TweetFollow Us on Twitter

September 96 - Adding Speech Recognition to an Application Framework

Adding Speech Recognition to an Application Framework

Tim Monroe

It's easy to add speech recognition capabilities to an application built with an object-oriented framework, with minimal disruption to your existing code. To illustrate the process, this article shows one way to add basic speech recognition capabilities to an application built with PowerPlant, Metrowerks' popular C++-based application framework. You can use the same strategy with other application frameworks as well.

Speech recognition capabilities, such as those provided by Apple's Speech Recognition Manager, promise to revolutionize the way people use computers. The reason for this is simple: it's often a lot easier to say what you want done than to actually do it, even in the "user-friendly" environment provided by the Macintosh graphical user interface. So the time you spend making your application speakable is time very well spent. Happily, if you've built your application with a framework such as PowerPlant or MacApp, you can add basic speech recognition capabilities quickly and easily.

To show how to add speech recognition to an application built with a framework, we'll modify the PowerPlant DocDemo sample provided with the CodeWarrior 8 release to add speech support for the File menu commands. Of course, there's nothing special about DocDemo: you should be able to drop the code we provide into any PowerPlant application. Moreover, although this code is specific to PowerPlant, you should be able to use similar techniques with other application frameworks as well.

Before reading this article, you should be familiar with the basic operations of the Speech Recognition Manager and with the PowerPlant application framework. For an overview of the Speech Recognition Manager, see the article "The Speech Recognition Manager Revealed" in this issue of develop. As mentioned in that article, you'll find everything you need to use the Speech Recognition Manager -- including detailed documentation (written by yours truly) -- on this issue's CD and on Apple's speech technology Web site. For basic information about PowerPlant, see The PowerPlant Book or other Metrowerks documentation.

THE BASIC STRATEGY

We want to add speech support for the File menu commands in the DocDemo application. This isn't the highest or best use of speech recognition capabilities (see "Speakable Menus?"), but it makes a simple example for us to focus on. In a nutshell, we'll define a custom C++ class and create a single instance of that class to handle all the required speech recognition processing (such as installing a language model and responding to recognition results sent to it via Apple events). Here are the steps we'll follow:
  • Add a few lines of code to the main application source code file, CDocDemoApp.cp. In part, this code creates a single instance of our

  • custom class CDocSpeech.

  • Design a set of language models that describe the words and phrases we

  • want to listen for.

  • Add resources containing string representations of those words and

  • phrases to the application's resource file.

  • Write Apple event handlers for the two speech recognition events.
The following sections explain these steps in detail, though not strictly in this order. All the code provided here is also included on this issue's CD.


    SPEAKABLE MENUS?

    While it's fairly easy to make your application's menus speakable, this isn't necessarily the best use of speech recognition technology and it's definitely not what Apple's speech engineers would like to see you focus your attention on. Most File and Edit menu commands are just too short to be easily distinguished by the recognizer ("quit" sounds a lot like "cut," for example).

    In addition, since menus can't be seen without pulling them down, novice users probably won't know which menu commands are available until they click in the menu bar; at that point, they may as well just use the menu.

    However, there is some value in knowing how to make menus speakable. For one thing, the techniques used in this article can easily be extended to handle more complex utterances that have nothing to do with menus. Also, there is real value in making tool palettes -- which are really just graphical menus that happen to float on the desktop -- speakable; for an example, see the demo program PlacMac on this issue's CD.

    So the moral is: make your menus speakable if you think there is value for the user, but don't just make your menus speakable. Do something creative and compelling with speech recognition.


HOOKING UP WITH THE MAIN APPLICATION

All the speech recognition processing for our PowerPlant-based application will be handled by a single custom object of type CDocSpeech. The main application code needs only to create (and later delete) that custom object. We'll start by adding

these lines of code to the beginning of the main application source code file, CDocDemoApp.cp:

#include "CDocSpeech.h"
extern CDocSpeech     *gDocSpeechObj;
Boolean               gHasSpeechRecog;
The external reference is to an instance of the CDocSpeech class, and the Boolean global variable indicates whether the Speech Recognition Manager is available in the current operating environment. To set that variable and create our custom object, we add the code in Listing 1 to the constructor CDocDemoApp::CDocDemoApp.



Listing 1. Creating a custom speech recognition object
// Determine whether the Speech Recognition Manager is available;
// if it's available, create a custom speech recognition object.
long      theVersion;
OSErr      theErr;

gHasSpeechRecog = false;
theErr = ::Gestalt(gestaltSpeechRecognitionVersion, &theVersion);
// Version must be at least 1.5.0 to support API used here.
if (!theErr)
   if (theVersion >= 0x00000150) {
      gHasSpeechRecog = true;
      gDocSpeechObj = new CDocSpeech();
   }
We'll also need to delete gDocSpeechObj when our application quits. We do this by adding the following code to the destructor CDocDemoApp::~CDocDemoApp:
// Shut down speech recognition, if it's running.
if (gHasSpeechRecog)
   delete gDocSpeechObj;

Those are all the modifications we need to make to our existing source code! The rest of the speech processing is handled by the custom speech recognition object created by our main application code.

DEFINING A SPEECH RECOGNITION CLASS

The header file CDocSpeech.h, shown in Listing 2, defines a number of constants specifying the 'STR#' resources (and indices within those resources) that contain the names of the language models we want to create and the actual words or phrases we want to listen for. We'll use these constants later, when we create the various language models.



Listing 2. Specifying 'STR#' resources and declaring CDocSpeech
#include "SpeechRecognition.h"

// Language model names
const ResIDT   rSTR_LMNames      = 400;   // ID of STR# resource
const short    kStr_GApplLM      = 1;     // Indices within resource
const short    kStr_GUnivLM      = 2;
const short    kStr_GDocuLM      = 3;
const short    kStr_UFileLM      = 4;
const short    kStr_DFileLM      = 5;

// Universal file command phrases
const ResIDT   kSTR_UFileCmds      = 500;  // ID of STR# resource
const short      kStr_New          = 1;    // Indices within resource
const short      kStr_Open         = 2;
const short      kStr_PageSetup    = 3;
const short      kStr_Quit         = 4;
// Document file command phrases
const ResIDT   kSTR_DFileCmds      = 501;  // ID of STR# resource
const short      kStr_Close        = 1;    // Indices within resource
const short      kStr_Save         = 2;
const short      kStr_SaveAs       = 3;
const short      kStr_Revert       = 4;
const short      kStr_Print        = 5;
const short      kStr_PrintOne     = 6;

// Apple menu command phrases
const ResIDT   kSTR_UApplCmds      = 503;  // ID of STR# resource
const short      kStr_About        = 1;    // Indices within resource

#define kEnableObj               true
#define kDisableObj              false

class CDocSpeech {
public:
                         CDocSpeech();
   virtual               ~CDocSpeech();
   static pascal OSErr   HandleSpeechBegunAppleEvent (AppleEvent 
                           *theAEevt, AppleEvent *reply, long refcon);
   static pascal OSErr   HandleSpeechDoneAppleEvent (AppleEvent
                           *theAEevt, AppleEvent *reply, long refcon);
private:
   OSErr                  MakeLanguageModels (void);
};


CDocSpeech.h also contains the declaration of the custom CDocSpeech class. CDocSpeech is extremely simple: it contains a constructor, a destructor, and two Apple event handlers. It also defines a private method, MakeLanguageModels, that creates the language models used by DocDemo. MakeLanguageModels is called by the constructor when an instance of the CDocSpeech class is created.

All the remaining code is found in the file CDocSpeech.cp. Listing 3 shows the beginning of that file, which declares all the global variables and function prototypes.



Listing 3. Declaring global variables and function prototypes
#include "CDocSpeech.h"

// Global variables
SRRecognitionSystem     gSystem;
SRRecognizer            gRecognizer;
SRLanguageModel         gGApplLM, gGDocuLM;
SRPhrase                gRevert;
CDocSpeech              *gDocSpeechObj = nil;

// Function prototypes
void SetLanguageObjectState (SRLanguageObject inObj, Boolean isEnabled);


The constructor method, shown in Listing 4, performs all the necessary startup associated with speech recognition. Much of this code should already be familiar to you from the article "The Speech Recognition Manager Revealed."



Listing 4. Starting up speech recognition
CDocSpeech::CDocSpeech()
{
   OSErr      theErr = noErr;
   
   // Open a recognition system.
   theErr = ::SROpenRecognitionSystem
                 (&gSystem, kSRDefaultRecognitionSystemID);
   
   // Set recognition system properties to user-selected feedback and
   // listening modes.
   if (!theErr) {
      short theModes = kSRHasFeedbackHasListenModes;
      theErr = ::SRSetProperty(gSystem, kSRFeedbackAndListeningModes,
                     &theModes, sizeof(theModes));
   }

   // Create a recognizer with default speech source.
   if (!theErr)
      theErr = ::SRNewRecognizer(gSystem, &gRecognizer,
                     kSRDefaultSpeechSource);

   // Set recognizer properties. We want to receive notifications
   // when recognition begins and ends.
   if (!theErr) {
      unsigned long theParam =
          kSRNotifyRecognitionBeginning | kSRNotifyRecognitionDone;
      theErr = ::SRSetProperty(gRecognizer, kSRNotificationParam,
                     &theParam, sizeof(theParam));
   }

   // Install Apple event handlers.
   if (!theErr) {
      theErr = ::AEInstallEventHandler
                  (kAESpeechSuite, kAESpeechDetected, 
                  NewAEEventHandlerProc(HandleSpeechBegunAppleEvent),
                  0, false);
      theErr = ::AEInstallEventHandler(kAESpeechSuite, kAESpeechDone, 
                  NewAEEventHandlerProc(HandleSpeechDoneAppleEvent),
                  0, false);
   }
   
   // Make our language models.
   if (!theErr)
      theErr = MakeLanguageModels();
   // Install initial language model and release our reference to it.
   if (!theErr) {
      theErr = ::SRSetLanguageModel(gRecognizer, gGApplLM);
      ::SRReleaseObject(gGApplLM);
   }

   // Have the recognizer start processing sound.
   if (!theErr)
      theErr = ::SRStartListening(gRecognizer);
}


Now we just need to write the MakeLanguageModels function called by the CDocSpeech constructor, and the two Apple event handlers.

CONSTRUCTING THE LANGUAGE MODELS

Probably the most time-consuming part of adding speech recognition to an application is defining the language models that describe the words and phrases you want to listen for. The process is straightforward, but it requires careful attention to the various states your application can be in. This is because you want the active language model to include only utterances that make sense at any given time. For instance, if no document window is open, it makes no sense to listen for the Close or Save command. Similarly, if a document isn't dirty (that is, if it hasn't changed since it was most recently saved), you probably don't want the user to be able to execute the Revert command.

This should remind you, of course, of the context-specific menu enabling and disabling that's a standard part of any good Macintosh application. For our demonstration application, we'll handle context sensitivity by creating a number of embedded language models that we'll enable or disable according to context.

The commands in the File menu fall into two main categories: those that can be issued at any time (such as New or Open) and those that apply to a specific document (such as Save or Close). Accordingly, we'll construct two language models, one for each type of command. Let's call the first variety universal file commands and the second variety document file commands. In addition, we want to make the About DocDemo command utterable. Here's a Backus-Naur Form (BNF) diagram of our top-level language model:

<Menu Commands> = 
    <Universal Commands> | <Document Commands>;
<Universal Commands> = 
    <Universal File Commands> | About DocDemo;
<Universal File Commands> = New | Open | Page Setup | Quit;
<Document Commands> = <Document File Commands>;
<Document File Commands> = 
    Close | Save | Save As | Revert | Print | Print One;
As you can see, the top-level language model Menu Commands consists of two embedded language models, one for commands that can be issued at any time and one for commands that require a document window to be open. Each of these embedded language models contains other language objects. The Universal Commands language model contains the phrase "About DocDemo" and the language model that contains the universal file commands. The Document Commands language model contains only the language model that contains the document file commands; you would

add other document-specific models here (for instance, document-specific editing commands). In all, we'll create five language models. (Note that the Page Setup command is in the universal file commands language model; that's because DocDemo allows you to choose that command even if no document window is open.)

Listing 5 shows the code defining the MakeLanguageModels function (error checking has been removed for the sake of readability). Apple provides a utility, SRLanguageModeler, that you can use to build and test language models described with BNF diagrams like that shown above. SRLanguageModeler can also save those language models into resources or files, from which your application can load the models at run time. Here, however, we build the language models on the fly to demonstrate the Speech Recognition Manager routines for doing so.



Listing 5. Creating the language models
OSErr CDocSpeech::MakeLanguageModels (void)
{
   OSErr             theErr = noErr;
   Str255            theStr;
   SRLanguageModel   myGUnivLM, myUFileLM, myDFileLM;
   
   // Make the language models (which are initially empty).
   ::GetIndString(theStr, rSTR_LMNames, kStr_GApplLM);
   ::SRNewLanguageModel(gSystem, &gGApplLM, &theStr[1], theStr[0]);
   ::GetIndString(theStr, rSTR_LMNames, kStr_GUnivLM);
   ::SRNewLanguageModel(gSystem, &myGUnivLM, &theStr[1], theStr[0]);
   ::GetIndString(theStr, rSTR_LMNames, kStr_UFileLM);
   ::SRNewLanguageModel(gSystem, &myUFileLM, &theStr[1], theStr[0]);
   ::GetIndString(theStr, rSTR_LMNames, kStr_GDocuLM);
   ::SRNewLanguageModel(gSystem, &gGDocuLM, &theStr[1], theStr[0]);
   ::GetIndString(theStr, rSTR_LMNames, kStr_DFileLM);
   ::SRNewLanguageModel(gSystem, &myDFileLM, &theStr[1], theStr[0]);

   // Make any other language objects we'll need.
   ::GetIndString(theStr, kSTR_DFileCmds, kStr_Revert);   
   ::SRNewPhrase(gSystem, &gRevert, &theStr[1], theStr[0]);
   
   // ****<Universal File Commands>****
   ::GetIndString(theStr, kSTR_UFileCmds, kStr_New);
   ::SRAddText(myUFileLM, &theStr[1], theStr[0], cmd_New);
   ::GetIndString(theStr, kSTR_UFileCmds, kStr_Open);
   ::SRAddText(myUFileLM, &theStr[1], theStr[0], cmd_Open);
   ::GetIndString(theStr, kSTR_UFileCmds, kStr_PageSetup);
   ::SRAddText(myUFileLM, &theStr[1], theStr[0], cmd_PageSetup);
   ::GetIndString(theStr, kSTR_UFileCmds, kStr_Quit);
   ::SRAddText(myUFileLM, &theStr[1], theStr[0], cmd_Quit);
   
   // ****<Document File Commands>****
   ::GetIndString(theStr, kSTR_DFileCmds, kStr_Close);
   ::SRAddText(myDFileLM, &theStr[1], theStr[0], cmd_Close);
   ::GetIndString(theStr, kSTR_DFileCmds, kStr_Save);
   ::SRAddText(myDFileLM, &theStr[1], theStr[0], cmd_Save);
   ::GetIndString(theStr, kSTR_DFileCmds, kStr_SaveAs);
   ::SRAddText(myDFileLM, &theStr[1], theStr[0], cmd_SaveAs);
   unsigned long theRefCon = cmd_Revert;
   ::SRSetProperty(gRevert, kSRRefCon, &theRefCon,
         sizeof(theRefCon));
   ::SRAddLanguageObject(myDFileLM, gRevert);
   ::GetIndString(theStr, kSTR_DFileCmds, kStr_Print);
   ::SRAddText(myDFileLM, &theStr[1], theStr[0], cmd_Print);
   ::GetIndString(theStr, kSTR_DFileCmds, kStr_PrintOne);
   ::SRAddText(myDFileLM, &theStr[1], theStr[0], cmd_PrintOne);
   
   // ****<Document Commands>****
   ::SRAddLanguageObject(gGDocuLM, myDFileLM);
   
   // ****<Universal Commands>****
   ::SRAddLanguageObject(myGUnivLM, myUFileLM);
   ::GetIndString(theStr, kSTR_UApplCmds, kStr_About);
   ::SRAddText(myGUnivLM, &theStr[1], theStr[0], cmd_About);

   // ****<Menu Commands>****
   ::SRAddLanguageObject(gGApplLM, myGUnivLM);
   ::SRAddLanguageObject(gGApplLM, gGDocuLM);

   // Release any embedded language models we won't need later.
   ::SRReleaseObject(myDFileLM);
   ::SRReleaseObject(myUFileLM);
   ::SRReleaseObject(myGUnivLM);

   return theErr;
}


MakeLanguageModels begins by calling SRNewLanguageModel five times to create the five new, empty language models. (As indicated earlier, the names of the language models are read from the application's resource fork.) Then MakeLanguageModels creates a language object for the single word revert, as follows:
::GetIndString(theStr, kSTR_DFileCmds, kStr_Revert);   
::SRNewPhrase(gSystem, &gRevert, &theStr[1], theStr[0]);
We treat the Revert command specially because we want to listen for it only when an open document has a file associated with it (and, of course, when the document is dirty). Even when the Document Commands language model is active, the Revert command might need to be disabled.

Next, MakeLanguageModels builds the two language models Universal File Commands and Document File Commands. In both cases, it simply adds the relevant words or phrases, read from resources, to the language model, like this:

::GetIndString(theStr, kSTR_UFileCmds, kStr_New);
::SRAddText(myUFileLM, &theStr[1], theStr[0], cmd_New);
SRAddText sets the reference constant property of the specified language object to the value passed in its fourth parameter. In this example, the reference constant for the New command is set to the value cmd_New, which is a constant defined by PowerPlant. As you'll see later, we'll use that value to get PowerPlant to react appropriately to the user's utterances. If you don't use SRAddText, you need to explicitly set an object's reference constant property, as is done for the Revert command:
unsigned long theRefCon = cmd_Revert;
::SRSetProperty(gRevert, kSRRefCon, &theRefCon, sizeof(theRefCon));
::SRAddLanguageObject(myDFileLM, gRevert);
Once the two main language models have been created, the hierarchy displayed in the BNF diagram is established by a series of calls to SRAddLanguageObject.

ENABLING AND DISABLING THE LANGUAGE MODELS

When a user begins speaking, your application is notified via a speech-detected

Apple event. In general, your speech-detected event handler should determine what state your application is in and set the active language model accordingly. As we've mentioned, we'll use this opportunity to enable or disable embedded language models (or even single words) to limit the recognizable utterances to those that make sense at the time. Listing 6 shows our speech-detected Apple event handler.



Listing 6. Handling speech-detected Apple events
pascal OSErr CDocSpeech::HandleSpeechDetectedAppleEvent 
            (AppleEvent *theAEevt, AppleEvent *reply, long refcon)
{
#pragma unused(reply, refcon)
   long            actualSize;
   DescType        actualType;
   OSErr           theErr = 0, recStatus = 0;
   SRRecognizer    theRec;
   LWindow         *theWindow;
            
   // Get status and recognizer.
   theErr = ::AEGetParamPtr(theAEevt, keySRSpeechStatus, 
              typeShortInteger, &actualType, (Ptr)&recStatus,
              sizeof(recStatus), &actualSize);
   if (!theErr && !recStatus)
      theErr = ::AEGetParamPtr(theAEevt, keySRRecognizer,
                  typeSRRecognizer, &actualType, (Ptr)&theRec,
                  sizeof(theRec), &actualSize);
   if (theErr)
      if (!theRec)
         return theErr;
   
   // Figure out what state we're in; then enable or disable the
   // appropriate language models.
   theWindow = UDesktop::FetchTopRegular(); // Look for a doc window.
   if (theWindow != nil) {                  // There is a doc window.
      SetLanguageObjectState(gGDocuLM, kEnableObj);
      
      // Turn off "Revert" if there's no file or it isn't dirty.
      Boolean      isEnabled, outUsesMark;
      Char16      outMark;
      Str255      outName;
         
      LCommander::GetTarget()->FindCommandStatus
          (cmd_Revert, isEnabled, outUsesMark, outMark, outName);
      SetLanguageObjectState(gRevert, isEnabled);
   } else                                  // There is no doc window.
      SetLanguageObjectState(gGDocuLM, kDisableObj);

   // Now tell the recognizer to continue.
   theErr = ::SRContinueRecognition(theRec);
   return theErr;
}


The event handler, HandleSpeechDetectedAppleEvent, calls the PowerPlant utility function UDesktop::FetchTopRegular to get the top document window. If there's an open document window, HandleSpeechDetectedAppleEvent calls the application-defined function SetLanguageObjectState to enable the Document Commands language model. Otherwise, if no document window is open, the event handler calls SetLanguageObjectState to disable that language model. Listing 7 shows the simple function SetLanguageObjectState.



Listing 7. Enabling or disabling a language object
void SetLanguageObjectState (SRLanguageObject inObj,
    Boolean isEnabled)
{
   Boolean      theState = isEnabled;

   ::SRSetProperty(inObj, kSREnabled, &theState, sizeof(theState));
}


Notice that if a document window is open, we need to determine whether to enable the Revert command. HandleSpeechDetectedAppleEvent cleverly calls the document window's FindCommandStatus function to determine this.

Instead of disabling the Revert command when it isn't relevant, we could just let the recognizer keep listening for it but ignore it when the frontmost document, if any, isn't dirty or has no file. This alternate strategy has some advantages. In particular, if the user says "revert" but we aren't listening for that command, the recognizer might think the user has uttered some other command (like "quit" or "print"). These misfires are much less likely to occur if the recognizer is listening for "revert" in addition to the other document file commands.

If you think that a user is apt to utter a particular command at an inappropriate time, it's probably better to ignore it than to disable it. On the other hand, we don't want to make the active language model too big, and one way to keep its size manageable is to enable or disable parts of it according to context. That's the strategy we've adopted for this article. Our sample application doesn't listen for the Revert command unless it's appropriate, to illustrate how to enable and disable language objects.

HANDLING RECOGNITION RESULTS

So far, we've defined our language models and set up the mechanism by which relevant parts of the language models are enabled or disabled according to context.

All that remains is to do the right thing when the recognizer recognizes an utterance. Our application is informed of successful recognitions via recognition-done Apple events. Listing 8 shows the DocDemo recognition-done event handler.



Listing 8. Handling recognition-done Apple events
pascal OSErr CDocSpeech::HandleRecognitionDoneAppleEvent 
              (AppleEvent *theAEevt, AppleEvent *reply, long refcon)
{
#pragma unused(reply, refcon)
   long                     actualSize;
   DescType                 actualType;
   OSErr                    theErr = 0, recStatus = 0;
   SRRecognitionResult      recResult = nil;
   Size                     theLen;
   SRPath                   thePath;
   SRSpeechObject           theItem;
   long                     theRefCon; // Reference constant of item
   // Get status.
   theErr = ::AEGetParamPtr(theAEevt, keySRSpeechStatus, 
               typeShortInteger, &actualType, (Ptr)&recStatus,
               sizeof(recStatus), &actualSize);

   // Get result.
   if (!theErr && !recStatus)
      theErr = ::AEGetParamPtr(theAEevt, keySRSpeechResult, 
                  typeSRSpeechResult, &actualType, (Ptr)&recResult,
                  sizeof(recResult), &actualSize);

   // Get command from result by reading the reference constant
   // of the relevant object.
   if (!theErr && !recStatus) {
      ::SRGetProperty(recResult, kSRPathFormat, &thePath, &theLen);
      theErr = ::SRGetIndexedItem(thePath, &theItem, 0);
      if (!theErr) {
         theLen = sizeof(theRefCon);
         ::SRGetProperty(theItem, kSRRefCon, &theRefCon, &theLen);
         ::SRReleaseObject(theItem);
      }
      // Release recognition result, since we're done with it.
      ::SRReleaseObject(recResult);
      ::SRReleaseObject(thePath);
   }
   // Send the reference constant up the chain of command.
   LCommander::GetTarget()->ObeyCommand((MessageT)theRefCon, nil);
   
   return theErr;
}


The interesting thing in this event handler is how utterly simple the important code is: all it does is extract the reference constant value of the recognized utterance and send that value up the PowerPlant chain of command. For example, if the recognized utterance is the word new, the reference constant is the value cmd_New, which is sent to a commander. In this case, the DocDemo application creates a new document. In effect, the CDocSpeech object does its work by calling code already in the DocDemo application.

THE LAST WORD

As you've seen, it's easy to add basic speech recognition for File menu commands to a PowerPlant application, largely because our custom speech object can simply issue the same commands that would be issued in response to a menu choice. You should now be able to add speech support for Edit menu commands and for any other menu commands supported by your application. Only one method remains to discuss, the destructor for the CDocSpeech class. The destructor simply stops recognizing utterances and closes down the recognition system opened by the constructor, as shown in Listing 9.



Listing 9. Shutting down speech recognition
CDocSpeech::~CDocSpeech()
{
   ::SRStopListening(gRecognizer);
   ::SRReleaseObject(gRecognizer);
   ::SRReleaseObject(gGDocuLM);
   ::SRReleaseObject(gRevert);
   ::SRCloseRecognitionSystem(gSystem);
}

'Nuff said.


    RELATED READING

    • "The Speech Recognition Manager Revealed" by Matt Pallakoff and Arlo Reeves, in this issue of develop.

    • "Speech Recognition Manager," on this issue's CD and on Apple's speech technology Web site, http://www.speech.apple.com.

    • The PowerPlant Book by Jim Trudeau, in Inside PowerPlant for CW8 (Metrowerks, 1995).


TIM MONROE (monroe@apple.com) is a technical writer for Apple's Developer Relations group. He's written more Inside Macintosh books and chapters than he cares to remember and is currently working with the QuickDraw 3D and QuickTime VR teams, as well as the speech recognition team, to bring the excitement of interactive media to Macintosh applications everywhere. He's rumored to have an office in Cupertino but prefers to spend his time in his converted garage in Oakland living the quiet life of a telecommuting "cybermonk." That way, he's never too far from his wife, his kids, or his model train layout.*

Thanks to our technical reviewers Mike Dilts, Guillermo Ortiz, Matt Pallakoff, Arlo Reeves, and Brent Schorsch.*

 

Community Search:
MacTech Search:

Software Updates via MacUpdate

BetterTouchTool 2.07 - Customize Multi-T...
BetterTouchTool adds many new, fully customizable gestures to the Magic Mouse, Multi-Touch MacBook trackpad, and Magic Trackpad. These gestures are customizable: Magic Mouse: Pinch in / out (zoom... Read more
BetterTouchTool 2.07 - Customize Multi-T...
BetterTouchTool adds many new, fully customizable gestures to the Magic Mouse, Multi-Touch MacBook trackpad, and Magic Trackpad. These gestures are customizable: Magic Mouse: Pinch in / out (zoom... Read more
PDFpen 8.3.2 - $74.95
PDFpen allows users to easily edit PDF's. Add text, images and signatures. Fill out PDF forms. Merge or split PDF documents. Reorder and delete pages. Even correct text and edit graphics! Features... Read more
DiskCatalogMaker 6.5.20 - Catalog your d...
DiskCatalogMaker is a simple disk management tool which catalogs disks. Simple, light-weight, and fast Finder-like intuitive look and feel Super-fast search algorithm Can compress catalog data for... Read more
Things 2.8.9 - Elegant personal task man...
Things is a task management solution that helps to organize your tasks in an elegant and intuitive way. Things combines powerful features with simplicity through the use of tags and its intelligent... Read more
PDFpenPro 8.3.2 - $124.95
PDFpenPro allows users to edit PDF's easily. Add text, images and signatures. Fill out PDF forms. Merge or split PDF documents. Reorder and delete pages. Create fillable forms and tables of content... Read more
Things 2.8.9 - Elegant personal task man...
Things is a task management solution that helps to organize your tasks in an elegant and intuitive way. Things combines powerful features with simplicity through the use of tags and its intelligent... Read more
DiskCatalogMaker 6.5.20 - Catalog your d...
DiskCatalogMaker is a simple disk management tool which catalogs disks. Simple, light-weight, and fast Finder-like intuitive look and feel Super-fast search algorithm Can compress catalog data for... Read more
PDFpenPro 8.3.2 - $124.95
PDFpenPro allows users to edit PDF's easily. Add text, images and signatures. Fill out PDF forms. Merge or split PDF documents. Reorder and delete pages. Create fillable forms and tables of content... Read more
PDFpen 8.3.2 - Edit and annotate PDFs wi...
PDFpen allows users to easily edit PDF's. Add text, images and signatures. Fill out PDF forms. Merge or split PDF documents. Reorder and delete pages. Even correct text and edit graphics! Features... Read more

Latest Forum Discussions

See All

Pokémon GO Generation 2 evolution guide
At long last, Niantic Labs finally unleashed the Generation 2 Pokémon into the wild. Pokémon GO trainers are scrambling to grab up this new set of 80 Pokémon. There are some special new tricks required to catch all of these new beasties, though.... | Read more »
The best new games we played this week
It feels as though the New Year got off to a creaking start as far as mobile games go, but that's changed over the past few weeks. The last few days alone have seen the debut of a number of wonderful games, so we thought we'd take the time to... | Read more »
Recruit more scallywags and discover new...
Get ready to show off your sea legs all over again in Oceans & Empires’ new grand update, which aims to make the act of rising to the role of seven seas ruler even more fresh and appealing, thanks to a richness of new content on both iOS and... | Read more »
Mage the Ascension: Refuge (Games)
Mage the Ascension: Refuge 1.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $4.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: The groundbreaking roleplaying game Mage: The Ascension manifests in our turbulent present with Refuge, an... | Read more »
Vampire: Prelude (Games)
Vampire: Prelude 1.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $4.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: The classic roleplaying game Vampire: The Masquerade returns to digital games with a Prelude of things to come. Experience a... | Read more »
Digby Forever Guide: How to dig to the d...
Digby Forever is a sparkling homage to arcade classics, and while you may be tiring of the number of arcade games being thrown at you, this endless digger finds many ways to stand out from the rest of the pack. The game manages to be challenging... | Read more »
The best sales on the App Store this wee...
It's been quite the week in mobile games, but if the latest releases(there were some pretty darn good ones, in case you missed out) aren't really doing the trick, perhaps some of these discounted games will. Many of these premium games had their... | Read more »
Why the new Fire Emblem Heroes update sh...
It’s exciting to see Nintendo delving into the mobile sphere, regardless of whether it’s to give fans another platform to enjoy their fans or simply a sound business venture. Two of the company's announced mobile games have finally come to... | Read more »
New Fire Emblem Heroes update adds new h...
Fire Emblem Heroes received a sizeable update first thing this morning. The update features a batch of fresh content along with a few updates to the game's systems. [Read more] | Read more »
The Deep Paths (Games)
The Deep Paths 1.0 Device: iOS iPhone Category: Games Price: $3.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: 25% off launch sale!!! The Deep Paths: Labyrinth Of Andokost is a first-person, dungeon crawling RPG, with traditional grid-based... | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

12-inch 1.1GHz Retina MacBooks on sale for $1...
B&H has 12″ 1.1GHz Retina MacBooks on sale for $150 off MSRP. Shipping is free, and B&H charges NY sales tax only: - 12″ 1.1GHz Space Gray Retina MacBook: $1149 $150 off MSRP - 12″ 1.1GHz... Read more
InTouch Health Expands iOS And Windows Produc...
Specialty telehealth enterprise provider InTouch Health has announced an expanded range of FDA Class I listed medical devices and software solutions for ambulatory, non-acute and non-emergent... Read more
iMobie Airs World’s 1st iCloud Manager with M...
iMobie Inc., an Apple-related software company, announced their newly-updated iPhone manager AnyTrans with exclusive feature to sync and manage contents across multiple iCloud accounts. With it,... Read more
New Proactive Apple Support Professional Cert...
Watchman Monitoring has announced Proactive Support Professional Certification at MacTech Pro. Watchman Monitoring is a premier Proactive Support Software as a Service (SaaS) tool for IT... Read more
13-inch 2.7GHz Retina MacBook Pro on sale for...
B&H Photo has the 2015 13″ 2.7GHz/128GB Retina Apple MacBook Pro on sale for $100 off MSRP. Shipping is free, and B&H charges NY tax only: - 13″ 2.7GHz/128GB Retina MacBook Pro (MF839LL/A): $... Read more
Back in stock: Apple refurbished 13-inch Reti...
Apple has Certified Refurbished 2015 13″ Retina MacBook Pros available for up to $360 off original MSRP, starting at $1099. An Apple one-year warranty is included with each model, and shipping is... Read more
Apple refurbished Apple TVs available for up...
Apple has Certified Refurbished 32GB and 64GB Apple TVs available for up to $30 off the cost of new models. Apple’s standard one-year warranty is included with each model, and shipping is free: -... Read more
2.6GHz Mac mini on sale for $559, $140 off MS...
Guitar Center has the 2.6GHz Mac mini (MGEN2LL/A) on sale for $559.99 including free shipping. Their price is $140 off MSRP, and it’s the lowest price available for this model. Read more
21-inch Apple iMacs on sale for $100-$150 off...
B&H Photo has 21″ iMacs on sale for up to $150 off MSRP, each including free shipping plus NY sales tax only: - 21″ 3.1GHz iMac 4K: $1349 $150 off MSRP - 21″ 2.8GHz iMac: $1189 $110 off MSRP - 21... Read more
Type Nine Keyboard 2.0 for iOS – World’s Firs...
Copenhagen, Denmark based indie developer Rasmus Porsager has released Type Nine Keyboard 2.0, an update to his keyboard utility for iOS devices. Type Nine Keyboard combines a t9 keypad layout with... Read more

Jobs Board

*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions - Apple,...
SalesSpecialist - Retail Customer Service and SalesTransform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, you're also the Read more
*Apple* macOS Systems Integration Administra...
…most exceptional support available in the industry. SCI is seeking an Junior Apple macOS systems integration administrator that will be responsible for providing Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions - Apple,...
Job Description: Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, Read more
Lead Senior *Apple* (Mac) Administrator - S...
…but also to protect them. Position Summary: SC3 is actively seeking a Senior Apple (Mac) Administrator that will be responsible for providing Apple Mac Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions - Apple,...
Job Description: Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, Read more
All contents are Copyright 1984-2011 by Xplain Corporation. All rights reserved. Theme designed by Icreon.