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Dissolve
Volume Number:2
Issue Number:6
Column Tag:Graphics Lab: Asm

Wizzo Shows Dissolve Effects

By Chris Yerga, Berkely, CA, MacTutor Contributing Editor

Fair Warning

Welcome to the second installment of the Graphic Lab. In this column we will explore the Mac's graphic capablilities and try to exploit them for all their worth. But I must warn prospective readers: This column is not for the so-called "power-users" or anyone else who bought their Mac to print out mailing labels. If you own a numeric keypad, this one isn't for you. This column is for people who'd rather watch a spaceship fly around on their screen than boot up Excel, given the choice. This column is for programmers who look forward to designing the title graphics for their applications, not the I/O drivers. This column is for those who never turn off the animation option in Switcher. So you've been warned. Everything beyond this paragraph will be pure frivolity. Let's go!

Crimes of Graphics

This second installment will deal with two crimes: one bad, and one good. First the bad one. Many of the people I've spoken with don't fully understand the potential of the Mac's graphics. They're blown away by some of the things they see, but they are convinced that the techniques are so involved that such feats are beyond their grasp. As a result, we haven't seen a lot of programs that push the Mac as far as they could. The good crime is one that we will commit, and one that will help us understand some basic principles of QuickDraw and graphics in general.

This is the crime of theft. We are going to use a Desk Accessory called BitNapper published in last month's column to steal graphics from other applications. Then we will show some title animation using those stolen bit maps in a fun little animation demo called Wizzo. The BitNapper DA is listed in last month's Graphics Lab column. With it, we can cut BitMaps from any application that supports desk accessories, or we can use it to cut our own graphics from MacPaint. BitNapper saves the stolen BitMap to disk as an MDS source file which allows us to install them as resources into our applications much like we have done with icons and the icon converter program published previously in Vol. 2 No.1 of MacTutor.

To use the BitNapper, install it into the system file on the disk with the application whose graphics you want to pilfer. When the picture you want is on the screen, select the BitNapper. It will install its own menu into the menu bar. Now select "Steal Bits" from its menu. Position the upper left hand corner of the selection rectangle at the upper left hand corner of the BitMap you want to steal. Now drag down to the lower right hand corner. The BitNapper will invert those bits within the selected rectangle. Release the button and the rest is self explanatory. The word constraint option will not be needed until later. It forces the selected BitMap to have left and right sides that coincide with word boundaries, which is sometimes useful. The BitNapper source, published last month, is also available on the source code disk #8 from MacTutor's mail order store.

What the good book has to say

Since we don't want to be complete outlaws, we will begin with some standard QuickDraw info taken straight from Inside Macintosh. The main QD data structure we will concern ourselves with is the BitMap. The BitMap is a rectangular arrangement of bits that describes some image. As a matter of fact, the Mac screen itself is a BitMap. Lets look at the structure of a BitMap.

From figure #1 we can see that the actual bit image of the BitMap is not a part of the BitMap data structure. Rather, there is a pointer to the bit image. This is because bit images, such as that of the Mac screen, tend to be quite large. The way that BitMaps are defined allows several different BitMaps use the same bit image. This is useful, as many times BitMaps only differ in their bounds rectangles. Another item of note is the fact that the rowBytes value should always be even. The reason for this is shown in figure #2. It makes sure that the beginning of each row of data, or each scanline in the case of the Mac screen, occurs on a word boundary. This allows us to access the rows using word or long sized instructions, which generally makes life simpler.

Peaceful coexistence

Now that we have grabbed a chunk of graphics from our favorite application, what shall we do next? How do we get our application to access the BitMap with ease? The answer is to keep the BitMap in the resource fork of the application. In the resource file for our application we do something like:

Resource 'GNRL' 135
Include  MyPicture.BMAP

Where MyPicture.BMAP is the filename of the BitMap that you saved with BitNapper. The ID number can be whatever you want. Although I was tempted to use my own resource type, I decided to go by the book and use GNRL, which Apple considers legal. To facilitate the use of BitMaps in resources, I have written a few utilities which simplify things a bit.

The first utility is a routine called GetBitMap, which loads a BitMap in from resources. It looks for an ID number in D0 and returns a handle to the BitMap in A2. The handle allows the BitMap to be relocatable in memory, preventing heap fragmentation, but creating a problem. The way that BitNapper stores the data is shown in figure #3. Since our resource BitMaps can move around in memory behind our backs, we can never be sure if the basAddr pointer actually points to the bit image that follows it.

The answer is a routine called LockBitMap. It locks the BitMap in memory and correctly sets the basAddr pointer according to the current position of the BitMap in memory. It takes a handle to the BitMap in A2 and returns a pointer to the BitMap in A3. Call LockBitMap just before you start using the BitMap. If memory is sparse, try to avoid allocating memory when there are locked BitMaps in memory. This will sidestep any heap fragmentation problems.

After you are done working with a BitMap, call UnLockBitMap to allow the memory manager to relocate the BitMap as it sees fit. UnlockBitMap takes a handle to the BitMap in A2. But be sure to lock it down again before using it.

The final routine is KillBitMap which, given a handle to the BitMap in A2, releases the memory occupied by the BitMap. If you don't want to kill your application as well, be sure not to use the handle after killing the BitMap.

More than one way to skin a BitMap

So we've stolen a BitMap, linked it into our resource fork, and are holding onto it by the handle. Now lets get it on the screen. This month's source code contains a couple examples of alternate ways to display a BitMap.

These routines fall into two general categories: ones that employ patterns and ones that employ regions. Lets start with the pattern based copies.

Wizzo Shows Bit Map Animation

Our Wizzo program shows how we can read in the stolen bit maps created with BitNapper and display it on the screen with some dissolve effects. Wizzo has two pattern based routines for use in titling or other dramatic drawing of the bit map. The two examples of pattern based routines are FadeIn and FadeOut.

FadeIn Shows Dissolve Effect

FadeIn takes a BitMap handle in A2 and dissolves it slowly onto the screen. The top,left corner of the destination is passed to FadeIn in D3,D4. First it locks the BitMap in memory. Then it makes a duplicate copy of the BitMap.

In the main loop it copies the source BitMap to the destination BitMap (which is off the screen). It then sets the pen mode to notPatBic. In this mode, any time a pattern is drawn on the BitMap, it performs a logical AND with the BitMap's current bit image. Figure #4 should make this more clear. The application has a table of 18 patterns of increasing darkness. In each iteration, a pattern is drawn over the entire duplicate BitMap, which at this point contains a copy of the source BitMap. Now we have a copy of the source BitMap in which only those bits set in our current pattern are set. I know...confusing, but the illustration is more clear.

After this, the duplicate is copied to the screen. Then the process begins again with a slightly darker pattern, until finally we have an all-black pattern which copies the entire BitMap. FadeIn then unlocks the source BitMap and disposes of the memory it allocated for the duplicate BitMap.

FadeOut does the opposite, as you may have guessed. Except that FadeOut only requires that you pass it a pointer to a rectangle in A4. It dissolves the bits enclosed within the rectangle on the screen. When it returns, the rectangle will be completely white.

FadeOut simply sets the pen mode to notPatBic and repeatedly does a _PaintRect with successively lighter patterns. It works from the end of our pattern list to the beginning.

These are fairly simple examples. Other possibilities are patterns of diagonal lines which move in barbershop-polelike fashion. Or perhaps altternating checkerboard patterns. Experiment with different variations.

A two-edged sword

The next set of copy routines are region based. They facilitate the use of QuickDraw's ability to clip graphics to an arbitraty region. The problem that arises here is that QuickDraw, as David Letterman might say, is "just too darn powerful." It can do all sorts of fabulous calculations with regions, but it requires great sacrifices in speed. When any kind of region calculations are involved, QuickDraw bogs down. There are certain solutions, but in some cases it is better to write your own application-specific routines which are frightfully optimized for your specific case. Examples of this will come in future issues. Stay tuned, campers.

Our region based routines, OpenRight and OpenOut repeatedy call _CopyBits with maskRgns that reveal more and more of the BitMap with each iteration. If you are not aware of it, _CopyBits allows the caller to pass it a region to which the copied bits will be clipped. OpenRight starts with a rectangular region which clips all but the leftmost vertical row of bits, and expands the region to the right until the entire BitMap is copied. OpenOut starts with a region that clips all but the centermost bit of the BitMap and expands outward in all directions until the entire BitMap is copied. Both of these routines use the routine _RectRgn which creates a rectangular region, given a rectangle and a region handle.

Fig. 5 Output of the BitNapper DA Formatted for an MDS Resource Include File

The saga continues...

These examples were intended to give you a basic familiarity with the techniques involved with using the BitNapper and the sample routines. In the coming months we will explore other areas of interest, such as scrolling and animation techniques. I'm very interested in hearing from readers. If you have any suggestions or questions, drop me a line at:

2556 Mabel St.

Berkeley, CA 94702-2141

Figure 5 shows the MDS text file format that BitNapper creates for us. As you can see, this is all ready to be included in our resource file. Figure 6 shows the bit map example used by Wizzo. Of course with any animation example, the real action is over by the time we get a screen shot. Perhaps next time we will look at exploding and imploding BitMaps...see you then.

Fig. 6 Output of our Wizzo program after Fadein Animation.

Chris Yerga wins $50 as our outstanding article for his Bitnapper DA and this month's Wizzo program!

!START

/Output WizzoGraf

]

Wizzo
/Resources
WizzoRes

/TYPE 'APPL' 'WIZZ'

$



;  BitMap Demo #1  
;
; © 1986 by Chris Yerga for MacTutor

INCLUDE MacTraps.D

;  Declare external labels

XDEF  START

MACRO   Center String,MidPT,Y =

 CLR.W  -(SP)    
 PEA    '{String}'
 _StringWidth
 CLR.L  D3; Clear high word of D3 for DIVU
 MOVE.W (SP)+,D3 ; Get the width (in pixels) in D3
 DIVU   #2,D3    ; Divide by 2
 MOVE.L #{MidPT},D4
 SUB.W  D3,D4    ;103-(width/2) to center text
 MOVE.W D4,-(SP) ;Push the X coordinate
 MOVE.W #{Y},-(SP) ;Push the Y coordinate
 _MoveTo;Position the pen
 
 PEA  '{String}'
 _DrawString
 | ;End of Macro
 
;========= Local Constants =================

AllEvents EQU  $0000FFFF  ; Mask for FlushEvents
MaxEvents EQU  12
DWindLenEQU $AA  ; size of a Dialog Record
windowSizeEQU  $9C   ; size of window data struct
DiskEvent EQU  7
shiftKeyEQU 512  ; eventRec mask modifier bits

;======= Start of Main Program ================

BadPtr: _Debugger;Should never get here.  

START:  
 MOVEM.LD0-D7/A0-A6,-(SP) ;The routine 
 LEA    SaveRegs(A5),A0 ;which saves the registers
 MOVE.L A6,(A0)  
 MOVE.L A7,4(A0)
 
;======== Initialize the ROM routines =============

 PEA    -4(A5) ;QD Global ptr
 _InitGraf;Init QD global
 _InitFonts ;Init font manager
 _InitWindows    ;Init Window Manager
 _InitMenus ;Guess what...you got it!
 CLR.L  -(SP)    ;Standard SysErr/DS dialog
 _InitDialogs    ;Init Dialog Manger
 _TEInit;Init ROM Text edit
 MOVE.L #AllEvents,D0;And flush ALL previous
 _FlushEvents    ;events
 _InitCursor;Get the standard arrow
 
;======== Begin our routine processing ==========

 MOVE #128,D0    ;get bitmap #128
 BSR    GetBitMap;from resources into A2
 
; This is where the BitMap routines are called

BMTest: 
 PEA    Screen
 PEA    White
 _FillRect
 MOVE #2,-(SP)   ;Get Geneva 12
 _TextFont
 MOVE #12,-(SP)
 _TextSize 
 Center MacTutor BitMap Demo,256,50
 
 MOVE #100,D3    ;top coordinate
 MOVE #140,D4    ;left coordinate
 BSR    FadeIn   ;FadeIn (Note handle in A2)
 
 LEA    TempRect(A5),A4 ;get tempRect 
 BSR    FadeOut  ;and erase its contents
 
 MOVE #100,D3    ;top coordinate
 MOVE #140,D4    ;left coordinate
 BSR    OpenRight;OpenRight
 
 LEA    TempRect(A5),A4 ;get tempRect again
 BSR    FadeOut  ;and erase its contents
 
 MOVE #100,D3    ;top
 MOVE #140,D4    ;left
 BSR    OpenOut  ;OpenOut
 
 BSR    BlackOut
 
 BSR    GetEvent ;check for any events
 MOVE Event(A5), D0
 CMP    #0, D0   ;do we have an event?
 BEQ    BMTest   ;no, keep going
 
Adios:
 LEA    SaveRegs(A5),A0 ;yes prepare to exit
 MOVE.L (A0),A6
 MOVE.L 4(A0),A7
 MOVEM.L(SP)+,D0-D7/A0-A6
 RTS  

; ========== Subroutines ==================

GetEvent: 
 
 CLR    -(SP)    ;returned event 
 MOVE #AllEvents,-(SP)  ;mask all events
 PEA    EventRecord(A5) ; event record block
 _GetNextEvent   ;go check the mouse 
 MOVE (SP)+,D0   ;get event result
 MOVE D0, Event(A5);save event in our global
 RTS    ;return
 
; =======These are the general BitMap utilities ======

; GetBitMap : Reads a BitMap in from resources
;
;on entry : D0 = BitMap resource ID
;returns a handle to the BitMap in A2

GetBitMap:
 CLR.L  -(SP)    ;room for Handle
 MOVE.L #'GNRL',-(SP);the resType
 MOVE D0,-(SP)   ;resID
 _GetResource
 MOVE.L (SP)+,A2 ;get the handle
 RTS
 
; LockBitMap : Locks the BitMap in memory and calculates the 
;       BasAddr field so that it's ready to use.
;
;on entry : A2 = handle to BitMap
;returns a pointer to the locked BitMap in A3

LockBitMap:
 MOVE.L A2,A0    ;copy handle
 _HLock ;lock it
 MOVE.L (A2),A3  ;get pointer
 ADDA   #14,A3   ;point to bit image
 MOVE.L A3,-14(A3) ;set basAddr field
 MOVE.L (A2),A3  ;get pointer
 RTS
 
; UnLockBitMap : makes the BitMap relocatable.  Called
; whenever processing has been finished on a bitMap
; that will be used again so that Heap Fragmentation
; doesn't occur.
;
;on entry : A2 = handle to bitMap

UnLockBitMap:
 MOVE.L A2,A0    ;copy handle
 _HUnLock ;unlock it
 RTS
 
; KillBitMap : Does what it says
;
;on entry : A2 = handle to bitMap
;
;BE SURE NOT TO REUSE A DEAD BITMAP! DANGLING
;POINTERS! YOUR APPLICATION WILL DIE ALSO!

KillBitMap:
 MOVE.L A2,A0    ;copy handle
 _DisposHandle
 RTS
 
; ====These are the sample BitMap display routines =====

 
; FadeIn : Displays the BitMap with a reverse dissolving effect
;
;on entry : A2 = bitMap handle
;D3,D4 = top,left coordinates of display rect

FadeIn:
 MOVE.L A2,A0    ;copy handle
 _GetHandleSize  ;get handle size
 _NewPtr,Clear   ;allocate an equal sized block
 MOVE.L A0,A4    ;copy pointer
 BSR    LockBitMap ;lock and init bitMap
 LEA    TempRect(A5),A0 ;get ptr to dest rect
 MOVE D3,(A0)    ;copy top
 MOVE D4,2(A0)   ;copy left
 ADD    10(A3),D3;calculate bottom
 MOVE D3,4(A0)
 ADD    12(A3),D4;calculate right
 MOVE D4,6(A0)   ;copy the header info
 MOVE.L 4(A3),4(A4)
 MOVE.L 8(A3),8(A4)
 MOVE 12(A3),12(A4)
 LEA    14(A4),A0
 MOVE.L A0,(A4)  ;set basAddr
 MOVE.L A4,-(SP) ;the dest bitMap
 _SetPBits
 MOVE #15,-(SP)  ;notPatBic mode
 _PenMode
 
 MOVE #0,D3 ;pat counter
@1 MOVE.L A3,-(SP) ;source BitMap
 MOVE.L A4,-(SP) ;dest BitMap
 LEA    6(A3),A0 ;get pointer to bitMap bounds
 MOVE.L A0,-(SP) ;sourceRect
 MOVE.L A0,-(SP) ;destRect
 MOVE #0,-(SP)   ;srcCopy
 CLR.L  -(SP)
 _CopyBits
 
 LEA    PatList,A0 ;ptr to patterns
 MOVE D3,D0 ;copy pattern index
 MULU   #8,D0    ;offset to pattern
 ADDA   D0,A0
 MOVE.L A0,-(SP) ;point to pattern
 _PenPat
 PEA    6(A4)    ;BitMap bounds
 _PaintRect ;paint the rect
 
 MOVE.L A4,-(SP) ;source BitMap
 MOVE.L (A5),A0  
 PEA    $FFFFFF86(A0);dest BitMap (GrafPort)
 PEA    6(A4)    ;sourceRect
 PEA    TempRect(A5) ;destRect
 MOVE #0,-(SP)   ;srcCopy
 CLR.L  -(SP)
 _CopyBits
 
 ADDQ #1,D3 ;next pattern...
 CMP    #19,D3   ;done?
 BNE    @1;not done..
 
 MOVE.L (A5),A0  ;restore screenbits
 PEA    $FFFFFF86(A0)
 _SetPBits
 MOVE.L A4,A0    ;free up memory
 _DisposPtr
 BSR    UnLockBitMap
 RTS
 
; FadeOut : Erases the contents of a rect with a dissolve
;
;on entry : A4 = pointer to rect to be erased

FadeOut
 MOVE #15,-(SP)  ;set pattern mode to notPatBic
 _PenMode
 MOVE #18,D3;init pattern counter
@1 LEA  PatList,A0 ;ptr to patterns
 MOVE D3,D0 ;copy pattern index
 MULU   #8,D0    ;offset to pattern
 ADDA   D0,A0
 MOVE.L A0,-(SP) ;point to pattern
 _PenPat
 MOVE.L A4,-(SP) ;BitMap bounds
 _PaintRect ;paint the rect
 
 TST    D3;are we done
 BEQ    @2;yes
 SUBQ #1,D3 ;decrement the pattern number
 BRA    @1;loop
@2 RTS  
 
; OpenRight : Opens the BitMap on the screen from left to right
;
;on entry : D3,D4 = top,left of screen destination
;     A2 = handle to bitMap

OpenRight
 BSR    LockBitMap ;lock the handle in memory
 CLR.L  -(SP)    ;room for rgnHandle
 _NewRgn
 MOVE.L (SP)+,TempRgn(A5) ;save the handle
 MOVE D3,RgnRect(A5) ;copy top  of bounds
 MOVE D4,RgnRect+2(A5)    ;copy left of bounds
 MOVE D3,D0
 ADD    10(A3),D0;calc bottom
 MOVE D0,RgnRect+4(A5)
 MOVE D4,RgnRect+6(A5)    ;make it 1 pixel wide    
 
@1 ADD  #1,RgnRect+6(A5)  ;extend right edge 1 pixel
 MOVE.L TempRgn(A5),-(SP) ;push rgnHandle
 PEA    RgnRect(A5);push the rect
 _RectRgn ;make it a region
 MOVE.L TempRgn(A5),A4  ;copy rgnHandle to A4
 BSR    ShowBitMap
 ADD    #1,RgnRect+2(A5)  ;extend left edge 1 pixel
 MOVE 12(A3),D0  ;get right edge of BitMap
 ADD    D4,D0    ;calculate width
 CMP    RgnRect+6(A5),D0  ;have we extended the rect
 ;all the way there?
 BNE    @1;no...keep going
 MOVE.L TempRgn(A5),-(SP) ;free up memory
 _DisposRgn
 RTS

; OpenOut : Opens the BitMap up from the center outward
;
;on entry : D3,D4 = top,left of display rect
;   A2 = handle to bitMap

OpenOut 
 BSR    LockBitMap ;lock the handle in memory
 CLR.L  -(SP)    ;room for rgnHandle
 _NewRgn
 MOVE.L (SP)+,TempRgn(A5) ;save the handle
 
 MOVE D3,D0 ;copy top
 ADD    D3,D0    ;multiply by 2
 ADD    10(A3),D0;add offset
 EXT.L  D0;extend to 32 bit precision
 DIVU   #2,D0    ;find center
 MOVE D4,D1 ;copy left
 ADD    D4,D1    ;multiply by 2
 ADD    12(A3),D1;add offset
 EXT.L  D1;extend precision
 DIVU   #2,D1    ;find center
 MOVE D0,RgnRect(A5) ;top of the rect
 MOVE D1,RgnRect+2(A5)  ;left
 ADD    #1,D0
 MOVE D0,RgnRect+4(A5)  ;bottom
 ADD    #1,D1
 MOVE D1,RgnRect+6(A5)  ;right
 
@1 MOVE.L TempRgn(A5),-(SP) ;push the rgnHandle
 PEA    RgnRect(A5);and the rect
 _RectRgn
 MOVE.L TempRgn(A5),A4  ;copy rgnHandle to A4
 BSR    ShowBitMap
 ADD    #1,RgnRect+4(A5)  ;extend the bottom 1 pixel
 ADD    #1,RgnRect+6(A5)  ;extend the right  1 pixel
 SUB    #1,RgnRect(A5)  ;extend the top 1 pixel
 SUB    #1,RgnRect+2(A5)  ;extend the left 1 pixel
 MOVE 12(A3),D0  ;get right edge of BitMap
 ADD    D4,D0    ;calculate width
 CMP    RgnRect+6(A5),D0  ;have we extended the rect
 ;all the way there?
 BGE    @1;no...keep going
 MOVE 10(A3),D0  ;get bottom of BitMap
 ADD    D3,D0
 CMP    RgnRect+4(A5),D0  ;are we done?
 BGE    @1;no...
 MOVE.L TempRgn(A5),-(SP)
 _DisposRgn
 RTS

; ShowBitMap : Displays the BitMap on the screen
;
;on entry : D3,D4 top,left of screen destination
;   A4 = maskRgn or NIL
 
ShowBitMap
 BSR    LockBitMap ;lock it in memory
 LEA    TempRect(A5),A0 ;get ptr to dest rect
 MOVE D3,(A0)    ;copy top
 MOVE D4,2(A0)   ;copy left
 MOVE D3,D0
 MOVE D4,D1
 ADD    10(A3),D0;calculate bottom
 MOVE D0,4(A0)
 ADD    12(A3),D1;calculate right
 MOVE D1,6(A0)
 
 MOVE.L A3,-(SP) ;source BitMap
 PEA    thePort(A5);get GrafPtr
 _GetPort
 MOVE.L thePort(A5),A0
 PEA    2(A0)    ;dest BitMap (GrafPort)
 PEA    6(A3)    ;sourceRect
 PEA    TempRect(A5) ;destRect
 MOVE #0,-(SP)
 MOVE.L A4,-(SP)
 _CopyBits
 RTS
 
; BlackOut :  Matthias Jabs would be proud...

BlackOut:
 MOVE #8,-(SP) ;set the pattern mode to patCopy
 _PenMode
 MOVE #0,D3 ;init pattern counter
@1 LEA  PatList,A0 ;ptr to patterns
 MOVE D3,D0 ;copy pattern index
 MULU   #8,D0    ;offset to pattern
 ADDA   D0,A0
 MOVE.L A0,-(SP) ;point to pattern
 _PenPat
 PEA    Screen   ;the whole screen
 _PaintRect ;paint the rect
 
 CMP    #18,D3   ;are we done
 BEQ    @2;yes
 ADDQ #1,D3 ;decrement the pattern number
 BRA    @1;loop
@2 RTS  
 
;======== Program Variables ==================

SaveRegs: DS.L 2 ;For saving the SP etc..

thePort:DS.L1
TempRect: DS.W 4
RgnRect:DS.W4
TempRgn:DS.L1

EventRecord:DS.B 16;event record block
Event:  DS.W1  ;save event number
 
; ======Program Constants =================

BlackPat: DC.L $FFFFFFFF,$FFFFFFFF
White:  DC.L0,0
GrayPat:DC.B$55,$AA,$55,$AA,$55,$AA,$55,$AA

Screen: DC.W0,0,342,512


PatList:;Pattern data for fade routines...if you have
 ;to type this in,  you have my sympathy
DC.B 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0
DC.B $08,$00,$00,$00,$02 
DC.B $00,$00,$00,$08 
DC.B $00,$00,$00,$02 
DC.B $20,$00,$00,$08 
DC.B $00,$40,$00,$02 
DC.B $24,$00,$00,$08 
DC.B $00,$42,$00,$02 
DC.B $24,$80,$08,$88 
DC.B $00,$42,$00,$02 
DC.B $26,$80,$28,$A8 
DC.B $00,$42,$00,$82 
DC.B $26,$80,$28,$A8 
DC.B $00,$4E,$20,$82 
DC.B $A6,$80,$2E,$A9 
DC.B $01,$4E,$21,$82 
DC.B $A6,$C0,$2E,$A9 
DC.B $01,$5E,$21,$86 
DC.B $A6,$C0,$2E,$A9 
DC.B $23,$5E,$25,$C6 
DC.B $A6,$C0,$2E,$A9 
DC.B $23,$5E,$25,$C6 
DC.B $AE,$D1,$2E,$AD 
DC.B $23,$DF,$25,$D6 
DC.B $AE,$D1,$AE,$AD 
DC.B $23,$DF,$E5,$D6 
DC.B $AE,$D7,$AE,$FF 
DC.B $6F,$DF,$E5,$DF 
DC.B $AF,$F7,$BE,$FF 
DC.B $6F,$DF,$F5,$FF 
DC.B $AF,$F7,$BE,$FF 
DC.B $7F,$DF,$FD,$FF 
DC.B $EF,$FF,$FE,$FF 
DC.B $FF,$DF,$FD,$FF 
DC.B $FF,$FF,$FF,$FF 
DC.B $FF,$FF,$FF,$FF 
DC.B $FF,$FF,$FF,$FF

;  Thats it...



; This is how you get your BitMaps 
; in your resource fork

.Align 2
Resource  'GNRL' 128  'test BitMap'
INCLUDE SpinalTap.BMAP 
 
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jAlbum Pro 12.2 - Organize your digital...
jAlbum Pro has all the features you love in jAlbum, but comes with a commercial license. With jAlbum, you can create gorgeous custom photo galleries for the Web without writing a line of code!... Read more
jAlbum 12.2 - Create custom photo galler...
With jAlbum, you can create gorgeous custom photo galleries for the Web without writing a line of code! Beginner-friendly, with pro results Simply drag and drop photos into groups, choose a design... Read more
Quicken 2015 2.0.4 - Complete personal f...
Quicken 2015 helps you manage all your personal finances in one place, so you can see where you're spending and where you can save. Quicken automatically categorizes your financial transactions,... Read more
iMazing 1.0 - Complete iOS device manage...
iMazing (formerly DiskAid) is the ultimate iOS device manager with capabilities far beyond what iTunes offers. With iMazing and your iOS device (iPhone, iPad, or iPod), you can: Copy music to and... Read more
Xcode 6.0.1 - Integrated development env...
Apple Xcode is Apple Computer's integrated development environment (IDE) for OS X. The full Xcode package is free to ADC members and includes all the tools you need to create, debug, and optimize... Read more

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View Source – HTML, JavaScript and CSS...
View Source – HTML, JavaScript and CSS 1.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Utilities Price: $.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: View Source is an app plus an iOS 8 Safari extension that makes it easy to do one key web developer... | Read more »
Avenged Sevenfold’s Hail To The King: De...
Avenged Sevenfold’s Hail To The King: Deathbat is Coming to iOS on October 16th Posted by Jessica Fisher on September 19th, 2014 [ permalink ] Just in time for Halloween, on October 16 Avenged Sevenfold will be launching | Read more »
Talisman Has Gone Universal – Can Now be...
Talisman Has Gone Universal – Can Now be Played on the iPhone Posted by Jessica Fisher on September 19th, 2014 [ permalink ] | Read more »
Tap Army Review
Tap Army Review By Jennifer Allen on September 19th, 2014 Our Rating: :: SHOOT EM ALLUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad Mindless but fun, Tap Army is a lane-based shooter that should help you relieve some stress.   | Read more »
Monsters! Volcanoes! Loot! Epic Island f...
Monsters! Volcanoes! Loot! | Read more »
Plunder Pirates: Tips, Tricks, Strategie...
Ahoy There, Seadogs: Interested in knowing our thoughts on all this plundering and pirating? Check out our Plunder Pirates Review! Have you just downloaded the rather enjoyable pirate-em-up Plunder Pirates and are in need of some assistance? Never... | Read more »
Goat Simulator Review
Goat Simulator Review By Lee Hamlet on September 19th, 2014 Our Rating: :: THE GRUFFEST OF BILLY GOATSUniversal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad Unleash chaos as a grumpy goat in this humorous but short-lived casual game.   | Read more »
A New and Improved Wunderlist is Here fo...
A New and Improved Wunderlist is Here for iOS 8 Posted by Jessica Fisher on September 19th, 2014 [ permalink ] Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad | Read more »
Evernote Update for iOS 8 Adds Web Clipp...
Evernote Update for iOS 8 Adds Web Clipping, Quick Notes, and More Posted by Ellis Spice on September 19th, 2014 [ permalink ] | Read more »
Apple Names Ultimate Productivity Bundl...
Apple Names Ultimate Productivity Bundle by Readdle as the Essential Bundle on the App Store Posted by Jessica Fisher on September 19th, 2014 [ permalink | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

Updated Price Trackers
We’ve updated our Mac Price Trackers with the latest information on prices, bundles, and availability on systems from Apple’s authorized internet/catalog resellers: - 15″ MacBook Pros - 13″ MacBook... Read more
Mac Pros available for up to $260 off MSRP
Adorama has Mac Pros on sale for up to $260 off MSRP. Shipping is free, and Adorama charges sales tax in NY & NJ only: - 4-core Mac Pro: $2839.99, $160 off MSRP - 6-core Mac Pro: $3739.99, $260... Read more
13-inch 2.6GHz/256GB Retina MacBook Pros avai...
B&H Photo has the 13″ 2.6GHz/256GB Retina MacBook Pro on sale for $1379 including free shipping plus NY sales tax only. Their price is $120 off MSRP. Read more
Previous-generation 15-inch 2.0GHz Retina Mac...
B&H Photo has leftover previous-generation 15″ 2.0GHz Retina MacBook Pros now available for $1599 including free shipping plus NY sales tax only. Their price is $400 off original MSRP. B&H... Read more
21″ 2.7GHz iMac available for $1179, save $12...
Adorama has 21″ 2.7GHz Hawell iMacs on sale for $1179.99 including free shipping. Their price is $120 off MSRP. NY and NJ sales tax only. Read more
iOS 8 Adoption Rate Slower than iOS 7, 6, Hit...
Apple began pushing out iOS 8 updates to eligible devices around 1pm ET on September 17, 2014. However, unlike with iOS 7, which boasted a wide variety of differences from its predecessor iOS 6, in... Read more
LIkely Final Definitive OS X 10.9.5 Mavericks...
Apple has released what will almost certainly be the last incremental version number update of OS X 10.9 Mavericks (save for futire security updates) before OS X 10.10 Yosemite is released next month... Read more
Fingerprints, Apple Pay and Identity Theft Wa...
On Sep 9th, CEO Tim Cook unveiled Apple Pay, along with the new iPhone 6 and iWatch. Apple Pay is a newly developed technology that utilizes a near field communication (NFC) to enable customer... Read more
Amazon Introduces Two All-New Kindles
Amazon on Thursday introduced the 7th generation of its Kindle dedicated e-reader device: Kindle Voyage, its top-of-the-line e-reader, and the new $79 Kindle, with a 20% faster processor, twice the... Read more
Save up to $300 on the price of a new Mac wit...
Purchase a new Mac or iPad at The Apple Store for Education and take up to $300 off MSRP. All teachers, students, and staff of any educational institution qualify for the discount. Shipping is free,... Read more

Jobs Board

*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions (US) - A...
Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, you're also the Read more
Project Manager, *Apple* Financial Services...
**Job Summary** Apple Financial Services (AFS) offers consumers, businesses and educational institutions ways to finance Apple purchases. We work with national and Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions (US) - A...
Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, you're also the Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions (US) - A...
Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, you're also the Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions (US) - A...
Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, you're also the Read more
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