TweetFollow Us on Twitter

Try Pop-Up
Volume Number:1
Issue Number:13
Column Tag:C Workshop

Try Pop-Up Menus!

By Mike Schuster, Consulair Corp.

What's a Pop-Up Menu?

The Macintosh™ user interface provides a repertoire of graphic objects that perform functions when pressed with the mouse. Pressing a scroll bar's arrow moves the document under the window. Selecting a tool from a palette determines the type of object to be drawn. Pressing on a menu title presents a list of choosable actions and attributes. A feature missing from this repertoire is the ability to associate a menu with an arbitrary graphic object on the screen. A pop-up menu provides just this capability.

Here's how it works: When you press on a object with an associated pop-up menu (the little menu icon above), the menu instantly "pops-up" right on top of the object and under the pointer. While holding down the mouse button, you move the pointer down the menu. As pointer moves to each item, the item is highlighted. The item that's highlighted when you release the mouse button is choosen. As soon as the button is released, the command blinks briefly, the menu disappears, and the command is executed, just like a pull-down menu.

A pop-up menu shares many of the advantages of a pull-down menu: It's invisible until you want to see it, yet at the same time it's easy to see and choose items from. Until you choose an item, nothing happens, so you can look at a pop-up without making a commitment to do anything.

The advantage of a pop-up is that it directly associates actions and attributes with an object on the screen. Its biggest disadvantage is that there may be no indication that a given object has an associated menu, until you happen to press on it. This disadvantage could lead to less transparent and less consistent applications, especially if the application's standard menus were replaced with pop-ups. Don't do that! I find them most useful in dialog boxes and desk accessories.

One final issue. When the user presses on an object with a pop-up menu, it might be desirable to highlight the object and have the menu pop-up just below the object, in a manner similar to pull-down menus. I'd call such a scheme a "pop-down" menu, and leave its implementation as an exercise.

Designing a Pop-Up

To make pop-up menus easy to use, I wanted to minimize the number of additional routines an application or desk accessory must call. Also, I wanted to apply all of the existing resource editing and compiling tools to construction and modification of the resource file description of a pop-up. Finally, to minimize my programming effort, I wanted to use as much of the Menu Manager's built in machinery as possible. With these goals in mind, I decided to use the standard menu record and the standard menu definition procedure without modification.

My efforts resulted in the single routine PopUpSelect. Its interface is almost identical to the Menu Manager routine MenuSelect:

 typedef short int16;
 typedef long int32;
 int32 PopUpSelect(theMenu, hitPt)
 MenuHandle theMenu;
 Point * hitPt;

Here's how you use it: When your application receives a mouse-down event in an object that has an associated pop-up, your application should call the PopUpSelect, supplying it with a handle to the pop-up menu and the point where the mouse button was pressed. PopUpSelect will pop-up the menu, track the mouse and highlight menu items until the user releases the mouse button. PopUpSelect returns a 32 bit integer in a manner identical to MenuSelect. The high-order 16 bits contains the menu ID of the pop-up menu, the low-order 16 bits contains the menu item number of the item that was choosen. If no item was choosen, the value returned is 0. (I use int16 and int32 to avoid the ambiguity inherent in the sizes of C's short, int, and long types. Also, I pass points by address rather than by value, in deference to Inside Mac.)

Before PopUpSelect can be called, the pop-up menu itself must be set up. Since a pop-up has the same structure as a pull-down menu, you do this by reading the menu from a resource file using GetMenu, or allocate it with NewMenu and filling it with items using AppendMenu, AddResMenu or InsertResMenu. The only difference in usage between pull-down and pop-up menus is that pull-downs are added to the menu bar using InsertMenu, and pop-ups are passed to PopUpSelect whenever the appropriate mouse-down events occur.

One thing to note: Don't bother defining a command key equivalent to an item in a pop-up. Since the pop-up is not in the menu bar, the Menu Manager routine MenuKey won't be able to find it. You could add all of your pop-ups to the menu bar just before the MenuKey call, and remove them just after, but don't do this! There's no need for these items to have command equivalents.

Making It Work

PopUpSelect is built up from the following sequence of operations:

- determine where to draw the pop-up

- save the part of the screen under the pop-up

- draw the pop-up

- track the mouse until the mouse button is released

- blink the selected item, if any

- erase the pop-up and restore the screen

- return the appropriate result

The first task, that of determining where to draw the pop-up, is based on the size of the menu and the location where the mouse was pressed. The size of the menu is defined by the fields menuWidth and menuHeight in the menu record (whose definition is shown below), which specify the horizontal and vertical dimensions of the menu, in pixels. The Menu Manager determines these values when the menu is allocated and filled with items.

 typedef struct
 {
 int16 menuID;
 int16 menuWidth;
 int16 menuHeight;
 Handle menuProc;
 int32 enableFlags;
 Str255 menuData;
 } MenuInfo, *MenuPtr, **MenuHandle;

The standard menu definition procedure draws the menu's items inside a rectangle of these dimensions. The black border and shadow of the standard pull-down menu appear immediately outside that rectangle.

I decided that the rectangle should be positioned so that the location where the mouse was pressed is just inside of the top-right corner of the menu. The pop-up hangs generally downward and to the left of the pointer. The only constraint on this positioning is that the menu must be completely visible in the desktop portion of the screen. Thus, the rectangle must be shifted in the appropriate direction if the mouse location is near the menu bar or an edge of the screen.

The technique I used to determine the coordinates of the menu rectangle can best be explained with the aid of a diagram. The point labeled S is the top-left corner of the screen. The point labeled M is the location where the mouse was pressed (defined by the hitPt argument). The rounded corner rectangle represents the screen. The thick bordered rectangle containing M represents the boundary of the pop-up.

Notice that top-left corner of the menu rectangle is displaced POINTERH pixels horizontally and POINTERV pixels vertically from M. These values incorporate my decision to have the menu appear generally to the left and downward from the pointer. They are constants in the implementation, and hence are easy to change.

The top of the menu rectangle is displaced 20 pixels downward from the local origin, labeled 0,0 in the diagram. By defining a local origin in this manner, the standard menu definition procedure is tricked into thinking that it is drawing the menu just below the menu bar. That is, the top coordinate of the menu rectangle in the local system is 20, the height of the standard menu bar. Given these values, you should be able to find that the horizontal coordinate of S is -(hitPt.h - POINTERH) and its vertical coordinate is -(hitPt.v - POINTERV - 20).

The final constraint on the local location of S is that the menu must be completely visible in the desktop portion of the screen. This constrains the horizontal coordinate of S to be less than or equal to 0 (otherwise the left side of the menu would be off-screen) and greater than or equal to the width of the menu minus the width of the screen (otherwise the right side would be off-screen). A similar situation holds vertically. All of these computations (plus an allowance for the menu's frame and shadow) are incorporated in the arguments of a Quickdraw SetOrigin call, which sets up the desired local origin.

One final item to note: SetOrigin translates the coordinates of the current port's portBits.bounds, portRect, and visRgn to the new coordinate system, but not its clipRgn. Hence, a call to ClipRect with the translated portRect as an argument is appropriate after the SetOrigin call.

PopUpSelect accomplishes the task of saving the part of the screen under the pop-up by copying that part to an off-screen bitmap using the Quickdraw routine CopyBits. The off-screen bitmap is allocated with a NewHandle call. The width of the menu rectangle (plus the width of the frame and shadow) determines the value of its rowBytes field (appropriate rounded up to a multiple of 2 bytes, since rowBytes must be even). The height of the menu rectangle (plus the height of the frame and shadow) determines the number of rows in the bitmap. These two values multiplied together, plus the size of a bitmap structure, determine the number of bytes to allocate. The bitmap structure itself is build in the first few bytes of the allocated area. The baseAddr field of the bitmap points to the byte immediately following the end of the bitmap structure.

The next task, that of drawing the menu, is performed by calling the standard menu definition procedure whose handle is contained in the menuProc field of the menu record. A menu definition procedure has the following interface:

 #define mDrawMsg 0
 #define mChooseMsg 1
 #define mSizeMsg 2

 MenuDefProc(message, theMenu, menuRect,
 hitPt, whichItem)
 int16 message;
 MenuHandle theMenu;
 Rect *menuRect;
 Point *hitPt;
 int16 *whichItem;

Passing the message mDrawMsg to the menu definition procedure causes it to draw the menu inside the rectangle menuRect. The Window Manager port should be the current port when this message is sent. I set the port's clipRgn equal to menuRect, just to be safe.

The task of tracking the mouse is accomplished by passing the message mChooseMsg to the menu definition procedure. When the procedure receives mChooseMsg, its hitPt parameter is the current mouse location, and its whichItem parameter is the item number of the last item that was choosen from the menu. If the location is in an enabled menu item, the procedure unhighlights whichItem and highlights the newly choosen item (unless the new item is the same as the whichItem), and returns the item number of the new item in whichItem. If the location isn't in an enabled item (or isn't inside menuRect), the procedure unhighlights whichItem and returns 0. The following fragment of code shows how this works:

 whichItem = 0;
 SetPt(hitPt, 0, 0);
 do
 {
 MenuDefProc(mChooseMsg, theMenu, 
 &menuRect, hitPt, &whichItem);
 GetMouse(hitPt);
 }
 while (WaitMouseUp());

WhichItem and hitPt are both initialized to 0 since the local coordinate system has changed, invalidating the original value of hitPt. This initialization is consistent since the local origin is outside menuRect. GetMouse returns the mouse location in the local coordinate system of the current port, which is just what we want. Finally, WaitMouseUp is called rather than StillDown so that the pending mouse-up event is removed, to avoid confusing the application (MenuSelect does this too).

If the final value of whichItem is not zero, then PopUpSelect interrogates the menu blink value in the system parameter ram area and sends the menu definition procedure the mChooseMsg message an appropriate number of times to blink the selected item. The hitPt argument is alternately modified so that the item blinks.

The task of restoring the screen after the mouse-up occurs is easily accomplished with CopyBits. The off-screen bitmap is deallocated after CopyBits completes. The original coordinate system is also restored with a second SetOrigin call.

Finally, PopUpSelect returns the appropriate result based on the menu's menuID field and the final value of whichItem.

An Implementation

The remainder of the article contains the implementation of PopUpSelect and a sample program showing how to use it. The sample draws the caution alert icon on the screen and pops-up a short menu whenever the icon is pressed. The sources are set up to use the Consulair C compiler and header files, version 4.01. [Note that a complete Megamax version is supplied along with this Consulair version on the source code disk, courtesy of the author. -Ed.]


/*
 * Pop-Up Menu Selection
 * by Mike Schuster
 *
 * function PopUpSelect(theMenu: MenuHandle, hitPt: Point): Longint
 *
 * with hitPt equal to the point (in global coordinates) where the mouse
 * button was pressed, PopUpSelect will pop up theMenu and retain control
 * by tracking the mouse and highlighting menu items until the mouse 
button
 * is released.  PopUpSelect returns a 32-bit integer in a manner identical
 * to the Menu Manager routine MenuSelect.
 *
 * October 16, 1985: Version 1.0
 */

#include "memory.h"
#include "resource.h"
#include "quickdraw.h"
#include "menu.h"
#include "osmisc.h"

#define GETSYSPPTR ((SysPPtr) 0x1F8)

typedef short int16;
typedef long int32;

#define mDrawMsg 0
#define mChooseMsg 1
#define mSizeMsg 2

#define POINTERH (*theMenu)->menuWidth - 4   /* width offset from hitPt 
*/
#define POINTERV 8 /* height offset from hitPt */

#define MENUV 20 /* height of menu bar */

#define FRAMEH 2 /* width of menu frame */
#define FRAMEV 2 /* height of menu frame */

#define DELAY 2L /* blink delay */

/* pin integer i between lower and upper bounds l and u */
static pin(i, l, u)
 int16 i;
 int16 l;
 int16 u;
 {
 if (i < l)
 return l;
 else if (i > u)
 return u;
 else
 return i;
 }

/* invoke the standard menu definition procedure */
static MenuDefProc(message, theMenu, menuRect, hitPt, whichItem)
 int16 message;
 MenuHandle theMenu;
 Rect *menuRect;
 Point *hitPt;
 int16 *whichItem;
 {
 #asm
 move.w message,-(A7); push first parameter
 move.l theMenu,-(A7)
 move.l menuRect,-(A7)
 move.l hitPt,A0
 move.l (A0),-(A7)
 move.l whichItem,-(A7)   ; push last parameter
 move.l theMenu,A0 ; get menu handle
 move.l (A0),A0  ; get menu pointer
 move.l 6(A0),A0 ; get menu proc handle
 move.l (A0),A0  ; get menu proc pointer
 jsr    (A0); dive in
 #endasm
 }

/* popup menu selection routine */
int32 PopUpSelect (theMenu, hitPt)
 MenuHandle theMenu;
 Point *hitPt;
 {
 GrafPtr port;   /* current graf port */
 GrafPtr wMgrPort; /* window manager port */
 BitMap **theMenuBits;    /* handle to BitMap to save screen in */
 BitMap *menuBits; /* pointer to "" */
 int16 rowBytes; /* rowBytes of "" */
 int16 rows;/* rows of "" */
 Rect menuRect;  /* menu rectangle, in local coordinates*/

 int16 whichItem;/* selected item */
 int16 blink;    /* blink count */
 int32 nilPt;    /* nil point for blink */

 /* return if mouse is not down */
 if (!WaitMouseUp())
 return 0L;

 /* determine the menu rectangle, in local coordinates */
 SetRect(&menuRect, 
 0, MENUV, (*theMenu)->menuWidth, MENUV + (*theMenu)->menuHeight);

 /* inset the menu rectangle to include the frame and shadow */
 InsetRect(&menuRect, -FRAMEH, -FRAMEV);

 /* allocate the bitmap to save screen in */
 rowBytes = ((menuRect.right - menuRect.left + 15) >> 4) << 1;
 rows = menuRect.bottom - menuRect.top;
 theMenuBits = (BitMap **) 
 NewHandle(rowBytes * rows + (int32) sizeof(BitMap));

 /* return if no space */
 if (!theMenuBits)
 return 0L;

 /* lock down the bitmap */
 HLock(theMenuBits);
 menuBits = *theMenuBits;

 /* initialize the BitMap */
 menuBits->baseAddr = (char *) (menuBits + 1);
 menuBits->rowBytes = rowBytes;
 menuBits->bounds = menuRect;

 /* save the current graf port, use the window manager port */
 GetPort(&port);
 GetWMgrPort(&wMgrPort);
 SetPort(wMgrPort);

 /* set origin so that menu definition procedure draws menu under hitPt 
*/
 /* pin so that whole menu is visible */
 SetOrigin
 (pin(POINTERH - hitPt->h, 
 (*theMenu)->menuWidth - wMgrPort->portRect.right + 
 FRAMEH, 1 - FRAMEH), 
  pin(MENUV + POINTERV - hitPt->v, 
   MENUV + (*theMenu)->menuHeight - wMgrPort->portRect.bottom + 
 FRAMEV, 1 - FRAMEV));

 /* clip to save the screen */
 ClipRect(&wMgrPort->portRect);

 /* save the screen */
 CopyBits(&wMgrPort->portBits, menuBits, 
 &menuBits->bounds, &menuBits->bounds, 0, 0L);

 /* erase and frame the menu rectangle */
 InsetRect(&menuRect, FRAMEH, FRAMEV);
 EraseRect(&menuRect);
 InsetRect(&menuRect, -1, -1);
 FrameRect(&menuRect);
 InsetRect(&menuRect, 1, 1);

 /* add shadow */
 PenNormal();
 MoveTo(menuRect.left + 1, menuRect.bottom + 1);
 Line((*theMenu)->menuWidth, 0);
 Line(0, - (*theMenu)->menuHeight);

 /* clip for the standard menu definition procedure */
 ClipRect(&menuRect);

 /* prepare to call the standard menu definition procedure */
 LoadResource((*theMenu)->menuProc);
 HLock((*theMenu)->menuProc);

 /* draw the menu */
 whichItem = 0;
 SetPt(hitPt, 0, 0);
 MenuDefProc(mDrawMsg, theMenu, &menuRect, hitPt, &whichItem);

 /* track the mouse until the button is released */
 do
 {
 MenuDefProc(mChooseMsg, theMenu, &menuRect, hitPt, &whichItem);
 GetMouse(hitPt);
 }
 while (WaitMouseUp());

 /* blink the item */
 if (whichItem)
 {
 for (blink = GETSYSPPTR->Misc >> 2 & 0x3; blink; blink--)
 {
 nilPt = 0L;
 MenuDefProc(mChooseMsg, theMenu, &menuRect, &nilPt,&whichItem);
 nilPt = Delay(DELAY);    /* Inside Mac and Consulair C differ here */
 menudefproc(mChooseMsg, theMenu, &menuRect, hitPt, &whichItem);
 nilPt = Delay(DELAY);    /* Inside Mac and Consulair C differ here */
 }
 }

 /* done calling the standard menu definition procedure */
 HUnlock((*theMenu)->menuProc);

 /* clip to restore screen */
 ClipRect(&wMgrPort->portRect);

 /* restore the screen and clean up */
 CopyBits(menuBits, &wMgrPort->portBits, 
 &menuBits->bounds, &menuBits->bounds, 0, 0L);
 HUnlock(theMenuBits);
 DisposHandle(theMenuBits);

 /* restore the window manager port origin and the current graf port 
*/
 SetOrigin(0, 0);
 ClipRect(&wMgrPort->portRect);
 SetPort(port);

 /* return the standard result */
 return whichItem ? ((int32) (*theMenu)->menuID << 16) + whichItem : 
0L;
 }

/*
 * Pop-up Menu Example
 */

#include "quickdraw.h"
#include "menu.h"
#include "events.h"

extern long PopUpSelect();

main()
 {
 MenuHandle menu;
 EventRecord event;
 GrafPtr port;
 Rect box;

 /* initialize the managers */
 /* InitGraf(&thePort); *//* Consulair does this for us */
 /* InitFonts(); */
 /* InitWindows(); */
 InitMenus();
 TEInit();
 InitDialogs(0L);
 InitCursor();

 /* draw the icon */
 GetWMgrPort(&port);
 SetPort(port);
 ClipRect(&port->portRect);
 SetRect(&box, 32, 32, 64, 64);
 PlotIcon(&box, GetIcon(0));

 /* initialize the popup menu */
 menu = NewMenu(1, "");
 AppendMenu(menu, "\pBeep;(-;Quit"); /* \p for pascal string */

 /* handle mouse down events */
 while (1)
 {
 GetNextEvent(everyEvent, &event);
 if (event.what == mouseDown)
 if (PtInRect(&event.where, &box))
 switch (LoWord(PopUpSelect(menu, &event.where)))
 {
 case 1:
 SysBeep(4);
 break;
 case 3:
 ExitToShell();
 break;
 }
 }
 }

 

Community Search:
MacTech Search:

Software Updates via MacUpdate

Capto 1.2.9 - $29.99
Capto (was Voila) is an easy-to-use app that takes capturing, recording, video and image editing to the next level. With an intelligent file manager and quick sharing options, Capto is perfect for... Read more
Opera 51.0.2830.40 - High-performance We...
Opera is a fast and secure browser trusted by millions of users. With the intuitive interface, Speed Dial and visual bookmarks for organizing favorite sites, news feature with fresh, relevant content... Read more
GarageSale 7.0.13 - Create outstanding e...
GarageSale is a slick, full-featured client application for the eBay online auction system. Create and manage your auctions with ease. With GarageSale, you can create, edit, track, and manage... Read more
1Password 6.8.7 - Powerful password mana...
1Password is a password manager that uniquely brings you both security and convenience. It is the only program that provides anti-phishing protection and goes beyond password management by adding Web... Read more
Evernote 7.0.1 - Create searchable notes...
Evernote allows you to easily capture information in any environment using whatever device or platform you find most convenient, and makes this information accessible and searchable at anytime, from... Read more
MacUpdate Desktop 6.2.0 - $20.00
MacUpdate Desktop brings seamless 1-click app installs and version updates to your Mac. With a free MacUpdate account and MacUpdate Desktop 6, Mac users can now install almost any Mac app on... Read more
HoudahSpot 4.3.5 - Advanced file-search...
HoudahSpot is a versatile desktop search tool. Use HoudahSpot to locate hard-to-find files and keep frequently used files within reach. HoudahSpot will immediately feel familiar. It works just the... Read more
EtreCheck 4.0.4 - For troubleshooting yo...
EtreCheck is an app that displays the important details of your system configuration and allow you to copy that information to the Clipboard. It is meant to be used with Apple Support Communities to... Read more
WhatsApp 0.2.8361 - Desktop client for W...
WhatsApp is the desktop client for WhatsApp Messenger, a cross-platform mobile messaging app which allows you to exchange messages without having to pay for SMS. WhatsApp Messenger is available for... Read more
iClock 4.2 - Customize your menubar cloc...
iClock is a menu-bar replacement for Apple's default clock but with 100x features. Have your Apple or Google calendar in the menubar. Have the day, date, and time in different fonts and colors in the... Read more

Latest Forum Discussions

See All

The best games like Florence
Florence is a great little game about relationships that we absolutely adored. The only problem with it is it's over a little too soon. If you want some other games with some emotional range like Florence, check out these suggestions: [Read more] | Read more »
Angry Birds Champions adds cash prizes t...
Collaborating with developer Rovio Entertainment, GSN Games has released a twist on the Angry Birds formula. Angry Birds Champions features the same bird-flinging gameplay, but now you can catapult Red and co for cash. | Read more »
Around the Empire: What have you missed...
148Apps is part of a family. A big family of sites that make sure you're always up to date with all the portable gaming news. Just like a real family, I guess. I don't know, my mum never told me anything about Candy Crush to be fair. [Read more] | Read more »
The Battle of Polytopia Guide - Tips for...
The addition of multiplayer to The Battle of Polytopia has catapulted the game from a fun enough time waster to a fully-fledged 4X experience on your phone. We've been playing quite a few matches over the past week or so, and we've put together a... | Read more »
All the best games on sale for iPhone an...
Hi there, and welcome to our round up of all the best games that are on sale for iOS at the moment. It's not a vintage week in terms of numbers, but I'm pretty sure that every single one of these is worth picking up if you haven't already played... | Read more »
Disc Drivin' 2 Guide - Tips for the...
We're all still playing quite a bit of Disc Drivin' 2 over here at 148Apps, and we've gotten pretty good at it. Now that we've spent some more time with the game and unlocked more powerups, check out some of these more advanced tips: | Read more »
Alto's Odyssey Guide - How to Tackl...
Alto’s Odyssey is a completely stunning and serene runner, but it can also be a bit tricky. Check out these to try and keep your cool while playing this endless runner: Don’t focus too much on tasks [Read more] | Read more »
Here's everything you need to know...
Alto's Odyssey is a really, really good game. If you don't believe me, you should definitely check out our review by clicking this link right here. It takes the ideas from the original Alto's Adventure, then subtly builds on them, creating... | Read more »
Alto's Odyssey (Games)
Alto's Odyssey 1.0.1 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $4.99, Version: 1.0.1 (iTunes) Description: Just beyond the horizon sits a majestic desert, vast and unexplored. Join Alto and his friends and set off on an endless... | Read more »
Vainglory 5v5: Everything you need to kn...
Vainglory just got bigger. [Read more] | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

Apple AirPods in stock today for $159, free s...
Adorama reports stock of Apple AirPods today for $159 including free shipping, plus pay no sales tax outside of NY & NJ. See our Apple AirPod Price Tracker for the latest prices and stock status... Read more
Saturday Sale: Amazon offers 12″ 1.3GHz MacBo...
Amazon has Silver and Gold 2017 12″ 1.3GHz Retina MacBooks on sale for $250 off MSRP. Shipping is free: – 12″ 1.3GHz Silver MacBook: $1349.99 $250 off MSRP – 12″ 1.3GHz Gold MacBook: $1349.99 $250... Read more
Use your Apple Education discount and save up...
Purchase a new Mac using Apple’s Education discount, and take up to $400 off MSRP. All teachers, students, and staff of any educational institution with a .edu email address qualify for the discount... Read more
Apple Canada offers 2017 21″ and 27″ iMacs fo...
 Canadian shoppers can save up to $470 on the purchase of a 2017 current-generation 21″ or 27″ iMac with Certified Refurbished models at Apple Canada. Apple’s refurbished prices are the lowest... Read more
9″ iPads available online at Walmart for $50...
Walmart has 9.7″ Apple iPads on sale for $50 off MSRP for a limited time. Sale prices are for online orders only, in-store prices may vary: – 9″ 32GB iPad: $279.99 $50 off – 9″ 128GB iPad: $379.99 $... Read more
15″ Apple MacBook Pros, Certified Refurbished...
Save $360-$420 on the purchase of a 2017 15″ MacBook Pro with Certified Refurbished models at Apple. Apple’s refurbished prices are the lowest available for each model from any reseller. An standard... Read more
Amazon restocks MacBook Pros with models avai...
Amazon has restocked 15″ and 13″ Apple MacBook Pros with models on sale for up to $251 off MSRP. Shipping is free. Note that stock of some Macs may come and go (and some sell out quickly), so check... Read more
Lowest price of the year: 15″ 2.8GHz Apple Ma...
Amazon has the 2017 Space Gray 15″ 2.8GHz MacBook Pro on sale today for $251 off MSRP. Shipping is free: – 15″ 2.8GHz Touch Bar MacBook Pro Space Gray (MPTR2LL/A): $2148, $251 off MSRP Their price is... Read more
Apple restocks full line of Certified Refurbi...
Apple has restocked a full line of Apple Certified Refurbished 2017 13″ MacBook Pros for $200-$300 off MSRP. A standard Apple one-year warranty is included with each MacBook, and shipping is free.... Read more
Lowest sale price available for 13″ 1.8GHz Ma...
Focus Camera has the 2017 13″ 1.8GHz/128GB Apple MacBook Air on sale today for $829 including free shipping. Their price is $170 off MSRP, and it’s the lowest price available for a current 13″... Read more

Jobs Board

*Apple* Media Products Commerce Engineering...
# Apple Media Products Commerce Engineering Manager Job Number: 56207285 Santa Clara Valley, California, United States Posted: 26-Jan-2018 Weekly Hours: 40.00 **Job Read more
Digital Platforms Lead, Today at *Apple* -...
# Digital Platforms Lead, Today at Apple Job Number: 56178747 Santa Clara Valley, California, United States Posted: 23-Feb-2018 Weekly Hours: 40.00 **Job Summary** Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions - Apple,...
Job Description:SalesSpecialist - Retail Customer Service and SalesTransform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions - Apple,...
Job Description: Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions - Apple,...
Job Description:SalesSpecialist - Retail Customer Service and SalesTransform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, Read more
All contents are Copyright 1984-2011 by Xplain Corporation. All rights reserved. Theme designed by Icreon.