,”Chicago”
 DATA  22,”Courier”
 DATA   3,”Geneva”
 DATA  21,”Helvetica”
 DATA   6,”London”
 DATA   4,”Monaco”
 DATA  15,”N Helvetica Narrow”
 DATA   2,”New York”
 DATA  16,”Palatino”
 DATA  23,”Symbol”
 DATA  20,”Times”
 DATA   5,”Venice”
 DATA  18,”Zapf Chancery”
REM
REM  DATA FOR ALL 8 ‘MACDRAW’ FONT SIZES
REM
 DATA  9
 DATA 10
 DATA 12
 DATA 14
 DATA 18
 DATA 24
 DATA 36
 DATA 48
REM
REM  DATA FOR ALL 6 ‘MACDRAW’ FONT STYLES
REM
 DATA  0,”Plain Text”
 DATA  1,”Bold”
 DATA  2,”Italic”
 DATA  4,”Underline”
 DATA  8,”Outline”
 DATA 16,”Shadow”
REM
REM  DATA FOR ALL 36 ‘MACDRAW’ FILL/PEN PATTERNS AS HEX STRINGS
REM
 DATA  1,”0000000000000000"
 DATA  2,”0000000000000000"
 DATA  3,”FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF”
 DATA  4,”77DD77DD77DD77DD”
 DATA  5,”AA55AA55AA55AA55"
 DATA  6,”8822882288228822"
 DATA  7,”8800220088002200"
 DATA  8,”8000080080000800"
 DATA  9,”8000000008000000"
 DATA 10,”8080413E080814E3"
 DATA 11,”FF808080FF080808"
 DATA 12,”8142241881422418"
 DATA 13,”8040201008040201"
 DATA 14,”E070381C0E0783C1"
 DATA 15,”77BBDDEE77BBDDEE”
 DATA 16,”8844221188442211"
 DATA 17,”99CC663399CC6633"
 DATA 18,”2040800008040200"
 DATA 19,”FF00FF00FF00FF00"
 DATA 20,”FF000000FF000000"
 DATA 21,”CC00000033000000"
 DATA 22,”F0F0F0F00F0F0F0F”
 DATA 23,”FF888888FF888888"
 DATA 24,”AA44AA11AA44AA11"
 DATA 25,”0102040810204080"
 DATA 26,”83070E1C3870E0C1"
 DATA 27,”EEDDBB77EEDDBB77"
 DATA 28,”1122448811224488"
 DATA 29,”3366CC993366CC99"
 DATA 30,”40A00000040A0000"
 DATA 31,”AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA”
 DATA 32,”8888888888888888"
 DATA 33,”0101101001011010"
 DATA 34,”0008142A552A1408"
 DATA 35,”FF80808080808080"
 DATA 36,”8244281028448201"
REM
REM  DATA FOR ALL 5 ‘MACDRAW’ LINE WEIGHTS
REM
 DATA 0,0
 DATA 1,1
 DATA 2,2
 DATA 4,4
 DATA 6,6
“Exit”
 WINDOW CLOSE #1
 WINDOW #1,”MacDrawFiles.BAS”,(4,41)-(506,337),261
 TEXT 4,9,0,1
 CALL MOVETO(162,50)
 PRINT “Both ‘MacDraw’ files created ! !”
 CALL MOVETO(174,65)
 PRINT “Hit [Return] to exit . . .”
 BEEP
 INPUT ANS$
 WINDOW CLOSE #1
 END

 

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