TweetFollow Us on Twitter





Here's a tool that gives you access to what you really need to know while debugging a driver. With Tracks, you decide what kind of information you want to track-- variable contents, who called the current function, timing information, and more--all while your driver's running. When a problem arises, you can easily tell where your driver's been and what it's been doing, so you can find out just what went wrong.

If you've ever written a device driver, you know how hard it is to keep track of what's going on. Learning the value of variables and other data as the driver runs usually requires a lot of time in a debugger.

When a driver crashes, trashing the stack in the process, it's often impossible to determine the last routine that was executed. Finding the bug can take many hours, especially if the crash appears only periodically. Even after you've found the bug, each crash requires recompiling, building, restarting, and retesting. Anything to help locate bugs more quickly and accurately could save a lot of time and frustration.

That's why Tracks was written. Whether you're writing your first or your fiftieth driver, it can help you track down those nasty bugs that always show up. The simple macros in Tracks make it easy to log all kinds of information from a driver written in C or C++. You can record strings, data blocks, longs, and even formatted data types. Tracks can write debugging information directly to disk as it comes in, or it can keep the information in a circular buffer and dump it to disk on command--a MacsBug dcmd (debugger command) lets you do this even after a crash.

You can completely control what information is logged, and your driver won't even know it. If you know a routine works, you can turn off calls from it at any time-- including while your driver's running.

On theDeveloper CD Series disc, you'll find TestDrvr, a sample driver that demonstrates how to implement Tracks functionality in a simple (and useless) driver. Also enclosed is the complete source for the Tracks utilities, as well as all the necessary support tools. In the following sections, you'll find out about how Tracks works, what kind of information the Tracks macros log, and what the code does. You'll also get some pointers on installing and using Tracks. If you're eager to start using Tracks, take a look at "Tracks in Action."


Tracks works somewhat like a message service that can accept telephone calls on 128 different lines from the target driver. You decide where to install the lines and what kinds of messages each line will deliver. You can control which lines to listen to (or not) and where to save incoming messages.

The invocations of macros--or calls--that send information to Tracks are calledtracepoints.  You assign each tracepoint a number between 0 and 127, called adiagnostic ID (diagID), and a name. The diagID represents one bit in a 128-bit flag that can be set or cleared from the Tracks control panel device (cdev). When a tracepoint is encountered, data is logged only if the corresponding bit has been set.

Being able to set or clear tracepoints on the fly allows you to tailor the type of information being traced. By assigning a meaningful name to each tracepoint, you'll know which ones to set or clear, and the name of the tracepoint will be recorded with any Tracks output. Tracksbreakpoints  are tracepoints that will drop you into your debugger.

Because the diagID doesn't have to be unique, a tracepoint can represent a single Tracks call, a type of Tracks call, or a grouping of Tracks calls. A type of Tracks call, for instance, might be all error- reporting calls. A grouping might be all tracepoints in a particular routine.

This kind of flexibility allows you to group your information into logical and functional units. It's up to you to create as many or as few tracepoints as you need. For instance, if you're working on a new routine, you may set a whole bunch of Tracks calls all to the same diagID. When you test the routine, you can set some or all of the other switches to off and focus on the messages from that routine. Later, when you know the function works, you can keep that switch off.

Numbering for ease of use. There aren't any limits on how you group your diagIDs. You might assign all messages to one tracepoint or simply start at 0 and increment by 1 from there. The key is that once you know something works, you want to be able to turn off tracing in that area. By assigning unique diagIDs to groups of Tracks calls, you can quickly tailor your tracing.

For convenience, there are four groups of 32 tracepoints each (0-31, 32-63, 64-95, and 96-127) that you can turn on or off with a click. (The Tracks cdev contains buttons for levels 1 through 4, which correspond to these four groups.) Most new users start out tracing all information. But as more and more Tracks output is added, information overload can be a problem, and it's great to be able to limit Tracks information easily.

PartCodes are used to identify consecutive Tracks calls that have the same diagID. PartCodes should start at 0 and increment by 1 for each additional Tracks call with the same diagID. For example, say you wanted to dump the contents of all three parameters you receive on entry to a function. You'd probably want all these to have the same diagID. The first Tracks call should have a partCode of 0, the next call a partCode of 1, and so on. The partCode makes it more evident if some Tracks information is lost. Data can be lost if the circular buffer fills before writing to a file, and data can be locked out if Tracks is already in use.


To log data from your driver, you call one of five simple macros from your driver code. Each macro logs a different kind of information. All the calls must have access to your driver's global storage and follow the numbering conventions just described for the diagID and partCode.

T_STACK, one of the most useful calls, records the current function and who called it. If the driver is written in C++, a special unmangler automatically prints out the arguments that were passed to the function. If called from every major routine, T_STACK will leave the proverbial trail of bread crumbs. T_STACK's partCode is always 0.

T_DATA(diagID, partCode, &dataBlock, sizeof(dataBlock));
T_DATA is used to dump a block of memory, formatted in hexadecimal and ASCII.

T_TYPE(diagID, partCode, recordPtr, sizeof(Record), "\pRecord");
T_TYPE records a data structure. The address, size, and a Pascal string with the name of the structure must be passed to the macro. The format of the data structure must be defined in an 'mxwt' resource, stored in your driver or in your MacsBug Debugger Prefs file. If the resource to define the structure isn't found, the data will be treated as a T_DATA call. Since the templates are used only to format data, you don't need to use MacsBug.

T_PSTR(diagID, partCode, "\pA string you'd like to see");
T_PSTR simply records a Pascal string.

T_PSTRLONG(diagID, partCode, "\ptheLong = ", theLong);
T_PSTRLONG records a Pascal string and a long. Usually the string is used to tell you what follows. Feel free to cast whatever you can get away with to the long.


TestDrvr is a simple driver skeleton that checks the status of the keyboard. If the Option key is down, it logs one type of data, and if the Command key is down, it logs another type of data.

To see Tracks in action, follow these condensed instructions:

  1. Put DumpTracks into your MPW Tools folder and TestDrvr into your System Folder or Extensions folder.
  2. Put Tracks into your System Folder or, in System 7, into your Control Panels folder.
  3. Restart your Macintosh.
  4. Open the Tracks cdev, click the Driver Name button, and locate the file TestDrvr.
  5. Turn on Tracks and click the Level 1 button to turn on tracepoints 0-31 (only 0-3 are used).
  6. Press the Command key or the Option key to begin to log data. The Bytes Buffered field should change.
  7. Click Write Buffer to send TestDrvr output to disk. Only data written to disk can be examined.
  8. Start up MPW and type "DumpTracks" to see what was just traced.

Look over the TestDrvr source code if you haven't already done so. Don't forget to remove TestDrvr when you're done. For information about the output from the example, see the section "Examining Tracks Output" under "Using Tracks."


This section is for folks who are really wide awake and ready for the gritty details. (If you're not one of those folks, you may want to jump ahead to the "Installing Tracks" section.) The Tracks file contains a cdev, an INIT, and the Tracks driver. The Tracks driver has three key responsibilities: maintaining the cdev, sending messages to the target driver, and accepting data from the target driver via the trace procedure (TraceProc). Figure 1 shows the flow of data between Tracks and the target driver.

The Tracks driver's first responsibility includes sending status information to the cdev and responding to cdev commands like "clear buffer" and "write file." Because the cdev displays the status of fields that can change at any time, the cdev monitors the driver and updates fields as they change.

The Tracks driver doesn't always need periodic (accRun) messages. When the driver gets a message to turn its periodic write-to-file flag on or off, the driver sets or clears its dNeedTime bit in the dCtlFlags. (Recall that BitClr, BitSet, and BitTst test bits starting at the high-order bit.)

BitClr(&dCtl->dCtlFlags, 2L);/* Clear bit 5 = dNeedTime bit. */
BitSet(&dCtl->dCtlFlags, 2L);/* Set bit 5 = dNeedTime bit. */

The Tracks driver can send one of two messages to the target driver: "enable tracing" or "disable tracing." The enable message passes the target driver a function pointer that points to an address within the Tracks driver code as well as a pointer that points to the Tracks driver's own globals. The target driver needs to save both of these because they're needed by the Tracks macros. The macros use the function pointer to call the Tracks driver directly, passing it the globals pointer along with tracing data.

When the target driver gets the disable message, the saved function pointer is set to nil. (For the code to handle enable and disable messages, see the "Installing Tracks" section.) The Tracks macros in the target driver check to see if the function pointer is nil, and if it isn't, the target driver calls the function pointer within Tracks with arguments that correspond to the particular Tracks function. The macro that checks and invokes a non-nil function pointer is defined in the following code. The macros used in the target driver's code reference this macro. Notice that for a Tracks call to compile, it needs to access your globals by the same name, in this case by the name globals. Macros are used so that they can easily be compiled out of the final product.

Figure 1How Tracks Interacts With the Target Driver [IMAGE Lowe2.GIF]

#define TRACE(diagID, partCode, formatID, data1, data2, data3) \
{ register ProcPtr func; \
func = globals->fTraceProcPtr; \
if ( func != nil ) \
(*((pascal void (*)(long, unsigned char, unsigned char, \
unsigned char, long, long, long))func)) \
(globals->fTraceArg, diagID, partCode, formatID, \
data1, data2, data3); }

The actual routine the macro executes, located in the Tracks driver, is shown below. The address of this routine was passed to the target driver in the enable message, and the first argument (long refcon) is actually the pointer to the Tracks driver's globals, which the Tracks driver expects the target driver to pass back to it each time. The macro calls right into the Tracks driver code.

pascal void TraceProc(long refcon, unsigned char diagID,
    unsigned char partCode, unsigned char formatID, long data1,
    long data2, long data3)
register TraceGlobals       *globals;
register Boolean            okLocked;
register Boolean            breakOnExit = false;    

    globals = (TraceGlobals *)refcon;   // Set up driver globals.

    if (diagID < 128)        // Valid diagIDs range from 0 to 127.
        // Check the need for a break on exit (breakpoint was set).
        breakOnExit = BitTst((Ptr)globals->fBreakMask, (long)diagID);
        // Check to see if the information passed should be logged.
        if (BitTst((Ptr)globals->fTraceMask, (long)diagID))
            // The tracepoint was set--check that the buffer is ready.
            if (globals->fBufferEnabled)     // Is the buffer ready?
                // Test and set "locked-out" flag.
                okLocked = UTLock(&globals->fTraceLock);

                // If trace request was locked out, set locked-out
                // flag.
                if (okLocked)
                    // Log incoming data to circular buffer.
                    HandleTraceData(globals, diagID, partCode,
                        formatID, data1, data2, data3);
                    globals->fLockedOutFlag = true; // Locked out!
// Handle a breakpoint, if any.
    if (breakOnExit)
        // We can assume there's a debugger installed.
        if (globals->fBreakOnceThenClear)
            // Signal cdev that debug mark was turned off.
            globals->fDebugMarkUnset = true;
            DebugStr("\pTrace User Breakpoint (Once)");
            DebugStr("\pTrace User Breakpoint");

The above routine checks to see if the diagID specified is enabled (checked in the cdev). If it is, HandleTraceData handles the data passed in the way indicated by the formatID. The formatID specifies what type of data is being passed--a Pascal string, a Pascal string and a long, a data block, a stack peek request, or a formatted type dump. Adventurous programmerscould add their own formats (for instance, to record floating-point numbers) by modifying the HandleTraceData routine and DumpTracks and then creating a new macro. Adding a new format isn't trivial, though. Usually, it's easier to make an existing format do the job. Since this routine can be called at interrupt time, it needs to test and set a "locked-out" flag, which it does with an assembly language routine called UTLock that uses the 68000's BSET instruction. BSET helps ensure that the routine won't get into trouble by executing more than one instance of itself. If the routine gets locked out, DumpTracks will notify you that some data was lost.

The routine also checks to see if a breakpoint has been set for that diagID. If it has, just before the routine exits, it invokes the debugger. Two kinds of breakpoints are supported--"once-only" and "immortal." The once-only kind of breakpoint flag is cleared after being tripped. Tracks breakpoints can be cleared or set only through the Tracks cdev--not from your debugger.

An interesting routine in drvr.c is StackPeek, which is called by T_STACK macros. StackPeek examines the stack frame to find what the current procedure is and who called it. StackPeek searches backward until it finds the return address of the function that called T_STACK. From there, it searches the actual code, looking for the last instruction (an RTS, a JMP(A0), or an RTD), which is followed by the name of the function. It then finds the length of the function name and repeats the process for the caller, which is just one stack frame deeper.


The following are instructions for adding Tracks capabilities to a driver written in C or C++. Currently the only way to view Tracks output is through the DumpTracks MPW tool.
  1. Install the Tracks files on your hard drive. Put a copy of Tracks into your System Folder or, in System 7, into your Control Panels folder. Put DumpTracks into your MPW Tools folder and add the 'dcmd' resource in Tracks.dcmd to your Debugger Prefs. Finally, make a copy of TracksInfo.h and put it with your driver code.
  2. Add two variables to your driver's global storage area. These must be accessible from every place you want to trace from. You may need to redo your globals so that these variables are always able to be accessed in the same way. The globals should look like this:

     typedef struct 
    your stuff 
     ProcPtr fTraceProcPtr;
    Ptr fTraceArg;
    } Globals, *GlobalsPtr;
  3. In your initialization routine, you'll need to set the fTraceProcPtr to nil.

     globals->fTraceProcPtr = nil;

    Tracks calls attempted before this is done will result in fireworks. If your driver's global storage isn't referenced by a parameter calledglobals, you can change the word "globals" in the file TracksInfo.h to whatever the global storage is referenced by. The Tracks macros require you to be consistent in your global storage references.

  4. Include TracksInfo.h in the header file where you define your global storage block.
  5. Add two csCodes to your driver's code. They need to look like this:
    case kInstallTrace: 
    globals->fTraceProcPtr = ((TraceDataPtr)paramPtr)->TraceProc;
    globals->fTraceArg = ((TraceDataPtr)paramPtr)->TraceGlobals; break;
    case kRemoveTrace: globals->fTraceProcPtr = nil;
    globals->fTraceArg = nil;
  6. Add two resources to your driver's .r or .rsrc file: 'DrvN' and 'STR#'.

    Resource 'DrvN' ID 128 contains a Pascal string with the name of your driver (which starts with a period). The 'DrvN' resource lets the cdev know which driver to send the "turn on" and "turn off" messages to.

    Resource 'STR#' ID 777 is a string list that should contain the names of tracepoints you create. It's for the tracepoint names in the cdev and for DumpTracks output--not for use by your driver. The 'STR#' resource can be partially filled, blank, or even missing.

    When you add a Tracks call with a new diagID, you'll want to give it a name and add it to the string list. Changes show up the next time the cdev is opened or DumpTracks is used. If the 'STR#' resource is missing, the tracepoint name will show up in the cdev as a number--the diagID. DumpTracks will warn you when there's no name associated with the diagID.

    Warning: The diagIDs range from 0 to 127, and in ResEdit the string list is set up to start at 1. This means that if you add a Tracks call with a new diagID of 5, you need to change entry number 6 in the string list.

Add a few Tracks macros to your code, rebuild your driver, and you're set to start using Tracks. When you're ready to ship your driver, simply #define GOLD in TracksInfo.h and remove the two Tracks resources and any 'mxwt' resources from your driver.


Tracks can be controlled via dcmd or cdev. The dcmd lets you turn tracing on and off and write the circular buffer to disk. The Tracks cdev, shown in Figure 2, lets you control all the Tracks functions.


Figure 2 A Look at the Tracks cdev

To begin tracing data, open the cdev, click the Driver Name button, and select a driver that has Tracks code installed at the Standard File prompt. If the target driver is set up properly, you'll see the name of the driver next to the button. To turn on tracing, click the On button and check the tracepoints you want traced. Tracepoints are represented by the list of 128 checkboxes. As soon as information is retrieved, the number in the Bytes Buffered field will change. To stop sending data to Tracks, click the Off button.

To set breakpoints from Tracks, either click in the Tracks cdev just to the left of the scroll bar, opposite the desired tracepoint, or Option-click a checkbox. A tiny bug will appear, indicating a breakpoint. When a breakpoint is hit, you'll need to step a few times to return from the Tracks code to your driver. Since the default type of breakpoint is once-only, a breakpoint must be reset each time after it's encountered.

Like all good circular buffers, the Tracks buffer will hold the most current data. The default (and minimum) setting is 4K. If you want to change this size, you need to turn off Tracks and clear the contents of the buffer before clicking the arrows button. Generally, it's better to have a large buffer if you can afford it. But if you aren't logging a lot of data, and periodic write-to-file is turned on, you can have a small buffer and not lose any information.

An excellent use of the circular buffer is to catch sporadic bugs that might not occur for hours (or days). For example, set up a test to run continuously until the problem is detected. Plan to let the test run over the weekend with write-to-file turned off. When you come in on Monday, the circular buffer will have the last 4K of data--or whatever size buffer you used--leading up to and including the occurrence of the problem.

Before you can examine any Tracks data, you need to send it to a file by clicking the Write Buffer button. To clear the file, click the Reset EOF button. The data is always written to the Tracks Prefs file, which hangs out in your System Folder or, in System 7, in your Preferences folder. Use the Reset EOF button instead of throwing the Tracks Prefs file away, since settings information is also stored there.

If you check the Periodic Write-To-File box, data will be written to the disk approximately every second (60 ticks), assuming there's data to send. Be forewarned that data can come out at an alarming clip--in minutes you can create a multimegabyte file. The periodic writes-to-file occur even when the cdev is closed, until you turn it off or your hard drive becomes full.

If your driver crashes, you can write the circular buffer to disk via the Tracks dcmd. Just type "Tracks write" from your dcmd-supporting debugger.

Once data has been written to your Tracks Prefs file, you can examine it using DumpTracks. Figure 3 shows a sample (from the TestDrvr example) of a couple of simple Tracks calls and the type of output you'll get. Notice that each routine that wants to use a Tracks macro needs to have a pointer to the globals passed as an argument with the same name--in this case,globals.

The first line of a record holds a time stamp. Because other calls with the same diagID will follow immediately, it's shown only when the partCode is 0.

The second line shows the diagID and the name of the corresponding tracepoint, shown in parentheses.

The "(diagID - partCode) TYPE_OF_TRACE" line (the third line) is followed by the data for that Tracks call. Figure 3Comparing Tracks Output With the Calls [IMAGE Lowe4.GIF] Notice that the T_TYPE call formats the contents of the driver's DCtlEntry. To be able to display formatted types, DumpTracks needs to read the 'mxwt' format from Debugger Prefs. Also notice that the DCtlEntry has a QHdr structure inside it, which was also displayed.


Debugging a device driver can be time consuming and difficult. Tracks provides you with a tool to help keep your drivers under control. How you set up tracing really depends on what kinds of things you'd like to monitor--error conditions, your own driver statistics, or whatever. If you suspect bugs will be, or are, a major source of headaches, you'll save time by adding lots of Tracks calls.

Take a look at the TestDrvr sample source code. Once you get Tracks going in your own code, you should find that you're debugging your drivers in a fraction of the time it used to take.


breakpoint  A tracepoint that enters your debugger.

diagnostic ID (diagID)  A number between 0 and 127 that represents one bit in a 128-bit flag. In Tracks, a diagID is assigned to a tracepoint. The flag determines whether trace data will be logged or not. A diagID can represent a single Tracks call or a grouping of calls.

DumpTracks  An MPW tool that lets you see Tracks output.

partCode  A number used to identify consecutive Tracks calls that have the same diagID.

tracepoint  An invocation of a macro in your driver code that sends out information to the Tracks driver.

Tracks  A programming utility--containing the Tracks cdev, INIT, and driver--used to debug drivers in development.


  • Inside Macintosh  Volume II, Device Manager chapter (Addison-Wesley, 1985).
  • Designing Cards and Drivers for the Macintosh Family , Second Edition (Addison-Wesley, 1990).
  • "Using Object-Oriented Languages for Building Non-Applications in MPW" by Allan Foster and David Newman (MacHack '91 proceedings, available on CompuServe).
  • "Writing a Device Driver in C++ (What? In C++?)" by Tim Enwall, develop  Issue 4, October 1990. (One caveat if you want to build the sample driver: Be sure to use to MPW 3.1 and System 6.)
  • Black Holes and Warped Spacetime  by William J. Kaufmann (W. H. Freeman and Co., 1979).
  • The Pleasantries of the Incredible Mulla Nasrudin  by Idries Shah (E. P. Dutton & Co., 1968).

BRAD LOWE attends Chico State, where he claims to be majoring in fashion merchandising, although informed sources say he's been sighted frequently in computer science classes. An Eagle Scout, he enjoys hiking, skiing, mountain biking, and scuba diving. His newest toy is a paraglider, which he flies--on his free weekends--over obscure regions of Northern California. *

Tracks was written by Jim Flood and Brad Lowe for Orion Network Systems, Inc., a subsidiary of Apple Computer, to help develop and debug Orion's SNA*ps Access driver, part of the SNA*ps product family. SNA*ps allows you to connect your Macintosh to an IBM SNA (System Network Architecture) network and communicate with SNA-based hosts, midrange systems (such as AS/400), and even personal computers. *

For more information on the 'mxwt' templates, see the MacsBug documentation. *

THANKS TO OUR TECHNICAL REVIEWERS Neil Day, Jim Flood, Craig Hotchkiss, Gordon Sheridan*


Community Search:
MacTech Search:

Software Updates via MacUpdate

Apple Safari 10.0.1 - Apple's Web b...
Note: The direct download link is currently unavailable. It is available in the OS X 10.11.6 release, as well as in the Apple Security Updates. Apple Safari is Apple's web browser that comes with OS... Read more
Apple macOS Sierra 10.12.1 - The latest...
With Apple macOS Sierra, Siri makes its debut on Mac, with new features designed just for the desktop. Your Mac works with iCloud and your Apple devices in smart new ways, and intelligent... Read more
Apple iOS 10.1 - The latest version of A...
iOS 10 is the biggest release of iOS ever. A massive update to Messages brings the power of the App Store to your conversations and makes messaging more personal than ever. Find your route with... Read more
Hazel 4.0.7 - Create rules for organizin...
Hazel is your personal housekeeper, organizing and cleaning folders based on rules you define. Hazel can also manage your trash and uninstall your applications. Organize your files using a familiar... Read more
Opera 40.0.2308.90 - High-performance We...
Opera is a fast and secure browser trusted by millions of users. With the intuitive interface, Speed Dial and visual bookmarks for organizing favorite sites, news feature with fresh, relevant content... Read more
BetterTouchTool 1.93 - Customize Multi-T...
BetterTouchTool adds many new, fully customizable gestures to the Magic Mouse, Multi-Touch MacBook trackpad, and Magic Trackpad. These gestures are customizable: Magic Mouse: Pinch in / out (zoom... Read more
Backblaze - Online backup serv...
Backblaze is an online backup service designed from the ground-up for the Mac. With unlimited storage available for $5 per month, as well as a free 15-day trial, peace of mind is within reach with... Read more
Postbox 5.0.5 - Powerful and flexible em...
Postbox is a new email application that helps you organize your work life and get stuff done. It has all the elegance and simplicity of Apple Mail, but with more power and flexibility to manage even... Read more
Coda 2.5.19 - One-window Web development...
Coda is a powerful Web editor that puts everything in one place. An editor. Terminal. CSS. Files. With Coda 2, we went beyond expectations. With loads of new, much-requested features, a few surprises... Read more
Toast Titanium 15.1 - $99.99
Roxio Toast 15 Titanium, the leading DVD burner for Mac, makes burning even better, adding Roxio Secure Burn to protect your files on disc and USB in Mac- or Windows-compatible formats. Get more... Read more

Latest Forum Discussions

See All

WitchSpring2 (Games)
WitchSpring2 1.27 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $3.99, Version: 1.27 (iTunes) Description: This is the story of Luna, the Moonlight Witch as she sets out into the world. This is a sequel to Witch Spring. Witch Spring 2... | Read more »
4 popular apps getting a Halloween makeo...
'Tis the season for all things spooky. So much, so, in fact, that even apps are getting into the spirt of things, dressing up in costume and spreading jack o' lanterns all about the place. These updates bring frightening new character skins, scary... | Read more »
Pokémon GO celebrates Halloween with can...
The folks behind Pokémon GO have some exciting things planned for their Halloween celebration, the first in-game event since it launched back in July. Starting October 26 and ending on November 1, trainers will be running into large numbers of... | Read more »
Best Fiends Forever Guide: How to collec...
The fiendship in Seriously's hit Best Fiends has been upgraded this time around in Best Fiends Forever. It’s a fast-paced clicker with lots of color and style--kind of reminiscent of a ‘90s animal mascot game like Crash Bandicoot. The game... | Read more »
5 apps for the budding mixologist
Creating your own cocktails is something of an art form, requiring a knack for unique tastes and devising interesting combinations. It's easy to get started right in your own kitchen, though, even if you're a complete beginner. Try using one of... | Read more »
5 mobile strategy games to try when you...
Strategy enthusiasts everywhere are celebrating the release of Civilization VI this week, and so far everyone seems pretty satisfied with the first full release in the series since 2010. The series has always been about ultra-addictive gameplay... | Read more »
Popclaire talk to us about why The Virus...
Humanity has succumbed to a virus that’s spread throughout the world. Now the dead have risen with a hunger for human flesh, and all that remain are a few survivors. One of those survivors has just called you for help. That’s the plot in POPCLAIRE’... | Read more »
Oceans & Empires preview build sets...
Hugely ambitious sea battler Oceans & Empires is available to play in preview form now on Google Play - but download it quickly, as it’s setting sail away in just a few days. [Read more] | Read more »
Rusty Lake: Roots (Games)
Rusty Lake: Roots 1.1.4 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $2.99, Version: 1.1.4 (iTunes) Description: James Vanderboom's life drastically changes when he plants a special seed in the garden of the house he has inherited.... | Read more »
Flippy Bottle Extreme! and 3 other physi...
Flippy Bottle Extreme! takes on the bottle flipping craze with a bunch of increasingly tricky physics platforming puzzles. It's difficult and highly frustrating, but also addictive. When you begin to master the game, the sense of achievement is... | Read more »

Price Scanner via

Apple’s Thursday “Hello Again” Event A Largel...
KGI Securities analyst Ming-Chi Kuo, who has a strong record of Apple hardware prediction accuracy, forecasts in a new note to investors released late last week that a long-overdue redo of the... Read more
12-inch Retina MacBooks on sale for $100 off...
Amazon has 2016 12″ Apple Retina MacBooks on sale for $100 off MSRP. Shipping is free: - 12″ 1.1GHz Silver Retina MacBook: $1199.99 $100 off MSRP - 12″ 1.1GHz Gold Retina MacBook: $1199.99 $100 off... Read more
Save up to $600 with Apple refurbished Mac Pr...
Apple has Certified Refurbished Mac Pros available for up to $600 off the cost of new models. An Apple one-year warranty is included with each Mac Pro, and shipping is free. The following... Read more
PixelStyle Inexpensive Photo Editor For Mac W...
PixelStyle is an all-in-one Mac Photo Editor with a huge range of high-end filters including lighting, blurs, distortions, tilt-shift, shadows, glows and so forth. PixelStyle Photo Editor for Mac... Read more
13-inch MacBook Airs on sale for $100-$140 of...
B&H has 13″ MacBook Airs on sale for $100-$140 off MSRP for a limited time. Shipping is free, and B&H charges NY sales tax only: - 13″ 1.6GHz/128GB MacBook Air (sku MMGF2LL/A): $899 $100 off... Read more
2.8GHz Mac mini available for $988, includes...
Adorama has the 2.8GHz Mac mini available for $988, $11 off MSRP, including a free copy of Apple’s 3-Year AppleCare Protection Plan. Shipping is free, and Adorama charges sales tax in NY & NJ... Read more
21-inch 3.1GHz 4K on sale for $1379, $120 off...
Adorama has the 21″ 3.1GHz 4K iMac on sale $1379.99. Shipping is free, and Adorama charges NY & NJ sales tax only. Their price is $120 off MSRP. To purchase an iMac at this price, you must first... Read more
Check Apple prices on any device with the iTr...
MacPrices is proud to offer readers a free iOS app (iPhones, iPads, & iPod touch) and Android app (Google Play and Amazon App Store) called iTracx, which allows you to glance at today’s lowest... Read more
Apple, Samsung, Lead J.D. Power Smartphone Sa...
Customer satisfaction is much higher among smartphone owners currently subscribing to full-service wireless carriers, compared with those purchasing service through a non-contract carrier, according... Read more
Select 9-inch Apple WiFi iPad Pros on sale fo...
B&H Photo has select 9.7″ Apple WiFi iPad Pros on sale for up to $50 off MSRP, each including free shipping. B&H charges sales tax in NY only: - 9″ Space Gray 256GB WiFi iPad Pro: $799 $0 off... Read more

Jobs Board

*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions- Towson,...
Job Description: Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, Read more
Software Engineering Intern: Integration / QA...
Job Summary Apple is currently seeking enthusiastic interns who can work full-time for a minimum of 12-weeks between Fall 2015 and Summer 2016. Our software Read more
Software Engineering Intern: Frameworks at *...
Job Summary Apple is currently seeking enthusiastic interns who can work full-time for a minimum of 12-weeks between Fall 2015 and Summer 2016. Our software Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions- Nashua,...
Job Description: Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions- Napervi...
Job Description:SalesSpecialist - Retail Customer Service and SalesTransform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, Read more
All contents are Copyright 1984-2011 by Xplain Corporation. All rights reserved. Theme designed by Icreon.