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Summer 91 - SCORING POINTS WITH TRUETYPE

SCORING POINTS WITH TRUETYPE

KONSTANTIN OTHMER AND MIKE REED

TrueType, Apple's outline font technology, opens up a world of possibilities for improved handling of text. For example, with outline fonts, users can resize text as they've always been able to resize other objects in drawing programs--by grabbing handles and dragging. This article shows how to program this and other exciting transformations to text.


The Font Manager in System 7.0 can use TrueType outline fonts, in addition to bitmapped fonts, to produce text on the screen and on a printer. In outline fonts, the appearance of individual characters is defined by outlines, not bitmaps. The TrueType font mechanism is also available as an INIT for System 6.0.7 users.

Your application can take advantage of the special capabilities provided by TrueType fonts to transform text in decorative and useful ways. These transformations include shrinking or stretching text to fit a given bounding box and creating patterned, antialiased text. This article provides routines for accomplishing both of these kinds of transformations. First, though, let's explore in more detail how TrueType fonts differ from their predecessor, bitmapped fonts.

WHY TRUETYPE IS TRULY WONDERFUL

To understand why TrueType is truly wonderful, you first have to understand the trouble with bitmapped fonts. With bitmapped fonts, to generate fonts of sizes for which no bitmap exists, QuickDraw simply picks an available font size according to a gnarly algorithm and stretches or shrinks the bits. Unfortunately, when a bitmap is resized the resulting image is often far from pleasing.

This problem is easily understood: imagine you're shrinking a 1-bit image by a factor of two in the vertical dimension. This means two pixels in the source image combine to form one pixel in the result. If both source pixels are black or both are white, the solution is easy. The problem comes when the two source pixels are different. In this case, since most images on the Macintosh appear on a white background, QuickDraw preserves black. Thus, if either source pixel is black, the result is black.

QuickDraw uses this same algorithm for larger shrinks. When an image is shrunk vertically by a factor of eight, if any one of the eight source pixels is black, the resulting pixel is black. Because there is more information in the source than can be represented in the destination, the resulting image often looks ragged and is typically too dark.

A similar problem is encountered when enlarging an image. QuickDraw enlarges images by replicating pixels; thus, the result becomes blocky. There simply is not enough information in the source image to provide a better scaled-up representation. Figure 1 shows a 72-point B in the bitmapped Times® font resized by various amounts.

[IMAGE 030-047_Othmer/Reed_html1.GIF]

Figure 1 Resizing a Bitmapped Character

This problem with resizing has further implications. Have you ever tried to resize text in the same way you resize other objects in a drawing program like MacDraw®? If you have, you've discovered that when you move the handles on the bounding box, the text clipping and formatting change, but the text isn't resized. This inconsistency between the way text and other objects are handled can be very confusing to users and may deny them the function they really want: to stretch the text to fill the box. The reason for this difficulty is--you guessed it! Although resizing an object such as a rectangle produces excellent results, resizing a bitmapped font results in an image that is, well, ugly.

Enter TrueType. With TrueType fonts, each character is stored as an outline. QuickDraw knows the shape of the character, much as it knows the shape of a circle. When a character is imaged, its outline is scaled to the appropriate size and then filled. When a character is scaled, the outline is scaled rather than the bits. Thus, an excellent representation of the character is possible at all scaling factors. Figure 2 shows how an outline font looks when compared to a bitmapped font drawn in a size for which no bitmap exists.

[IMAGE 030-047_Othmer/Reed_html1a.GIF]

Figure 2 Bitmapped Versus Outline Font

Because characters maintain their integrity at all sizes in TrueType, it's now possible to resize text in the same way users have always been able to resize other objects in drawing programs. We'll show you a routine for doing this. It's also possible to superimpose a text mask on any picture you want in order to create decorative effects. We'll also show you how to do this.

SCALING TEXT TO FIT A GIVEN RECTANGLE

To show how easy it is with TrueType to produce high-quality text scaled to given dimensions, we've written a routine called BoxText that scales a string of text to fit a given rectangle. It takes a parameter that indicates how the text should be constrained: vertically, horizontally, both, or neither. Figure 3 shows examples of text treated in these ways with the BoxText routine.

The BoxText routine is fairly simple. It first checks to see if any constraints are turned on. The constraints are defined as follows:

typedef enum boxTextOptions {
    noConstraints,
    constrainH,
    constrainV
} boxTextOptions;

Normally, BoxText works just like DrawString. If you pass constraints, the text is stretched to fit the bounding rectangle's width, or height, or both. This is done through a call to StdText. The stretching factors are computed from the text's original bounds and the bounds passed to BoxText.

[IMAGE 030-047_Othmer/Reed_html2.GIF]

Unconstrained, Constrained horizontally, Constrained vertically, Constrained both

Figure 3 Text Scaled With the BoxText Routine


void GetTextRect(char* text, Rect* bounds)
{
    Point       identity;
    SetPt(&identity, 1, 1);     /* No scaling. */
    GetTextBounds(text, identity, identity, bounds);
}
void GetTextBounds(char* text, Point numer, Point denom,
        Rect* bounds)
{
    FontInfo    info;
    Fixed       hScale = FixDiv(numer.h, denom.h);
    Fixed       vScale = FixDiv(numer.v, denom.v);

    GetFontInfo(&info);
    SetRect( bounds, 0, FixMul(-info.ascent, vScale),
                FixMul(StringWidth(text), hScale),
                FixMul(info.descent + info.leading, vScale) );
    OffsetRect(bounds, thePort->pnLoc.h, thePort->pnLoc.v);
}

GetTextRect calls GetTextBounds. GetTextBounds takes a string and scaling factors and returns the bounding rectangle; note that it calls GetFontInfo to determine the height and StringWidth to determine the width. GetFontInfo is used instead of OutlineMetrics since the measurements for the entire font (not just individual characters) are used to calculate the rectangle for the text. Furthermore, GetFontInfo is faster than OutlineMetrics.

The bounds are then scaled by the given scaling factors. The ascent is scaled by the vertical stretching factor to correctly place the text's baseline. Without this adjustment, the top of the text would not align with the top of the constraining rectangle. Finally, the rectangle is offset to the current pen location.

When the text is constrained to fit in the rectangle both horizontally and vertically, the numerator for vertical scaling is set to the height of the rectangle and the denominator is set to the height of the text. For horizontal scaling, the numerator is set to the rectangle width and the denominator is set to the string width. Traditionally, these scaling factors have been stored in point records, and in our routine the code uses SetPt to set the values. Then MoveTo is called to position the pen at the location where the text is to be drawn. Finally, the scaled text is drawn using StdText and the text size is restored.

Note the technique used to call StdText: First the code checks to see whether there are custom bottlenecks in the current port (as there are when printing). If so (the grafProcs field is nonzero), the StdText bottleneck routine, rather than the trap, is called. This is necessary to allow BoxText to print. (Calling the StdText bottleneck is accomplished via the macro, given for both MPW and THINK C, before the BoxText routine.)

#ifdef MPW
    typedef pascal void (*StdTextProc)(short count, Ptr text,
        Point numer, Point denom);
    #define STDTEXTPROC(count, text, numer, denom) \
        ((StdTextProc)thePort->grafProcs->textProc) \
        (count, text, numer, denom)
#else       /* THINK C version. */
    #define STDTEXTPROC(count, text, numer, denom)  \
        CallPascal(count, text, numer, denom, \
        thePort->grafProcs->textProc)
#endif

void BoxText(char* myPString, Rect *dst, boxTextOptions options)
{
    Point       numer, denom;
    short       txSize;
    Rect        src;

    if (!(options & (constrainH | constrainV))) {
        /* If there are no constraints, just call DrawString. */
        MoveTo(dst->left, dst->bottom);
        DrawString(myPString);
        return;
    }

    /* Save the current point size. */
    txSize = thePort->txSize;

    /* Temporarily set the size to something big, so that our 
     * source rectangle is more precise. This is needed since QD 
     * doesn't return fixed-point values for ascent, descent, and
     * leading. */
    TextSize(100);

    MoveTo(0, 0);
    GetTextRect(myPString, &src);

    switch (options) {

        case constrainH:
            numer.h = numer.v = dst->right - dst->left;
            denom.h = denom.v = src.right - src.left;
            break;

        case constrainV:
            numer.h = numer.v = dst->bottom - dst->top;
            denom.h = denom.v = src.bottom - src.top;
            break;

        case (constrainH | constrainV):
        /* Constrain both dimensions. */
            SetPt(&numer, dst->right - dst->left,
                dst->bottom - dst->top);
            SetPt(&denom, src.right - src.left,
                src.bottom - src.top);
            break;
    }

    if (denom.h && denom.v) {
        /* Since we're applying a fixed scale to src.top, a short,
         * the result, baseline, is also a short. */
        short baseline = FixMul(-src.top, FixDiv(numer.v, denom.v));
        MoveTo(dst->left, dst->top + baseline);
        /* If there are bottleneck procs installed, call them instead
         * of calling the trap directly. */
        if (thePort->grafProcs)
            STDTEXTPROC(*myPString, myPString+1, numer, denom);
        else
            StdText(*myPString, myPString+1, numer, denom);
    }
    TextSize(txSize);
}

RESIZING TEXT INTERACTIVELY

In most drawing programs, you change the size of an object by clicking and dragging with the mouse. This type of interactive resizing is calledrubberbanding since the borders of the object stretch and shrink like a rubber band. Using the previously described BoxText routine, it's easy to achieve this result for text.

The following routine, SlowRubberBandText, performs the operation. As you can probably guess from the routine name, the performance is not optimal. We'll return to this issue later with the FastRubberBandText routine.

The first thing SlowRubberBandText does is to set the pen mode and text mode to Xor. Xor mode is used so that drawing and erasing can be accomplished without buffering the screen contents and thus without using much memory. The drawback is that the text flickers when it's being resized. A commercial application would check to see if enough memory is available to buffer the screen contents, and if so would provide flicker-free resizing.

Next we have a do-while loop that tracks the mouse as long as the button is held down. On each iteration through the loop, a rectangle is constructed from the anchor point and the current mouse position. This rectangle is drawn and then BoxText is called to draw the text scaled to the rectangle.

The do-while loop waits for the mouse to move or for the button to be let up. If either of these conditions occurs, the text is erased (by being drawn again in the same place). If the button is let up (the terminating condition on the do-while loop), the routine exits, returning the bounding rectangle. Otherwise, the text is drawn scaled, using the new mouse position.

void SlowRubberBandText(char* myPString, Point anchorPoint,
        Rect *theRect, boxTextOptions options)
{
    Point       oldPoint;
    Point       newPoint;

    PenMode(patXor);
    TextMode(srcXor);
    SetRect(theRect, 0, 0, 0, 0);
    do {
        GetMouse(&oldPoint);
        Pt2Rect(oldPoint, anchorPoint, theRect); 
        FrameRect(theRect);                     /* Draw it. */
        BoxText(myPString, theRect, options);
        newPoint = oldPoint;
        while (EqualPt(newPoint, oldPoint) && Button())
            GetMouse(&newPoint);
        FrameRect(theRect);                     /* Erase it. */
        BoxText(myPString, theRect, options);
    } while (Button());
}

While this routine is a simple illustration of the use of BoxText, it's excruciatingly slow. The reason is that QuickDraw must rerender the outline every time the scaling changes. The FastRubberBandText routine images the text into a 1-bit off-screen GWorld, and then uses CopyBits to stretch the resulting bitmap to fit the specified rectangle. This is similar to the method QuickDraw uses to scale bitmapped fonts, described previously, and is much faster than the slow case.

The code first allocates a sufficiently large bitmap so that the text looks good even at large sizes. If the allocation fails in both temporary memory and the application heap, the code tries smaller rectangles in both heaps. If this also fails, it calls the SlowRubberBandText routine. If the needed memory is available, GWorld gyrations are performed to image the text into the off-screen pixMap. Then a do-while loop similar to the one in the SlowRubberBandText routine is executed, but rather than calling BoxText, it calls CopyBits. The exit conditions are similar to SlowRubberBandText, with the addition that the GWorld is disposed of.

void FastRubberBandText(char* myPString, Point p, Rect *theRect,
     boxTextOptions constraints)
{
    Rect                srcRect, dstRect, origRect;
    GDHandle            oldGD;
    GWorldPtr           oldGW;
    GWorldPtr           myOffGWorld;
    Point               oldPoint;
    Point               newPoint;
    PixMapHandle        myPixMapHandle;
    short               theFont = thePort->txFont;
    short               theFace = thePort->txFace;
    short               err;
    GetTextRect(myPString, &origRect);
    srcRect = origRect;
    OffsetRect(&srcRect, -srcRect.left, -srcRect.top);
/* Scale rectangle up by a factor of 8 to get good results when
 * resizing bitmap. */
    srcRect.right <<= 3;
    srcRect.bottom <<= 3;
/* Take a ride on the GWorld allocation loop. Try temporary memory
 * first, then the application heap. If both fail, keep trying with
 * smaller rectangles until success or until the rectangle is
 * smaller than the original rectangle. */
    do
        if (err = NewGWorld(&myOffGWorld, 1, &srcRect, 0, 0,
               useTempMem))
            if (err = NewGWorld(&myOffGWorld, 1, &srcRect, 0, 0,
                   0)) {
                srcRect.right >>= 1;
                        /* Try rectangle smaller by factor of 2. */
                srcRect.bottom >>= 1;
            }
    while (err && srcRect.right >= (origRect.right - origRect.left));
    if (!err) {
        GetGWorld(&oldGW,&oldGD);

    /* Copy font info from current port into GWorld, clear GWorld,
     * and draw the text into the GWorld. This leaves a pixMap that
     * can be stretched using CopyBits. */
        SetGWorld(myOffGWorld, 0);
        TextFont(theFont);      /* Use font from the current port. */
        TextFace(theFace);      /* Ditto. */
        myPixMapHandle = GetGWorldPixMap(myOffGWorld); 
        LockPixels(myPixMapHandle);
        EraseRect(&srcRect);
        BoxText(myPString, &srcRect, constraints);
    /* Back to old GWorld for drawing. */
        SetGWorld(oldGW, oldGD);
        PenMode(patXor);
        TextMode(srcXor);
        do {
            GetMouse(&oldPoint);
            Pt2Rect(oldPoint, p, &dstRect);
            ConstrainRect(&srcRect, &dstRect, theRect,
                constraints);
            FrameRect(&dstRect);     /* Draw the text scaled to
                                          * fit in the rectangle. */
            CopyBits(*myPixMapHandle, &thePort->portBits,
                &srcRect, theRect, srcXor, 0);
            newPoint = oldPoint;
            while (EqualPt(newPoint, oldPoint) && Button())
                GetMouse(&newPoint);
            FrameRect(&dstRect);            /* Erase the text. */
            CopyBits(*myPixMapHandle, &thePort->portBits,
                &srcRect, theRect, srcXor, 0);
        } while (Button());
        UnlockPixels(myPixMapHandle);
        DisposeGWorld(myOffGWorld);
    }
    else
/* If GWorld allocation fails, use the slow version, which doesn't
 * require a GWorld. */
        SlowRubberBandText(myPString, p, theRect, constraints);
}
The FastRubberBandText routine calls ConstrainRect, which mirrors the scaling performed by BoxText. The routine scales the source rectangle to fit inside the destination rectangle with regard to constraints.

void ConstrainRect(Rect* src, Rect* dst, Rect* result,
        boxTextOptions constraints)
{
    Fixed       ratio;
    *result = *dst;
    switch (constraints) {
        case constrainH:
            ratio = FixDiv(src->bottom - src->top,
                src->right - src->left);
            result->bottom = dst->top +
                FixMul(dst->right - dst->left, ratio);
            break;
        case constrainV:
            ratio = FixDiv(src->right - src->left,
                src->bottom - src->top);
            result->right = dst->left +
                FixMul(dst->bottom - dst->top, ratio);
            break;
    }
}

CREATING PATTERNED, ANTIALIASED TEXT

Generation of high-quality scaled text is only one of the fun tricks of the new outline fonts in System 7.0. You can also create patterned, antialiased text with just a few lines of code. (Antialiased text is text whose edges have been smoothed by the addition of gray, creating a softer effect; see Figure 4, and see the antialiased version in color on the inside front cover of this issue.) The possibilities this opens up for writing a "Hello, World" program are staggering, as illustrated in Figure 5.

[IMAGE 030-047_Othmer/Reed_html3.GIF]

Figure 4 Regular Versus Antialiased Text

[IMAGE 030-047_Othmer/Reed_html4.GIF] Figure 5 How "Hello, World" Looks in 1991

To achieve this result you use the CopyDeepMask call (available only in System 7.0). Your application generates a source pixMap with the pattern or picture you want to use; the CreateTextMask routine creates a GWorld containing the text mask; and finally, you call CopyDeepMask to image the source through the mask onto the destination. Figure 6 illustrates this.

GENERATING THE MASK
The CreateTextMask routine works as follows: First, we attempt to allocate a GWorld that would allow text to be rendered at four times its final size. (If there's not enough memory in the application heap or temporary memory to allocate a GWorld this big, GWorlds of three times and then two times the final size are created. If all of these attempts fail, nil is returned.) Next the 1-bit GWorld is cleared to white and the text is imaged into it scaled by a factor of four (or whatever multiple the 1- bit GWorld turned out to be) in each direction. Then CopyBits with mode ditherCopy is used to shrink the large 1-bit GWorld to a 4-bit gray-scale GWorld; this is illustrated in Figure 7.

Because the mask will consist only of grays, the 4-bit GWorld is given a gray-scale CLUT. We are now finished with the 1-bit GWorld and dispose of it. The 4-bit gray-scale image we just created is returned by CreateTextMask. Notice that this routine may return a GWorld allocated in temporary memory, so you must dispose of the GWorld before calling WaitNextEvent.

[IMAGE 030-047_Othmer/Reed_html5.GIF]

Figure 6 Using CopyDeepMask

[IMAGE 030-047_Othmer/Reed_html6.GIF]

Figure 7 Shrinking the Mask With ditherCopy




GWorldPtr CreateTextMask(char* text, Rect* myRect,
        boxTextOptions options)
{
PixMapHandle        bigPixMap;
GDHandle            oldGD;
GWorldPtr           oldGW, maskWorld, bigWorld;
short               theFont = thePort->txFont;
short               theFace = thePort->txFace;
Rect                myRectBig;

/* Create the 4-bit maskWorld. */
    {   CTabHandle ctab = GetCTable(4+32);
        if (NewGWorld(&maskWorld, 4, myRect, ctab, 0,
                useTempMem) != noErr)
            if ((NewGWorld(&maskWorld, 4, myRect, ctab, 0,
                     0) != noErr)) {
                DisposHandle(ctab);
                return 0;
            }
    }

/* Create the supersample bigWorld. First try to use a GWorld 4
 * times larger. If that fails, try 3 and 2 times larger. If all
 * attempts fail, return a nil GWorld. */
    {   short zoom = 4;
        short width = myRect->right-myRect->left;
        short height = myRect->bottom-myRect->top;
        do {
            SetRect(&myRectBig, 0, 0, width * zoom, height * zoom);
            if (NewGWorld(&bigWorld, 1, &myRectBig, 0, 0,
                    useTempMem) == noErr)
                break;
            else
            if (NewGWorld(&bigWorld, 1, &myRectBig, 0, 0,
                    0) == noErr)
                break;
            zoom--;
        } while (zoom > 1);
        if (zoom == 1) {
            DisposeGWorld(maskWorld);
            return 0;
        }
    }

/* Draw the text into supersample bigWorld. */
    GetGWorld(&oldGW, &oldGD);
    SetGWorld(bigWorld, 0);
    TextFont(theFont);
    TextFace(theFace);
    LockPixels(bigPixMap = GetGWorldPixMap(bigWorld));
    EraseRect(&myRectBig);
    BoxText(text, &myRectBig, options);

/* Create 4-bit maskWorld by shrinking the big GWorld (with
 * ditherCopy) into the 4-bit gray-scale GWorld. NOTE: This is one of
 * the slowest steps, and is relatively easy to optimize with a
 * custom shrinking procedure. */
    {   PixMapHandle maskPixMap = GetGWorldPixMap(maskWorld);
        LockPixels(maskPixMap);
        SetGWorld(maskWorld, 0);
        CopyBits(*bigPixMap, *maskPixMap, &myRectBig, myRect,
               ditherCopy+srcCopy, 0L);
        UnlockPixels(maskPixMap);
    }
    DisposeGWorld(bigWorld);
    SetGWorld(oldGW, oldGD);

    return maskWorld;
}

SAYING "HELLO, WORLD"
Now we're ready to say "Hello, World" in patterned, antialiased text as shown in Figure 4. The following routine combines the BoxText, FastRubberBandText, and CreateTextMask routines to produce its results. In this example, the source pixMap contains a picture that's read in from a resource file. This pixMap could, of course, contain anything, and that image would peek through the text mask. The interesting thing to notice is that if you scale the source picture to the size of the text, the image behind each letter will stay the same regardless of the scaling factor.

void JustShowOff(Point anchorPt)
{
#define     kBoxOptions  constrainH | constrainV

    Rect            myRect;
    GWorldPtr       mask = 0;
    char            *text = "\pHello, World";

    FastRubberBandText(text, anchorPt, &myRect, kBoxOptions);

    if (mask = CreateTextMask(text, &myRect, kBoxOptions)) {

        GWorldPtr           oldGW;
        GWorldPtr           src;
        PicHandle           pic;
        PixMapHandle        maskBits;
        PixMapHandle        srcbits;
        GDHandle            oldGD;

        if (NewGWorld(&src, 8, &myRect, 0, 0,
                useTempMem) != noErr)
            if (NewGWorld(&src, 8, &myRect, 0, 0, 0) != noErr)
                goto EXIT;
        if (!(pic = GetPicture(1001)))  /* Assumes the PICT is marked
                                         * purgeable. */
            goto EXIT;
        GetGWorld(&oldGW, &oldGD);
        SetGWorld(src, 0);              /* Set to draw into
                                         * off-screen 8-bit. */
        DrawPicture(pic, &myRect);      /* Stretch picture to fill
                                         * user's rect. */
        LockPixels(maskBits = GetGWorldPixMap(mask));
        LockPixels(srcBits = GetGWorldPixMap(src));
        SetGWorld(oldGW, oldGD);
        CopyDeepMask(*srcBits, *maskBits, &thePort->portBits,
            &myRect, &myRect, &myRect, srcCopy, 0L);
        DisposeGWorld(src);
    }
EXIT:
    if (mask) DisposeGWorld(mask);
}

SUMMARY AND PARTING THOUGHTS

TrueType fonts provide high-quality characters at all sizes and scaling factors. This is possible because TrueType fonts are stored as outlines rather than bitmaps, and scaling an outline produces much better results than scaling a bitmap. The BoxText routine described in this article uses the StdText call to stretch text to fit within a specified box. A logical extension of this could solve a problem that has plagued humankind (or at least high school students): how to expand six and a half pages of text to produce a report that's exactly ten pages long, as required by law or a high school teacher.

Usually tactics such as adjusting the margins, line spacing, and font size can get you close. But this trial-and-error process could easily be replaced with a procedure written by some enterprising and humanitarian programmer:

FitTextToPages(char *text, long numPages);

Rather than simply adjusting the margins and line spacing, this routine could uniformly stretch a block of text to fill the desired number of pages.

System 7.0 also allows applications to pass a deep mask to CopyMask or CopyDeepMask. By imaging text into a large bitmap and then scaling it down with ditherCopy, it's possible to generate a soft- edged mask for producing antialiased text. Furthermore, text drawn using CopyDeepMask can have any image as the source pixMap, making it easy to produce patterned or picture text.

In the process of producing all of these great effects with text, we used GWorlds extensively. From the code samples it should be clear that GWorlds are extremely simple to create and manipulate. Judicious use of temporary memory for holding GWorlds allows our sample "Hello, World" program to run in a 100K heap and still produce very large (bigger than 1200 x 500 pixels) scaled text (provided there's enough temporary memory available, of course).

Enjoy!

KONSTANTIN OTHMER AND MIKE REED Have you seen these two guys? Konstantin and Mike, better known as Jake and Elwood, were last seen driving an old Black & White to the Palace Hotel Ballroom where they performed such hits as "Everybody Needs Some PixMaps to CopyBits" and "Gimme Some TrueType." Frequented hangouts: kitchen after lunch meetings, football field, poker tables,slopes at Tahoe, beach, Fitness Center, center stage. Known contacts: Bruce "Second Hand" Leak, Dave "Know" Good. Distinguishing marks: gym bag, running shoes, soft-edged clip art, smooth text forms. Latest fortune cookie: Ask and you shall receive; this includes trouble. Any information as to the whereabouts of these rascals should be sent to their managers, who are probably looking for them. *

Note that the fonts shown in the illustrations are drawn at screen resolution, so they don't look as good as they would if drawn on a higher-resolution device such as a printer. *

The example code shown here was written in THINK C. The Developer Essentials disc contains both THINK C and MPW ®versions. *

The antialiasing technique used in this article requires a multiple-bits-per-pixel destination device. Since most printers are 1 bit per pixel, these antialiasing techniques are useful primarily for the screen. A second problem with printing antialiased text using these techniques is that QuickDraw does not pass the CopyDeepMask call to printer drivers. For multiple-bits-per- pixel printers, you could image the antialiased text into a GWorld and then use CopyBits to draw the image on a printer. *

For details on using CopyBits with ditherCopy, see "QuickDraw's CopyBits Procedure" in develop, Issue 6. *

Thanks to Our Technical Reviewers Pete "Luke" Alexander, John Harvey, Bryan "Beaker" Ressler *

 

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Batting Average, by Pixolini, is designed to help you manage your statistics. Every time you go to bat, you can use your Apple Watch to track  your swings, strikes, and hits. [Read more] | Read more »
Celebrate Studio Pango's 3rd Annive...
It is time to party, Pangoland pals! Studio Pango is celebrating their 3rd birthday and their gift to you is a new update to Pangoland. [Read more] | Read more »
Become the World's Most Important D...
Must Deliver, by cherrypick games, is a top-down endless-runner witha healthy dose of the living dead. [Read more] | Read more »
SoundHound + LiveLyrics is Making its De...
SoundHound Inc. has announced that SoundHound + LiveLyrics, will be one of the first third-party apps to hit the Apple Watch. With  SoundHound you'll be able to tap on your watch and have the app recognize the music you are listening to, then have... | Read more »
Adobe Joins the Apple Watch Lineup With...
A whole tidal wave of apps are headed for the Apple Watch, and Adobe has joined in with 3 new ways to enhance your creativity and collaborate with others. The watch apps pair with iPad/iPhone apps to give you total control over your Adobe projects... | Read more »
Z Steel Soldiers, Sequel to Kavcom'...
Kavcom has released Z Steel Soldiers, which continues the story of the comedic RTS originally created by the Bitmap Brothers. [Read more] | Read more »
Seene Lets You Create 3D Images With You...
Seene, by Obvious Engineering, is a 3D capture app that's meant to allow you to create visually stunning 3D images with a tap of your finger, and then share them as a 3D photo, video or gif. [Read more] | Read more »
Lost Within - Tips, Tricks, and Strategi...
Have you just downloaded Lost Within and are you in need of a guiding hand? While it’s not the toughest of games out there you might still want some helpful tips to get you started. [Read more] | Read more »
Entertain Your Pet With Your Watch With...
The Petcube Camera is a device that lets you use live video to check in on your pet, talk to them, and play with them using a laser pointer - all while you're away. And the Petcube app is coming to the Apple Watch, so you'll be able to hang out with... | Read more »
Now You Can Manage Your Line2 Calls With...
You'll be able to get your Line2 cloud phone service on the Apple Watch very soon. The watch app can send and receive messages using hands-free voice dictation, or by selecting from a list of provided responses. [Read more] | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

Intel Compute Stick: A New Mini-Computing For...
The Intel Compute Stick, a new pocket-sized computer based on a quad-core Intel Atom processor running Windows 8.1 with Bing, is available now through Intel Authorized Dealers across much of the... Read more
Heal to Launch First One-Touch House Call Doc...
Santa Monica, California based Heal, a pioneer in on-demand personal health care services — will offer the first one-touch, on-demand house call doctor app for the Apple Watch. Heal’s Watch app,... Read more
Mac Notebooks: Avoiding MagSafe Power Adapter...
Apple Support says proper usage, care, and maintenance of Your Mac notebook’s MagSafe power adapter can substantially increase the the adapter’s service life. Of course, MagSafe itself is an Apple... Read more
12″ Retina MacBook In Shootout With Air And P...
BareFeats’ rob-ART morgan has posted another comparison of the 12″ MacBook with other Mac laptops, noting that the general goodness of all Mac laptops can make which one to purchase a tough decision... Read more
FileMaker Go for iPad and iPhone: Over 1.5 Mi...
FileMaker has announced that its FileMaker Go for iPad and iPhone app has surpassed 1.5 million downloads from the iTunes App Store. The milestone confirms the continued popularity of the FileMaker... Read more
Sale! 13-inch 2.7GHz Retina MacBook Pro for $...
 Best Buy has the new 2015 13″ 2.7GHz/128GB Retina MacBook Pro on sale for $1099 – $200 off MSRP. Choose free shipping or free local store pickup (if available). Price for online orders only, in-... Read more
Minimalist MacBook Confirms Death of Steve Jo...
ReadWrite’s Adriana Lee has posted a eulogy for the “Digital Hub” concept Steve Jobs first proposed back in 2001, declaring the new 12-inch MacBook with its single, over-subscribed USB-C port to be... Read more
13-inch 2.7GHz Retina MacBook Pro for $1234 w...
Adorama has the 13″ 2.7GHz/128GB Retina MacBook Pro in stock for $1234.99 ($65 off MSRP) including free shipping plus a free LG external DVD/CD optical drive. Adorama charges sales tax in NY & NJ... Read more
13-inch 2.5GHz MacBook Pro available for $999...
 Adorama has the 13-inch 2.5GHz MacBook Pro on sale for $999 including free shipping plus NY & NJ sales tax only. Their price is $100 off MSRP. Read more
Save up to $600 with Apple refurbished Mac Pr...
The Apple Store is offering Apple Certified Refurbished Mac Pros for up to $600 off the cost of new models. An Apple one-year warranty is included with each Mac Pro, and shipping is free. The... Read more

Jobs Board

*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions (US) - A...
Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, you're also the Read more
*Apple* Support Technician IV - Jack Henry a...
Job Description Jack Henry & Associates is seeking an Apple Support Technician. This position while acting independently, ensures the proper day-to-day control of Read more
*Apple* Client Systems Solution Specialist -...
…drive revenue and profit in assigned sales segment and/or region specific to the Apple brand and product sets. This person will work directly with CDW Account Managers Read more
*Apple* Software Support - Casper (Can work...
…experience . Full knowledge of Mac OS X and prior . Mac OSX / Server . Apple Remote Desktop . Process Documentation . Ability to prioritize multiple tasks in a fast pace Read more
*Apple* Software Support - Xerox Corporation...
…Imaging experience Full knowledge of Mac OS X and prior Mac OSX / Server Apple Remote Desktop Process Documentation Ability to prioritize multiple tasks in a fast pace Read more
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