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Speed Your Software Development With MacApp

Speed Your Software Development With MacApp

CHRIS KNEPPER

Using MacApp, Apple's object-based application framework, saves time and effort for programmers, and results in an application with the authentic Macintosh look and feel. Developing a Macintosh application can become a simple matter of selecting and integrating functionally specific routines with MacApp and letting MacApp take care of the user interface and other standard application behavior, as this article shows.

Wouldn't it be nice if you could develop a Macintosh application using previously existing routines? Think of the time and effort you could save if you were able to integrate functionally specific routines from an application you'd written for another platform. Or if you were able to obtain such routines from a public source and use them in your Macintosh application. Or if you could develop such routines yourself, in a language of your choice, and then use them in multiple applications.

And wouldn't it be nice if you had available to you libraries of routines that did the tedious work of creating the interface Macintosh users have come to expect? You wouldn't have to spend time and effort making sure your application did all the things a well-behaved Macintosh application should do.

Dream no more. MacApp makes all of this possible.

INTRODUCING MACAPP

MacApp is an application framework--a skeletal structure for a program that must be fleshed out before it is useful. The bones of this skeletal structure are the MacApp libraries, which handle standard application behavior such as initialization; accessing documents; managing user interface components, such as windows, buttons, scrollbars, and text; managing memory; and handling user input. You flesh out this skeleton by adding functionally specific routines and application-specific code. Figure 1 shows how these pieces fit together.

[IMAGE MacApp_v007_html1.GIF]

Figure 1. How MacApp Relates to Your Application

Because of Apple's commitment to MacApp, the MacApp libraries have been maintained and have matured over time. This has produced libraries that are both versatile, having been used in many applications to address a variety of needs, and robust, because they've been tested and debugged in hundreds of applications and on a wide variety of Macintosh configurations. You can use the code as is or modify pieces that don't meet your needs exactly.

The MacApp libraries are written in Object Pascal, and are distributed via APDA along with interfaces in Object Pascal and C++. Also, p1 Modula-2, Version 4.1, an object language based on Modula-2 now available from the MacApp Developer's Association is fully compatible with MacApp 2.0 and includes interfaces to the MacApp libraries. MPW allows you to develop in Object Pascal, C, C++, FORTRAN, and Modula-2 and still get the benefits of MacApp.

WHAT MACAPP CAN DO FOR YOU

MacApp can speed your application development process and help you create more robust applications for the Macintosh. Specifically, MacApp manages the user interface, handles events, implements memory management services, manages printing services, provides basic debugging services, and gives you high-level access to code via Mouser. In addition, when you use MacApp, a number of support organizations and class libraries are available to you. We'll take a closer look at each of these benefits.

Manages the user interface. Macintosh users are a demanding audience, having grown accustomed to the Macintosh's distinctive look and feel. Apple has explicitly defined the elements of this look and feel in its Human Interface Guidelines, available from APDA. If your application is to succeed, it must conform to these guidelines. The most significant benefit of using MacApp as your application framework is that it provides for all aspects of Apple's Human Interface Guidelines. MacApp handles user interaction, creates draggable, resizable windows, supports pull-down menus, and provides default behavior for a number of contingencies.

Furthermore, MacApp ships with a tool called ViewEdit that enables you to graphically manipulate and edit the user interface aspects of your software, such as the location, size, and text of buttons and scrollable lists. Creating a dialog box with various controls becomes a simple matter of sketching out these items much as you would sketch a drawing with MacDraw. Figure 2 shows the ViewEdit editing window from the DemoDialogs example that comes with MacApp, offering the programmer the chance to edit the Save As dialog.

[IMAGE MacApp_v007_html2.GIF]

Figure 2. Editing the Save As Dialog in the ViewEdit Window

Handles events. User interaction produces events that an application gets through the Main Event Loop. Programming this code from scratch is both time-consuming and difficult. MacApp frees you from this requirement, managing the extensive code to handle events and dispatching them accordingly.

Implements memory management services. The most difficult part of Macintosh programming, as veteran Macintosh programmers will attest, is careful memory management. Memory management services are fully implemented in MacApp, along with support for failure notification and a simple but elegant mechanism for recovering from failure conditions, such as a memory allocation failure in low-memory situations.

Manages printing services. Most Macintosh applications require some degree of printing services. Writing good printing code is difficult and demanding. MacApp makes the job of providing printing capabilities in an application easy, freeing most developers from the necessity of writing even a single line of printing code. MacApp's generalized printing model correctly manages most printing needs. It provides support for monochrome and color printing and for the print dialog boxes, and provides a default notification when the application is busy printing.

Provides basic debugging services. Debugging is always a chore. But MacApp eases this chore by supplying a built-in debugger that provides basic debugging services, such as a notification each time a code segment is loaded, and a built-in inspector that allows you to inspect your objects dynamically. Also, SADE 1.1, Apple's standard debugging environment and an excellent debugging tool, supports source code debugging of MacApp applications.

Gives you high-level access to code via Mouser. MacApp ships with a tool called Mouser that allows you to access both the MacApp libraries and your source code by class, method, and field. For details, see the sidebar "About Mouser" by Mary Boetcher, author of Mouser.

Makes support organizations available to you. When you program for the Macintosh, you can turn to a number of organizations for support. The MacApp Developer's Association (MADA) provides regular newsletters, source code disks, and MacApp tools for developers. Also, a large developer group address on AppleLink called MacApp.Tech$ provides quick answers to technical questions. Many of MacApp's current and former engineers appear on this group address to answer questions.

Makes class libraries available to you. Last but not least, if you program with MacApp, you can use existing class libraries from a variety of sources. MacApp comes bundled with five fully functional demo applications in Object Pascal and three in C++. Code can be copied and pasted from these examples into your application. MADA maintains a catalog of powerful classes that are available for purchase, such as an offscreen-imaging unit to improve graphics rendering, a database unit to integrate database capabilities into your application, and several more.

ABOUT MOUSER

by Mary "Mouser Woman" Boetcher

Mouser is a browser, a program for viewing and editing source code files.

The difference between a browser and an editor is that the browser "knows" something about the structure of the language and/or development system the code is written in.

Mouser knows about the structure of Object Pascal and C++ programs, and can use this information to allow you to quickly navigate among the classes and methods of a program. The leftmost pane of the browser window displays a list of the program's classes. Clicking on a class name brings up lists of the class's methods and fields. You can then click on a method or field name to see its source code.

[IMAGE MacApp_v007_html3.GIF]

Figure 3 Mouser Provides High-level Access to code

You can get a list of

  • all the methods that reference a particular string
  • all the methods with a particular name
  • all the fields or methods of a class, including those of its superclasses

You can also find out

  • which segment a method is in
  • which source file a method or class definition is in very useful for MacApp!)
  • the inherited form of a method
  • the source code for some selected text

Mouser provides a number of commands for getting information about your program.

MACAPP'S FLEXIBILITY

What if there's something your application needs to do slightly differently from the MacApp libraries? The fact that these libraries are written in an object-based language (Object Pascal) means that you can easily modify the pieces of the libraries that don't exactly meet your needs. (If you're not familiar with object programming, and words like object, class, subclass, superclass, method, andinheritance mean nothing to you, you might want to consult the section entitled "Basic Concepts of the Object-Based Approach" in Brian Wilkerson's article "How to Design an Object-Based Application" in this issue for help in understanding the next couple of paragraphs.)

Suppose, for example, you want to add a Preferences item to the standard File menu supported by MacApp. In MacApp, the TApplication.DoMenuCommand method (or member function, in C++ terminology) handles the standard menu items (those creating a new document, opening a document, quitting the application, and so on). In your subclass TMyApplication of the MacApp class TApplication, you define a method that will override the inherited DoMenuCommand method to handle the case where the user selects Preferences from the File menu. If the item the user selects from the File menu is not Preferences, then your method simply calls the inherited version of the method so TApplication can handle the menu selection.

The following simple method allocates a Preferences command object if Preferences is chosen from the File menu, and otherwise calls the inherited version of the method:

FUNCTION TMyApplication.DoMenuCommand(aCmdNumber: CmdNumber):
        TCommand; OVERRIDE;
    VAR aPreferencesCommand: TPreferencesCommand;
    BEGIN
        DoMenuCommand := NIL;
        CASE aCmdNumber OF
            cPreferences:
                BEGIN
                New(aPreferencesCommand);
                FailNil(aPreferencesCommand);
                aPreferencesCommand.IPreferencesCommand(aCmdNumber);
                DoMenuCommand := aPreferencesCommand;
                END;
            OTHERWISE
            DoMenuCommand := INHERITED DoMenuCommand(aCmdNumber);
        END; { CASE aCmdNumber }
    END; { TMyApplication.DoMenuCommand }

Note that for this example to work, you would also have to add the Preferences item to the cmnu resource of the application, and override DoSetupMenus in TMyApplication to enable the menu item.

WHAT IT TAKES TO USE MACAPP

While MacApp will save you time and effort in the long run, you must invest time and effort up front to learn how to use it. If you are new to the Macintosh, you face two steep learning curves: first learning the Macintosh (the Toolbox, operating system, and user interface) and then learning MacApp. Learning MacApp also requires learning object programming.

But don't let this discourage you. Apple Developer University offers excellent introductory courses on the Macintosh programming environment and on MacApp. These courses make the learning process easier and provide programming labs in which you can immediately apply what you learn. Furthermore, using Mouser to browse the MacApp classes can help speed your learning. Finally, the MacApp example applications are a rich source of ideas and examples of how to implement a wide variety of features. And by the end of this article, if you read the next section carefully and try the exercise I lead you through, you will already have some familiarity with MacApp.

NOW, AN EXAMPLE

Now that you know what MacApp can do for you, and what you must do for MacApp, let's look at an example of how you might use MacApp to develop an application that integrates previously existing routines.

Say we want to develop a database package for the Macintosh based on an application we've developed for another platform. The application has many capabilities that we can reuse (such as b- tree creation and management, graphing, searching, and sorting) and some capabilities that we should not use (such as window management and data entry screens). In this example we'll focus on reusing the graphing capability.

The source code for the graphing capability is in two files of graphics routines written in C. We've been careful in the design of our graphics routines, ensuring that they make no assumptions about their environment, such as graphics parameters or hardware attributes. For example, the routines avoid drawing and instead have an interface that describes what should be drawn. This lets the application that uses the routines determine how the drawing should occur.

We start, then, with our graphics routines. We will create a class that encapsulates the services offered by these routines. Then, you will learn step by step how to seamlessly integrate this code into a MacApp sample application, using MPW.

START WITH YOUR ROUTINES
Our graphics routines reside in a set of two files: Graph.h, which contains the interfaces to the routines, and Graph.c, which contains the source to the graphics routines. You'll find a complete listing of these files on develop, the disc.

For this example, these files reside on the Macintosh. In your case, the files you want to use may reside on another platform. To transfer your files to the Macintosh, you should consider either a disk transfer or a file transfer. A disk transfer, to transfer the files from another disk, is best accomplished with a utility such as Apple File Exchange. A file transfer is best accomplished with either a terminal emulator, to download the file using standard file transfer protocols, or a file server, such as AppleShare, to access the other platform over AppleTalk and transfer the files.

Now I'll point out selected features of our files Graph.h and Graph.c.

The header file Graph.h contains some type and constant declarations, including the following:

#define kMaxPoints 20 /* Maximum number of points we support. */

This file also contains some type definitions, like these:

typedef enum {kBar, kStackedBar, kPie, kLine} GraphType;
/* These are the kinds of graphs that the graph routines support;
   only the bar graph is implemented for this example. */
typedef GraphValue GData[kMaxPoints-1];
                             /* Zero-based array of points. */
typedef struct {
  GraphType thisGraph;       /* Type of graph it is. */
  short     numPoints;       /* Number of points in this graph. */
  short     top;
  short     left;
  short     bottom;
  short     right;           /* The graph's rectangle with respect */
                             /*to which our graph is computed. */
  short     graphYMax;       /* The graph's maximum Y coord value. */
  short     graphYMin;       /* the graph's minimum Y coord value. */
                             /* Use these to scale the graph. */
  GData     graphItems;      /* The data points in the graph. */
} GraphStruct, *GraphStructPtr;

Finally, Graph.h also contains some function declarations, such as:

GraphStructPtr DoGraphInit( GraphType whichGraphType );
void DoGraphSetGraphRect( short top, short left, short bottom,
            short right, GraphStructPtr graphStorage );
void DoGraphSetPoint( short which, short value,
            GraphStructPtr graphStorage );

The actual routines are implemented in Graph.c. Here's a sample from this file:

GraphStructPtr DoGraphInit( GraphType whichGraphType )
{
    GraphStructPtr  graphStorage = 0;
    short           counter;
    GraphValue      aGraphValue;
    
    if (!(graphStorage =
             (GraphStructPtr) malloc(sizeof (GraphStruct))))
        return 0;               /* Error... */
    switch ( whichGraphType ) {
        case kBar:
            graphStorage->numPoints = graphStorage->top = 
                graphStorage->left = graphStorage->bottom =
                graphStorage->right = graphStorage->graphYMax =
                graphStorage->graphYMin = 0;
            for (counter = 0; counter  graphltems[counter];
                aGraphValue.whichOne = aGraphValue.value =
                aGraphValue.top = aGraphValue.left = 
                aGraphValue.right = aGraphValue.bottom = 0;
            }
            break;
        case kStackedBar:
        case kPie:
        case kLine:
            /* These are unsupported in this version. */
            break;
    }
    return graphStorage;
}

CREATE A CLASS TO ENCAPSULATE SERVICES
We next encapsulate the services of our graphics routines in a C++ class. To do this requires changes to our header. We modify our header files by surrounding our function declarations with the extern"C" directive as follows:

#ifdef __cplusplus

extern "C" {
#endif
// Function declarations go here, for example:
GraphStructPtr DoGraphInit( short graphType );
// and so on.
#ifdef __cplusplus
}
#endif

This ensures that when CFront, the C++ preprocessor, reads in this header, it won't mangle the names of our C routines.

Next we create a "wrapper object" for these routines. In essence, this is a class that can be used to define objects that provide all the services of the graph routines. This class can then be used in a MacApp application. Such a class can be defined in Object Pascal or C++. In this example, we'll create a class in C++ that provides the services of the graph routines.

To create the C++ wrapper object--TGraph--for our graph routines, we make two new files: UGraph.h and UGraph.cp (following MacApp's naming convention). The first file contains the class definition, and the second contains the class implementation. See develop, the disk, for a complete listing of these two files.

Creating these files is a three-step procedure, as follows:

  1. After putting our copyright notices at the top of these two files, we put in UGraph.h the following basic structure:

    #ifndef __UGRAPH__
    #define __UGRAPH__
    // * Auto-Include the requirements for this unit's
    interface.
    #ifndef __UMacApp__
    #include "UMacApp.h"
    #endif
    #include "Graph.h"
    // The interface to this class goes here.
    #endif

    This allows the MPW C++ compiler to perform at its best by only making it do the work to include this unit's interface (and the requirements for this unit's interface) when it's not already included.

  2. Next, we create the definition for TGraph and put the definition in UGraph.h.

    To do this, we must choose which class TGraph will descend from. Since graphs are things that are drawn on the screen and are viewed, we decide to make the graph class descend from MacApp's TView class. Ideally, we would create a generalized base class for a graph, such as TGraph descended from TView, and then create specialized subclasses of TGraph for the various kinds of graphs. A bar graph--TBarGraph--would descend from TGraph; a line chart-- TLineGraph--would descend from TGraph; and so on. However, to keep this example simple, we'll make the bar graph class descend directly from TView.

    Here's the class definition we come up with:

    class TGraph : public TView {
    public:
        virtual pascal void IRes(TDocument *itsDocument,
            TView *itsSuperView, Ptr *itsParams);
        // Initialize the graph view from its resource template.
        virtual pascal void SetGraphRect(Rect graphRect);
        // Initialize the graph data structure to be the size of
        // this view.
        virtual pascal void SetPoint( short which, long value );
        // Set a point to a value.
        virtual pascal short GetNumPoints();
        // Return the number of points in the graph.
        virtual pascal void ComputeBars(Boolean redraw);
        // The graph library computes each of the bars for this
        // graph and if redraw is TRUE forces the view to redraw
        // itself.
        virtual pascal void GetCoordinateRange(Rect *coordRange);
        // Return min & max Y coordinates, and min & max X
        // coordinates, useful for labeling the axes of the graph.
        virtual pascal void Draw(Rect *area);
        // Draw the graph.
        
        virtual pascal void Free(void);
        // Free the data allocated by this class.
    private:
        GraphStructPtrfData;
        };

    There are several things to note about this wrapper object.

    First, note that the class functions don't map one-to-one with the graph routines. Rather, there is an attempt to abstract from the routines various services available for this class. For example, instead of retrieving the maximum value of a point on the Y-axis with a call to the routine DoGraphGetYMax, we abstract from this routine the notion of retrieving the range of values on both axes (useful in setting up labels on the axes), and implement the class member function GetCoordinateRange, which retrieves the range of values on the X- and Y-axes and returns the result in a Rect.

    Also note that instead of retrieving a specific bar by calling the routineDoGraphGetBar, we attempt to hide that activity behind the class member functionDraw, which simply draws the graph, iterating over all bars in the bar graph.

    And note that since this class descends directly from TView, three member functions in this class definition override TView's member functions: IRes, which initializes the view and calls the graph routine to allocate and initialize the graph data structure; Draw, which does the work of drawing the graph; and Free, which calls the graph routines to dispose of the graph data structure.

  3. Finally, we create the file UGraph.cp, which contains the implementation of the class TGraph in C++. The first thing to add here (after the copyright notice) is an #include so that the header file is included:

    #ifndef __UGRAPH__ 
    #include "UGraph.h"
    #endif

    This ensures that the TGraphimplementation "sees" its class definition, as well as any other necessary definitions. We then list the implementation of the TGraph class in the body of the file UGraph.cp. The TGraph::IRes member function implemented in this file might look something like this:

    pascal void
    
    TGraph::IRes(TDocument *itsDocument, TView
            *itsSuperView, Ptr *itsParams)
    
    {
        GraphStructPtr aGraphStructPtr;
        Rect aRect;
    
        inherited::IRes(itsDocument, itsSuperView, itsParams);
        aGraphStructPtr = DoGraphInit(kBar);
        fData = aGraphStructPtr;
        aRect = gZeroRect;
        if (Focus())
            GetQDExtent(&aRect);
        SetGraphRect(aRect);
        }

    This member function initializes the TView object by calling its inherited IRes member function and then initializes the graph routines by calling DoGraphInit. This view object then attempts to get information about its graphics environment and lets the routines set up various values for this environment.

INTEGRATE THE CLASS INTO AN APPLICATION
At this point, we have a C++ class that encapsulates the services offered by our graphics routines. To see how you can use this C++ class in a MacApp application, try the following exercise. In this exercise, you'll modify the C++ version of the DemoDialogs sample application that comes with MacApp 2.0, by adding a bar graph to the Monthly Values Dialog. All the files you need are ondevelop, the disc.

[IMAGE Knepper fig4.GIF]

Figure 4. The Monthly Values Dialog Before Modification

  1. Put the following files in the DemoDialogs folder: Graph.h, Graph.c, UGraph.h, UGraph.cp. Use MPW to set this folder as the current directory.
  2. Open the file DemoDialogs.r and locate the Monthly Values Dialog resource description:

    resource 'view' (cMonthlyDialog, purgeable) {
        {
        ...
        }};
  3. Increase the width of the DialogView from 500 to 600 as follows:

    'SCLR', 'DLOG', { 0, 0 }, { 1000, 600 },
  4. Add to the end of this resource description (that is, inside the second-to-last right curly brace) the following description:
       ;
        'DLOG', 'graf', { 25, 300 }, { 300, 300 },
        sizeFixed, sizeFixed, shown, disabled,
        View { "TGraph" }

    This puts a TGraph view in the Monthly Values Dialog and ensures that the TGraph object is allocated and initialized via its IRes member function when the dialog is created.

  5. To make sure that the DemoDialogs headers know about your graph routines, add the following line at the end of the list of#include files at the top of the file UDemoDialogs.h:

    #include "UGraph.h"
  6. Since your graph view is a subview of the Monthly Values Dialog, modify that class so that the graph recomputes and redraws whenever a new monthly value is typed in. To do this, modify the file UDemoDialogs.h by adding the following to theTMonthlyDialog class:

     virtual pascal Boolean DeselectCurrentEditText(void);
  7. Then add the implementation for this member function to the file UDemoDialogs.cp:

    pascal Boolean
        TMonthlyDialog::DeselectCurrentEditText(void)
    
    {
        TGraph      *aGraph;
        TNumberText *theNumberText;
        
        aGraph = (TGraph *) FindSubView('graf');
        for (short which = 0; which fIdentifier ==
                    gMonthIDs[which]) {
                theNumberText =
                    (TNumberText *) FindSubView(gMonthIDs[which]);
                if (theNumberText)
                    aGraph->SetPoint(which+1,
                        theNumberText->GetValue());
                aGraph->ComputeBars(kRedraw);
                break;
            }
        }
        return inherited::DeselectCurrentEditText();
    }
  8. Next, to prevent the linker from stripping the TGraph class, modify TTestApplication::ITestApplication to include the following variable:

    TGraph *aGraph;

    and to allocate this variable within the gDeadStripSuppression section at the end of this function:

    if (gDeadStripSuppression) {
        ...
        aGraph = new TGraph;
    }
  9. Then, so that the graph points are set up as the Monthly Values are set up, modify TMonthlyDialog::StuffValues as follows:

    pascal void
    TMonthlyDialog::StuffValues()
    
    {
        TGraph *aGraph;
        TNumberText *aNumberText;
        
        aGraph = (TGraph *) FindSubView('graf');
        for (short i = 0; i
        SetValue(gMonthlyValues[i], kDontRedraw);
            aGraph->SetPoint(i+1, gMonthlyValues[i]);
        }
        aGraph->ComputeBars(kDontRedraw);
    }
  10. Finally, so that the graph unit and the file of graph routines are built when this example is built, add the following lines to the end of the file DemoDialogs MAMake:

    OtherLinkFiles = ð
    
    "{CLibraries}"StdCLib.o ð
                "{ObjApp}UGraph.cp.o" ð
                "{ObjApp}Graph.c.o"
    
    "{ObjApp}Graph.c.o" f ð
                "{SrcApp}Graph.c" ð
                "{SrcApp}Graph.h"
                
    {MAEcho} {EchoOptions} "Compiling: Graph.c"
    {MAC} "{SrcApp}Graph.c" ð
        -i "{SrcApp}" ð
        -i "{CIncludes}" ð
        -i "{MACIncludes}" ð
        -o "{ObjApp}Graph.c.o" ð
        {COptions} ð
        {OtherCOptions}
    
    "{ObjApp}UGraph.cp.o" f ð
                "{SrcApp}UGraph.h" ð
                "{SrcApp}Graph.h" ð
                {MacAppIntf}
  11. Compile DemoDialogs and run it. You will see your graph class at work calling your graph routines and drawing the graph in the Monthly Values Dialog.

[IMAGE MacApp_v007_html4.GIF]

Figure 5. The Monthly Values Dialog After Modification

SUMMARY

You've learned that using MacApp as your framework in developing a Macintosh application not only enables you to reuse your functionally specific code routines, but also saves you time and effort by providing standard application behavior. You've also learned that because the MacApp libraries are written in an object-based language (Object Pascal), you can easily modify the pieces that don't meet your needs. You've watched as we've created a class to encapsulate the functionality of an existing group of routines, and you've gone through the process of integrating this class into a MacApp sample application. Now you're ready to integrate some of your own code into the MacApp sample application ondevelop, the disc. With the help of MacApp, you'll soon be reusing your code in Macintosh applications that present users with the interface they know and love.

CHRIS KNEPPER is this issue's token beer connoisseur. He's proud that he has never drunk a Mountain Dew in his life, and never plans to. He received a BSEE/CS from Stanford in 1984, and since then has worked in a Dickensian industrial sweat shop (he won't say exactly why or where) and at a small Macintosh consulting firm. Since he came to Apple in 1986, he has done a variety of jobs including software testing, developer technical support, and work for Apple Integrated Systems--all the while consuming record amounts of coffee. When he's not hanging out at local breweries, he's reading, cycling, rooting for the San Francisco Giants, or playing his favorite sport. What is it? Hint--he's been saving his pennies for his dream vanity plate:TNSNE1. . . *

MACAPP, its manuals, and other useful books on MacApp and object programming are available from APDA. *

Note that whatever work you do with MacApp and Object Pascal is restricted to the Macintosh, because Apple's implementation of Object Pascal has not been endorsed by other vendors on other platforms. If you want to eventually use your code on another platform, consider coding in C++, as C++ compilers are available on other platforms. Of course, you will need to be careful how you structure your application as it develops on the Macintosh (and vice versa) to ensure compatibility across hardware platforms. *

You can contact MADA at P.O. Box 23; Everett, WA; 98206; phone (206) 252-6946; AppleLink address MADA. To join the AppleLink group address MacApp.Tech$, contact AppleLink address MacApp.Admin. *

 
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Ubisoft Gives Everyone Two New Ways to Earn In-Game Stuff for Far Cry 4 Posted by Jessica Fisher on November 21st, 2014 [ permalink ] | Read more »
Golfinity – Tips, Tricks, Strategies, an...
Dig this: Would you like to know what we thought of being an infinite golfer? Check out our Golfinity review! Golfinity offers unlimited ways to test your skills at golf. Here are a few ways to make sure your score doesn’t get too high and your... | Read more »
Dark Hearts, The Sequel to Haunting Meli...
Dark Hearts, The Sequel to Haunting Melissa, is Available Now Posted by Jessica Fisher on November 21st, 2014 [ permalink ] Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad | Read more »
Meowza! Toyze Brings Talking Tom to Life...
Meowza! | Read more »
Square Enix Announces New Tactical RPG f...
Square Enix Announces New Tactical RPG for Mobile, Heavenstrike Rivals. Posted by Jessica Fisher on November 21st, 2014 [ permalink ] With their epic stories and gorgeous graphics, | Read more »
Quest for Revenge (Games)
Quest for Revenge 1.0.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $4.99, Version: 1.0.0 (iTunes) Description: The great Kingdom of the west has fallen. The gods ignore the prayers of the desperate. A dark warlord has extinguished... | Read more »
Threadz is a New Writing Adventure for Y...
Threadz is a New Writing Adventure for You and Your Friends Posted by Jessica Fisher on November 21st, 2014 [ permalink ] In the tradition of round-robin storytelling, | Read more »
SteelSeries Stratus XL Hardware Review
Made by: SteelSeries Price: $59.99 Hardware/iOS Integration Rating: 4 out of 5 stars Usability Rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars Reuse Value Rating: 4.25 out of 5 stars Build Quality Rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars Overall Rating: 4.31 out of 5 stars | Read more »
ACDSee (Photography)
ACDSee 1.0.0 Device: iOS iPhone Category: Photography Price: $1.99, Version: 1.0.0 (iTunes) Description: Capture, perfect, and share your photos with ACDSee. The ACDSee iPhone app combines an innovative camera, a powerful photo... | Read more »
ProTube for YouTube (Entertainment)
ProTube for YouTube 2.0.2 Device: iOS Universal Category: Entertainment Price: $1.99, Version: 2.0.2 (iTunes) Description: ProTube is the ultimate, fully featured YouTube app. With it's highly polished design, ProTube offers ad-free... | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

Save up to $400 with Apple refurbished 2014 1...
The Apple Store has restocked Apple Certified Refurbished 2014 15″ Retina MacBook Pros for up to $400 off the cost of new models. An Apple one-year warranty is included with each model, and shipping... Read more
New 13-inch 1.4GHz MacBook Air on sale for $8...
 Adorama has the 2014 13″ 1.4GHz/128GB MacBook Air on sale for $899.99 including free shipping plus NY & NJ tax only. Their price is $100 off MSRP. B&H Photo has the 13″ 1.4GHz/128GB MacBook... Read more
Apple Expected to Reverse Nine-Month Tablet S...
Apple and Samsung combined accounted for 62 percent of the nearly 36 million branded tablets shipped in 3Q 2014, according to early vendor shipment share estimates from market intelligence firm ABI... Read more
Stratos: 30 Percent of US Smartphone Owners t...
Stratos, Inc., creator of the Bluetooth Connected Card Platform, has announced results from its 2014 Holiday Mobile Payments Survey. The consumer survey found that nearly one out of three (30 percent... Read more
2014 1.4GHz Mac mini on sale for $449, save $...
 B&H Photo has lowered their price on the new 1.4GHz Mac mini to $449.99 including free shipping plus NY tax only. Their price is $50 off MSRP, and it’s the lowest price available for this new... Read more
Check Apple prices on any device with the iTr...
MacPrices is proud to offer readers a free iOS app (iPhones, iPads, & iPod touch) and Android app (Google Play and Amazon App Store) called iTracx, which allows you to glance at today’s lowest... Read more
64GB iPod touch on sale for $249, save $50
Best Buy has the 64GB iPod touch on sale for $249 on their online store for a limited time. Their price is $50 off MSRP. Choose free shipping or free local store pickup (if available). Sale price for... Read more
15″ 2.2GHz Retina MacBook Pro on sale for $17...
 B&H Photo has the 2014 15″ 2.2GHz Retina MacBook Pro on sale for $1799.99 for a limited time. Shipping is free, and B&H charges NY sales tax only. B&H will also include free copies of... Read more
New Logitech AnyAngle Case/Stand Brings Flexi...
Logitec has announced the newest addition to its suite of tablet products — the Logitech AnyAngle. A protective case with an any-angle stand for iPad Air 2 and all iPad mini models, AnyAngle is the... Read more
Notebook PC Shipments Rise Year-Over-Year as...
According to preliminary results from the upcoming DisplaySearch Quarterly Mobile PC Shipment and Forecast Report, the global notebook PC market grew 10 percent year-over-year in Q3’14 to 49.4... Read more

Jobs Board

*Apple* Solutions Consultant (ASC) - Apple (...
**Job Summary** The ASC is an Apple employee who serves as an Apple brand ambassador and influencer in a Reseller's store. The ASC's role is to grow Apple Read more
*Apple* Solutions Consultant (ASC)- Retail S...
**Job Summary** The ASC is an Apple employee who serves as an Apple brand ambassador and influencer in a Reseller's store. The ASC's role is to grow Apple Read more
Project Manager, *Apple* Financial Services...
**Job Summary** Apple Financial Services (AFS) offers consumers, businesses and educational institutions ways to finance Apple purchases. We work with national and Read more
*Apple* Store Leader Program - College Gradu...
Job Description: Job Summary As an Apple Store Leader Program agent, you can continue your education as you major in the art of leadership at the Apple Store. You'll Read more
*Apple* Retail - Multiple Positions (US) - A...
Sales Specialist - Retail Customer Service and Sales Transform Apple Store visitors into loyal Apple customers. When customers enter the store, you're also the Read more
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