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May 92 - POSTSCRIPT ENHANCEMENTS FOR THE LASERWRITER FONT UTILITY

POSTSCRIPT ENHANCEMENTS FOR THE LASERWRITER FONT UTILITY

BRYAN K. ("BEAKER") RESSLER

[IMAGE Ressler.GIF]

For System 7, the LaserWriter Font Utility was given the ability to handle drop-in enhancements, called UTILs. These hybrid Macintosh-and-PostScript utilities are provided with a rich parameter block and many useful callbacks. They offer a straightforward method for putting useful tidbits of PostScript code to work--with a real user interface.


The LaserWriter Font Utility is an obscure system software application that isn't even installed by the System 7 Installer. Its main mission is to facilitate the downloading of TrueType, PostScript Type 1, and PostScript Type 3 fonts to PostScript (and PostScript-compatible) printers and printer hard disks. With System 7, however, the innocuous LaserWriter Font Utility has been endowed with an extensible Utilities menu and the ability to handle drop-in enhancements, calledUTILs.  UTILs can be used for a variety of interesting applications. For example:

  • downloading a PostScript language file or restarting a PostScript printer with special-purpose PostScript utilities
  • setting the resolution or printing an alignment page on a particular model of typesetter with device-specific applications
  • putting little snippets of PostScript code to work

INTRODUCING UTILS

UTILs are resources that are stored in the LaserWriter Font Utility's application resource file. When the Font Utility is run, UTILs are collected into the Utilities menu, listed by their resource name.

UTILs are generally modal and very task-specific. For example, one of the UTILs that are distributed as part of the Font Utility, Start Page Options, allows users of PostScript printers to decide whether or not the printer produces a "start page" when turned on. When the user chooses this UTIL from the menu, the dialog box shown in Figure 1 appears.

[IMAGE Ressler_final_rev1.GIF]

Figure 1 Example of a UTIL Dialog Box

A UTIL performs its task via PostScript code embedded in the UTIL or in its owned resources. Therefore, UTILs are provided with routines that ease two-way communication with the PostScript printer.

UTILs may own resources and allocate a block of private "global" memory. UTILs get printer configuration information from the Font Utility and may also query the printer directly for configuration information. This allows for device-specific UTILs.

Since most UTILs are expected to be implemented similarly, many application facilities are provided to UTILs so that common code, like the bold outline for the default button in Figure 1, is not duplicated in every UTIL. As a result, most UTILs are very small (under 2K).

UTIL RESOURCES
UTILs are stored as resources of type 'UTIL'. Their IDs start at 128. However, the range 128 through 149 is reserved by Apple, so you should use an ID of 150 or higher for the UTILs you write. The UTIL's resource name defines the text of the menu item that's appended to the Utilities menu.

The UTIL resource format is shown in Figure 2.

The first two bytes of the resource specify the version of the UTIL resource format, which is currently $0001. Next comes resSpace, the first ID in the UTIL's resource space.  A UTIL'sresource space is the range of IDs that the UTIL may use for its owned resources. The UTIL has 100 consecutive IDs, starting with resSpace. In general, to calculate a given UTIL's resource space ID, use the formula

resSpace = 16000 + (UTILID - 128)* 100

where UTILID is the resource ID of the UTIL resource itself. For example, if your UTIL resource were numbered 158, your UTIL's resource space would be calculated as follows:

resSpace = 16000 + (158 -128)* 100 = 19000

[IMAGE Ressler_final_rev2.GIF] Figure 2 UTIL Resource Format

In your UTIL's code, it's important to userelative resource IDs, in case your UTIL is renumbered at installation time. There are several examples of relative resource IDs in the code we'll be examining.

Following the version and resSpace, the UTIL resource contains offsets to the four UTIL entry points (described in the next section). These offsets are from the beginning of the UTIL resource. The beginning and order of entry points is flexible (see "Variations on UTIL Entry Points" for details).

UTIL ENTRY POINTS
Let's take a quick look at the four UTIL entry points. Later, in the section "The Script: NamerUTIL.c Code," we go into more detail.

Utility_Open. This routine is called by the Font Utility at startup, right after the UTIL is loaded into memory. Utility_Open initializes the UTIL and allocates any memory it requires. Utility_Open needs to return a Boolean result which, if true, tells the Font Utility to install the UTIL in the Utilities menu. A false result from Utility_Open, which might occur if there were insufficient memory, tells the Font Utility not to install this UTIL.


VARIATIONS ON UTIL ENTRY POINTS
There's no requirement that the Utility_Open routine start at offset 20, nor is there any specification of the order in which the routines are stored within the resource. This allows noncode data to be stored in the UTIL resource along with the code. Figure 3 shows an example of PostScript code stored inside a UTIL resource, and the four routines rearranged as desired.

While this method of storage works well for embedded PostScript code, remember that other textual data (that's not  PostScript code) should be stored in resources to facilitate localization.

[IMAGE Ressler_final_rev3.GIF]

Figure 3 Arranging UTIL Routines

Utility_Delta. This routine is called by the Font Utility once after Utility_Open and subsequently any time the user selects a different printer with the Chooser. Utility_Delta is the means by which a UTIL informs the Font Utility whether the UTIL's menu item should be dimmed or not (usually based on the characteristics of the currently selected printer). The Font Utility provides a host of useful printer configuration information, but should your UTIL require different or more specific information, it may download PostScript code at this point and parse the response from the printer. Utility_Delta needs to return true if the UTIL's menu item is to be available, or false if it's to be dimmed.

Utility_Prime. This routine is called by the Font Utility to carry out the basic function of the UTIL. It's called when the user chooses your UTIL's menu item from the Utilities menu. The Start Page Options UTIL described earlier downloads some PostScript code to determine the current state of thedostartpageflag in the printer, puts up a dialog box, and then downloads more PostScript code to set the flag to the new setting. The Utility_Prime routine needs to return a long word composed of (possibly multiple) return codes. These codes tell the Font Utility of any special behavior it should take upon return, such as refreshing its font lists.

Utility_Close. This routine is called by the Font Utility at quit time. Normally, at this point your UTIL releases any memory it has allocated.

GOODIES IN THE LWFUPARMBLK STRUCTURE
When the LaserWriter Font Utility is starting up, it allocates one LWFUParmBlk for each installed UTIL. That means that each UTIL's parameter block is unique, and the same block is always passed to it. Each of the entry points described above takes as a parameter a pointer to an LWFUParmBlk structure. This structure is discussed in detail in the section "The Script: NamerUTIL.c Code," but here are the high points.

General information. This part of the structure includes the version of the LWFUParmBlk structure, the base resource ID for this UTIL's resource space, and a storage field into which the UTIL may place a handle to some global storage space.

Driver information. You're provided with an FSSpec pointing to the currently selected printer driver. Tempting as this might be, you should use this only to retrieve the driver's version, allowing your UTIL to put the driver version in a dialog box.

Printer information. This includes the name of the current printer and a host of printer configuration information. Also included is a handle to the Font Utility's own standard Macintosh print record, which allows you to print via the Printing Manager if you wish.

Callback information. This is a rich set of callbacks into the Font Utility. There's also a pointer to the Font Utility's QuickDraw globals and pointers to two large I/O buffers you can use for printer communication. The callback routines can be grouped into three major categories:

  • 3 PAP routines that assist in printer communication
  • 18 dialog utility routines, many of which you would have probably had to include anyway
  • 4 Pascal-string utility routines that aid in the construction of PostScript language strings

ON STAGE: NAMERUTIL

Now that we've got an overview of how UTILs fit into the LaserWriter Font Utility, let's take a closer look at a specific example, NamerUTIL, provided on theDeveloper CD Series disc. NamerUTIL, which appears in the Utilities menu as Rename Printer, allows the user to rename the currently selected printer.

Figure 4 shows part of the Utilities menu, including the Rename Printer UTIL.

[IMAGE Ressler_final_rev4.GIF]

Figure 4 UTILs in the Utilities Menu

Rename Printer's Utility_Prime routine presents the user with the dialog box shown at the top of Figure 5. The dialog is smart enough to limit the length of the new name to 30 characters and disallow various illegal characters. If the user clicks Rename, the UTIL transmits a PostScript program to rename the printer as specified. The UTIL then puts up one of the two alerts shown in Figure 5, depending on whether the printer was successfully renamed or not.

That's the basic user interface design for the Rename Printer UTIL. So how do we make it work? First, let's take a look at how you rename a printer in PostScript.

RENAMING A PRINTER IN POSTSCRIPT
The PostScript code to rename a printer is trivial.

serverdict begin 0 exitserver
    statusdict begin
        (NewPrinterName) setprintername
end

The first line entersserverdict, a dictionary of operators for controlling the PostScript server, then exits the server loop with theexitserveroperator. The 0 is the system administrator password, which is almost universally 0. (In fact, the LaserWriter driver won't work correctly if the password has been changed, so it's OK for us to assume it's 0 and hard-code the password.) The net effect of exiting the server loop is to allow us to change persistent parameters, like the printer name.

[IMAGE Ressler_final_rev5.GIF]

[IMAGE Ressler_final_rev6.GIF]

[IMAGE Ressler_final_rev7.GIF]

Figure 5 Rename Printer Dialog Box and Alerts

The next line entersstatusdict, a dictionary containing machine- and configuration-dependent operators. The printer is renamed with thesetprinternamePostScript operator. The UTIL replacesNewPrinterName with the new name provided by the user.

NAMERUTIL AND ITS SOURCE FILES
NamerUTIL, the Rename Printer UTIL, is made up of five source files. Two of them, UTIL.h and UTILHead.a, are provided on the CD as general interface files and are the same for all UTILs. Figure 6 gives an overview of the source files and their relationships. We'll look at the source files whose names begin with "Namer" and at the makefile.

[IMAGE Ressler_final_rev8.GIF]

Figure 6 Source File Relationships

NamerUTIL.c. This C language source file is the bulk of the code for NamerUTIL. It contains the four entry points, and three other routines that carry out NamerUTIL's job. Thanks to all the Font Utility's callbacks, it's fairly straightforward.

NamerUTIL.r. This Rez input file contains descriptions of all the NamerUTIL's owned resources. Since the owned resources' IDs depend on the ID of the UTIL resource itself, the resource IDs are specifiedrelatively , that is, by an offset from a variable named ResSpace, which is defined in the makefile.

NamerResIDs.h. This file contains #define statements for all the resource IDs. It's included by both NamerUTIL.c and NamerUTIL.r.

MakeFile. MakeFile ties all the pieces together. For development, it's easiest to use Rez to place NamerUTIL's resources into a copy of the Font Utility. Use Rez's- aoption to append the resources to those already present in the LaserWriter Font Utility application file. Then link NamerUTIL's UTIL resource directly into the Font Utility as well. Finally, by launching the Font Utility, you can test your UTIL. That's the approach of the makefile we'll be looking at. The CD contains an alternate makefile that generates a standalone file and an application called UTILInstall for installing UTILs into the Font Utility.

Let's dive right into NamerUTIL.c.

THE SCRIPT: NAMERUTIL.C CODE

Here's the first part of NamerUTIL.c in MPW 3.2 C.

/* NamerUTIL.c - a UTIL that allows the LaserWriter Font Utility to
   rename PostScript printers. */

/* --- Includes --------------------------------------------------*/
#include <Types.h>                    /* Macintosh includes */
#include <Memory.h>
#include <Resources.h>
#include <QuickDraw.h>
#include <Dialogs.h>
#include <Printing.h>
#include <ToolUtils.h>
#include <Errors.h>

#include "UTIL.h"         /* Standard UTIL constants and */
                                        /* structures */
#include "NamerResIDs.h"     /* "Relative" resource IDs */

/* --- Defines ------------------------------------------------ */
#define kMinVersion         1      /* Minimum version we'll run */ 

#define kPSErrStr           1      /* Strings in 'STR#' kNamerStrs */
#define kExitVerStr         2
#define kRenameStartStr 3
#define kRenameEndStr       4

#define kNDDummy            0      /* Item #s in Namer dialog box */
#define kNDRename           1
#define kNDCancel           2
#define kNDNewName          6
#define kNDBoldOutline      7

#define kReturnKey          0x0d   /* Key and char code constants */
#define kEnterKey           0x03
#define kBackspaceKey       0x08
#define kAtChar             '@'
#define kColonChar          ':'
#define kLowASCII           0x7f

#define kMaxNameLength      30     /* Maximum printer name length */
#define kNameBufLen         40     /* Size of printer name buffers */
#define kCompStrLen         80     /* Size of parse string buffers */

/* --- Prototypes --------------------------------------------- */
pascal Boolean          Utility_Open(LWFUParmBlk *pb);
pascal Boolean          Utility_Delta(LWFUParmBlk *pb);
pascal unsigned long    Utility_Prime(LWFUParmBlk *pb);
pascal void             Utility_Close(LWFUParmBlk *pb);
pascal short            ExitBufferRtn(short length, LWFUParmBlk *pb);
pascal Boolean          NamerFilter(DialogPtr TheDialog,
                        EventRecord *TheEvent, short *ItemHit);
short                   RenamePrinter(LWFUParmBlk *pb);

At the beginning are the includes. Besides the usual Macintosh Toolbox and OS includes, we include UTIL.h, a header file used by all UTILs, and NamerResIDs.h. The latter, as mentioned earlier, contains constants that we'll add to the resSpace field of the LWFUParmBlk to form valid resource IDs. Sharing this file with NamerUTIL.r makes maintenance easier.

The #defines are for indices into NamerUTIL's owned STR# resource, item numbers for the dialog box, various keyboard and character constants, and buffer sizes.

Below the constant definitions are prototypes for NamerUTIL's routines. You can see the standard four entry points, Utility_Open, Utility_Delta, Utility_Prime, and Utility_Close, plus three other routines, which will be called from the Prime routine.

THE SUPPORTING CAST: UTILITY_OPEN, UTILITY_DELTA, AND UTILITY_CLOSE
The Utility_Open routine is exceedingly simple. It checks that the parameter block passed in pb is equal to or newer than the minimum version. In the future, the LWFUParmBlk structure may be extended--for instance, to add new fields or callbacks. Since subsequent versions of the UTIL parameter block are defined to beextensions , a UTIL can function with any version of the LWFUParmBlk greater than or equal to the version provided when the UTIL was written. Thecurrent version is $0001. If the parameter block is new enough, Utility_Open returns true and we're on our way.

pascal Boolean Utility_Open(LWFUParmBlk *pb)
{
    return(pb->version >= kMinVersion);
}

Some UTILs might want to allocate memory in their Utility_Open routine and store a handle to the storage in pb->uStorage. If the allocation failed, Utility_Open could return false, indicating that it should not be installed into the Utilities menu.

If you thought NamerUTIL's Utility_Open was trivial, take a look at Utility_Delta. This entry point is called for each UTIL, once at startup and subsequently every time the user chooses a different printer with the Chooser. Since NamerUTIL can rename any PostScript printer, its Utility_Delta always returns true, indicating to the Font Utility that the Rename Printer menu item should always be available (as opposed to dimmed). Utility_Delta is provided to facilitate device-specific UTILs that might, for instance, want to send out PostScript code to determine the printer's specific make and dim the menu item if the UTIL isn't applicable to the chosen printer.

pascal Boolean Utility_Delta(LWFUParmBlk *pb)
{
#pragma unused(pb)

    return(true);
}

The #pragma keeps the C compiler from barking at us about not using the pb parameter.

Let's save the best for last and dispatch with Utility_Close, so we can get on with the meat of the UTIL, Utility_Prime. Since Utility_Open didn't allocate any storage, the Utility_Close routine can simply return without doing anything. Even though the routine may do nothing,it must be included , and will be called at quit time.

pascal void Utility_Close(LWFUParmBlk *pb)
{
#pragma unused(pb)
}

THE STAR OF THE SHOW: UTILITY_PRIME
All the work NamerUTIL performs is handled by the Utility_Prime routine, shown here:

pascal unsigned long Utility_Prime(LWFUParmBlk *pb)
{
    if (RenamePrinter(pb))
        return(urCheckPrinter | urCheckFeatures | urEraseLists);
    else return(urNoAction);
}

Utility_Prime calls RenamePrinter to do most of its work. RenamePrinter returns a Boolean result that indicates, if true, that the printer was successfully renamed or, if false, that there was an error or the user canceled the process. If RenamePrinter returns true, Utility_Prime returns a conglomerate return code that indicates to the Font Utility that it should recheck its connection with the chosen printer, recheck the printer's features, and forget any font lists it might have for the printer. If the user canceled or there was an error, Utility_Prime tells the Font Utility to take no special action.

Let's look at the beginning of RenamePrinter:

short RenamePrinter(LWFUParmBlk *pb)
{
  DialogPtr          nameDlg;            /* The Rename dialog */
  short              itemHit;            /* From ModalDialog */
  char               psBuffer[150];      /* Buffer for PostScript */
  char               newName[kNameBufLen]; /* New printer name */
  char               blankStr[1];        /* Handy empty string */
  short              status;             /* ExitBufferRtn's status */
  Point              where;              /* For positioning dialog */
  LWFUCallBackInfo   *cb;                /* Pointer to callbacks */
  Boolean            doneFlag = false;   /* Flags to dismiss */
  Boolean            renameFlag = false; /* Flags to rename */
  Boolean            retVal = false;     /* True/false on success */

  *blankStr = 0;
  cb = pb->callBacks;

Here we declare the local variables. The most important locals are nameDlg, the dialog pointer; status, which tests the success of the rename operation; and cb, a cached pointer to the callback array. We set blankStr to be an empty string (for use in ParamText calls and such) and initialize cb's value.

Creating the set. Now, we set up our Namer dialog box.

nameDlg = GetNewDialog(pb->resSpace + kNamerDlg, nil, (WindowPtr)-1);
cb->CenterDialog(nameDlg, &where);
MoveWindow(nameDlg, where.h, where.v, true);

ParamText(pb->printerInfo->currentPrinterName, blankStr, blankStr, 
    blankStr);

cb->SetPText(nameDlg, kNDNewName, blankStr);
cb->UserItem(nameDlg, kNDBoldOutline, cb->BoldOutlineItem);

(LWFUParmBlk *)((DialogPeek)nameDlg)->window.refCon = pb;
ShowWindow((WindowPtr)nameDlg);

RenamePrinter gets the Namer dialog box from the resource file with a call to GetNewDialog. Notice the way the resource ID is specified as pb->resSpace +constant . This relative resource ID convention makes the code flexible in case the UTIL was renumbered for some reason. You'll see this convention throughout NamerUTIL.

The design for the Font Utility tried to encompass the most common types of operations UTIL writers would be performing and provided those routines as callbacks. One example is centering a dialog box. The CenterDialog callback returns a point--the top left coordinates for a MoveWindow call.

RenamePrinter then installs the current printer name as parameter ^0, so the user can see the current printer name in the dialog box. RenamePrinter presets the new printer name to blank and installs a userItem to put the bold outline around the dialog box's default button. Again, notice the handy callbacks.

The dialog filter, NamerFilter, needs access to the LWFUParmBlk. To allow this, RenamePrinter installs a pointer to the block in the dialog window's refCon field.

The dialog template resource for the Namer dialog box specifies a hidden window, so all the fuss we've just gone through hasn't been disturbing the poor user. Once finished, RenamePrinter puts the dialog box on the screen with ShowWindow.

Behind the scenes. Next comes the ModalDialog loop.

do {
    ModalDialog(NamerFilter, &itemHit);
    switch(itemHit) {
        case kNDRename:     /* Rename */
            renameFlag = doneFlag = true;
            break;
        case kNDCancel:     /* Cancel */
            doneFlag = true;
            break;
    }
} while (!doneFlag);

HideWindow((WindowPtr)nameDlg);

This is your average modal dialog hit-loop. RenamePrinter waits for the user to dismiss the dialog box, setting the renameFlag appropriately, then hiding the dialog window (but not disposing of it yet). RenamePrinter filters the dialog events with NamerFilter, shown here:

pascal Boolean NamerFilter(DialogPtr TheDialog,
    EventRecord *TheEvent, short *ItemHit)
{
    unsigned char theKey;                 /* From the event record */
    short         retVal = false;         /* The return value */
    char          newName[kNameBufLen];   /* The new name */
    LWFUParmBlk   *pb;                    /* The parameter block */
    
    /* Retrieve a pointer to the parameter block. */
    pb = (LWFUParmBlk *)((WindowPeek)TheDialog)->refCon;
    
    /* Trap keyDown and autoKey events. */
    if (TheEvent->what == keyDown || TheEvent->what == autoKey) {
    
        /* Grab the ASCII character code from the event record. */
        theKey = TheEvent->message & charCodeMask;
        
        if (theKey == kReturnKey || theKey == kEnterKey) {
            /* Return or Enter? Hit the default button. */
            retVal = true;
            *ItemHit = kNDRename;
        } else if (theKey == kAtChar || theKey == kColonChar ||
                theKey > kLowASCII) {
            /* "@", ":", or a high ASCII char? Beep and tell */
            /* ModalDialog to ignore the event. */
            SysBeep(5);
            retVal = true;
            *ItemHit = kNDDummy;
        } else if (theKey != kBackspaceKey) {
            /* Key other than Backspace? Check length to decide. */
            pb->callBacks->GetPText(TheDialog, kNDNewName, newName);
            if (*newName >= kMaxNameLength) {
                SysBeep(5);
                retVal = true;
                *ItemHit = kNDDummy;
            } else retVal = false;
        }
    } else retVal = false;

    return(retVal);
}
This filter keeps users from entering an illegal printer name. Specifically, it disallows ampersand (@) and colon (:) characters (reserved for forming NBP network names) and high ASCII characters (because PostScript is technically 7-bit ASCII), and it limits the length of the name to kMaxNameLength (30). The filter can make use of callbacks, because we put a pointer to our LWFUParmBlk into the window's refCon field.

Performance time. If renameFlag is true, RenamePrinter performs the rename operation.

Here's the code:

if (renameFlag) {
    GetIndString(psBuffer, pb->resSpace + kNamerStrs,
        kRenameStartStr);
    cb->GetPText(nameDlg, kNDNewName, newName);
    cb->Pstrcat(psBuffer, newName);
    cb->GetAndAppend(psBuffer, pb->resSpace + kNamerStrs,
       kRenameEndStr);

In constructing an appropriate PostScript program to rename the printer, we get the first part of the PostScript code from our STR# resource, append the new name the user provided, and finally tack on the end of the PostScript code. The handy Pascal-string utility callbacks were included for just this situation. We end up with our little PostScript renamer program in psBuffer, as a Pascal string.

Now things start getting a little more interesting. The code that actually downloads psBuffer to the printer and checks the results is as follows:

    if ((status = cb->OpenPrinter()) == noErr) {
        status = cb->DoWrite(psBuffer + 1, (short)*psBuffer,
            sendEOF, pb, ExitBufferRtn);
        cb->ClosePrinter();
    }

RenamePrinter opens a connection to the printer with the callback OpenPrinter. If there's no error, RenamePrinter uses DoWrite to write psBuffer to the printer. The sendEOF argument tells DoWrite to send an end-of-file indication to the printer after writing the specified text to the printer. Notice that ExitBufferRtn, the "output parser," is included as a parameter to DoWrite.

Here's the code for ExitBufferRtn:

pascal short ExitBufferRtn(short length, LWFUParmBlk *pb)
{
    Handle  dataHandle;               /* "Handlized" response */
    short   status;                   /* The return code */
    char    psErrorText[kCompStrLen]; /* Buffer for "fail" test */
    char    exitText[kCompStrLen];    /* Buffer for "success" test */
    GetIndString(psErrorText, pb->resSpace + kNamerStrs, kPSErrStr);
    GetIndString(exitText, pb->resSpace + kNamerStrs, kExitVerStr);

    PtrToHand(pb->callBacks->PAPReadBuffer, &dataHandle, length);
    
    if (Munger(dataHandle, 0, psErrorText + 1, *psErrorText,
            nil, 0) >= 0)
        status = printerError;
    else if (Munger(dataHandle, 0, exitText + 1, *exitText,
            nil, 0) >= 0)
        status = noErr;
    else status = printerError;
    
    DisposHandle(dataHandle);
    return(status);
}

DoWrite constantly polls the printer for some response. If anything comes back from the printer (like an error, or some verification that the operation was completed), it's sent to ExitBufferRtn. The return value from ExitBufferRtn is passed back to DoWrite, and subsequently returned as DoWrite's return value. This allows ExitBufferRtn to essentially "post" an error. The only predefined error is printerError, which is defined in UTIL.h. You may define your own error codes as well.

In order to return an error code, ExitBufferRtn needs to look for some sign of success or failure from the printer. To determine failure, it looks for "%%[ Error: ", which is the beginning of all error strings that are returned by PostScript printers. We don't care about parsing the rest, sinceany error is enough for us to return printerError.

To detect success, ExitBufferRtn searches for the string "%%[ exitserver: permanent", which is the beginning of "%%[ exitserver: permanent state may be changed ]%%". This string tells us that theexitserverpassword was correct. We should always see this response from the printer. These two search strings are stored in the resource file. Observe the relative resource IDs.

You may have noticed that a characteristic of UTILs seems to be avoiding work by using all those handy callbacks. But now we have to search for a string. Yuck! Well, let's cheat. We'll take the momentary memory hit and use PtrToHand to create a handle to a copy of the response from the printer. Then we'll search with every hacker's dream routine, Munger. After ExitBufferRtn sets status, it disposes of the temporary handle and returns.

Back in RenamePrinter, we set our local variable status from the DoWrite call. Since status was passed through from ExitBufferRtn, RenamePrinter can tell whether or not the rename operation was successful. Either way, it's really important to remember to close the connection. The rule is,if the OpenPrinter call succeeded, do a ClosePrinter call, even if the code in between failed .

Posting the reviews. Now that the ugly transmission-reception stuff is finished, let's tell the user what's going on.

     cb->UseCursor(0);
    if (status == noErr) {
        retVal = true;
        ParamText(newName, blankStr, blankStr, blankStr);
        cb->PositionAlert(pb->resSpace + kVerifyAlrt);
        CautionAlert(pb->resSpace + kVerifyAlrt, nil);
    } else {
        retVal = false;
        cb->PositionAlert(pb->resSpace + kFailAlrt);
        StopAlert(pb->resSpace + kFailAlrt, nil);
    }
}

Since the user needs to go out and choose the newly renamed printer with the Chooser, RenamePrinter puts up an alert if the rename operation is successful, half as a reminder to choose the printer, and half as a reminder of the new printer name. (See "Where'd That Printer Go?") If status, the local variable, was nonzero, RenamePrinter puts up a general error alert. In any case, RenamePrinter sets the return value appropriately, since Utility_Prime needs to know whether the printer is renamed, so that it can return the appropriate flags to the Font Utility.

Finally, RenamePrinter disposes of the (currently hidden) Namer dialog and returns.

 DisposDialog(nameDlg);
return(retVal);
}

That's basically it! Now let's glance at the resource file, NamerUTIL.r.

NAMERUTIL'S RESOURCES: NAMERUTIL.R

The only remarkable feature of NamerUTIL's resource file, NamerUTIL.r, is its use of relative resource IDs. For example, here's NamerUTIL's main dialog box DLOG resource:

resource 'DLOG' (ResSpace + kNamerDlg, "Namer", purgeable) {
    {40, 20, 162, 412},
    dBoxProc, invisible, noGoAway, 0x0,
    ResSpace + kNamerDlg,
    ""
};

Note that both the resource ID of the DLOG resource itself and the ID of the associated DITL resource are specified relatively. NamerUTIL.r also contains the following resource definition:

resource 'uvrs' (ResSpace + kVersion) {
    0x01, 0x00, final, 0x00,
    verUS,
    "1.0",
    "1.0, © 1991 Apple Computer, Inc."
};

The 'uvrs' resource is encouraged but not required. A 'uvrs' resource is structured exactly like a 'vers' resource. It stands forUTIL version,  and should have the same ID as the UTIL resource. The 'uvrs' resource provides a handy way to attach your copyright information to the UTIL.

BUILDING NAMERUTIL: MAKEFILE

Here's NamerUTIL's makefile:

# makefile - make rules for NamerUTIL

# Set up vars that describe UTIL's ID and resource space base
ID UTILID = 150
ResSpace = 18200
UTILName = "Rename Printer..."

COptions = -b -mbg full -sym off -r
AOptions = -d ResSpace={ResSpace}
LOptions = -sym off
ROptions = -a -d ResSpace={ResSpace}
Objects = UTILHead.a.o NamerUTIL.c.o "{Libraries}Interface.o"

LWFU ƒ LWFU.bak {Objects} NamerResources.rsrc MakeFile
    Duplicate -y LWFU.bak LWFU
    Rez {ROptions} -o LWFU NamerUTIL.r
    Link {LOptions} ð
        -rt UTIL={UTILID} ð
        -sn Main={UTILName} ð
        -o LWFU {Objects}
    Beep 1c,5 1e,5 1g,5 2c,5 2c,5,0 1g,5 2c,10

This makefile assumes you have a copy of the LaserWriter Font Utility named LWFU.bak in your target directory. It makes a copy, called LWFU, and Rezzes and links your UTIL directly into LWFU. Naturally, you can't distribute a modified version of the LaserWriter Font Utility (see "Distribution of UTILs"), but for development, this is a really handy way to test your UTILs. The Beep command to play "CHARGE!" at the end is optional. I put it there to remind me that I'd rather be at the ball game.

BUT WAIT! THERE'S MORE!

Our little NamerUTIL is a useful example of what you might do with a LaserWriter Font Utility UTIL. It does not, however, use every callback and exercise every option available to it. The CD contains a UTIL specification that lists prototypes for all the callbacks and more detailed descriptions of the fields of the LWFUParmBlk. There's also a version of the NamerUTIL sources that's set up for use with the UTILInstall application, for those who are hoping to write the first modal-word- processor-spreadsheet-communications-package UTIL.

SO GO FOR IT!

A great aspect of UTILs is their hybrid nature--a unique combination of Macintosh code and PostScript code. So where you would have had to analyze a text file that came back from your PostScript code, you can write a UTIL that actually does something useful with the output. UTILs are also a great chance for hardware manufacturers to make those device-specific test and calibration pages accessible to common users.

So go for it! If you've got a collection of really cool PostScript hacks sitting around, here's your chance to give them a shiny faceplate and loose them on the unsuspecting world!

DISTRIBUTION OF UTILS

Since you can't distribute modified Apple system software, how can you distribute UTILs? The answer is to distribute them as UTIL files along with the UTILInstall application. UTILInstall (included with the source code on the Developer CD Series  disc) is specifically designed for installing UTILs into the LaserWriter Font Utility. It requires that you generate a file, containing the UTIL and all its owned resources, that has a creator of 'UtIn' and a type of 'UTIL'. Also, you must supply a resource of type 'USPC' ( UTIL specification) that tells the UTILInstall program what resources you own. This is the Rez format of the USPC resource:
type 'USPC' {
    integer = $$Countof(ResourceList);
    array ResourceList {
        unsigned longint;/* Resource type */
        integer; /* Resource ID */
    };
};

You provide a USPC resource with the same ID as your UTIL. The USPC resource lists the resource type and ID for every resource your UTIL owns. This tells the UTILInstall program exactly what resources to move, plus it facilitates the renumbering of your owned resources should there be an ID conflict.

For instance, suppose you've built your UTIL with UTIL ID 150 and ResSpace 18200. If the user attempts to install your UTIL into a copy of the Font Utility that already contains a UTIL with the ID 150, UTILInstall renumbers your UTIL and all its owned resources as specified in the USPC list.

Given a little thought, you might wonder what happens to resources that refer to other resources by ID, like DLOG and ALRT resources. Unfortunately, UTILInstall doesn't provide a comprehensive renumbering facility. It does, however, have special cases for renumbering DLOG and ALRT resources. Other resource types that refer to other resources by ID should be avoided if you plan to distribute your UTIL with UTILInstall.

For a complete example of the use of USPC resources, see the alternate NamerUTIL sources and the UTILInstall source code on the CD.

WHERE'D THAT PRINTER GO?

We rename the printer behind the Font Utility's back (and the Chooser's, for that matter). The name and zone information for the currently chosen printer is stored in some string resources in the System file. After we rename the printer, the strings in the System file still contain the old printer name.

The return value urCheckPrinter causes the Font Utility to attempt to open a PAP connection with the "currently chosen printer." Since the name of the currently chosen printer has not been updated, the PAPOpen call fails, and the user gets the alert shown in Figure 7. This is an unfortunate side effect of renaming the printer.

The solution is to tell the Chooser that we have chosen a printer in the same zone with our new name, but there's no officially sanctioned way to do this. Future versions of system software will remedy this situation.

[IMAGE Ressler_final_rev9.GIF]

Figure 7A NamerUTIL Side Effect


BRYAN K. RESSLER, a.k.a. "Beaker," is a bloodstained "binary vivisectionists" who regularly cuts into live code just to see what happens. He terrorized the University of California, Irvine for four years, and just to get rid of him, they gave him a B.S. in computer science. Beaker did the System 7 revision of the LaserWriter Font Utility. Now, when the medication wears off and he's allowed out of his cell, he writes sound and MIDI applications, composes marginal music, and sharpens his "binary scalpel."*

THANKS TO OUR TECHNICAL REVIEWERS Richard Hu, Dave Johnson, Scott "Zz" Zimmerman*

 
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